Author Archive

Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – May 2024

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Dr Arundhati Deshmukh, Dr Zhiliang Wang and Professor Biplab Maji. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Dr Arundhati Deshmukh, Stanford University. My current research is related to the broad family of halide perovskites. I design new derivatives of the original perovskites structures, specifically layered perovskites that can emit broadband white-light through a complex excited state landscape.

Dr Zhiliang Wang, the University of Queensland. My research focuses on materials innovation and mechanism understanding in solar energy conversion, such as photoelectrocatalysis, photocatalysis and electrocatalysis.

Professor Biplab Maji, IISER Kolkata. My research focuses on developing diverse catalytic strategies using cheap and abundant resources for environmentally benign and economically sound catalytic transformations.

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Dr Zhiliang Wang: My first paper was published in Chemical Science. The high requirement and professional peer-review impress me a lot. The paper published in this journal has a high quality. The peer-review for Chemical Science gives me a good chance to get the very first taste of some potential eye-catching researches.

Dr Arundhati Deshmukh: I have always followed the journal for its interdisciplinary showcase, it’s a great way to get acquainted with interesting work outside of your sub-discipline. So, when I received a review request and the paper looked interesting to me, I didn’t even have to think twice.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Professor Biplab Maji: What I particularly enjoy about reviewing manuscripts is the opportunity to engage with the latest research findings and contribute to advancing knowledge in the field.

Dr Zhiliang Wang: I enjoy the comments-reply very much because it provides a channel to have a critical communication about science. It is much like a scientific argument, during which it will deepen my understanding about the research topic.

 

Do you have any advice to our readers seeking publication in Chemical Science on what makes a good paper?

Professor Biplab Maji: First, ensure your work’s originality and clarity, and always try to get peer feedback from your colleagues, mentors, or collaborators before submitting your paper.

 

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science?

Dr Arundhati Deshmukh: I love seeing papers where fundamental chemistry or a chemical insight/principle is directly related to an impactful solution to current challenges or discovers a new and interesting phenomenon. Of course, it goes without saying that the work has to be sound and well-written, and the findings sufficiently substantiated.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Apply here now!

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – November 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Bhisma Kumar Patel, Gloria Mazzone, Ting Yang and Xiaodong Michael Shi. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Bhisma Kumar Patel, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati. Our group is focused on transition-metal catalyzed cascade/annulation and C-H bond functionalization. We also develop sustainable protocols employing photo and electrochemistry.

Gloria Mazzone, University of Calabria. My research is focused on the use of computational approaches in medicinal chemistry for studying the mechanism of action of drugs and rationally designing new potential therapeutic agents.

Ting Yang, Northeastern University. My research interest is focused on affinity interfaces and their applications in liquid biopsy, pathogen detection and immune-sensing.

Xiaodong Michael Shi, University of South Florida. Our research focuses on the development of new synthetic methodologies from new catalyst and reagent development.  We are particularly interested in applying 1,2,3-triazole derivatives as ligands in tuning transition metal reactivity with applications in synthesis.

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Bhisma Kumar Patel: Chemical Science is a prestigious journal published by the Royal Society of Chemistry in interdisciplinary science that always brings novel and cutting-edge research. So, it’s always a treat to read and review excellent works that keep me up-to-date with the latest trends in scientific research. The review process gives me the opportunity to improve the quality of the publication by providing constructive suggestions.

Xiaodong Michael Shi: Chemical Science is one of the highest quality journals in the field of chemical research.  It is always a great pleasure to be a reviewer for the journal where I proudly publish my own work.  In addition, the constructive communication from reviewers to me has been extremely helpful and I would like return the favor to the community as it is my honor and responsibility.

 

What has been your biggest learning point from reviewing?

Ting Yang: The reviewing paper is a mirror that reflects the flaws you might have when submitting your own papers, so during judging, you also learn and improve.

 

What would you recommend to new reviewers to ensure their report is helpful?

Gloria Mazzone: Looking at the paper with two perspectives, the first one that wants to catch the strengths of the work, the second one searching for weakness. Combining the reports deriving from the two analysis should provide a surely helpful report for the authors.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Xiaodong Michael Shi: Be the first reader of the exciting works and educate myself with the most recent discovery in the community.  This is particular true while reviewing works for top-tier journals, like Chemical Science.

Ting Yang: To help the authors to improve their manuscript together is the most enjoyable part about reviewing.

 

How do you find that Chemical Science has contributed to your research field?

Bhisma Kumar Patel: Chemical Science always publishes high-impact results supported by properly analyzed data. The published works consist of unexploited synthetic problems that become the foundation of other positions and pave the way to build something meaningful for society. Thus, I believe that Chemical Science has greatly contributed to the field of synthetic methodology.

 

What advice would you give a first-time author looking to maximise their chances of successful peer review?

Gloria Mazzone: Undoubtedly to present the results in as clear as possible highlighting the novelty and strengths of the work looking to all the literature in the specific field.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Apply here now!

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – May 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Søren Kramer, William Evans, Mi Hee Lim and Anastassia Alexandrova. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Søren Kramer, Technical University of Denmark. Søren’s research focuses on development of new methods in the fields of transition-metal catalysis, asymmetric catalysis, and photocatalysis – all with a predilection for C–H functionalization.

 

William Evans, University of California, Irvine. My group synthesizes new molecular complexes of heavy metals like the rare-earth metals, thorium, uranium, and bismuth.  The goal is to identify new phenomena in terms of oxidation states, reactivity, and physical properties that are not known with the other metals in the periodic table.

 

Mi Hee Lim, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). Our research objective is to identify how metal-involved biological networks are linked to dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.

 

Anastassia Alexandrova, University of California, Los Angeles, and California NanoSystems Institute. Theoretical development of new physical paradigms in catalysis; quantum information science; enzymology; advancing multiscale modeling methods, and experimentally-testable materials design based on new paradigms

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Anastassia Alexandrova: Chem. Sci. is a top journal in our field, which I find exceptionally open-minded to new concepts and directions, and not locked in particular eternal sub-areas of chemistry. I very much like contributing to Chem. Sci. publishing as an author, and a reviewer, for this reason. 

Mi Hee Lim: The studies that I have reviewed are related to our research interests, and they are at a high level.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Mi Hee Lim: The studies that have been accomplished through multidisciplinary approaches

Anastassia Alexandrova:  I hope I make new science even better, and my goal is to help the authors. But the second part of it is that I get to be among the first pairs of eyes to see top new science.

Søren Kramer: It forces me to study a manuscript and supporting information very thoroughly and practice my critical thinking. In order to make sure that claims are supported, I frequently end up on detours into the literature learning something new along the way.

 

What advice would you give a first-time author looking to maximise their chances of successful peer review?

William Evans: Think of your audience.  It is not enough for the result to be important to you.  You must communicate why it is important to the reader.

 

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science?

Søren Kramer: The deciding factor is often whether there is a high level of novelty compared to existing literature and potential for significant impact on the research field. Of course, it is essential that the conclusions are solidly supported by the experimental data and appropriate literature.

 

What would you recommend to new reviewers to ensure their report is helpful?

William Evans: Never send your report immediately after you write it.  Always redo your report at least a day later to give it a fresh look before you send it.  Write it in a way that you would like to get a review.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – February 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Elisa Fadda, Samuel Sanders and Miho Yamauchi. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Elisa Fadda, Maynooth University. Elisa’s lab uses high-performance computing to study the 3D structure and dynamic behaviour of complex carbohydrates and of glycoproteins by atomistic simulations. They use this high-resolution insight to determine links to the many biological functions of glycans in health and disease, and for the past two years in viral (COVID-19) infection.

Samuel Sanders, Rowland Institute at Harvard. Sam is interested in studying the interactions between light and matter on the nanoscale.

Miho Yamauchi, Kyushu University. Yamaichi develops nanoscale materials composed of metals and oxides as a catalyst for energy storage, electrochemical CO2 reduction and ammonia synthesis.

 

Do you have any advice to our readers seeking publication in Chemical Science on what makes a good paper?

Elisa Fadda: What makes a good paper is most definitely in the eye of the reader, yet to me a good paper is a clear (and easy to read) account of a scientific discovery, supported by carefully and properly analysed and presented data, with links and implications to the ‘big-picture’ of interest discussed more in depth than just mentioned in the abstract. In brief, I enjoy reading papers that are exciting and engaging for all the right reasons. As scientists we all have to read so much already, work that stands out is always welcome.  

 

What advice would you give a first-time author looking to maximise their chances of successful peer review?

Miho Yamauchi: The authors need to provide reasonable explanations for the originality, novelty and importance of the work.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Samuel Sanders: In general, I read the literature to stay on top of the latest and greatest work coming out around the world. By reviewing, I get to read work even ahead of that curve.

Miho Yamauchi: I enjoy new concepts and deep insights created by the authors.

 

What has been your biggest learning point from reviewing?

Elisa Fadda: To be kind, gracious (it’s always work), short, clear and to the point. I think reviewers sometimes forget that they are also authors and that being a reviewer entails providing useful feedback, where necessary, not just dry criticism.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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Happy Chinese New Year!

Happy Chinese New Year to all our authors, reviewers and readers from all of us at Chemical Science!

To celebrate the year of the tiger we have put together a collection highlighting our most popular articles from the past year from our Chinese authors, as well as a selection of infographics accompanying some of these papers, which you can find below.

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ChemSci2020 Symposium @ IISER Kolkata

Over the past few days, the ChemSci2020 Symposium @ IISER Kolkata has been held (virtually). The Department of Chemical Science, IISER Kolkata organised the second edition of the RSC sponsored Chemical Science conference, ChemSci2020: Leaders in the Field Symposium. The symposium has included presentations by students and postdocs, and a twitter-based poster session.

We are pleased to announce below the winners of the poster session:

Materials Chemistry:

Debashree Roy – Seed-mediated Synthesis of Gold Nano-Earbuds

Navpreet Kamboj – A 10.8 V metal-free microsupercapacitor with highly stable laser-irradiated graphene electrode for integrated energy storage device

Sahanaz Parvin – An earth-abundant bimetallic catalyst coated metallic nanowire grown electrode with platinumlike pH-universal hydrogen evolution activity at high current density

Soumendu Roy – Surface Ligand Directed Nanoparticle Catalysis

Supramolecular Chemistry:

Anastasiia V. Sharko – Dissipative Non-Equilibrium Self-Assembly of Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes

Ayan Chatterjee – Complex Cascade Reaction Networks via Cross β Amyloid Nanotubes

Sk. Atiur Rahaman – Energy Relay Enhances Switching Efficiency in a Dendrimer-Azobenzene Supramolecular Assembly having an Anion-pi Motif

Synthetic Chemistry:

Kingshuk Mahanty – Manganese-Catalyzed Electrochemical Tandem Azidation-Coarctate Reaction: Facile Access to Azo-benzonitriles

Jyoti Dhankhar – Spatial Anion Control on Palladium for Mild C-H Arylation of Arenes

Soniya Rani – Stereoretentive and Enantioselective C–H Alkylation of Pyridines: Phosphite Catalyzed N to C Migration from N–Alkylpyridinium Salt

Satyadeep Waiba – Manganese catalyzed α-alkylation of ketones with secondary alcohols

Techniques in Chemistry:

Abinash Padhy – Amphiphilic Mannose-6-Phosphate Glycopolypeptide-Based Bioactive and Responsive Self-Assembled Nanostructures for Controlled and Targeted Lysosomal Cargo Delivery

Kushal Sengupta – A Single-Molecule Study of Two-Component System CusRS for Efficient Copper Homeostasis in E. coli

Theoretical Chemistry:

Abhishek Aggarwal – DNA versus RNA- which one conducts better?

Dhiman Ray – Free Energy Landscape and Conformational Kinetics of Hoogsteen Base Pairing in DNA vs RNA: Enhanced Sampling and Markov State Modeling

Congratulations, from all of us at Chemical Science!

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Osmium complex for photochemotherapy: a new way to win with hypoxic tumors

By Damayanti Bagchi, Guest Web Writer

Hypoxia, an event of inadequate oxygen supply to solid tumor, is related to aggressive propagation of malignancy by altering cancer cell metabolism. It also induces resistance to standard cancer chemotherapeutics and requires ‘out of the box’ thinking to deal with, often termed as alternative strategies.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a light activated chemical, termed photosensitizer (PS), which can behave like a drug only in the presence of specific light. The photon energy could excite the PS molecule that can produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) which in turn destroys cancer cells. PDT requires an oxygen-filled environment to be effective, which restricts its application in hypoxic tumors. Alternatively, photochemotherapy (PCT) follows a similar mechanism to PDT, and differs only by exploiting an oxygen-independent reaction pathway and hence could be used under hypoxic conditions.

The search for new effective PCT agents needs optimization in a lot of parameters given the stability of the compound, and sensitivity to different physical (light, heat) and chemical (pH, tumor micro-environment) conditions. The replication of hypoxic tumor conditions in a lab-based cell culture set up is quite challenging. Despite all of these tricks, scientists from the US, Canada and Italy came up with a new class of heavy-metal based photo-chemo agents, in a cross-country collaborative scientific investigation.

The researchers synthesized a range of Os(II)-oligothienyl-appended metal-ligand complexes that can produce highly effective cytotoxicity in hypoxia, through light- induced electron transfer reactions via triplet intra-ligand charge transfer excited states. The novel complex is defined as [Os(phen)2(IP-nT)]Cl2, where phen =1,10- phenanthroline, IP = imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, and nT = thiophenes of varying chain lengths n (n = 0–4). Scheme 1 shows details of the structural variety.

Scheme 1: Molecular structures of reference compound [Os(phen)3]2+ and Os-0T–Os-4T.

Rigorous computational investigation using quantum mechanical calculations indicates all the Os(II) complexes have the requisite triplet state energies to sensitize ROS production by Type II energy transfer pathway but the actual effect in cells would likely depend on the local concentrations of these complexes and the redox environment. The detailed experimental photophysical studies reveal more on the structure-activity relationship of the complexes. All these complexes show broad absorption in the visible light region (400-550 nm) and weaker absorption in the near-infra red (NIR 700 nm) range. The excited state absorption spectra clearly show the difference in the long-lived triplet state with increasing conjugation with the addition of ligands (n=1-4). Figure 1 depicts the different photophysical pathways present in the complexes. The extended conjugation in Os-4T provides the longest triplet excited state lifetimes (3–4ms and 14–16ms), which suggests it’s superior ROS generation capability over the other complexes.

Figure 1: Jablonski diagrams depicting the proposed decay pathways in (a) Os-1T, (b) Os-3T, and (c) Os-4T. UV-vis spectra of Os-nT complexes at room temperature in acetonitrile (d). Transient absorption profiles for (e) Os-0T–Os-2T, and (f) Os-3T and Os-4T.

The complex Os-4T provides remarkable photocytotoxicity in human melanoma cells and the activity is dependent on the wavelength of the light source used. Authors reported an exceedingly high phototherapeutic index (PI) of 6500 (a value of more than 100 is highly active) under red light irradiation. The significant activity attained using NIR light expands the potential activity of the complex Os-4T via implication of the NIR biological window I. However, the light dependency of cytotoxicity changes in hypoxic conditions in which PI is found to be 90. The potential toxicity of the heavy metal-based complex is also investigated, and the complex is found to be safe up to 200 mg/kg doses in mice, which is pretty high compare to other PCT agents. The study gives the first insight into Os-based photo-chemo agents with remarkably high activity in both oxygen-rich normoxic and oxygen-deficient hypoxic conditions. Researchers are currently expanding this work and validating the effects of Os-4T in mice models and hope to proceed with clinical human trials for the eradication of the long-standing invincible problem of cancer.

To find out more, please read:

Breaking the barrier: an osmium photosensitizer with unprecedented hypoxic phototoxicity for real world photodynamic therapy

John A. Roque, III, Patrick C. Barrett, Houston D. Cole, Liubov M. Lifshits, Ge Shi, Susan Monro, David von Dohlen, Susy Kim, Nino Russo, Gagan Deep, Colin G. Cameron,* Marta E. Alberto* and Sherri A. McFarland*

Chem. Sci., 2020, 11, 9784-9806

About the blogger:

Dr Damayanti Bagchi is a postdoctoral researcher in Irene Chen’s lab at University of California, Los Angeles, United States. She obtained her PhD in Physical Chemistry from Satyendra Nath Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, India. Her research is focused on spectroscopic studies of nano-biomaterials. She is interested in exploring light enabled therapeutics. She enjoys food and experimenting with various cuisines, which she found resembles products/ side products of chemical reactions!

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International Conference on Energy Materials and Interfaces

Last month the North East Centre for Energy Materials (NECEM) held the International Conference on Energy Materials and Interfaces in Newcastle, UK, which was sponsored by Chemical Science. The conference covered topics including flexible photovoltaics, thermoelectric devices, computational simulations of interfaces in energy capture devices, applications of 2D materials in energy capture and storage, tailored interfaces in turbines and new conc‌epts in electrical and electrochemical energy storage.

Chemical Science sponsored a poster prize, which was awarded to Stephen Campbell from Northumbria University. RSC journals Energy & Environmental Science and Sustainable Energy & Fuels also awarded poster prizes to David Alejandro Palacios Gomez from Durham Unviersity and Wei-Hsiang Lin from National Tsing Hua University.

Energy & Environmental Science poster prize winner David Alejandro Palacios Gomez, from Durham University

Sustainable Energy & Fuels poster prize winner Wei-Hsiang Lin from National Tsing Hua University

Congratulations to the prize winners from everyone at Chemical Science!

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2019 Alberta Nanosymposium

The 6th Alberta Nano Research Symposium was held earlier this year in May. The theme this year was NaNoTeCH: Celebrating the periodic table, with keynote speakers Dr Shirley Tang (University of Waterloo) and Dr Robert Carpick (University of Pennsylvania).

Chemical Science sponsored a poster prize, along with RSC journal Nanoscale Horizons. Congratulations to both of the prize winners from everyone at Chemical Science!

Taylor Lynk was awarded the Chemical Science Poster Prize

Nidhika Bhoria was awarded the Nanoscale Horizons Poster Prize

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Charge & Substrate Transport in 3D Electrocatalytic Materials, ACS Fall Meeting

Chemical Science, along with RSC journals RSC AdvancesEnergy & Environmental ScienceSustainable Energy & Fuels and Nanoscale Advances are pleased to be sponsoring the Charge & Substrate Transport in 3D Electrocatalytic Materials symposium at the ACS Fall 2019 National Meeting and Exposition in San Diego this August. It will be held at 8:30 am on Tuesday 27th in the Marina Ballroom Salon G at Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina.

Organized by Anthony Hall, Charles McCrory and V. Sara Thoi as part of the Division of Inorganic Chemistry, this symposia will be presided by Charles McCrory (University of Michigan) and feature presentations from Shelley D Minteer (University of Utah), Daniel Esposito (Columbia University), Yogesh Surendranath (MIT), Joseph Thomas Hupp (Northwestern University), Casey R Wade (Ohio State University), Amanda J Morris (Virginia Tech) as well as Charles McCrory.

 

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