Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – August 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Satoshi Horike, Maria Contel, Stefanie Dehnen and Christopher Barner-Kowollik. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Photo of Satoshi Horike

Satoshi Horike, Kyoto University. Satoshi’s research group studies hybrid glass-forming materials consisting of metals and molecules, involving solid-state ion conductors and porous solids.

Photo of Stefanie Dehnen

Stefanie Dehnen, Philipps-University Marburg. Stefanie is interested in the synthesis, in-depth analysis and application of cluster compounds, i.e. compounds with large molecules of atomically precise composition and defined structure comprising (semi-)metal atoms.

Photo of Maria Contel

Maria Contel, Brooklyn College, The City University of New York (CUNY). Maria’s research group is focused on developing anticancer and antimicrobial agents based on metal- compounds. They study modes of action to help optimize the design of drugs with an improved pharmacological profile. They also work on strategies to develop targeted drugs.

Photo of Christopher Barner-Kowollik

Christopher Barner-Kowollik, Queensland University of Technology. Christopher’s research focuses on understanding photochemical reactions via wavelength-by-wavelength reactivity assessments via so-called action plots, which drive precision photochemistry development for the design of advanced (macromolecular) photoresists for 3D laser lithography and 3D printing applications.

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Stefanie Dehnen: Chemical Science is one of the most important journals for research in all areas of chemistry. It is a pleasure to review for it, as the articles are usually of high quality and report on cutting-edge research (even if not all of them actually reach the quality required for publication in Chemical Science in the end).

Christopher Barner-Kowollik: The outstanding quality of the journal and the diverse and vibrant author community, underpinned by one of the most respected learned chemical societies in the world.

        

What advice would you give a first-time author looking to maximise their chances of successful peer review?

Maria Contel: I would have a supportive senior colleague with ample experience in the field to look at the manuscript and provide feedback. I would read quite a bit, every week and keep current with the literature (within your possibilities). There are also wonderful webinars on writing scientific papers, including those from specific journals, which can be very useful for first time authors.

Satoshi Horike: In many cases, the research field is competitive and has a vast background. It is important to clearly explain how the authors find and solve the challenges that have not yet been explored in the field. The focus should not be dispersed. If the paper includes non-conventional methods on synthesis and characterization, it is eye-catching and I feel that they have provided new values.

 

What makes a paper truly stand out for you when reviewing a paper?

Christopher Barner-Kowollik: Beautiful and carefully crafted schemes and figures, including the all-important overview scheme that should be at the end of every introduction, summarizing the idea and concept of the presented work. When reviewing a manuscript, I look at the figures first, even before reading the abstract. In my view, effective science communication starts with outstanding imagery, including the presentation of technical data such as NMR spectra.

 

What has been your biggest learning point from reviewing?

Maria Contel: To be concise and straight forward. Less is more when it comes to writing. You also need to tell a story and should not forget to cite relevant papers in your field!  

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Apply here now!

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – July 2022

By .

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Jacquelyne Read, Seda Keskin, Qichun Zhang and Wei Zhang. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Jacquelyne Read, Dartmouth College

Jacquelyne Read, Dartmouth College.  Jacquelyne is interested in research at the interface of synthetic organic and computational chemistry with a focus on noncovalent interactions that affect catalysis.

Seda Keskin, Koç University. Seda’s research focuses on the computational modeling of metal-organic frameworks for energy applications and CO2 capture.

Qichun Zhang, City University of Hong Kong. Qichun and his team’s research focuses on carbon-rich materials and applications.

Wei Zhang, University of Colorado Boulder. Wei and his team are focused on utilizing dynamic covalent chemistry to develop novel organic or hybrid functional materials targeting a broad range of environmental, energy, and biological applications.

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Jacquelyne Read: I love reading the high-quality and interdisciplinary research in Chemical Science, and I was excited for the opportunity to contribute to this journal by serving as a peer reviewer.

Seda Keskin: Chemical Science focuses on novel, new, exciting studies, and being one of the very first scientists who will read this type of works is priceless.

        

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Wei Zhang: It feels very rewarding to see the quality of certain works improve after my and (other reviewers’) in-depth comments and constructive advice are carefully addressed. Sometimes, I also see some professional debates between the authors and reviewers regarding the experiment design or interpretation of certain results, which is very valuable to moving science forward.

Qichun Zhang: I get very excited when I see novel chemistry and fresh ideas in a manuscript.  

 

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science? Seda Keskin: Quality of the figures, representation/reproducibility/interpretation of the data, in fact, everything from the first word of the title down to the completeness of the references.

Jacquelyne Read: I look for a manuscript that presents new research in a clear and professional way that is relevant and l contributes in a meaningful way to the field of study. The data must also support the conclusions made by the authors.

Qichun Zhang: Bright ideas, clever strategies or unexpected results will make a paper stand out.

 

Did reviewing for Chemical Science affect how you approached preparation of your recent publication with us?

Wei Zhang: Yes, some peer review comments are very insightful and are generally applicable, which helped me avoid certain mistakes in the preparation of future manuscripts published in Chemical Science.   

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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Congratulations to the award winners at Durham University’s 2022 Chemistry Postgraduate Research Symposium

Congratulations to the award winners at Durham University’s 2022 Chemistry Postgraduate Research Symposium, in Durham, England which took place from 22-23 June 2022!

Chemical Science was delighted to be one of the sponsoring RSC journals at the event, and the following awards were given:

  • Chemical Science PDRA Oral Prize winner: Emma Puttock (Supervisor: Gareth Williams)
  • Chemical Science Chemistry Photo Prize: Exequiel Porta (Supervisor: Patrick Steel)

 

 

 

Congratulations, from all of us at Chemical Science!

 

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – June 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Iwona Nierengarten, Ashlee Howarth, Jonathan Goodman and Stefan Matile. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Iwona Nierengarten, CNRS and University of Strasbourg. My main research interests are concerned with supramolecular chemistry in general and with pillar[n]arenes and rotaxanes in particular. We also develop versatile scaffolds that are easy to functionalize for the construction of sophisticated nanomolecules for applications in materials science and biology.

 

Ashlee Howarth, Concordia University. The Howarth research group is focused on making new rare-earth cluster-based metal–organic frameworks for potential applications in wastewater treatment, catalysis, drug delivery, bioimaging, and sensing.

 

Jonathan Goodman, University of Cambridge. My research group is working on understanding organic chemistry better, by analysing chemical information and by calculating molecular properties. Our DP5 method enables us to get more information out of NMR spectra, our calculations help us to predict how molecules react, and our studies of toxicology tell us whether chemicals are likely to be poisonous.

 

Stefan Matile, University of Geneva. My research focuses on functional supramolecular chemistry, supramolecular systems in action, at work. The general vision is that offering different, at best new ways to get into contact on the molecular level will lead to new structures and functions that ultimately will allow us to tackle challenges in science and society that are otherwise beyond reach. Current topics of interest are systems catalysis with unorthodox interactions (anion-π interactions, chalcogen, pnictogen bonds), chemistry tools to image physical forces in living cells, and the search for new ways to enter into cells.

 

What would you recommend to new reviewers to ensure their report is helpful?

Ashlee Howarth: To always be kind. Remember that you are writing these reviews for real people, many of whom are trainees (it could be their first manuscript!). You can be thorough and constructive, while still being kind. Compliment aspects of the manuscript that are well-done or exciting and be constructive and reasonable with your critiques.

 

Do you have any advice to our readers seeking publication in Chemical Science on what makes a good paper?

Jonathan Goodman: Good papers say something new that is justified by the supporting data and analysis. Very good papers help us to think about chemistry in different ways.

Ashlee Howarth: The main thing I look for when I review a manuscript is thoroughness. Are new materials fully characterized? Are all necessary control experiments performed? Are all the conclusions made supported by data? In addition, the manuscript should be well-written, clear, and easy to follow.

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Stefan Matile: I review for journals that publish my research.  For publishing, I submit mostly to journals published by chemical societies.  Chemical Science thus deserves highest respect for pioneering thoughtful publishing with regard to all aspects.  This includes outstanding editors who always send me papers to reviewers that match my interests.  I can only congratulate Chemical Science, I hope it will continue to excel and am of course more than happy to make my contribution. 

Iwona Nierengarten: Chemical Science offers to the readers the possibility to stay informed on emerging trends in science and it is great to read papers before their publication. It is also very rewarding to help authors to improve the quality of their manuscripts and thus to contribute to the high quality of the papers published by the journal.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Iwona Nierengarten: Reviewing is like discovering a first thought of the authors about their research, challenges and achievements. Writing a report offers the possibility to communicate with the authors and share with them your feelings about their work.

Stefan Matile: Reviewing is a lot of work but most enjoyable because it keeps me updated, forces me to catch up on topics different from, but close to, my own research interests – I learn so much, reviewing broadens my horizon.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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Chemical Science HOT Articles: January – June 2022

We are pleased to share a selection of our referee-recommended HOT articles for January to June 2022. We hope you enjoy reading these articles, congratulations to all the authors whose articles are featured! As always, Chemical Science is free for authors and readers.

You can explore our full 2022 Chemical Science HOT Article Collection here!

Browse a selection of our January to June HOT articles below:

January: 

Universal encoding of next generation DNA-encoded chemical libraries
Louise Plais, Alice Lessing, Michelle Keller, Adriano Martinelli, Sebastian Oehler, Gabriele Bassi, Dario Neri, and
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 967-974

Solid-state 17O NMR study of α-d-glucose: exploring new frontiers in isotopic labeling, sensitivity enhancement, and NMR crystallography
Jiahui Shen, Victor Terskikh, Jochem Struppe, Alia Hassan, Martine Monette, Ivan Hung,  Zhehong Gan, Andreas Brinkmann, and Gang Wu
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 2591-2603

February: 

Fluorescent supramolecular polymers of barbiturate dyes with thiophene-cored twisted π-system
Maika Kawaura, Takumi Aizawa, Sho Takahashi, Hiroshi Miyasaka, Hikaru Sotome, and Shiki Yagai
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 1281-1287

Diboramacrocycles: reversible borole dimerisation–dissociation systems
Sonja Fuchs, Arumugam Jayaraman, Ivo Krummenacher, Laura Haley, Marta Baštovanović, Maximilian Fest, Krzysztof Radacki, Holger Helten and, Holger Braunschweig
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 2932-2938

Stepwise assembly and reversible structural transformation of ligated titanium coated bismuth-oxo cores: shell morphology engineering for enhanced chemical fixation of CO2
Qing-Rong Ding, Yinghua Yu, Changsheng Cao, Jian Zhang, and Lei Zhang
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 3395-3401

Photocytotoxicity and photoinduced phosphine ligand exchange in a Ru(ii) polypyridyl complex
Sean J. Steinke, Sayak Gupta, Eric J. Piechota, Curtis E. Moore, Jeremy K. Kondanko, and Claudia Turro
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 1933-1945

March:

Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of enantioenriched α-deuterated pyrrolidine derivatives
Xin Chang, Xiang Cheng, and Chun-Jiang Wang
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4041-4049

Catalytic alkene skeletal modification for the construction of fluorinated tertiary stereocenters
Liyin Jiang, Pau Sarró, Wei Jie Teo, Jordi Llop, and Marcos G. Suero
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4327-4333

Chiral molecular nanosilicas
Zhaohui Zong, Aiyou Hao, Pengyao Xing, and Yanli Zhao
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4029-4040

Bioinspired superwettable electrodes towards electrochemical biosensing
Qinglin Zhu, Yuemeng Yang, Hongxiao Gao, Li-Ping Xu, and Shutao Wang
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 5069-5084

Stronger together for in-cell translation: natural and unnatural base modified mRNA
Lisa Bornewasser, Christof Domnick, and Stephanie Kath-Schorr
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4753-4761

April: 

Multi-component self-assembled molecular-electronic films: towards new high-performance thermoelectric systems
Troy L. R. Bennett, Majed Alshammari, Sophie Au-Yong, Ahmad Almutlg, Xintai Wang, Luke A. Wilkinson, Tim Albrecht, Samuel P. Jarvis, Lesley F. Cohen, Ali Ismael, Colin J. Lambert, Benjamin J. Robinson, and Nicholas J. Long
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 5176-5185

Harnessing natural-product-inspired combinatorial chemistry and computation-guided synthesis to develop N-glycan modulators as anticancer agents
Wei-An Chen, Yu-Hsin Chen, Chiao-Yun Hsieh, Pi-Fang Hung, Chiao-Wen Chen, Chien-Hung Chen, Jung-Lee Lin, Ting-Jen R. Cheng, Tsui-Ling Hsu, Ying-Ta Wu, Chia-Ning Shen, and Wei-Chieh Cheng
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 6233-6243

May:

Insights into electrochemiluminescence dynamics by synchronizing real-time electrical, luminescence, and mass spectrometric measurements
Xuemeng Zhang, Weifeng Lu, Cheng Ma, Tao Wang, Jun-Jie Zhu, Richard N. Zare, and Qianhao Min
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 6244-6253

Cagearenes: synthesis, characterization, and application for programmed vapour release
Shuai Fang, Mengbin Wang, Yating Wu, Qing-Hui Guo, Errui Li, Hao Li, and Feihe Huang
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 6254-6261

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Strategies for improved fabrication of polysaccharide nanofibers

Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) are used in large amounts in the paper and biomedical industry. The synthesis process, the nature of the catalyst used, and the recyclability of the catalyst has a direct impact on the cost effectiveness of industrial grade CNFs. CNF production follows carboxylation of the primary alcohol groups at the surface of the cellulose fibres mediated by catalyst 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidine-N-oxy radicals (TEMPO). The genotoxic nature of TEMPO suggests the requirement of a lower concentration of the catalyst used during the reaction.

Scheme for different synthesis strategies and characterization of TEMPO mediated CNFs.

Researchers across the world tried a green synthetic approach for CNFs preparation. This also includes successful removal of the catalyst from the product after completion of the reaction. One of the processes employs oxidation of wood pulp fibres using the magnetically recoverable Karimi’s catalyst (TEMPO@SiO2@Fe3O4). The products obtained using the modified catalyst is 5 nm thick cellulose nanofibrils like those obtained in the oxidation mediated by TEMPO in solution. Whereas, the catalyst was easily recovered with a magnet and successfully reused in 4 successive reaction cycles.

Differently modulated TEMPO like SiliaCat TEMPO (a commercial immobilized TEMPO catalyst) and others, show that hybrid sol–gel catalyst allows the synthesis of insoluble polysaccharide nanofibers of superior quality, eliminating waste.

New production strategies involve TEMPO-mediated oxidation followed by homogenisation. The residual hypochlorite can be quenched with 0.3% ascorbic acid to produce chloride and subsequently CNF is separated from the solid catalyst via simple filtration. This dramatically reduced the polysaccharide nanofiber production costs opening the route to large-scale production of functional products where their use has been limited by high cost.

For details: please visit https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2021/sc/d1sc03114g

 

About the blogger:

Dr. Damayanti Bagchi is a postdoctoral researcher in Irene Chen’s lab at University of California, Los Angeles, United States. She has obtained her PhD in Physical Chemistry from Satyendra Nath Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, India. Her research is focused on spectroscopic studies of nano-biomaterials. She is interested in exploring light enabled therapeutics. She enjoys travelling and experimenting with various cuisines.

You can find her on Twitter at @DamayantiBagchi.

Please note this blog post was originally posted on the Chemical Communications Blog.

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – May 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Søren Kramer, William Evans, Mi Hee Lim and Anastassia Alexandrova. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Søren Kramer, Technical University of Denmark. Søren’s research focuses on development of new methods in the fields of transition-metal catalysis, asymmetric catalysis, and photocatalysis – all with a predilection for C–H functionalization.

 

William Evans, University of California, Irvine. My group synthesizes new molecular complexes of heavy metals like the rare-earth metals, thorium, uranium, and bismuth.  The goal is to identify new phenomena in terms of oxidation states, reactivity, and physical properties that are not known with the other metals in the periodic table.

 

Mi Hee Lim, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). Our research objective is to identify how metal-involved biological networks are linked to dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.

 

Anastassia Alexandrova, University of California, Los Angeles, and California NanoSystems Institute. Theoretical development of new physical paradigms in catalysis; quantum information science; enzymology; advancing multiscale modeling methods, and experimentally-testable materials design based on new paradigms

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Anastassia Alexandrova: Chem. Sci. is a top journal in our field, which I find exceptionally open-minded to new concepts and directions, and not locked in particular eternal sub-areas of chemistry. I very much like contributing to Chem. Sci. publishing as an author, and a reviewer, for this reason. 

Mi Hee Lim: The studies that I have reviewed are related to our research interests, and they are at a high level.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Mi Hee Lim: The studies that have been accomplished through multidisciplinary approaches

Anastassia Alexandrova:  I hope I make new science even better, and my goal is to help the authors. But the second part of it is that I get to be among the first pairs of eyes to see top new science.

Søren Kramer: It forces me to study a manuscript and supporting information very thoroughly and practice my critical thinking. In order to make sure that claims are supported, I frequently end up on detours into the literature learning something new along the way.

 

What advice would you give a first-time author looking to maximise their chances of successful peer review?

William Evans: Think of your audience.  It is not enough for the result to be important to you.  You must communicate why it is important to the reader.

 

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science?

Søren Kramer: The deciding factor is often whether there is a high level of novelty compared to existing literature and potential for significant impact on the research field. Of course, it is essential that the conclusions are solidly supported by the experimental data and appropriate literature.

 

What would you recommend to new reviewers to ensure their report is helpful?

William Evans: Never send your report immediately after you write it.  Always redo your report at least a day later to give it a fresh look before you send it.  Write it in a way that you would like to get a review.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Theresa M. Reineke

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Theresa M. Reineke

Theresa was born in St. Paul, Minnesota and received a B. S. Degree from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, M.S. from Arizona State University, and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan working with Prof. Omar Yaghi.  She then completed a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship at the California Institute of Technology working with Prof. Mark Davis. She has held independent faculty positions at the University of Cincinnati, Virginia Tech, and in 2011 joined the University of Minnesota, where she is a Distinguished McKnight University Professor in the Department of Chemistry. She also holds graduate faculty appointments in the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science as well as Pharmaceutics. Her research interests lie in the fields of fundamental monomer and polymer synthesis and degradation, understanding structural ordering and directing molecular interactions of macromolecules with biological systems, and understanding fundamental physicochemical and biological properties of polymeric materials. Her group is focused on enabling fundamental chemical and applied technology advancements of polymers for sustainability, drug delivery, and gene/cell therapy and genome editing. In recognition of her group’s research, she has received the 2017 Carl S. Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award from the ACS POLY Division, the 2018 DuPont Nutrition and Health Sciences Excellence Medal, and a 2022 Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award from the ACS, among many others. Prior to joining Chemical Science in 2022, she was a founding Associate Editor of ACS Macro Letters 2011-2022.

 

Browse a selection of Theresa’s work below: 

Stereoregular functionalized polysaccharides via cationic ring-opening polymerization of biomass-derived levoglucosan
Mayuri K. Porwal, Yernaidu Reddi, Derek J. Saxon, Christopher J. Cramer, Christopher J. Ellison and Theresa M. Reineke
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4512-4522

Ring opening polymerization of β-acetoxy-δ-methylvalerolactone, a triacetic acid lactone derivative
Hussnain Sajjad, Emily A. Prebihalo, William B. Tolman and Theresa M. Reineke
Polym. Chem., 2021,12, 6724-6730

Facile synthesis of GalNAc monomers and block polycations for hepatocyte gene delivery
Matthew R. Bockman, Rishad J. Dalal, Ramya Kumar and Theresa M. Reineke
Polym. Chem., 2021,12, 4063-4071

Tuning PNIPAm self-assembly and thermoresponse: roles of hydrophobic end-groups and hydrophilic comonomer
Monica L. Ohnsorg, jeffrey M. Ting, Seamus D. Jones, Seyoung Jung, Frank S. Bates and Theresa M. Reineke
Polym. Chem., 2019,10, 3469-3479

Sustainable advances in SLA/DLP 3D printing materials and processes
Erin M. Maines, Mayuri K. Porwal, Christopher J. Ellison and Theresa M. Reineke
Green Chem., 2021,23, 6863-6897

Optimizing linear polymer affinity agent properties for surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of aflatoxin B1
Victoria M. Szlag, Rebeca S. Rodriguez, Seyoung Jung, Marc R. Bourgeois, Samuel Bryson, Anatolii Purchel, George C. Schatz, Christy L. Haynes and Theresa M. Reineke
Mol. Syst. Des. Eng., 2019,4, 1019-1031

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – April 2022

By .

Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – April 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Neelanjana Sengupta, Tatiana Martins, David Mills and Luca Bernardi. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Neelanjana’s group study complex biomolecular behaviour, such as protein self-assembly and aggregation, with “bottoms up” theoretical and computational approaches.

Neelanjana Sengupta, IISER Kolkata. Neelanjana’s group study complex biomolecular behaviour, such as protein self-assembly and aggregation, with “bottoms up” theoretical and computational approaches.

Tatiana Martins, Federal University of Goias. Tatiana develops materials based on peptides nanotubes combined to fluorescent molecules, which are able to convert energy for use in sensors and solar cells.

 

David Mills, University of Manchester. David’s group focuses on the synthesis and analysis of lanthanide and actinide compounds which can provide enhanced physicochemical properties.

 

Luca Bernardi, University of Bologna. Luca’s research is focused on asymmetric organocatalysis, and the valorisation of marine biopolymers by exploring their potential in catalysis.

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Tatiana Martins: I was caught by the excellence of the research papers that were presented to me by Chemical Science. For me, it’s really delightful to review works such as those published by this journal, because I can understand the scientific progress and discuss high quality works.

Luca Bernardi: Reviewing implies in-depth study of upcoming works, and their backgrounds, in different research areas. Due to the reputation of Chemical Science, reviewing for this journal means absorbing knowledge from significant works, often belonging to emerging research trends.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Tatiana Martins: The perspective of contributing somehow to a better quality of great scientific work. Even anonymously, the reviewer always knows that they have an opportunity to enhance the quality of the science that will bridge other works and build something really impactful.

David Mills: I get a bit of a buzz from seeing some exciting new research before everyone else does, and also the chance to provide some feedback on a scientific output.

 

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science?

Neelanjana Sengupta: Novelty and the highest quality science. I have to admit a special fondness for papers that incorporate both experiments and theory.

Tatiana Martins: I look for good and clear writing, flawless research, enough experiments, thorough explanations and for the questions that rise in my mind during the reading to be answered.

David Mills: It’s important that the paper provides some new insights for the research field, and that the work is thorough.

Luca Bernardi: I like original ideas, and the disclosure of appealing and practical solutions to untapped synthetic problems.

 

What has been your biggest learning point from reviewing?

Neelanjana Sengupta: The experience has showcased the power of scientific communication. The best work are not just of highest quality, but are also easily comprehensible.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Zaiping Guo

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Zaiping Guo!

 

We are pleased to welcome Professor Zaiping Guo to the Chemical Science Editorial Board this month as a new Associate Editor for the journal.

Zaiping is an ARC Australian Laureate Fellow in the School of Chemical Engineering & Advanced Materials at the University of Adelaide. She received her doctorate degree from the University of Wollongong, Australia in 2003, followed by postdoctoral work at the University of Wollongong from 2004-2006. She received successive promotions to Associate Professor in 2010, Professor in 2012 and Distinguished Professor in 2019 at the University of Wollongong. She then joined the University of Adelaide as a Top-talented Professor in March 2021.

The interests of her research team focus on the design and application of electrode materials and electrolytes for energy storage and conversion, including rechargeable batteries, hydrogen storage and fuel cells. Her field of expertise includes electrochemistry, charge transfer and transport kinetics, electrocatalysis, solid-state chemistry, and materials synthesis and characterisation.

Browse a selection of Zaiping’s work below:

Constructing nitrided interfaces for stabilizing Li metal electrodes in liquid electrolytes
Zhijie Wang, Yanyan Wang, Chao Wu, Wei Kong Pang, Jiafeng Mao and Zaiping Guo
Chem. Sci., 2021,12, 8945-8966

Lanthanide doping induced electrochemical enhancement of Na2Ti3O7 anodes for sodium-ion batteries
Jiale Xia, Hongyang Zhao, Wei Kong Pang, Zongyou Yin, Bo Zhou, Gang He, Zaiping Guo and Yaping Du
Chem. Sci.
, 2018,9, 3421-3425

A CoSe–C@C core–shell structure with stable potassium storage performance realized by an effective solid electrolyte interphase layer
Xin Gu, Li Zhang, Wenchao Zhang, Sailin Liu, Sheng Wen, Xinning Mao, Pengcheng Dai, Liangjun Li, Dandan Liu, Xuebo Zhao and Zaiping Guo
Mater. Chem. A2021,9, 11397-11404

Elucidation of the high-voltage phase in the layered sodium ion battery cathode material P3–Na0.5Ni0.25Mn0.75O2
Jiatu Liu, Christophe Didier, Matthew Sale, Neeraj Sharma, Zaiping Guo, Vanessa K. Peterson and Chris D. Ling
Mater. Chem. A, 2020,8, 21151-21162

Liquid metal batteries for future energy storage
Shilin Zhang, Ye Liu, Qining Fan, Chaofeng Zhang, Tengfei Zhou, Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh and Zaiping Guo
Energy Environ. Sci.
, 2021,14, 4177-4202

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

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