HOT articles: December

We are pleased to share a selection of our referee-recommended HOT articles for December. We hope you enjoy reading these articles and congratulations to all the authors whose articles are featured! As always, Chemical Science is free to read & download. You can find our full 2019 HOT article collection here.

 

Interplay between intrinsically disordered proteins inside membraneless protein liquid droplets
Yongsang Jo and Yongwon Jung
Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC03191J

https://doi.org/10.1039/C9SC03191J

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Single-molecule nanopore sensing of actin dynamics and drug binding
Xiaoyi Wang, Mark D. Wilkinson, Xiaoyan Lin, Ren Ren, Keith R. Willison, Aleksandar P. Ivanov, Jake Baum and Joshua B. Edel
Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC05710B

10.1039/C9SC05710B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Uncommon structural and bonding properties in Ag16B4O10
Anton Kovalevskiy, Congling Yin, Jürgen Nuss, Ulrich Wedig and Martin Jansen
Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC05185F
10.1039/C9SC05185F

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rational synthesis of interpenetrated 3D covalent organic frameworks for asymmetric photocatalysis
Xing Kang, Xiaowei Wu, Xing Han, Chen Yuan, Yan Liu and Yong Cui
Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC04882K

10.1039/C9SC04882K
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Serine is the molecular source of the NH(CH2)2 bridgehead moiety of the in vitro assembled [FeFe] hydrogenase H-cluster
Guodong Rao, Lizhi Tao and R. David Britt
Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC05900H

10.1039/C9SC05900H
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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Welcome to our new Associate Editor: Lin Chen

We would like to wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Professor Lin Chen!

 

Lin Chen, Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Lin X. Chen is a Professor of Chemistry in Northwestern University and a Senior Chemist in Argonne National Laboratory. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. After her postdoctoral research at UC Berkeley, she joined Argonne as a staff scientist. In 2007, she joined Northwestern University where her research are focused on fundamental light-matter interactions of different solar energy conversion platforms, including excited state molecular structural dynamics in photocatalytic processes and photovoltaic materials; understanding roles of ultrafast and coherent electronic and atomic motions in in photochemical reactions, and functional structural dynamics of biomacromolecules on multiple spatial and temporal scales. Her main tools for research are ultrafast laser and X-ray spectroscopy/scattering and other property/structural methods in collaborations with theorists and chemists making molecules and materials.

She was awarded one of the highly cited scientists in 2019 by the Web of Science, with >230 publications, and >200 invited lectures. She has been members of the Research Council for the Chemical, Biological and Geological Sciences Division, Basic Energy Science, US Department of Energy, the Advisory Editorial Board of Journal of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics Letters, Senior Editor of ACS Energy Letters, and the International Science Advisory Committee for π-Functional Materials. She is an AAAS Fellow and has won distinguished performance award at Argonne. Her group website is at http://chemgroups.northwestern.edu/chen_group/.

 

Browse a selection of Lin’s latest work published by the Royal Society of Chemistry:

X-ray snapshots reveal conformational influence on active site ligation during metalloprotein folding
Darren J. Hsu, Denis Leshchev, Dolev Rimmerman, Jiyun Hong, Matthew S. Kelley, Irina Kosheleva, Xiaoyi Zhang and Lin X. Chen
Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 9788-9800
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC02630D, Edge Article

Controlled growth of imine-linked two-dimensional covalent organic framework nanoparticles
Rebecca L. Li, Nathan C. Flanders, Austin M. Evans, Woojung Ji, Ioannina Castano, Lin X. Chen, Nathan C. Gianneschi and William R. Dichtel
Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 3796-3801
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC00289H, Edge Article

Effects of 1,8-diiodooctane on domain nanostructure and charge separation dynamics in PC71BM-based bulk heterojunction solar cells
Sylvia J. Lou, Nanjia Zhou, Xugang Guo, Robert P. H. Chang, Tobin J. Marks and Lin X. Chen
J. Mater. Chem. A, 2018, 6, 23805-23818
DOI: 10.1039/C8TA06865H, Paper

Insulin hexamer dissociation dynamics revealed by photoinduced T-jumps and time-resolved X-ray solution scattering
Dolev Rimmerman, Denis Leshchev, Darren J. Hsu, Jiyun Hong, Baxter Abraham, Irina Kosheleva, Robert Henning and Lin X. Chen
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2018, 17, 874-882
DOI: 10.1039/C8PP00034D, Communication

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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How Does Nano-Confinement Boost Oxygen-Reduction Electrocatalytic Activity?

Why do biological enzymes exhibit superior catalytic activity? Well, this is mainly because they can firmly anchor reactants into catalytically active pockets using their three-dimensional structures. Inspired by this nano-confinement effect, scientists have developed “nanozymes,” a family of artificial enzymes.

A group of scientists from the University of New South Wales (Australia), University of Utah (USA), and Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Germany) investigated the interplay between the degree of nano-confinement and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. They discovered that ORR activity only scaled proportionally to the degree of confinement at low overpotentials (ORR theoretical potential: 1.23 V vs. RHE). The results have been published in Chemical Science (doi: 10.1039/C9SC05611D).

Synthesized by etching Ni from Pt-Ni alloy nanoparticles, metallic Pt nanoparticles possessing channels of different opening sizes served as the nanozymes with different confinement degrees. When the Ni content increased, the channel of the etched nanoparticles widened. Specifically, Pt nanozymes prepared from Pt-Ni nanoparticles with Pt/Ni = 1/1.5 (NZsmall) contained 69% channel openings smaller than 2 nm (Fig. 1a); Whereas those from the precursors with Pt/Ni = 1/2.5 (NZmedium) and 1/3 (NZlarge) had 52% (Fig. 1b) and 34% (Fig. 1c) <2-nm-wide channels, respectively. Therefore, the nano-confinement degrees of the three nanozymes followed the sequence of NZsmall>NZmedium>NZlarge.

Figure 1. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images (left) and channel diameter distribution profiles (right) of (a) NZsmall, (b) NZmedium, and (c) NZlarge.

The ORR activity of the three nanozymes strongly depended on the magnitude of the overpotential. With the outer surfaces passivated by surfactants, the ORR activities of the nanozymes were only associated with O2 reduction within their channels. At low overpotentials (Fig. 2, inset), NZsmall had the highest ORR activity among all the catalysts evaluated by the authors, as indicated by its lowest kinetic current. At high overpotentials or low applied biases; however, the ORR activity of NZmedium and NZlarge rapidly increased (Fig. 2). NZmedium and NZlarge became more active than NZsmall at potentials lower than 0.82 V (vs. RHE) and 0.80 V (vs. RHE), respectively.

Figure 2. The potential (E)-dependence of kinetic current density (jk). Inset: low-overpotential (high potentials) region. Legends: solid black – NZsmall; solid blue – NZmedium; solid red – NZlarge; open black – mesoporous Pt nanoparticles without nano-channels. The consistently small absolute jk of the mesoporous nanoparticles reflected its relatively low ORR activity.

The finite element simulation revealed the underlying mechanism of the experimental results. At low overpotentials, the ORR activity was governed by the kinetics of O2-reduction. Due to high charge density, the local proton concentration inside the channels of NZsmall was the highest, leading to the fastest reaction and the highest ORR activity. At high overpotentials, the ORR activity became mass-transport limited. Nanozymes with wide channel openings, that is, NZmedium and NZlarge, allowed a large amount of O2 to diffuse into the channels, which enhanced O2 supply and augmented ORR activity.

This work unveiled the potential-dependence of the ORR catalytic activities of porous Pt nanoparticles under different degrees of nano-confinement. This insight could rationalize and further enable the design of nanozymes with tailorable ORR activities.

 

To find out more, please read:

The Importance of Nanoscale Confinement to Electrocatalytic Performance

Johanna Wordsworth, Tania M. Benedetti, Ali Alinezhad, Richard D. Tilley, Martin A. Edwards, Wolfgang Schuhmann, and J. Justin Gooding

Chem. Sci., 2019, DOI: 10.1039/C9SC05611D

 

Tianyu Liu acknowledges Zac Croft at Virginia Tech, U.S., for his careful proofreading of this post.

 

About the blogger:

Tianyu Liu obtained his Ph.D. (2017) in Chemistry from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in the United States. He is passionate about the communication of scientific endeavors to both the general public and other scientists with diverse research expertise to introduce cutting-edge research to broad audiences. He is a blog writer for Chem. Comm. and Chem. Sci. More information about him can be found at http://liutianyuresearch.weebly.com/.

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Looking Inside Nanocomposites with Tomography

As a nanocrystal chemist, it pains me to say that sometimes nanoparticles aren’t enough. One strategy for engineering materials with complex functionalities is to embed nanoparticles into a larger host matrix structure. This has been widely studied for polymer-nanoparticle assemblies, but challenges abound for inorganic host matrices. Difficulties stem from problems controlling the microstructure of the host, as nanoparticles tend to accumulate at the borders of individual crystals in polycrystalline materials. Even when higher quality inorganic materials are made in the presence of nanocrystals loadings are below 1 wt%. A possible route to address these issues is by combining inorganic matrices with polymer-functionalized nanoparticles. The polymers can also form into vesicle structures that contain the nanoparticles which are larger and more compatible with characterization techniques.

One of those techniques is cryo-ptychographic X-ray computed tomography (cryo-PXCT), a fascinating and literally cool characterization method to image the internal structure of crystals. This is a variation on imaging techniques used heavily in medicine archeology to non-destructively visualize the interior of humans or artifacts. Cryo-PXCT cools the sample to -180 oC and has spatial resolution on the order of 50-70 nm. The researchers synthesized polymer vesicles and worms of approximately 232 nm in diameter and over 1 micron in length, respectively. The nanocomposites were made via an ammonia diffusion method with a solution of calcium chloride containing the polymer nano-structure exposed to gaseous ammonia and carbon dioxide to form CaCO3 crystals with nano-structure occlusions. The morphology of the nanocomposite crystal altered based on the type of occlusion – the vesicle/calcite combination retained a traditional calcite rhombohedral structure, while the worm/calcite composite crystals featured several rounded sides, an elongated shape, and only three flat faces. These composites possessed 15 – 25 wt% occlusions, significantly higher than prior work with pure nanoparticle incorporation.

Figure 1. SEM images of vessicle/calcite (left) and worm/calcite (right) nanocomposite single crystals.

Once prepared, the researchers examined the crystals by cryo-PXCT to determine the locations of the occlusions within the composites. In the vesicle/calcite composite the vesicles are non-uniformly distributed, with several layers of vesicle density, starting with a vesicle poor core, followed by a vesicle rich region, surrounded by another vesicle poor layer, with a slight vesicle enrichment near the surface. On average the vesicles are 300 nm apart and they maintain their shape, with the larger vesicles preferentially occluding in regions of higher occlusion densities.

Figure 2. Rendering of slice through the vesicle/calcite nanocomposite colored to show both components.

The worm/calcite composite crystals show a very different distribution of occlusions, with an hourglass of low density in the center of the crystal, surrounded by a worm rich zone, and an exterior worm poor layer. These zoning effects are likely determined by the interactions between the polymers and the growing crystal surfaces or the calcium cations in the solution. Cryo-PXCT offers a fascinating way to probe the internal structure of novel multicomponent crystals in three dimensions with nanoscale resolution, providing valuable information to eventually help determine structure-function relationships.

Figure 3. Tomographs of worm/calcite nanocomposites showing the localization of worms in an hourglass shape in the center of the crystal.

To find out more, please read:

Ptychographic X-ray tomography reveals additive zoning in nanocomposite single crystals

Johannes Ihli, Mark A. Levenstein, Yi-Yeoun Kim, Klaus Wakonig, Yin Ning, Aikaterini Tatani, Alexander N. Kulak, David C. Green, Mirko Holler, Steven P. Armes and Fiona C. Meldrum

Chem. Sci., 2020, 11, 355-363.

About the blogger:

Beth Mundy is a PhD candidate in chemistry in the Cossairt lab at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. Her research focuses on developing new and better ways to synthesize nanomaterials for energy applications. She is often spotted knitting in seminars or with her nose in a good book. You can find her on Twitter at @BethMundySci.

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The 18th Meeting of the French-American Chemical Society (FACS XVIII), Charleston, June 2020

FACSXVIII

 

Chemical Science is pleased to be sponsoring The 18th Meeting of theFrench-American Chemical Society (FACS XVIII) in Charleston, South Carolina, 07-11 June 2020 along with Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry and ChemSocRev.

It will be held in The Emmeline hotel in the historic district of Charleston and early reigstration is now open!

 

Find out more

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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HOT Chemical Science articles for November

We are happy to present a selection of our HOT articles for October. To see all of our HOT referee-recommended articles from 2019, please find the collection here.

As always, Chemical Science articles are free to access.

CsAlB3O6F: a beryllium-free deep-ultraviolet nonlinear optical material with enhanced thermal stability

Chem Sci., 2019, Advance Article


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Programmable dynamic covalent nanoparticle building blocks with complementary reactivity

Chem Sci., 2020, Advance Article


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Aqueous microdroplets containing only ketones or aldehydes undergo Dakin and Baeyer–Villiger reactions

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Significantly improved electrocatalytic oxygen reduction by an asymmetrical Pacman dinuclear cobalt(ii) porphyrin–porphyrin dyad

Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article

 

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Ptychographic X-ray tomography reveals additive zoning in nanocomposite single crystals

Johannes Ihli, Mark A. Levenstein, Yi-Yeoun Kim, Klaus Wakonig, Yin Ning, Aikaterini Tatani, Alexander N. Kulak, David C. Green, Mirko Holler, Steven P. Armes and Fiona C. Meldrum

Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article

 

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Biosynthesis of plant tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids through an imine reductase route

Chem. Sci., 2020, Advance Article

 

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Molecular Switches from DNA

The idea of using DNA-based devices to create highly specific sensors, diagnostic tools, and therapeutics has inspired widespread research. DNA molecular switches, a basic class of DNA nanostructures, turn some process on and off depending on whether a substrate binds to the switch. They are typically coupled with some form of signal amplification process to increase sensitivity and should theoretically provide enhanced signal-to-noise. Unfortunately, current amplification procedures have a significant amount of background reactions, called leakage, that limit their current utility. One approach to design better switches is to find ways to observe single molecule dynamics. Combining transient binding of complimentary oligonucleotides with high resolution fluorescence microscopy allows for the development of highly sensitive molecular switches without leakage problems.

To do this, researchers in China developed a series of three-way junction DNA-based molecular switches. These TWJs possess a recognition domain, which interacts with the target of interest and induces a structural change in the TWJ, and a transduction domain, which then becomes accessible and binds to a fluorescent molecule (Figure 1).

Figure 1. General scheme of three-way junction molecular switch with two domains noted.

Experimentally, the TWJs were captured on the imaging surface and only fluorophores bound to a TWJ would remain in place long enough for signal to be acquired by the camera with a 500 ms integration time. The researchers found that shorter transduction domains with 5 or fewer base pairs were not stable enough to allow the fluorescent probes access in the absence of a bound target. The next generation of TWJs feature a hybridization probe to allow the switch to recognize specific DNA inputs. In the presence of inputs, the researchers observed transient binding behavior of the fluorophore, whereas they observed only nonspecific binding in the absence of inputs. The ability to differentiate between non-specific and transient binding in the single-molecule system gives a detection limit of 10 fM without concerns about leakage.

Building on this work, the researchers utilized the same general framework and substituted aptamer sequences for the hybridization probe in the recognition domain. They utilized split aptamer fragments that only draw together when bound to a target molecule. This motif was tested on ATP, a small molecule, and thrombin, a protein. These aptamer-coupled TWJs exhibited sensitivity to concentrations as low as 20 – 50 pm with high sensitivity (Figure 2). In the presence of molecular analogs to ATP or thrombin, the signal level showed no significant difference from that of a blank.

Figure 2. A) Split aptamer-based molecular switch schematic. B) Single-molecule fluorescence-time trajectory data in the presence (top) or absence (bottom) of targets. C) and D) Linear relationship between thrombin concentration and signal and specificity when compared to analogs. E) and F) Linear relationship between ATP concentration and signal and specificity when compared to analogs.

Another advantage of this system is its ability to provide information on the binding affinity of substrates, as it should impact the kinetics of the fluorescent probes. The dwell times of the fluorescence on and off states demonstrated exponential trends with changing input concentrations and could be fit to extract time constants. These time constants can then be used to derive the kinetics parameters and binding affinities of the target species. The general stability of the molecular switch framework allows for studying these types of interactions in a range of pH and salinity conditions, useful for mimicking different environments relevant to future applications. This provides a platform for studying the fundamental interactions that will allow DNA-based nanotechnology to move forward.

To find out more, please read:

Single-molecule dynamic DNA junctions for engineering robust molecular switches

Shuang Cai, Yingnan Deng, Shengnan Fu, Junjie Li, Changyuan Yu and Xin Su

Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 9922-9927.

About the blogger:

Beth Mundy is a PhD candidate in chemistry in the Cossairt lab at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. Her research focuses on developing new and better ways to synthesize nanomaterials for energy applications. She is often spotted knitting in seminars or with her nose in a good book. You can find her on Twitter at @BethMundySci.

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HOT Chemical Science articles for October

We are happy to present a selection of our HOT articles for October. To see all of our HOT referee-recommended articles from 2019, please find the collection here.

As always, Chemical Science articles are free to access.

Development of a DUB-selective fluorogenic substrate

ChemSci., 2019, 10, 10290-10296

 

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Facile triflic acid-catalyzed α-1,2-cis-thio glycosylations: scope and application to the synthesis of S-linked oligosaccharides, glycolipids, sublancin glycopeptides, and TN/TF antigens

Sanyong Zhu, Ganesh Samala, Eric T. Sletten, Jennifer L. Stockdill and Hien M. Nguyen

ChemSci., 2019, 10, 10475 – 10480

 

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Preferential binding of unsaturated hydrocarbons in aryl-bisimidazolium·cucurbit[8]uril complexes furbishes evidence for small-molecule π–π interactions

Steven J. Barrow, Khaleel I. Assaf, Aniello Palma, Werner M. Nau and Oren A. Scherman

ChemSci., 2019, 10, 10240 – 10246

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Synthesis of bicyclo[3.1.0]hexanes by (3 + 2) annulation of cyclopropenes with aminocyclopropanes

Bastian Muriel, Alec Gagnebina and Jerome Waser

ChemSci., 2019, Advance Article

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Development of a hydrolysis-based small-molecule hydrogen selenide (H2Se) donor

Turner D. Newton and Michael D. Pluth

ChemSci.,  2019, Advance Article

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Ruthenium based antimicrobial theranostics – using nanoscopy to identify therapeutic targets and resistance mechanisms in Staphylococcus aureus

Kirsty L. Smitten, Simon D. Fairbanks, Craig C. Robertson, Jorge Bernardino de la Serna, Simon J. Foster and Jim A. Thomas

ChemSci.,  2019, Advance Article

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Metallohelices to kill microbes

I feel pretty safe saying that the development of effective antimicrobial drugs (looking at you penicillin!) was one of the most significant pharmacological events of recent history. Unfortunately, the widespread and often indiscriminate use of antibiotics has created an environment where bacteria with evolved drug resistances, colloquially known as “superbugs,” pose a serious threat to global health. While development of new small-molecule antimicrobial drugs is still ongoing, scientists are exploring alternative approaches as well. Of interest are antimicrobial peptides, found in plants and animals as a part of native immune systems. The most common are cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) comprised of 10-50 amino acids that possess both cationic and hydrophobic subunits and an overall positive charge. This allows them to strongly electrostatically interact with negatively charged bacterial cell membranes without disrupting neutral animal cells. Unfortunately, CAMPs have proved challenging to commercialize with generally unfavorable activities and issues with large-scale manufacture.

Figure 1. General synthetic scheme, structure, and key for components of metallohelices.

Researchers in the UK and Czech Republic recently developed a range of cationic metallohelices (Figure 1) that demonstrate structure-dependent activity against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. The diamine ligands form cleanly in the presence of [15]-crown-[5] and upon combination with 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde and a metal salt self-assemble into the iron or zinc metallohelices. The metallohelices consist of a single enantiomer, as the ligands are optically pure, as determined by NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction when possible. Altering the aryl linker unit in the ligand the overall size and shape of the metallohelix in both zinc and iron derivatives. The iron metallohelices are water compatible, with lifetimes exceeding 10 days even in highly acidic conditions, and thus suitable for antimicrobial activity screening.

The researchers used ­in vitro studies to find minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), the lowest concentration necessary to see bacterial growth inhibition. While the metallohelices demonstrate the highest activity towards Gram-positive bacteria, some showed lethal effects on Gram-negative E. coli in 20-40 minutes. The 5b helices with a para-benzene bridging group acted most selectively on E. coli with the Λ-5b enantiomer acting as the champion compound and selected for further mechanistic study. The researchers exposed a notorious E. coli strain to inhibitory levels of Λ-5b in an attempt to isolate resistant mutants. The 17 isolates showed only slight tolerance increases rather than true resistance and could be classified into 4 genetic sub-types. Two of the sub-types developed mutations that altered the biophysical properties of their outer membrane, a third lost the ability to produce the vitamin B12 transporter protein, and the fourth lost the pO157 virulence plasmid (which makes this particularly E. coli strain particularly unpleasant). Taken in concert, these 4 sub-types show that tolerance can be derived from disrupting the ability of Λ-5b to interact with and cross the cellular membrane.

Figure 2. Fluorescence images of cells treated with Λ-5b coupled to a fluorescent probe, with arrows pointing to the localization of Λ-5b.

Given data suggesting the ability of Λ-5b to cross the cellular membrane, despite the relatively large of the metallohelices, the researchers used fluorescence microscopy to probe Λ-5b localization by coupling Λ-5b with a fluorescent label. The labeled metallohelix preferentially localized to regions in growing cells that contain anionic phospholipids (Figure 2). This indicates that Λ-5b can cross the cellular membrane and acts internally to the cell rather than simply acting via electrostatic interaction that disrupts the membrane. Overall, this work provides an exciting approach to developing novel anti-microbial drugs that mimic CAMPs with higher stability, activity, and easier synthesis.

To find out more please read:

Metallohelices that kill Gram-negative pathogens using intracellular antimicrobial peptide pathways

Daniel H. Simpson, Alexia Hapeshi, Nicola J. Rogers, Viktor Brabec, Guy J. Clarkson, David J. Fox, Ondrej Hrabina, Gemma L. Kay, Andrew K. King, Jaroslav Malina, Andrew D. Millard, John Moat, David I. Roper, Hualong Song, Nicholas R. Waterfield and Peter Scott

Chem. Sci., 2019,10, 8547-8557

About the blogger:

Beth Mundy is a PhD candidate in chemistry in the Cossairt lab at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. Her research focuses on developing new and better ways to synthesize nanomaterials for energy applications. She is often spotted knitting in seminars or with her nose in a good book. You can find her on Twitter at @BethMundySci.

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1st International Conference on Noncovalent Interactions

Last month, Chemical Science sponsored the 1st International Conference on Noncovalent Interactions, in Lisbon, Portugal. The talks highlighted the important role of noncovalent interactions in a range of disciplines, such as theoretical chemistry, synthesis, catalysis, crystal engineering, molecular recognition, medicinal chemistry, biology, materials science, and electrochemical immobilization.

Chemical Science, along with Dalton Transactions and RSC Advances, sponsored poster prizes at the conference. Congratulations to Anh Tuan Pham (University of Geneva, Switzerland) who received the Chemical Science poster prize, Sara R. G. Fernandes (University of Lisbon, Portugal) who received the Dalton Transactions poster prize, and Errui Li (Zhejiang University, China) who received the RSC Advances poster prize. There was a fantastic array of posters on display at the meeting, and we would like to extend a huge congratulations to all those who presented.

       

 

 

 

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