Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – May 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Søren Kramer, William Evans, Mi Hee Lim and Anastassia Alexandrova. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Søren Kramer, Technical University of Denmark. Søren’s research focuses on development of new methods in the fields of transition-metal catalysis, asymmetric catalysis, and photocatalysis – all with a predilection for C–H functionalization.

 

William Evans, University of California, Irvine. My group synthesizes new molecular complexes of heavy metals like the rare-earth metals, thorium, uranium, and bismuth.  The goal is to identify new phenomena in terms of oxidation states, reactivity, and physical properties that are not known with the other metals in the periodic table.

 

Mi Hee Lim, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). Our research objective is to identify how metal-involved biological networks are linked to dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.

 

Anastassia Alexandrova, University of California, Los Angeles, and California NanoSystems Institute. Theoretical development of new physical paradigms in catalysis; quantum information science; enzymology; advancing multiscale modeling methods, and experimentally-testable materials design based on new paradigms

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Anastassia Alexandrova: Chem. Sci. is a top journal in our field, which I find exceptionally open-minded to new concepts and directions, and not locked in particular eternal sub-areas of chemistry. I very much like contributing to Chem. Sci. publishing as an author, and a reviewer, for this reason. 

Mi Hee Lim: The studies that I have reviewed are related to our research interests, and they are at a high level.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Mi Hee Lim: The studies that have been accomplished through multidisciplinary approaches

Anastassia Alexandrova:  I hope I make new science even better, and my goal is to help the authors. But the second part of it is that I get to be among the first pairs of eyes to see top new science.

Søren Kramer: It forces me to study a manuscript and supporting information very thoroughly and practice my critical thinking. In order to make sure that claims are supported, I frequently end up on detours into the literature learning something new along the way.

 

What advice would you give a first-time author looking to maximise their chances of successful peer review?

William Evans: Think of your audience.  It is not enough for the result to be important to you.  You must communicate why it is important to the reader.

 

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science?

Søren Kramer: The deciding factor is often whether there is a high level of novelty compared to existing literature and potential for significant impact on the research field. Of course, it is essential that the conclusions are solidly supported by the experimental data and appropriate literature.

 

What would you recommend to new reviewers to ensure their report is helpful?

William Evans: Never send your report immediately after you write it.  Always redo your report at least a day later to give it a fresh look before you send it.  Write it in a way that you would like to get a review.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Theresa M. Reineke

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Theresa M. Reineke

Theresa was born in St. Paul, Minnesota and received a B. S. Degree from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, M.S. from Arizona State University, and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan working with Prof. Omar Yaghi.  She then completed a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship at the California Institute of Technology working with Prof. Mark Davis. She has held independent faculty positions at the University of Cincinnati, Virginia Tech, and in 2011 joined the University of Minnesota, where she is a Distinguished McKnight University Professor in the Department of Chemistry. She also holds graduate faculty appointments in the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science as well as Pharmaceutics. Her research interests lie in the fields of fundamental monomer and polymer synthesis and degradation, understanding structural ordering and directing molecular interactions of macromolecules with biological systems, and understanding fundamental physicochemical and biological properties of polymeric materials. Her group is focused on enabling fundamental chemical and applied technology advancements of polymers for sustainability, drug delivery, and gene/cell therapy and genome editing. In recognition of her group’s research, she has received the 2017 Carl S. Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award from the ACS POLY Division, the 2018 DuPont Nutrition and Health Sciences Excellence Medal, and a 2022 Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award from the ACS, among many others. Prior to joining Chemical Science in 2022, she was a founding Associate Editor of ACS Macro Letters 2011-2022.

 

Browse a selection of Theresa’s work below: 

Stereoregular functionalized polysaccharides via cationic ring-opening polymerization of biomass-derived levoglucosan
Mayuri K. Porwal, Yernaidu Reddi, Derek J. Saxon, Christopher J. Cramer, Christopher J. Ellison and Theresa M. Reineke
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4512-4522

Ring opening polymerization of β-acetoxy-δ-methylvalerolactone, a triacetic acid lactone derivative
Hussnain Sajjad, Emily A. Prebihalo, William B. Tolman and Theresa M. Reineke
Polym. Chem., 2021,12, 6724-6730

Facile synthesis of GalNAc monomers and block polycations for hepatocyte gene delivery
Matthew R. Bockman, Rishad J. Dalal, Ramya Kumar and Theresa M. Reineke
Polym. Chem., 2021,12, 4063-4071

Tuning PNIPAm self-assembly and thermoresponse: roles of hydrophobic end-groups and hydrophilic comonomer
Monica L. Ohnsorg, jeffrey M. Ting, Seamus D. Jones, Seyoung Jung, Frank S. Bates and Theresa M. Reineke
Polym. Chem., 2019,10, 3469-3479

Sustainable advances in SLA/DLP 3D printing materials and processes
Erin M. Maines, Mayuri K. Porwal, Christopher J. Ellison and Theresa M. Reineke
Green Chem., 2021,23, 6863-6897

Optimizing linear polymer affinity agent properties for surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of aflatoxin B1
Victoria M. Szlag, Rebeca S. Rodriguez, Seyoung Jung, Marc R. Bourgeois, Samuel Bryson, Anatolii Purchel, George C. Schatz, Christy L. Haynes and Theresa M. Reineke
Mol. Syst. Des. Eng., 2019,4, 1019-1031

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – April 2022

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – April 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Neelanjana Sengupta, Tatiana Martins, David Mills and Luca Bernardi. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Neelanjana’s group study complex biomolecular behaviour, such as protein self-assembly and aggregation, with “bottoms up” theoretical and computational approaches.

Neelanjana Sengupta, IISER Kolkata. Neelanjana’s group study complex biomolecular behaviour, such as protein self-assembly and aggregation, with “bottoms up” theoretical and computational approaches.

Tatiana Martins, Federal University of Goias. Tatiana develops materials based on peptides nanotubes combined to fluorescent molecules, which are able to convert energy for use in sensors and solar cells.

 

David Mills, University of Manchester. David’s group focuses on the synthesis and analysis of lanthanide and actinide compounds which can provide enhanced physicochemical properties.

 

Luca Bernardi, University of Bologna. Luca’s research is focused on asymmetric organocatalysis, and the valorisation of marine biopolymers by exploring their potential in catalysis.

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Tatiana Martins: I was caught by the excellence of the research papers that were presented to me by Chemical Science. For me, it’s really delightful to review works such as those published by this journal, because I can understand the scientific progress and discuss high quality works.

Luca Bernardi: Reviewing implies in-depth study of upcoming works, and their backgrounds, in different research areas. Due to the reputation of Chemical Science, reviewing for this journal means absorbing knowledge from significant works, often belonging to emerging research trends.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Tatiana Martins: The perspective of contributing somehow to a better quality of great scientific work. Even anonymously, the reviewer always knows that they have an opportunity to enhance the quality of the science that will bridge other works and build something really impactful.

David Mills: I get a bit of a buzz from seeing some exciting new research before everyone else does, and also the chance to provide some feedback on a scientific output.

 

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science?

Neelanjana Sengupta: Novelty and the highest quality science. I have to admit a special fondness for papers that incorporate both experiments and theory.

Tatiana Martins: I look for good and clear writing, flawless research, enough experiments, thorough explanations and for the questions that rise in my mind during the reading to be answered.

David Mills: It’s important that the paper provides some new insights for the research field, and that the work is thorough.

Luca Bernardi: I like original ideas, and the disclosure of appealing and practical solutions to untapped synthetic problems.

 

What has been your biggest learning point from reviewing?

Neelanjana Sengupta: The experience has showcased the power of scientific communication. The best work are not just of highest quality, but are also easily comprehensible.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Zaiping Guo

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Zaiping Guo!

 

We are pleased to welcome Professor Zaiping Guo to the Chemical Science Editorial Board this month as a new Associate Editor for the journal.

Zaiping is an ARC Australian Laureate Fellow in the School of Chemical Engineering & Advanced Materials at the University of Adelaide. She received her doctorate degree from the University of Wollongong, Australia in 2003, followed by postdoctoral work at the University of Wollongong from 2004-2006. She received successive promotions to Associate Professor in 2010, Professor in 2012 and Distinguished Professor in 2019 at the University of Wollongong. She then joined the University of Adelaide as a Top-talented Professor in March 2021.

The interests of her research team focus on the design and application of electrode materials and electrolytes for energy storage and conversion, including rechargeable batteries, hydrogen storage and fuel cells. Her field of expertise includes electrochemistry, charge transfer and transport kinetics, electrocatalysis, solid-state chemistry, and materials synthesis and characterisation.

Browse a selection of Zaiping’s work below:

Constructing nitrided interfaces for stabilizing Li metal electrodes in liquid electrolytes
Zhijie Wang, Yanyan Wang, Chao Wu, Wei Kong Pang, Jiafeng Mao and Zaiping Guo
Chem. Sci., 2021,12, 8945-8966

Lanthanide doping induced electrochemical enhancement of Na2Ti3O7 anodes for sodium-ion batteries
Jiale Xia, Hongyang Zhao, Wei Kong Pang, Zongyou Yin, Bo Zhou, Gang He, Zaiping Guo and Yaping Du
Chem. Sci.
, 2018,9, 3421-3425

A CoSe–C@C core–shell structure with stable potassium storage performance realized by an effective solid electrolyte interphase layer
Xin Gu, Li Zhang, Wenchao Zhang, Sailin Liu, Sheng Wen, Xinning Mao, Pengcheng Dai, Liangjun Li, Dandan Liu, Xuebo Zhao and Zaiping Guo
Mater. Chem. A2021,9, 11397-11404

Elucidation of the high-voltage phase in the layered sodium ion battery cathode material P3–Na0.5Ni0.25Mn0.75O2
Jiatu Liu, Christophe Didier, Matthew Sale, Neeraj Sharma, Zaiping Guo, Vanessa K. Peterson and Chris D. Ling
Mater. Chem. A, 2020,8, 21151-21162

Liquid metal batteries for future energy storage
Shilin Zhang, Ye Liu, Qining Fan, Chaofeng Zhang, Tengfei Zhou, Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh and Zaiping Guo
Energy Environ. Sci.
, 2021,14, 4177-4202

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – March 2022

Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – March 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Eric Masson, Mark Crimmin, Ru-Jia Yu and Larissa von Krbek. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and what they are looking for in a paper that can be recommended for acceptance in Chemical Science.

Photograph of Eric Masson

Eric Masson, Ohio University. Eric’s group seeks to characterize and quantify intermolecular interactions in both organic and aqueous environments. They are particularly interested in the interactions of guest molecules with Cucurbituril hosts, a family of hollow, pumpkin-shaped macrocycles that can encapsulate guests with extreme affinity in aqueous medium.

 

Photograph of Mark Crimmin

Mark Crimmin, Imperial College London. Mark’s research team develops new types of chemical transformations and new types of catalysts. They are interested in methods to recycle and re-use environmentally persistent fluorocarbons and also developing new types of catalysts that possess an active site that contains two or more metals in proximity.

 

Photograph of Ru-Jia Yu

Ru-Jia Yu, Nanjing University. Ru-Jia’s research involves nanopore-based electrochemistry and direct measurement of single molecules and single cells.

 

Photograph of Larissa von Krbek

Larissa von Krbek, University of Bonn. Larissa’s research looks at developing and investigating metallo-supramolecular assemblies that form via consumption of energy in the form of an electrochemical fuel or light.

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Mark Crimmin: I have been publishing in, and reviewing for, Chemical Science since it started more than 10 years ago. I love the fact that Chemical Science is open access and is a venue for some of the best science from around the world. The work I receive is nearly always of direct interest and I think the editorial team do a great job assigning papers to people with relevant expertise.

 

What has been your biggest learning point from reviewing?

Ru-Jia Yu: Critical and logical thinking skills. As a junior researcher, taking part in reviewing deepens my current scientific research, challenges me to understand different fields, and helps to shape my own academic career.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Larissa von Krbek: The deep dive into the author’s scientific work, thinking through the line of argument and the necessary controls. When do we ever take (or can take) the time to do that with a publication we are interested in? Furthermore, if necessary at all, I enjoy giving constructive feedback on how to improve the work or the presentation thereof.

Ru-Jia Yu: Communicating with authors about their cutting-edge research from different angles. It feels like I am involved in their work by deep discussion and interaction. 

 

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science?

Eric Masson: I am looking first and foremost for conceptual novelty supported by meticulously designed experiments and a very careful, critical, and concise discussion.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

 

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – February 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Elisa Fadda, Samuel Sanders and Miho Yamauchi. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Elisa Fadda, Maynooth University. Elisa’s lab uses high-performance computing to study the 3D structure and dynamic behaviour of complex carbohydrates and of glycoproteins by atomistic simulations. They use this high-resolution insight to determine links to the many biological functions of glycans in health and disease, and for the past two years in viral (COVID-19) infection.

Samuel Sanders, Rowland Institute at Harvard. Sam is interested in studying the interactions between light and matter on the nanoscale.

Miho Yamauchi, Kyushu University. Yamaichi develops nanoscale materials composed of metals and oxides as a catalyst for energy storage, electrochemical CO2 reduction and ammonia synthesis.

 

Do you have any advice to our readers seeking publication in Chemical Science on what makes a good paper?

Elisa Fadda: What makes a good paper is most definitely in the eye of the reader, yet to me a good paper is a clear (and easy to read) account of a scientific discovery, supported by carefully and properly analysed and presented data, with links and implications to the ‘big-picture’ of interest discussed more in depth than just mentioned in the abstract. In brief, I enjoy reading papers that are exciting and engaging for all the right reasons. As scientists we all have to read so much already, work that stands out is always welcome.  

 

What advice would you give a first-time author looking to maximise their chances of successful peer review?

Miho Yamauchi: The authors need to provide reasonable explanations for the originality, novelty and importance of the work.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Samuel Sanders: In general, I read the literature to stay on top of the latest and greatest work coming out around the world. By reviewing, I get to read work even ahead of that curve.

Miho Yamauchi: I enjoy new concepts and deep insights created by the authors.

 

What has been your biggest learning point from reviewing?

Elisa Fadda: To be kind, gracious (it’s always work), short, clear and to the point. I think reviewers sometimes forget that they are also authors and that being a reviewer entails providing useful feedback, where necessary, not just dry criticism.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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Happy Chinese New Year!

Happy Chinese New Year to all our authors, reviewers and readers from all of us at Chemical Science!

To celebrate the year of the tiger we have put together a collection highlighting our most popular articles from the past year from our Chinese authors, as well as a selection of infographics accompanying some of these papers, which you can find below.

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – January

By .

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Nan-Nan Deng, Ashraf Brik, Goran Angelovski and Jiang Weng. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Nan-Nan Deng, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Nannan’s research focuses on bottom-up construction of artificial cells and their behaviors using microfluidics.

Ashraf Brik, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. My research focuses on using chemical approaches to shed light on the function of proteins—the molecules that carry most cellular tasks, studying how malfunction in their role can lead to disease development and find solutions to such defects for drug development.

Goran Angelovski, Chinese Academy of Science. My research is focused on the design, preparation, and validation of bioresponsive MRI probes that are sensitive to calcium ions or neurotransmitters. These are intended to serve as markers for the functional molecular imaging applications, particularly the neuroimaging.

Jiang Weng, Sun Yat-sen University. Jiang’s research focuses on developing efficient methods for the synthesis of functional small molecules. Currently, we are involved in the areas of asymmetric catalysis and SuFEx click chemistry, and their further application in medicinal chemistry.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Ashraf Brik: Being able to review for excellent journals is a privilege! This is because you not only being among the first people to see the emergence of great science but also being part in shaping it. With this also comes the responsibility of being very rigorous and updated of your particular research area and in science general.   

Goran Angelovski: I like observing the evolution of the manuscript from its initial version, to being published in the final form. I enjoy the exchange of arguments and a constructive communication between the reviewers and authors, even if strong criticism has been expressed.

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science?

Jiang Weng: I think sufficient novelty and/or significance is the most essential element for the acceptance of a manuscript. In addition, telling a science story clearly and concisely is also very important.

What would you recommend to new reviewers to ensure their report is helpful?

Goran Angelovski: Be critical but fair. Do not focus on the final recommendation to accept or reject the manuscript, but how you can help identifying its shortcomings, eventual flaws, or parts where it may become even better. Focus on your role as the evaluator and how/if you can help the work submitted for publication become even better, in the submitted journal or elsewhere. Always have in mind that your role is the assessment of the work under the review, not the decision making. Leave the latter part to the editor.

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Nan-Nan Deng: Chemical Science is a journal that I usually glance over on-line for finding good papers in my fields.  I have read many great papers from the journal, and am glad to be a reviewer of it.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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How can cooling rate define the nature of nano-structures formed using block copolymers?

Block copolymers (BCPs) consist of amphiphilic molecules that can self-assemble in selective solvents and generate various types of nano- and micro-dimensional structures. The unique self-assembly process is low-cost and relatively straight forward in solution phase.  The final structures have morphological diversity and complexity.  These self-assembled structures have been widely used in various applications such as drug delivery, catalysis, and water purification. The self-assembly process follows a heating step for dissolution of all the components and a subsequent cooling step. Both the steps and the parameters are vital for final structural characteristics of the assembled structures. A group of scientists from two esteemed universities in Canada recently studied the effects of rate of cooling in the self-assembly process.

Schematic representation of how cooling rate can change the morphology of formed micellar structures using PFS BCP and homopolymers

The authors used a systematic approach to explain the influence of cooling rate on micelle morphologies for a series of PFS based BCPs. The cooling rate greatly influences the size and the shape of colloidal structures. Rapid cooling increases branching and opens a new avenue to manipulate micelle morphologies. The study finds that rapid cooling reduces crystallinity, as polymer chains do not have enough time to pack in ordered structures.

The authors standardized sample preparation protocol and then varied the cooling times, with quick cooling of 2.5 min producing flower like structures and median cooling time of 50 mins leading to the same structural features with larger size. Co-self-assembly of homopolymer BCP mixtures with variable cooling rate also shows that quick cooling generates uniform sized branched micellar structures with elongated central platelets whereas slow cooling led to a long single fiber with a dark circle platelet in the centre.

With several examples and optimization conditions, the effect of cooling in the formation of self-assembled micellar structures has been evaluated. The main outcome of this study is that the cooling rate is another parameter to manipulate crystallization-driven self-assembly and to control micelle morphologies. There exists a lot of possibilities to use the findings and apply them to generate BCPs with a crystallizable block with important optical or electronic properties.

For details, please visit the entire article at https://doi.org/10.1039/D1SC05937H

About the author:

Dr Damayanti Bagchi is a postdoctoral researcher in Irene Chen’s lab at University of California, Los Angeles, United States. She obtained her PhD in Physical Chemistry from Satyendra Nath Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, India. Her research is focused on spectroscopic studies of nano-biomaterials. She is interested in exploring light enabled therapeutics. She enjoys food and experimenting with various cuisines, which she found resembles products/ side products of chemical reactions!

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Chemical Science HOT Articles: December 2021

New month, new HOT articles!

We are pleased to share a selection of our referee-recommended HOT articles for December 2021. We hope you enjoy reading these articles, congratulations to all the authors whose articles are featured! As always, Chemical Science is free to read & download.

You can explore our full 2021 Chemical Science HOT Article Collection here!

Browse a selection of our December HOT articles below:

Linking metal-organic cages pairwise as a design approach for assembling multivariate crystalline materialsve zinc thiolates for low-cost aqueous rechargeable Zn-ion batteries
Adrian W. Markwell-Heys, Michael Roemelt, Ashley D. Slattery, Oliver M. Linder-Patton and Witold M. Bloch
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 68-73

The role of cooling rate in crystallization-driven block copolymer self-assembly
Shaofei Song, Jingjie Jiang, Ehsan Nikbin, Jane Y. Howe, Ian Manners and Mitchell A. Winnik
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 396-409

Structure, reactivity and luminescence studies of triphenylsiloxide complexes of tetravalent lanthanides
Aurélien R. Willauer, Iskander Douair, Anne-Sophie Chauvin, Farzaneh Fadaei-Tirani, Jean-Claude G. Bünzli, Laurent Maron and Marinella Mazzanti
Chem. Sci., 2022, Advance Article

Visible-light-induced transition metal and photosensitizer free decarbonylative addition of amino-arylaldehydes to ketones
Yi Wang, Yatao Lang, Chao-Jun Li and Huiying Zeng
Chem. Sci., 2022, Advance Article

Kinetic trapping of a cobalt(ii) metallocage using a carbazole-containing expanded carbaporphyrinoid ligand
Weinan Zhou, Tridib Sarma, Yonghuan Su, Chuanhu Lei and Jonathan L. Sessler
Chem. Sci., 2022, Advance Article

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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