Archive for the ‘Editorial Board News’ Category

Associate Editor highlight – interview with Professor Graeme Day

Chemcial Science Associate Editor Graeme Day

Professor Graeme Day joined the Chemical Science Editorial Board in 2021. To celebrate this occasion, we met virtually with Graeme to discuss his area of research and how he hopes to see his field progress in the next 10 years.

Graeme’s research focuses on the development of computational approaches for predicting the structures and properties of materials, focussing mainly on organic molecular crystals and their applications in a range of areas from pharmaceuticals to organic electronics. Graeme’s research group have also started to explore the use of machine learning methods for exploring chemical space to find new molecules with exceptional properties.

What excites you most about your area of research and what has been the most exciting moment of your career so far?

Being able to predict the structure of a new material computationally, with the structure then going on to be found experimentally, is very exciting. Going back about 20 years, this is not something that was thought to be possible! The idea that I have seen the crystal structure of a molecule, possibly before that molecule has ever been synthesised, is pretty cool. I feel lucky that we can collaborate and combine our computational work with the experimental work from other groups to uncover new materials. It’s exciting to think about all of the possibilities of these kinds of structure and property prediction methods.

With regards to the most exciting moment of my career, it is difficult to pinpoint one moment. However, in 2004, I was able to take part in my first blind crystal structure prediction test as an independent researcher. This was exciting! Being the only entrant to correctly predict one of the targets gave me a lot of confidence that I had valuable ideas and methods to bring to the field. The field has moved forward dramatically since 2004, but we still use some of the methods that I was working on back then.

What has been the most challenging moment of your career so far?

It’s probably the supervision of a research group that I have found the most challenging, but also very rewarding. Within a few years, I went from carrying out a lot of the research on my own, to receiving an ERC grant and being able to recruit a group of ten or so researchers. I had a very short period of time to learn how to make that transition and accept that I would spend more time discussing results, with less time doing hands-on research. Thankfully, I’ve had the opportunity to work with lots of great people and I hope that they have enjoyed their time in my research group.

Which of your Chemical Science publications are you most proud of and why?

That’s a tough one. Looking back, I’m quite proud of the range of work that we have published in Chemical Science, from fundamental questions about crystal packing, prediction of co-crystallisation, and machine learning applications for structure prediction. I really liked our 2014 contribution, which investigated the conformational preferences of molecules in their crystal structures. This work has important implications for crystal structure prediction.

However, it’s probably our 2020 paper that I’m most proud of because it demonstrates an approach to materials discovery that has been a vision of mine for quite a few years: combining chemical space exploration to identify new molecules with crystal structure prediction to evaluate their likely solid state properties.

What do you feel has been the most important development with your area of research since your first publication in Chemical Science in 2011?

The most important thing has been the increasing trust that people put in computational methods for studying materials. Even just a decade ago, there was a lot of scepticism surrounding methods like crystal structure prediction. This has changed, partly because of the improved methods that are now available, but also due to better communication of the limitations and uncertainties in computational predictions.

What do you hope to be able to contribute to the community through your new role as Associate Editor?

I have tried to keep up a broad level of knowledge of computational chemistry methods and their applications and I hope that I can use this to make informed and fair decisions on what to publish in Chemical Science. I’m really excited to see what people submit because there’s so much interesting work going on.

Why do you feel that researchers should choose to publish their work in Chemical Science?

I feel that I’m joining an editorial board that has done a great job in attracting the highest quality work and building a strong reputation for this flagship journal of the RSC. This means that people read Chemical Science when looking for exciting work. That’s important for researchers: knowing that you’re publishing your best work in a journal where it will be picked up quickly by the community. I think that this is particularly true in the area of computational chemistry, machine learning and AI applications in chemistry. The journal has been a great place for work in these areas that are of broad interest. The journal being Diamond Open Access is, of course, also a great thing. Researchers can make their work freely available without needing to find the budget to pay open access fees.

How do you see your field progressing in the next 10 years?

One big area will be the increasing integration of computational methods with experiments, where automation and robotics will play a big role. I’m looking forward to seeing more experiments where ideas are seeded by computational modelling and machine learning. I also hope that we see some artificial boundaries fall away, particularly between theoretical and experimental chemists. Of course, we need specialisation, but I want to see more people working across that boundary.

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Associate Editor highlight – interview with Professor Hemamala Karunadasa

Hemamala Karunadasa Chemical Science Associate Editor

Professor Hemamala Karunadasa joined the Chemical Science Editorial Board in 2021. In 2020, the year of Chemical Science‘s 10th anniversary, we met virtually with Hemamala to discuss her research. In celebration of Hemamala joining the Editorial Board, we have taken the opportunity to revisit this interview.

Hemamala’s research focuses on the preparation of solid-state materials using the tools of solution-state chemistry. Through careful design, Hemamala and her group prepare new materials that can be utilised for clean energy applications.

image block

Browse a selection of Hemamala’s work below:

Dimensional reduction of the small-bandgap double perovskite Cs2AgTlBr6
Bridget A. Connor, Raisa-Ioana Biega, Linn Leppert and Hemamala I. Karunadasa
Chem. Sci., 2020, 11, 7708-7715
DOI: 10.1039/D0SC01580F, Edge Article

A pencil-and-paper method for elucidating halide double perovskite band structures
Adam H. Slavney, Bridget A. Connor, Linn Leppert and Hemamala I. Karunadasa
Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 11041-11053
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC03219C, Edge Article

Tuning the bandgap of Cs2AgBiBr6 through dilute tin alloying
Kurt P. Lindquist, Stephanie A. Mack, Adam H. Slavney, Linn Leppert, Aryeh Gold-Parker, Jonathan F. Stebbins, Alberto Salleo, Michael F. Toney, Jeffrey B. Neaton and Hemamala I. Karunadasa
Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 10620-10628
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC02581B, Edge Article

Structural origins of broadband emission from layered Pb–Br hybrid perovskites
Matthew D. Smith, Adam Jaffe, Emma R. Dohner, Aaron M. Lindenberg and Hemamala I. Karunadasa
Chem. Sci., 2017, 8, 4497-4504
DOI: 10.1039/C7SC01590A, Edge Article

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Tanja Junkers

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Tanja Junkers!

Tanja Junkers Chemcial Science Associate Editor

 

We are pleased to welcome Professor Tanja Junkers to the Chemical Science Editorial Board this month as a new Associate Editor for the journal. She has joined us from Polymer Chemistry where she remains as an Editorial Board member and will continue to serve as an Associate Editor and handle papers until the end of the year.

Tanja studied chemistry and graduated with a PhD in physical chemistry from Göttingen University, Germany, in 2006 and subsequently worked at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, at the Centre for Advanced Macromolecular Design as research associate. In 2008 she moved to the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany. In early 2010 she was appointed professor at Hasselt University, Belgium, where she founded the Polymer Reaction Design research group within the Institute for Materials Research. In January 2018 she moved back to Australia where she became full professor at Monash University in Melbourne, and since then continues activities there. She remains guest professor at Hasselt University and her group is currently active at both locations. Her main research interests are precision polymer synthesis, use of continuous flow chemistry approaches, light-induced chemistries, polymer surface modification and investigations on kinetics and mechanisms of radical reactions.

Tanja is currently a Guest Editor for a themed collection on Sustainable Polymers which you can explore here.

Browse a selection of Tanja’s work below:

A machine-readable online database for rate coefficients in radical polymerization
Joren Van Herck, Simon Harrisson, Robin A. Hutchinson, Gregory T. Russell and Tanja Junkers
Polym. Chem., 2021, 12, 3688-3692

Muconic acid isomers as platform chemicals and monomers in the biobased economy
Ibrahim Khalil, Greg Quintens, Tanja Junkers and Michiel Dusselier
Green Chem., 2020, 22, 1517-1541

Simple and secure data encryption via molecular weight distribution fingerprints
Jeroen H. Vrijsen, Maarten Rubens and Tanja Junkers
Polym. Chem., 2020, 11, 6463-6470

Direct synthesis of acrylate monomers in heterogeneous continuous flow processes
Jatuporn Salaklang, Veronique Maes, Matthias Conradi, Rudy Dams and Tanja Junkers
React. Chem. Eng., 2018, 3, 41-47

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Associate Editor highlight – interview with Professor Subi George

Professor Subi George joined the Chemical Science Editorial Board in 2020. To celebrate this occasion, we met virtually with Subi to discuss his research highlights and what attracted him to join the Chemical Science team.

Subi’s research focuses on the synthesis of small molecules and the study of molecular self-assembly processes. His group use supramolecular approaches to develop bioinspired and adaptive materials, including dynamic supramolecular polymers and optoelectronic materials.

What would you say is your biggest motivation?

I would say my interactions with passionate and creative young researchers. This interaction motivates and encourages me. I am also highly motivated when we are able to come up with new discoveries and are able to publish our exciting findings in high impact journals. As scientists, we are lucky – we never stop learning, and we have the academic freedom of trying new things every day. This provides new opportunities to bring about change and explore solutions to a whole range of problems. These are my biggest motivations to push forward with my research.

What has been the most challenging moment of your career so far?

I would say that I have two moments, one in my earlier career and one later. The point when I decided to pursue chemistry as a career was quite a challenging moment. In India, this kind of decision previously attracted a lot of criticism, because it was believed that there were no job opportunities if you decided to pursue science as a career. Medicine and engineering were always seen as being more promising careers. It was therefore difficult at times to convince my family that a career in chemistry was a good decision. Luckily, I did have support from my close family, so that was a real blessing.

Secondly, I feel that it can be quite challenging when you develop your own independent group. It can be quite difficult to establish and differentiate yourself, and to ensure that you create a strong, internationally recognised group.

In your area of research, what do you feel has been the most revolutionary piece of work within the past 5 years?

The particular class of materials that we have been working on are based on supramolecular polymers, which are dynamic systems. This field has been active over the past two decades, from which we have gained a high level of mechanistic understanding. Over the past five years, significant progress has been made and elegant design strategies have been developed, which have allowed a high level of structural control. We have also witnessed a push in the limit of self-assembly from equilibrium to being out of equilibrium, towards the preparation of biomimetic, adaptive materials. We have been working in this particular field. We recognised that synergy between structural and temporal control would be the most suitable way to prepare biomimetic materials, so we came up with a strategy called bioinspired temporal supramolecular polymerisation. Overall, the past 5 years have therefore seen an increase in our understanding of these systems, and in tools and strategies to assist in the preparation of optimised biomimetic supramolecular polymers.

It’s been over a year since the outbreak of the global pandemic. What changes have you witnessed in the local researcher community? Do you think there are any new challenges or opportunities for chemistry researchers from this ongoing pandemic?

The pandemic has hit every sector, and the scientific community has not been spared. We were required to switch to working online for group meetings and teaching, which was quite difficult. The pandemic has also resulted in a lack of exposure for students, who haven’t been able to attend things such as international conferences, and for those in their final years who were hoping to seek research opportunities abroad. Again, this is such an important experience, so it has definitely been challenging for the community and made it even more important to keep up the motivation of my students.

Looking to the brighter side of things, the pandemic has forced us to slow down and take a step back. We have had the time to consult the literature and to carefully plan what we would like to achieve in the future. The pandemic has therefore definitely provided opportunities.

This is also an important time where the public is looking to the scientific community with a lot of expectations. Many researchers in India have worked to contribute towards COVID-related research to combat the disease, including breakthroughs in diagnostic tools, vaccines, or even the development of PPE equipment. It has given us the chance to think about our responsibilities and what our commitment is to society.

Which of your Chemical Science publications are you most proud of and why?

I would have to say that I love them all. We always ensure that we publish unique and high-quality research. However, if I had to pick one piece, it would be a contribution from 2017. This demonstrated chemically-fuelled temporal switching of an amphillic self-assembly system. We introduced the use of redox fuels for the preparation of these materials that are away from equilibrium. This is a concept that people are starting to utilise.

Chemical Science is the flagship journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry. What aspects of the journal do you feel contribute to us being the flagship?

Chemical Science is a place where you can publish high quality, high impact, multidisciplinary chemistry. It is one of the few high impact science journals that is diamond open access, meaning that content in the journal is free to read and free to publish. This is incredibly important for the whole research community, but especially for researchers in India because it is not always possible to pay the high article processing charges that are charged by other high impact journals. This is very unique, and contributes to Chemical Science being the flagship. In India, unlike places in Europe, we don’t have a dedicated budget or grants that can be used for open access publications. This is going to be a big challenge for India as we move towards an open publishing platform. At this time, if a journal is not diamond open access, or does not have significant waiver policies, researchers in India will struggle to publish in journals with high article-processing charges.

Another highlight of Chemical Science is the Edge Article format that researchers can use when publishing their primary research. This was so unique when it was introduced. Communication-style articles can be too restrictive, so the Edge Article format helps researchers to be able to communicate their research in as much or as little detail as is required, and allows for a much smoother reading process than having lots of information that has to be put in the supplementary information section. The Edge Article format allows science to be discussed in depth.

What attracted you to join the Editorial Board for Chemical Science?

I feel that I can help to popularise Chemical Science in India, and help to promote the journal to our authors there. Being an Associate Editor of a high-impact journal like Chemical Science provides the opportunity to learn about lots of different research areas first-hand, and I am able to learn more about the latest developments in science through this role, which is great. I’m very happy to be on the board, and to help to contribute to the growth of the journal to continue to make it one of the most exciting and high impact chemistry journals.

How do you see your field progressing in the next 10 years?

Research on supramolecular polymers shows a lot of promise I feel. Given the previous work in this field, we are in a position to access a higher level of complex structures and address further challenges that are still faced when preparing these systems. I think we’ll start to be able to produce more complex, self-organised systems. I am confident that we will be able to make much-enhanced adaptive and multicomponent biomimetic systems in this area soon.

In celebration of joining the Chemical Science team, Subi has highlighted a selection of important contributions from the past few years, with a focus on recent trends in supramolecular polymers, dissipative systems and organic materials. The collection can be viewed here.

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Graeme Day

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Graeme Day!

 

Chemcial Science Associate Editor Graeme Day

 

Graeme Day was born in Canada and studied chemistry, mathematics and computing science at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax before moving to the University of Oxford for a Masters in theoretical chemistry and a PhD in computational chemistry at University College London. After postdoctoral work in the Pfizer Institute for Pharmaceutical Materials at the University of Cambridge, Graeme began his independent research as a Royal Society University Research Fellow, also in Cambridge, spending most of his time working on modelling pharmaceutical materials and computational methods for interpreting terahertz spectra of molecular crystals. He moved to the University of Southampton in 2012, where he is now Professor of Chemical Modelling, and was awarded a European Research Council Starting Grant for the ‘Accelerated design and discovery of novel molecular materials via global lattice energy minimisation’ (ANGLE). This grant shifted the focus of his research to functional materials, including porous crystals and organic electronics.

In 2020, Graeme was awarded an ERC Synergy grant ‘Autonomous Discovery of Advanced Materials’ (ADAM) with Professors Andrew Cooper (Liverpool) and Kerstin Thurow (Rostock) to integrate computational predictions, chemical space exploration with automation and robotics in the materials discovery lab. He continues to work in the area of pharmaceutical solid form modelling, has worked on methods for NMR crystallography and has a developing interest in applying machine learning methods for accelerating simulations, analysing energy landscapes and generating ideas.

Browse a selection of Graeme’s work below:

Evolutionary chemical space exploration for functional materials: computational organic semiconductor discovery
Chi Y. Cheng, Josh E. Campbell and Graeme M. Day
Chem. Sci., 2020, 11, 4922-4933

Crystal structure determination of an elusive methanol solvate – hydrate of catechin using crystal structure prediction and NMR crystallography
Marta K. Dudek, Piotr Paluch, Justyna Śniechowska, Karol P. Nartowski, Graeme M. Day and Marek J. Potrzebowski
CrystEngComm, 2020, 22, 4969-4981

Photocatalytic proton reduction by a computationally identified, molecular hydrogen-bonded framework
Catherine M. Aitchison, Christopher M. Kane, David P. McMahon, Peter R. Spackman, Angeles Pulido, Xiaoyan Wang, Liam Wilbraham, Linjiang Chen, Rob Clowes, Martijn A. Zwijnenburg, Reiner Sebastian Sprick, Marc A. Little, Graeme M. Day and Andrew I. Cooper
J. Mater. Chem. A, 2020, 8, 7158-7170

Mining predicted crystal structure landscapes with high throughput crystallisation: old molecules, new insights
Peng Cui, David P. McMahon, Peter R. Spackman, Ben M. Alston, Marc A. Little, Graeme M. Day and Andrew I. Cooper
Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 9988-9997

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Associate Editor highlight – interview with Professor Jinlong Gong

In 2021, Chemical Science was delighted to welcome Professor Jinlong Gong as an Associate Editor, handling manuscripts within the area of heterogenous catalysis. To celebrate this occasion, we met virtually with Jinlong to discuss his research and to discuss the kind of manuscripts that he is looking forward to handling for the journal.

Jinlong’s research focuses on understanding the catalytic processes occurring during alkane dehydrogenation and CO2 hydrogenation by developing advanced catalytic materials, as well as optimised industrial processes.

What excites you most about your area of research and what has been the most exciting moment of your career so far?

The major motivation of my research is to provide constructive solutions for a sustainable society, particularly associated with the chemical industry. For example, propane dehydrogenation is a traditional chemical process which has been under development over the past 60-80 years. Our research therefore focuses on trying to develop new catalytic processes to reduce the energy consumption with enhanced catalytic performance. Another example is about the utilisation of CO2 with sustainable energy to produce renewable fuels and help reduce emissions. President Xi Jinping has announced that China’s aim is to achieve a carbon neutral society by 2060. Actually, my work on photocatalytic reduction of CO2 follows such a direction. The big challenge in this area is to improve the efficiency, which is currently still low.

Some of the most exciting moments of my career have been when former students of mine have been recruited into faculty positions at top universities. It is always a pleasure to see young researchers grow up independently and then go on to do amazing things! Another exciting moment for me was when we were able to find new oxide materials that displayed very high efficiency for propane dehydrogenation. We believe that this is going to be the next generation of catalysts for this process.

What has been the most challenging moment of your career so far?

It is always challenging to navigate research into a scientifically critical direction at the right time, rather than staying in a comfortable zone. Transitioning the direction of your research into a new but important area tends be exhausting, especially at the start. On the other hand, the potential reward can be more exciting. Sometimes, it is also challenging to convince funders to support an unrevealed but potentially important research direction, which can be a common issue for most scientists.

You have published over 10 papers with Chemical Science since your first publication with us in 2015. Of these papers, which one do you feel has made the most significant contribution to your area of research and why?

One of the pieces that I like the most is a paper that we published in 2019 – hydroxyl-mediated ethanol selectivity of CO2 hydrogenation. In this paper, we developed a catalyst based on Rh, where we simply added some Fe and Li metals as promoters. One interesting thing we found was that, with various oxide supports, we can tune the surface coverage of hydroxyl groups bound on Rh-based catalysts, which has a very important correlation with ethanol selectivity for CO2 hydrogenation. I believe that this story will provide researchers with a deeper understanding of the formation mechanism of ethanol on this kind of catalyst, particularly in understanding the C-C coupling mechanism for this reaction, which is very important if we want to have a high C2 selectivity.

It’s been over a year after China’s first lockdown started. What changes have you witnessed in the Chinese researcher community? Do you think there are any new challenges or opportunities for chemistry researchers from this ongoing global pandemic?

This is a very good question! Last spring, early in the pandemic, many online seminars were arranged by researchers from all over the world and involved various publishers, which was great for scientific communication. In terms of academic activities, I noticed that there weren’t any big delays in the publication process, which again was great. Since last fall, the situation in China has become much better, with most academic meetings now being able to take place on-site.

One noticeable opportunity from the overall research strategy in China is the focus on health. Funding agencies will now put even more emphasis on bio-relevant research. I think there will be a big boom in this area in China in the next few decades. Globally, I believe we will see lots of joint projects taking place between research groups that work in chemical engineering, chemistry, materials and medicine, which will promote multidisciplinary collaboration.

Why do you feel that researchers should choose to publish their work in Chemical Science

Chemical Science, as flagship journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry, has a prestigious reputation in the chemistry and physical science community. Chemical Science publishes cutting-edge papers that provide deep and novel understanding of the chemistry of important reactions. Multidisciplinary research, including radical physical chemistry, is also welcome. For example, AI methods used to screen candidate materials or analyse chemical reactions can be attractive. This kind of research, in turn, will reward the scientific community. Chemical Science, as an open-access journal, provides a highly fair publishing platform, and the Editorial Office is also very efficient – manuscripts are turned around in a very timely manner. It is one of best journals publishing chemical research.

What attracted you to join the Editorial Board of Chemical Science?

I have served on the Advisory Board for Chemical Science since 2013, and I am also a regular referee for the journal. Now, I feel that I am very fortunate to have the opportunity to handle submissions to Chemical Science, particularly in the area of heterogeneous catalysis. Chemical Science has a high-profile impact on the scientific community, which provides me with the opportunity to handle exciting scientific research, communicate with diverse groups of scientists, and most importantly, serve the research community. Together with the warm editorial team, we can provide authors with a professional publication experience.

It is important for Chemical Science to have an open and inclusive Editorial Board. Do you feel that we are achieving this goal?

I received a lot of warm greetings when May introduced me to the other members of the Editorial Board. Looking at the profiles of our members in the editorial team, we have great diversity among the board, including Associate Editors from all over the world, with expertise spanning across the chemical sciences. So far, I think we are achieving the goal. They are all renowned scientists.

What impact do you feel that your area of research can make over the next 10 years?

First of all, I would like to highlight the impact that I feel light alkane dehydrogenation can make in the next 10 years. This is a major industrial process to produce ethylene/propylene, which are building blocks for preparing polymers. The development of new technology as well as catalytic materials will further decrease the energy consumption during this process, and also increase the catalytic efficiency overall. This can help to ensure a better and greener industrial process in the future.

My second area of research focuses on the photocatalytic reduction of CO2. It’s very important for us to transform from a fossil fuel society into a renewable energy society. Energy conversion and storage technologies will play critical roles in this area. In the next 10-20 years, I think this type of research will definitely have more impact. There has already been a lot of investment into the research as well as infrastructure to support this initiative, so I hope that this goal will be able to be realised.

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Hemamala Karunadasa

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Hemamala Karunadasa!

Hemamala Karunadasa Chemical Science Associate Editor

 

Hemamala Karunadasa is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University and a Faculty Scientist at the SLAC National Lab. Her group is invested in gaining synthetic control over extended ionic solids, with a focus on halide perovskites. They seek to both improve technologically important materials as well as to design new materials with unprecedented properties.

Hemamala was born in Sri Lanka and attended school in Colombo. She studied solid-state chemistry at Princeton University, receiving her A.B. in 2003. She moved to molecular inorganic chemistry for my Ph.D., which she received from UC Berkeley in 2009, and for her postdoctoral studies at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and at the California Institute of Technology.

As an associate editor, Hemamala looks forward to receiving papers that provide fundamental insights into obtaining desirable properties from new materials.

 

Browse a selection of Hemamala’s work below:

Dimensional reduction of the small-bandgap double perovskite Cs2AgTlBr6
Bridget A. Connor, Raisa-Ioana Biega, Linn Leppert and Hemamala I. Karunadasa
Chem. Sci., 2020, 11, 7708-7715
DOI: 10.1039/D0SC01580F, Edge Article

A pencil-and-paper method for elucidating halide double perovskite band structures
Adam H. Slavney, Bridget A. Connor, Linn Leppert and Hemamala I. Karunadasa
Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 11041-11053
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC03219C, Edge Article

Tuning the bandgap of Cs2AgBiBr6 through dilute tin alloying
Kurt P. Lindquist, Stephanie A. Mack, Adam H. Slavney, Linn Leppert, Aryeh Gold-Parker, Jonathan F. Stebbins, Alberto Salleo, Michael F. Toney, Jeffrey B. Neaton and Hemamala I. Karunadasa
Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 10620-10628
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC02581B, Edge Article

Structural origins of broadband emission from layered Pb–Br hybrid perovskites
Matthew D. Smith, Adam Jaffe, Emma R. Dohner, Aaron M. Lindenberg and Hemamala I. Karunadasa
Chem. Sci., 2017, 8, 4497-4504
DOI: 10.1039/C7SC01590A, Edge Article

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Associate Editor highlight – interview with Professor Ning Jiao

Ning Jiao, Chemical Science Associate Editor

In 2021, Chemical Science was delighted to welcome Professor Ning Jiao as an Associate Editor, handling manuscripts within the area of organic synthesis. To celebrate this occasion, we met virtually with Ning to discuss his area of research and what he hopes to achieve through his new role with the journal.

Ning’s research focuses on new methodology development in synthetic chemistry. His group mainly focus on heteroatom incorporation reactions, such as oxygenation, nitrogenation and halogenation reactions towards the synthesis and discovery of functional molecules.

What excites you most about your area of research and what has been the most exciting moment of your career so far?

In contrast to well-developed C-C bond forming reactions, selective C-C bond cleavage is still one of the biggest challenges in organic chemistry, and is highly attractive because it can bring innovative solutions to a number of different applications including coal liquefaction, petroleum cracking, polymer degradation, and biomass conversion.

One of the most exciting moments of my career was when we were able to achieve inert C-C bond activation. Following on from this, we have developed some novel C-C bond functionalisation reactions over the past 10 years through selective inert C-C, C=C and C≡C bond cleavage. We have successfully incorporated nitrogen and/or oxygen atoms into a variety of starting materials, even very simple hydrocarbons, producing some interesting value added nitrogen- or oxygen-containing compounds. I therefore really like this area of research.

What has been the most challenging moment of your career so far?

The most challenging moments for me have been when the results we obtain are not necessarily the same as what we expected, which has happened at various times throughout my research career. The challenge is that you must be able to clearly explain what happened for this new chemistry. It can be incredibly challenging to fully understand and prove new mechanisms, because sometimes you aren’t always able to isolate the active intermediate so therefore can’t always monitor the real reaction process. I have been really challenged by mechanistic studies in my career, but I have learnt to look for answers in detailed studies of the by-products and in the in-situ detection of intermediates. I’ve also learnt to verify the answers obtained through the design of new reactions.

What is your favourite reaction and why?

My favourite reactions are those which are easily operated under mild and environmentally friendly conditions, and can turn waste into value materials. In my opinion, if somebody can use carbon dioxide as the oxygen source for the preparation of oxygen-containing compounds, with the release of carbon monoxide as a by-product that can then be used as an energy source, then this would be one of my favourite ideal reactions that I would like to realise.

Which of your Chemical Science publications are you most proud of and why?

I definitely love every paper that we have published in Chemical Science, and I am especially proud of our publications over the last two years. These have provided contributions to the area of C-C bond functionalization reactions, in which we have achieved the incorporation of oxygen and nitrogen atoms into molecules through C-C and C=C bond cleavage, respectively, for the preparation of tertiary amines and cyclic imides. The one that I am most proud of will be our next publication in Chemical Science!

Chemical Science was delighted to welcome you to the Editorial Board in 2021. What are you most looking forward to when acting as Associate Editor for the journal?

Thank you! It was my great pleasure to take on this new role. We know that Chemical Science is one of the top multidisciplinary chemistry journals, being the flagship journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry. It is also one of the few top journals that is fully open access with all articles being free to read, and free to publish. This is very attractive and gives the journal very strong vitality. As an Associate Editor, I’m so delighted to be able to contribute to the journal with the rest of the Editorial Board members to help to continue to make Chemical Science the most progressive, exciting and impactful leading chemistry journal. I also hope to serve all authors and readers as well as I can with optimal publication times.

One other aspect of the role that I am highly excited about is having the opportunity to learn and read the latest research first hand, and to learn more about the various contributions and novel ideas that come out from the organic community.

What goal would you set for yourself over the next 10 years?

I have several goals for my research. I first hope that we can realise the direct transformation of carbon dioxide as an oxygen source in oxygenation reactions. I would also like to realise direct catalytic nitrogen-containing compound synthesis, using nitrogen gas as the nitrogen source under mild conditions. Overall, my biggest goal is to apply our methods for the efficient synthesis and discovery of drugs and other functional molecules, and to make contributions to the development of green and sustainable chemistry.

In celebration of joining the Chemical Science team, Ning has highlighted a selection of important organic chemistry contributions from the past few years. The collection can be viewed here.

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Jinlong Gong

Jinlong Gong, Chemical Science Associate Editor

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Jinlong Gong!

 

Jinlong Gong studied chemical engineering and received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Tianjin University and his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. Upon the completion of postdoctoral research at Harvard University, he joined the faculty of chemical engineering at Tianjin University, where he currently holds a Pei Yang Chair Professorship.

His research group work on heterogeneous catalysis and kinetics with a focus on catalytic conversions of small molecules, production of hydrogen energy, and syntheses and applications of nanostructured catalytic materials.

 

Browse a selection of Jinlong’s work below:

Facilitating the reduction of V–O bonds on VOx/ZrO2 catalysts for non-oxidative propane dehydrogenation
Yufei Xie, Ran Luo, Guodong Sun, Sai Chen, Zhi-Jian Zhao, Rentao Mu and Jinlong Gong
Chem. Sci., 2020, 11, 3845-3851
DOI: 10.1039/D0SC00690D, Edge Article

Gas–water interface engineered exceptional photoconversion of fatty acids to olefins
Qin Dai, Jingyi Lin, Hongbin Cao, He Zhao, Guangfei Yu, Chaoqun Li, Tianyu Wang, Yanchun Shi, Guangwei Wang and Jinlong Gong
Green Chem., 2020, 22, 7848-7857
DOI: 10.1039/D0GC02237C, Paper

Theoretical insights into single-atom catalysts
Lulu Li, Xin Chang, Xiaoyun Lin, Zhi-Jian Zhao and Jinlong Gong
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2020, 49, 8156-8178
DOI: 10.1039/D0CS00795A, Review Article

Operando characterization techniques for electrocatalysis
Jingkun Li and Jinlong Gong
Energy Environ. Sci., 2020, 13, 3748-3779
DOI: 10.1039/D0EE01706J, Review Article

Core–shell structured catalysts for thermocatalytic, photocatalytic, and electrocatalytic conversion of CO2
Sonali Das, Javier Pérez-Ramírez, Jinlong Gong, Nikita Dewangan, Kus Hidajat, Bruce C. Gates and Sibudjing Kawi
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2020, 49, 2937-3004
DOI: 10.1039/C9CS00713J, Review Article

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Ning Jiao

Ning Jiao, Chemical Science Associate Editor

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Professor Ning Jiao!

 

Ning Jiao received his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Shandong University in 1999. He obtained his Ph.D. degree (2004) with Prof. Shengming Ma at Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry (SIOC). He then spent 2004-2006 as an Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellow with Prof. Manfred T. Reetz at Max Planck Institute für Kohlenforschung. In 2007, he joined the faculty at Peking University as an Associate Professor, and was promoted to Full Professor in 2010, and is currently the Yangtze-river scholars distinguished Professor at Peking University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

His current research efforts are focused on:

1)  New methodologies development in Atom-Incorporation Reactions mainly on oxygenation, nitrogenation, and halogenation reactions
2)  The first-row transition metal catalysis and the inert chemical bonds functionalization
3)  Bioactive compounds synthesis and drug discovery

 

Browse a selection of Ning’s work below:

Intramolecular Csp3–H/C–C bond amination of alkyl azides for the selective synthesis of cyclic imines and tertiary amines
Xiaojin Wen, Xinyao Li, Xiao Luo, Weijin Wang, Song Song and Ning Jiao
Chem. Sci., 2020, 11, 4482-4487
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC05522C, Edge Article

Cu-catalyzed oxygenation of alkene-tethered amides with O2via unactivated C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond cleavage: a direct approach to cyclic imides
Junhua Li, Jialiang Wei, Bencong Zhu, Teng Wang and Ning Jiao
Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 9099-9103
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC03175H, Edge Article

A metal-free desulfurizing radical reductive C–C coupling of thiols and alkenes
Qixue Qin, Weijing Wang, Cheng Zhang, Song Song and Ning Jiao
Chem. Commun., 2019, 55, 10583-10586
DOI: 10.1039/C9CC05378F, Communication

Efficient and practical synthesis of unsymmetrical disulfides via base-catalyzed aerobic oxidative dehydrogenative coupling of thiols
Xu Qiu, Xiaoxue Yang, Yiqun Zhang, Song Song and Ning Jiao
Org. Chem. Front., 2019, 6, 2220-2225
DOI: 10.1039/C9QO00239A, Research Article

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)