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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – July 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Jacquelyne Read, Seda Keskin, Qichun Zhang and Wei Zhang. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Jacquelyne Read, Dartmouth College

Jacquelyne Read, Dartmouth College.  Jacquelyne is interested in research at the interface of synthetic organic and computational chemistry with a focus on noncovalent interactions that affect catalysis.

Seda Keskin, Koç University. Seda’s research focuses on the computational modeling of metal-organic frameworks for energy applications and CO2 capture.

Qichun Zhang, City University of Hong Kong. Qichun and his team’s research focuses on carbon-rich materials and applications.

Wei Zhang, University of Colorado Boulder. Wei and his team are focused on utilizing dynamic covalent chemistry to develop novel organic or hybrid functional materials targeting a broad range of environmental, energy, and biological applications.

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Jacquelyne Read: I love reading the high-quality and interdisciplinary research in Chemical Science, and I was excited for the opportunity to contribute to this journal by serving as a peer reviewer.

Seda Keskin: Chemical Science focuses on novel, new, exciting studies, and being one of the very first scientists who will read this type of works is priceless.

        

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Wei Zhang: It feels very rewarding to see the quality of certain works improve after my and (other reviewers’) in-depth comments and constructive advice are carefully addressed. Sometimes, I also see some professional debates between the authors and reviewers regarding the experiment design or interpretation of certain results, which is very valuable to moving science forward.

Qichun Zhang: I get very excited when I see novel chemistry and fresh ideas in a manuscript.  

 

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science? Seda Keskin: Quality of the figures, representation/reproducibility/interpretation of the data, in fact, everything from the first word of the title down to the completeness of the references.

Jacquelyne Read: I look for a manuscript that presents new research in a clear and professional way that is relevant and l contributes in a meaningful way to the field of study. The data must also support the conclusions made by the authors.

Qichun Zhang: Bright ideas, clever strategies or unexpected results will make a paper stand out.

 

Did reviewing for Chemical Science affect how you approached preparation of your recent publication with us?

Wei Zhang: Yes, some peer review comments are very insightful and are generally applicable, which helped me avoid certain mistakes in the preparation of future manuscripts published in Chemical Science.   

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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Congratulations to the award winners at Durham University’s 2022 Chemistry Postgraduate Research Symposium

Congratulations to the award winners at Durham University’s 2022 Chemistry Postgraduate Research Symposium, in Durham, England which took place from 22-23 June 2022!

Chemical Science was delighted to be one of the sponsoring RSC journals at the event, and the following awards were given:

  • Chemical Science PDRA Oral Prize winner: Emma Puttock (Supervisor: Gareth Williams)
  • Chemical Science Chemistry Photo Prize: Exequiel Porta (Supervisor: Patrick Steel)

 

 

 

Congratulations, from all of us at Chemical Science!

 

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Chemical Science HOT Articles: January – June 2022

We are pleased to share a selection of our referee-recommended HOT articles for January to June 2022. We hope you enjoy reading these articles, congratulations to all the authors whose articles are featured! As always, Chemical Science is free for authors and readers.

You can explore our full 2022 Chemical Science HOT Article Collection here!

Browse a selection of our January to June HOT articles below:

January: 

Universal encoding of next generation DNA-encoded chemical libraries
Louise Plais, Alice Lessing, Michelle Keller, Adriano Martinelli, Sebastian Oehler, Gabriele Bassi, Dario Neri, and
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 967-974

Solid-state 17O NMR study of α-d-glucose: exploring new frontiers in isotopic labeling, sensitivity enhancement, and NMR crystallography
Jiahui Shen, Victor Terskikh, Jochem Struppe, Alia Hassan, Martine Monette, Ivan Hung,  Zhehong Gan, Andreas Brinkmann, and Gang Wu
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 2591-2603

February: 

Fluorescent supramolecular polymers of barbiturate dyes with thiophene-cored twisted π-system
Maika Kawaura, Takumi Aizawa, Sho Takahashi, Hiroshi Miyasaka, Hikaru Sotome, and Shiki Yagai
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 1281-1287

Diboramacrocycles: reversible borole dimerisation–dissociation systems
Sonja Fuchs, Arumugam Jayaraman, Ivo Krummenacher, Laura Haley, Marta Baštovanović, Maximilian Fest, Krzysztof Radacki, Holger Helten and, Holger Braunschweig
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 2932-2938

Stepwise assembly and reversible structural transformation of ligated titanium coated bismuth-oxo cores: shell morphology engineering for enhanced chemical fixation of CO2
Qing-Rong Ding, Yinghua Yu, Changsheng Cao, Jian Zhang, and Lei Zhang
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 3395-3401

Photocytotoxicity and photoinduced phosphine ligand exchange in a Ru(ii) polypyridyl complex
Sean J. Steinke, Sayak Gupta, Eric J. Piechota, Curtis E. Moore, Jeremy K. Kondanko, and Claudia Turro
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 1933-1945

March:

Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of enantioenriched α-deuterated pyrrolidine derivatives
Xin Chang, Xiang Cheng, and Chun-Jiang Wang
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4041-4049

Catalytic alkene skeletal modification for the construction of fluorinated tertiary stereocenters
Liyin Jiang, Pau Sarró, Wei Jie Teo, Jordi Llop, and Marcos G. Suero
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4327-4333

Chiral molecular nanosilicas
Zhaohui Zong, Aiyou Hao, Pengyao Xing, and Yanli Zhao
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4029-4040

Bioinspired superwettable electrodes towards electrochemical biosensing
Qinglin Zhu, Yuemeng Yang, Hongxiao Gao, Li-Ping Xu, and Shutao Wang
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 5069-5084

Stronger together for in-cell translation: natural and unnatural base modified mRNA
Lisa Bornewasser, Christof Domnick, and Stephanie Kath-Schorr
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4753-4761

April: 

Multi-component self-assembled molecular-electronic films: towards new high-performance thermoelectric systems
Troy L. R. Bennett, Majed Alshammari, Sophie Au-Yong, Ahmad Almutlg, Xintai Wang, Luke A. Wilkinson, Tim Albrecht, Samuel P. Jarvis, Lesley F. Cohen, Ali Ismael, Colin J. Lambert, Benjamin J. Robinson, and Nicholas J. Long
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 5176-5185

Harnessing natural-product-inspired combinatorial chemistry and computation-guided synthesis to develop N-glycan modulators as anticancer agents
Wei-An Chen, Yu-Hsin Chen, Chiao-Yun Hsieh, Pi-Fang Hung, Chiao-Wen Chen, Chien-Hung Chen, Jung-Lee Lin, Ting-Jen R. Cheng, Tsui-Ling Hsu, Ying-Ta Wu, Chia-Ning Shen, and Wei-Chieh Cheng
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 6233-6243

May:

Insights into electrochemiluminescence dynamics by synchronizing real-time electrical, luminescence, and mass spectrometric measurements
Xuemeng Zhang, Weifeng Lu, Cheng Ma, Tao Wang, Jun-Jie Zhu, Richard N. Zare, and Qianhao Min
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 6244-6253

Cagearenes: synthesis, characterization, and application for programmed vapour release
Shuai Fang, Mengbin Wang, Yating Wu, Qing-Hui Guo, Errui Li, Hao Li, and Feihe Huang
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 6254-6261

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Strategies for improved fabrication of polysaccharide nanofibers

Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) are used in large amounts in the paper and biomedical industry. The synthesis process, the nature of the catalyst used, and the recyclability of the catalyst has a direct impact on the cost effectiveness of industrial grade CNFs. CNF production follows carboxylation of the primary alcohol groups at the surface of the cellulose fibres mediated by catalyst 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidine-N-oxy radicals (TEMPO). The genotoxic nature of TEMPO suggests the requirement of a lower concentration of the catalyst used during the reaction.

Scheme for different synthesis strategies and characterization of TEMPO mediated CNFs.

Researchers across the world tried a green synthetic approach for CNFs preparation. This also includes successful removal of the catalyst from the product after completion of the reaction. One of the processes employs oxidation of wood pulp fibres using the magnetically recoverable Karimi’s catalyst (TEMPO@SiO2@Fe3O4). The products obtained using the modified catalyst is 5 nm thick cellulose nanofibrils like those obtained in the oxidation mediated by TEMPO in solution. Whereas, the catalyst was easily recovered with a magnet and successfully reused in 4 successive reaction cycles.

Differently modulated TEMPO like SiliaCat TEMPO (a commercial immobilized TEMPO catalyst) and others, show that hybrid sol–gel catalyst allows the synthesis of insoluble polysaccharide nanofibers of superior quality, eliminating waste.

New production strategies involve TEMPO-mediated oxidation followed by homogenisation. The residual hypochlorite can be quenched with 0.3% ascorbic acid to produce chloride and subsequently CNF is separated from the solid catalyst via simple filtration. This dramatically reduced the polysaccharide nanofiber production costs opening the route to large-scale production of functional products where their use has been limited by high cost.

For details: please visit https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2021/sc/d1sc03114g

 

About the blogger:

Dr. Damayanti Bagchi is a postdoctoral researcher in Irene Chen’s lab at University of California, Los Angeles, United States. She has obtained her PhD in Physical Chemistry from Satyendra Nath Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, India. Her research is focused on spectroscopic studies of nano-biomaterials. She is interested in exploring light enabled therapeutics. She enjoys travelling and experimenting with various cuisines.

You can find her on Twitter at @DamayantiBagchi.

Please note this blog post was originally posted on the Chemical Communications Blog.

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Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Theresa M. Reineke

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Theresa M. Reineke

Theresa was born in St. Paul, Minnesota and received a B. S. Degree from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, M.S. from Arizona State University, and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan working with Prof. Omar Yaghi.  She then completed a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship at the California Institute of Technology working with Prof. Mark Davis. She has held independent faculty positions at the University of Cincinnati, Virginia Tech, and in 2011 joined the University of Minnesota, where she is a Distinguished McKnight University Professor in the Department of Chemistry. She also holds graduate faculty appointments in the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science as well as Pharmaceutics. Her research interests lie in the fields of fundamental monomer and polymer synthesis and degradation, understanding structural ordering and directing molecular interactions of macromolecules with biological systems, and understanding fundamental physicochemical and biological properties of polymeric materials. Her group is focused on enabling fundamental chemical and applied technology advancements of polymers for sustainability, drug delivery, and gene/cell therapy and genome editing. In recognition of her group’s research, she has received the 2017 Carl S. Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award from the ACS POLY Division, the 2018 DuPont Nutrition and Health Sciences Excellence Medal, and a 2022 Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award from the ACS, among many others. Prior to joining Chemical Science in 2022, she was a founding Associate Editor of ACS Macro Letters 2011-2022.

 

Browse a selection of Theresa’s work below: 

Stereoregular functionalized polysaccharides via cationic ring-opening polymerization of biomass-derived levoglucosan
Mayuri K. Porwal, Yernaidu Reddi, Derek J. Saxon, Christopher J. Cramer, Christopher J. Ellison and Theresa M. Reineke
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 4512-4522

Ring opening polymerization of β-acetoxy-δ-methylvalerolactone, a triacetic acid lactone derivative
Hussnain Sajjad, Emily A. Prebihalo, William B. Tolman and Theresa M. Reineke
Polym. Chem., 2021,12, 6724-6730

Facile synthesis of GalNAc monomers and block polycations for hepatocyte gene delivery
Matthew R. Bockman, Rishad J. Dalal, Ramya Kumar and Theresa M. Reineke
Polym. Chem., 2021,12, 4063-4071

Tuning PNIPAm self-assembly and thermoresponse: roles of hydrophobic end-groups and hydrophilic comonomer
Monica L. Ohnsorg, jeffrey M. Ting, Seamus D. Jones, Seyoung Jung, Frank S. Bates and Theresa M. Reineke
Polym. Chem., 2019,10, 3469-3479

Sustainable advances in SLA/DLP 3D printing materials and processes
Erin M. Maines, Mayuri K. Porwal, Christopher J. Ellison and Theresa M. Reineke
Green Chem., 2021,23, 6863-6897

Optimizing linear polymer affinity agent properties for surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of aflatoxin B1
Victoria M. Szlag, Rebeca S. Rodriguez, Seyoung Jung, Marc R. Bourgeois, Samuel Bryson, Anatolii Purchel, George C. Schatz, Christy L. Haynes and Theresa M. Reineke
Mol. Syst. Des. Eng., 2019,4, 1019-1031

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Chemical Science welcomes new Associate Editor Zaiping Guo

We wish a very warm welcome to our new Chemical Science Associate Editor Zaiping Guo!

 

We are pleased to welcome Professor Zaiping Guo to the Chemical Science Editorial Board this month as a new Associate Editor for the journal.

Zaiping is an ARC Australian Laureate Fellow in the School of Chemical Engineering & Advanced Materials at the University of Adelaide. She received her doctorate degree from the University of Wollongong, Australia in 2003, followed by postdoctoral work at the University of Wollongong from 2004-2006. She received successive promotions to Associate Professor in 2010, Professor in 2012 and Distinguished Professor in 2019 at the University of Wollongong. She then joined the University of Adelaide as a Top-talented Professor in March 2021.

The interests of her research team focus on the design and application of electrode materials and electrolytes for energy storage and conversion, including rechargeable batteries, hydrogen storage and fuel cells. Her field of expertise includes electrochemistry, charge transfer and transport kinetics, electrocatalysis, solid-state chemistry, and materials synthesis and characterisation.

Browse a selection of Zaiping’s work below:

Constructing nitrided interfaces for stabilizing Li metal electrodes in liquid electrolytes
Zhijie Wang, Yanyan Wang, Chao Wu, Wei Kong Pang, Jiafeng Mao and Zaiping Guo
Chem. Sci., 2021,12, 8945-8966

Lanthanide doping induced electrochemical enhancement of Na2Ti3O7 anodes for sodium-ion batteries
Jiale Xia, Hongyang Zhao, Wei Kong Pang, Zongyou Yin, Bo Zhou, Gang He, Zaiping Guo and Yaping Du
Chem. Sci.
, 2018,9, 3421-3425

A CoSe–C@C core–shell structure with stable potassium storage performance realized by an effective solid electrolyte interphase layer
Xin Gu, Li Zhang, Wenchao Zhang, Sailin Liu, Sheng Wen, Xinning Mao, Pengcheng Dai, Liangjun Li, Dandan Liu, Xuebo Zhao and Zaiping Guo
Mater. Chem. A2021,9, 11397-11404

Elucidation of the high-voltage phase in the layered sodium ion battery cathode material P3–Na0.5Ni0.25Mn0.75O2
Jiatu Liu, Christophe Didier, Matthew Sale, Neeraj Sharma, Zaiping Guo, Vanessa K. Peterson and Chris D. Ling
Mater. Chem. A, 2020,8, 21151-21162

Liquid metal batteries for future energy storage
Shilin Zhang, Ye Liu, Qining Fan, Chaofeng Zhang, Tengfei Zhou, Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh and Zaiping Guo
Energy Environ. Sci.
, 2021,14, 4177-4202

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – February 2022

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Elisa Fadda, Samuel Sanders and Miho Yamauchi. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

Elisa Fadda, Maynooth University. Elisa’s lab uses high-performance computing to study the 3D structure and dynamic behaviour of complex carbohydrates and of glycoproteins by atomistic simulations. They use this high-resolution insight to determine links to the many biological functions of glycans in health and disease, and for the past two years in viral (COVID-19) infection.

Samuel Sanders, Rowland Institute at Harvard. Sam is interested in studying the interactions between light and matter on the nanoscale.

Miho Yamauchi, Kyushu University. Yamaichi develops nanoscale materials composed of metals and oxides as a catalyst for energy storage, electrochemical CO2 reduction and ammonia synthesis.

 

Do you have any advice to our readers seeking publication in Chemical Science on what makes a good paper?

Elisa Fadda: What makes a good paper is most definitely in the eye of the reader, yet to me a good paper is a clear (and easy to read) account of a scientific discovery, supported by carefully and properly analysed and presented data, with links and implications to the ‘big-picture’ of interest discussed more in depth than just mentioned in the abstract. In brief, I enjoy reading papers that are exciting and engaging for all the right reasons. As scientists we all have to read so much already, work that stands out is always welcome.  

 

What advice would you give a first-time author looking to maximise their chances of successful peer review?

Miho Yamauchi: The authors need to provide reasonable explanations for the originality, novelty and importance of the work.

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Samuel Sanders: In general, I read the literature to stay on top of the latest and greatest work coming out around the world. By reviewing, I get to read work even ahead of that curve.

Miho Yamauchi: I enjoy new concepts and deep insights created by the authors.

 

What has been your biggest learning point from reviewing?

Elisa Fadda: To be kind, gracious (it’s always work), short, clear and to the point. I think reviewers sometimes forget that they are also authors and that being a reviewer entails providing useful feedback, where necessary, not just dry criticism.

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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How can cooling rate define the nature of nano-structures formed using block copolymers?

Block copolymers (BCPs) consist of amphiphilic molecules that can self-assemble in selective solvents and generate various types of nano- and micro-dimensional structures. The unique self-assembly process is low-cost and relatively straight forward in solution phase.  The final structures have morphological diversity and complexity.  These self-assembled structures have been widely used in various applications such as drug delivery, catalysis, and water purification. The self-assembly process follows a heating step for dissolution of all the components and a subsequent cooling step. Both the steps and the parameters are vital for final structural characteristics of the assembled structures. A group of scientists from two esteemed universities in Canada recently studied the effects of rate of cooling in the self-assembly process.

Schematic representation of how cooling rate can change the morphology of formed micellar structures using PFS BCP and homopolymers

The authors used a systematic approach to explain the influence of cooling rate on micelle morphologies for a series of PFS based BCPs. The cooling rate greatly influences the size and the shape of colloidal structures. Rapid cooling increases branching and opens a new avenue to manipulate micelle morphologies. The study finds that rapid cooling reduces crystallinity, as polymer chains do not have enough time to pack in ordered structures.

The authors standardized sample preparation protocol and then varied the cooling times, with quick cooling of 2.5 min producing flower like structures and median cooling time of 50 mins leading to the same structural features with larger size. Co-self-assembly of homopolymer BCP mixtures with variable cooling rate also shows that quick cooling generates uniform sized branched micellar structures with elongated central platelets whereas slow cooling led to a long single fiber with a dark circle platelet in the centre.

With several examples and optimization conditions, the effect of cooling in the formation of self-assembled micellar structures has been evaluated. The main outcome of this study is that the cooling rate is another parameter to manipulate crystallization-driven self-assembly and to control micelle morphologies. There exists a lot of possibilities to use the findings and apply them to generate BCPs with a crystallizable block with important optical or electronic properties.

For details, please visit the entire article at https://doi.org/10.1039/D1SC05937H

About the author:

Dr Damayanti Bagchi is a postdoctoral researcher in Irene Chen’s lab at University of California, Los Angeles, United States. She obtained her PhD in Physical Chemistry from Satyendra Nath Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, India. Her research is focused on spectroscopic studies of nano-biomaterials. She is interested in exploring light enabled therapeutics. She enjoys food and experimenting with various cuisines, which she found resembles products/ side products of chemical reactions!

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Chemical Science HOT Articles: December 2021

New month, new HOT articles!

We are pleased to share a selection of our referee-recommended HOT articles for December 2021. We hope you enjoy reading these articles, congratulations to all the authors whose articles are featured! As always, Chemical Science is free to read & download.

You can explore our full 2021 Chemical Science HOT Article Collection here!

Browse a selection of our December HOT articles below:

Linking metal-organic cages pairwise as a design approach for assembling multivariate crystalline materialsve zinc thiolates for low-cost aqueous rechargeable Zn-ion batteries
Adrian W. Markwell-Heys, Michael Roemelt, Ashley D. Slattery, Oliver M. Linder-Patton and Witold M. Bloch
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 68-73

The role of cooling rate in crystallization-driven block copolymer self-assembly
Shaofei Song, Jingjie Jiang, Ehsan Nikbin, Jane Y. Howe, Ian Manners and Mitchell A. Winnik
Chem. Sci., 2022,13, 396-409

Structure, reactivity and luminescence studies of triphenylsiloxide complexes of tetravalent lanthanides
Aurélien R. Willauer, Iskander Douair, Anne-Sophie Chauvin, Farzaneh Fadaei-Tirani, Jean-Claude G. Bünzli, Laurent Maron and Marinella Mazzanti
Chem. Sci., 2022, Advance Article

Visible-light-induced transition metal and photosensitizer free decarbonylative addition of amino-arylaldehydes to ketones
Yi Wang, Yatao Lang, Chao-Jun Li and Huiying Zeng
Chem. Sci., 2022, Advance Article

Kinetic trapping of a cobalt(ii) metallocage using a carbazole-containing expanded carbaporphyrinoid ligand
Weinan Zhou, Tridib Sarma, Yonghuan Su, Chuanhu Lei and Jonathan L. Sessler
Chem. Sci., 2022, Advance Article

 

Chemical Science, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Chemical Science today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Chemical Science Reviewer Spotlight – December 2021

To further thank and recognise the support from our excellent reviewer community, we are highlighting reviewers who have provided exceptional support to the journal over the past year.

This month, we’ll be highlighting Tarun Panda, Sofia Pauleta, Anmin Zheng and Natalia Shustova. We asked our reviewers a few questions about what they enjoy about reviewing, and their thoughts on how to provide a useful review.

 

 

 

Tarun Panda, IIT Hyderabad, India. Tarun’s research interests include the development of well-defined earth-abundant and environmentally benign metal complexes using non-cyclopentadienyl-based ligands and their utilization as homogeneous catalysts in various organic transformations under ambient reaction conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sofia Pauleta, Nova University Lisbon, Portugal. Sofia’s research focuses on the characterisation of molecular systems involved in responses to microbial stress to metals and hydrogen peroxide, and on the application of spectroscopic techniques for the characterisation of (metallo)enzymes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anmin Zheng, Chinese Academy of Science, China. Anmin’s research focuses on studying the structure and reaction mechanisms of solid acid catalysts by means of experimental solid-state NMR and theoretical quantum chemical calculations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natalia Shustova, University of South Carolina, USA. Natalia’s research focuses on the design, photophysics, and electronic properties of hybrid materials including metal- and covalent-organic frameworks for their utilisation in catalysis, logic-gate development, nuclear waste sequestration and separation, and optoelectronics.

 

 

 

 

 

What encouraged you to review for Chemical Science?

Anmin Zheng: Chemical Science has a great reputation in the chemical and physical sciences, and publishes leading edge papers with a deep and novel understanding of chemical transformation processes and reaction mechanisms. During the review process, I really enjoy learning about these new discoveries across a broad range of multidisciplinary research.

Natalia Shustova: The emergent research topics, high-quality publication material, constructive communication with the Associate Editors, and the transparency of the reviewing process to the scientific community. 

 

What do you enjoy most about reviewing?

Sofia Pauleta: Reading high quality research first-hand and being able to provide a critical analysis of research work to authors. It can be seen as a scientific discussion. Peer review is essential in order to validate the high impact science that is being considered.

Tarun Panda: By reviewing a manuscript, I mostly enjoy learning about how contemporary researchers work with novel ideas that have the potential to shape future developments in the chemical sciences. It’s a great feeling when reading a manuscript ahead of it being published. 

 

Do you have any advice to our readers seeking publication in Chemical Science on what makes a good paper?

Natalia Shustova: I believe that a concise and informative abstract is the first “gate” which should be open for efficient presentation of the publication for a general audience. As a second important component, I would highlight the inclusion of illustrative material that can tell a story even without a detailed textual description of the presented content. 

Anmin Zheng: In addition to innovative, eye-catching images, in-depth analysis and precise expressions are also very important for the acceptance of a manuscript.

What has been your biggest learning point from reviewing?

Tarun Panda: I always find an opportunity to improve my skills while reviewing a manuscript, learning not to make similar mistakes. Furthermore, it gives me a flavor of the advanced level of research that is being conducted around the globe.

What are you looking for in a paper that you can recommend for acceptance in Chemical Science?

Sofia Pauleta: Outstanding research, coherent and complementary data, and novelty in the research performed (in the subject and methodology used).

 

Tune in next month to meet our next group of #ChemSciReviewers!

 

If you want to learn more about how we support our reviewers, check out our Reviewer Hub.

Interested in joining our ever-growing reviewer community? Send us your CV and a completed Reviewer Application Form to becomeareviewer@rsc.org.

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