Archive for the ‘Editorial Board News’ Category

Jihong Yu elected Academician by the Chinese Academy of Sciences

We proudly congratulate Chemical Science Associate Editor Jihong Yu (Jilin University), who was officially elected as Academician by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) on 7 December 2015 – congratulations from the Royal Society of Chemistry, and especially from the whole Chemical Science team!

After rigorous selection and assessment, Jihong was awarded the title of Academician – widely regarded as one of the highest honours for scientists in China – together with eight other professors working in the chemical sciences. A total of 61 new Academicians from various science disciplines were selected by CAS in this round of biennial elections. As a CAS Academician, Jihong is now even better placed to help shape the nation’s science policy and influence significant decisions on the future of the chemical sciences in China.

Jihong’s research focuses on the synthesis and preparation chemistry of inorganic microporous materials, typically known as zeolites. In the course of her research, she has made significant contributions to the molecular engineering of zeolites by developing effective strategies for the structural design and rational synthesis of these materials.

As an Associate Editor for Chemical Science since 2012, Jihong welcomes submissions in the area of inorganic materials. Together with our dynamic international team of Associate Editors, she has been actively driving the journal’s scientific development by making direct decisions on its content – submit your best work to any of their Editorial Offices today!

Read Jihong Yu’s latest articles in Chemical Science* and its sister journals, published by the Royal Society of Chemistry:

Synthesis of new zeolite structures
Jiyang Li, Avelino Corma and Jihong Yu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, 44, 7112-7127
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00023H
From themed collection Recent Advances in Zeolite Chemistry and Catalysis

Coupling of chromophores with exactly opposite luminescence behaviours in mesostructured organosilicas for high-efficiency multicolour emission
Dongdong Li, Yuping Zhang, Zhiying Fan, Jie Chen and Jihong Yu
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 6097-6101
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02044A, Edge Article
Open Access

Methyl viologen-templated zinc gallophosphate zeolitic material with dual photo-/thermochromism and tuneable photovoltaic activity
Junbiao Wu, Chunyao Tao, Yi Li, Jiyang Li and Jihong Yu
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 2922-2927
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00291E, Edge Article
Open Access

Ultrafast synthesis of nano-sized zeolite SAPO-34 with excellent MTO catalytic performance
Qiming Sun, Ning Wang, Guanqi Guo and Jihong Yu
Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 16397-16400
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC07343J, Communication

With thanks to Guanqun Song, our Editorial Development Manager based in Beijing, for contributing to this blog post.

*Access is free through a registered RSC account

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Vy Dong’s organic love story

Chemical Science Associate editor Vy Dong recently gave a TEDx talk at UC Irvine. Check out her inspirational 15 minute lecture on YouTube: in it she tells how her family came to the US from Vietnam and why she chose a career in organic chemistry. She also compares organic chemistry to her favourite childhood toy, Lego, and talks about why she describes her students as ‘molecular architects’!

 

Submit your next high-quality manuscript to Vy Dong’s Chemical Science editorial office

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Carsten Shultz joins Chemical Science as Associate Editor

In March this year Chemical Science was delighted to welcome Dr Carsten Schultz as an Associate Editor, further strengthening our Associate Editor team. He is now handling submissions in the area of Chemical Biology.

Biography
Dr Schultz received his PhD from the University of Bremen in 1989. He then spent some time as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, San Diego before returning to Germany to take up a position at the University of Bremen in 1997 for a few years. He has been a group leader at EMBL since 2001 and a Senior Scientist since 2008.

Research
Carsten leads the Schultz Group at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg. The lab is interested in better understanding complex intracellular signalling networks relevant in diabetes, cancer, lung inflammation and metabolic diseases. For this purpose the group develops probes useful for visualizing intracellular events such as enzyme activities, lipid metabolism or protein translocation in intact cells. The Schultz lab also constructs tools to manipulate cell components and their activities.

Carsten and Chemical Science:
Carsten says that “in Chemical Science I like to see articles that describe chemistry of the highest quality.” He enjoys reading papers on novel synthetic methods, natural compound syntheses, and mechanistic studies, and says that what excites him most is “when chemistry is used to solve highly relevant problems in biology, pharmacology, physiology or medicine; similarly important are applications of chemistry to material sciences and physics.”

You can submit your high quality research in the area of Chemical Biology to Carsten Schultz’s Editorial Office.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Chemical Science welcomes Alán Aspuru-Guzik as Associate Editor

Chemical Science is delighted to announce the addition of another Associate Editor: Professor Alán Aspuru-Guzik of Harvard University, who is now handling submissions in the area of theoretical chemistry.

Biography
Professor Aspuru-Guzik joined Harvard University in 2006 and has been a full professor there since 2013 (the same year in which he received the ACS Early Career Award in Theoretical Chemistry). Prior to joining Harvard, Alán spent a couple of years as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, where he also completed his PhD in Physical Chemistry. He holds a BSc in Chemistry from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

Research
Alán leads the Aspuru-Guzik Research Group, a theoretical physical chemistry group in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. The group’s research focuses on:

  • The Clean Energy Project: a theory-driven search for the next generation of organic solar cell materials
  • Excitonics: aiming to understand, control, and harness electronic excitations in nanoscale environments
  • Quantum Simulation: developing digital and analogue quantum simulators for quantum chemistry, in order to enhance understanding of complicated electronic structures and molecules
  • Open Quantum Systems and Quantum Algorithms: developing efficient quantum algorithms for quantum simulation of chemical systems, reaction dynamics, and state preparation, and developing methods by which these algorithms can be successfully carried out on quantum computers
  • Electronic Structure Theory: developing methods to apply quantum chemical calculations to the description of new types of quantum processes

Alán is very interested in the design of novel materials for renewable energy in general. He recently had a breakthrough in screening for practical organic molecules for flow batteries. The theoretical aspects related to that work were published in Chemical Science as a cover article.

Chemical Science: Alan’s choice
We asked Alan to send us his pick of Chemical Science articles in the area of theoretical chemistry. His choices are listed below and you can read them by clicking on the links – all are free to access* until 24th May.

van der Waals dispersion interactions in molecular materials: beyond pairwise additivity
Anthony M. Reilly and Alexandre Tkatchenko 
Chem. Sci., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00410A, Perspective
Open Access
C5SC00410A GA
Novel metal–organic framework linkers for light harvesting applications
Michael E. Foster, Jason D. Azoulay, Bryan M. Wong and Mark D. Allendorf 
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 2081-2090
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00333K, Edge Article
C4SC00333K GA
Polymethine dyes for all-optical switching applications: a quantum-chemical characterization of counter-ion and aggregation effects on the third-order nonlinear optical response
Sukrit Mukhopadhyay, Chad Risko, Seth R. Marder and Jean-Luc Brédas 
Chem. Sci., 2012,3, 3103-3112
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20861J, Edge Article
 C2SC20861J GA
Thermodynamic analysis of Xe/Kr selectivity in over 137 000 hypothetical metal–organic frameworks
Benjamin J. Sikora, Christopher E. Wilmer, Michael L. Greenfield and Randall Q. Snurr 
Chem. Sci., 2012, 3, 2217-2223
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC01097F, Edge Article
From themed collection Physical Chemistry
 C2SC01097F GA
Estimating chemical reactivity and cross-influence from collective chemical knowledge
Siowling Soh, Yanhu Wei, Bartlomiej Kowalczyk, Chris M. Gothard, Bilge Baytekin, Nosheen Gothard and Bartosz A. Grzybowski 
Chem. Sci., 2012, 3, 1497-1502
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC00011C, Edge Article
C2SC00011C GA

 

Alán is now accepting submissions to Chemical Science in the area of theoretical chemistry.  He is keen to emphasize that he is interested not only in exceptional applications of theoretical methods, but also in the top methods-development manuscripts. He is also very interested in articles that are at the interface of theoretical chemistry and other fields.

Submit your high-impact research to Alán’s Editorial Office.

*Access is free with a registered RSC account.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Jim McCusker joins Chemical Science as Associate Editor

Chemical Science is delighted to announce that Professor James K. McCusker of Michigan State University has joined the journal as an Associate Editor. Jim is now handling submissions in the area of Physical Inorganic chemistry.

Biography
Jim McCusker was born in New Haven, Connecticut in 1965. After graduating from Bucknell University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, he joined the University of North Carolina as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow, where he worked with Professor Thomas J. Meyer from 1992-94. Following this he took up a position as Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. In 2001 Jim moved his research group to Michigan State University, where he is currently Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Center of Research Excellence in Complex Materials (CORE-CM).

Research
The McCusker Group’s research revolves around the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of transition metal complexes – in particular as this relates to the development of solar energy conversion strategies – as well as the interplay between zero-field spin polarization and the physical and photophysical properties of molecular systems.

Jim on Chemical Science
We asked Jim to talk us through some of his favourite Chemical Science articles. He picked the following as his highlights:

C4SC01333F GARecent advances on ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy in the chemical sciences
L. X. Chen, X. Zhang and M. L. Shelby  
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 4136-4152, DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01333F, Minireview

Jim says, “This is a mini-review by Chen and co-workers. It’s a great example of one of the formats that Chem Sci has created that allows an expert in a certain area to present his/her perspective. In this case, Lin Chen, one of the world’s experts in the application of ultrafast x-ray science to chemical problems, does a great job in explaining the history of the methodology and what the information derived from these experiments can provide to chemists. In essence, Chen takes a fairly sophisticated physical chemistry/chemical physics technique and explains its relevance to the broader chemical community.”

C1SC00596K GAEnergy transfer mediated by asymmetric hydrogen-bonded interfaces
Elizabeth R. Young, Joel Rosenthal and Daniel G. Nocera  
Chem. Sci., 2012, 3, 455-459 , DOI: 10.1039/C1SC00596K, Edge Article

“A paper by our new Editor-in-Chief. This is a great example of how judicious use of molecular design can be used to illustrate and expand our understanding of fundamental chemical principals. In this case, the topic is proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a field that Nocera (along with my colleague at MSU, Robert Cukier) effectively defined and codified back in the 90s. This paper shows that the motion of protons in donor-acceptor systems can not only play a role in electron transfer (hence the term PCET), but can also be important in energy transfer. This effectively expands the scope of the PCET picture into a completely new realm of reactivity.”

C2SC20801F GASlow magnetization dynamics in a series of two-coordinate iron(II) complexes
Joseph M. Zadrozny, Mihail Atanasov, Aimee M. Bryan, Chun-Yi Lin, Brian D. Rekken, Philip P. Power, Frank Neese and Jeffrey R. Long  
Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 125-138, DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20801F, Edge Article

“A paper by former Associate Editor Jeffrey Long, this represents a terrific confluence of synthesis, physical methods, and theory to demonstrate the applicability of an important physical concept in setting that would previously have been deemed unlikely at best. The present case deals with the rapidly developing area of single-molecule magnetism. Once thought to be relegated to large metal clusters, this paper shows how, by paying attention to the true underlying basis for the phenomenon, one can design molecules that exhibit the same effect in the simplest of coordination environments, namely a single-ion, two-coordinate complex.”

C0SC00262C GAVibrational coherence in the excited state dynamics of Cr(acac)3: probing the reaction coordinate for ultrafast intersystem crossing
Joel N. Schrauben, Kevin L. Dillman, Warren F. Beck and James K. McCusker  
Chem. Sci., 2010, 1, 405-410, DOI: 10.1039/C0SC00262C, Edge Article

On choosing this Edge Article from an early issue of Chemical Science, Jim comments, “Okay, this is a bit self-serving in that it comes out of my group, but I’m actually quite proud of this paper. In chemistry we often talk about the “reaction coordinate” for a chemical process, be it a thermal reaction or a photo physical transformation, but what does that really mean? In this study, we were actually able to identify what this reaction coordinate is in the context of ultrafast excited-state dynamics. This paper was the first to document vibrational coherence associated with ligand-field electronic states. The underlying nature of the molecular motion responsible for this coherence was identified, and that information was used to synthetically modify the compound. The result was a > 10x modulation of the kinetics associated with the photo physics of this system, demonstrating for the first time that one could in fact use synthetic chemistry to effect significant changes in the photo-induced properties of molecules, even those occurring on sub-picosecond time scales.”

These articles are all free to access until 14th May.

Jim is now accepting submissions to Chemical Science in the area of physical inorganic chemistry. Submit your high-impact research to his Editorial Office.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Christopher Hunter joins Chemical Science as Associate Editor

Chemical Science is pleased to welcome Christopher Hunter as Associate Editor for Physical Organic chemistry.  

Biography
Christopher Hunter is Herchel Smith Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Cambridge. Originally from New Zealand, he moved to Northern Ireland at the age of four and completed his early education there.  After receiving his undergraduate degree and PhD from Churchill College, Cambridge, he returned to his native New Zealand for a couple of years to lecture at the University of Otago. In 1991 he moved back to the UK, joining the University of Sheffield first as Lecturer and then as Professor, before taking up his current post at the University of Cambridge in September 2014.  

Research
The Hunter Group’s aim is to establish a reliable set of rules that can be used for the design of non-covalent systems. Their research focuses on four main areas of development:
1. Fundamental investigations of the nature of intermolecular interactions
2. Molecular design of functional assemblies
3. Development of new methods for studying solvation and co-operativity
4. Computer modelling of intermolecular interactions  

Awards
Chris’s recent awards include the RSC Physical Organic Chemistry Award (2011) and the RSC Tilden Prize (2009). In 2008 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.  

Publications
You can read some of the most recent work from the Hunter group in Chemical Science – click on the links below to get to the articles. All are either Open Access or free to access until 24th March: 

The flexibility–complementarity dichotomy in receptor–ligand interactions
Hongmei Sun, Christopher A. Hunter and Eva Marina Llamas  
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 1444-1453
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03398A, Edge Article
OA icon Open Access
 
pH-dependent binding of guests in the cavity of a polyhedral coordination cage: reversible uptake and release of drug molecules
William Cullen, Simon Turega, Christopher A. Hunter and Michael D. Ward  
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 625-631
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC02090A, Edge Article
OA icon Open Access
 
Applications of dynamic combinatorial chemistry for the determination of effective molarity
Maria Ciaccia, Irene Tosi, Laura Baldini, Roberta Cacciapaglia, Luigi Mandolini, Stefano Di Stefano and Christopher A. Hunter  
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 144-151
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC02347A, Edge Article
OA icon Open Access
 
A solvent-resistant halogen bond
Craig C. Robertson, Robin N. Perutz, Lee Brammer and Christopher A. Hunter  
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 4179-4183
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01746C, Edge Article
OA icon Open Access
 
Quantification of solvent effects on molecular recognition in polyhedral coordination cage hosts
Martina Whitehead, Simon Turega, Andrew Stephenson, Christopher A. Hunter and Michael D. Ward  
Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 2744-2751
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC50546D, Edge Article 
OA icon Open Access

A surface site interaction model for the properties of liquids at equilibrium
Christopher A. Hunter  
Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 1687-1700
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC22124E, Edge Article
From themed collection Physical Chemistry  

van der Waals interactions in non-polar liquids
Christopher A. Hunter  
Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 834-848
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC21666C, Edge Article
From themed collection Physical Chemistry  

Chris is now accepting submissions to Chemical Science in the area of physical organic chemistry.  Submit your high-impact research to his Editorial Office.  


Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Chemical Science welcomes Vy Dong as Associate Editor

Chemical Science is delighted to welcome Vy Dong of UC Irvine as Associate Editor in the area of Organic Chemistry.

Vy DongBiography
Vy Dong grew up in Big Spring, Texas and Anaheim, California. After graduating from the University of California, Irvine, she joined David MacMillan‘s group at UC Berkeley, moving with his group to Caltech to complete her doctoral studies. She began her independent academic career at the University of Toronto in 2006, where she was promoted with tenure and named the Adrian Brook Professor. After six years in Canada, Vy returned to the United States to assume a professorship at her alma mater, UC Irvine.

In 2013 we interviewed Vy for Chemistry Worldread the full interview to find out why Vy chose to pursue a career in chemistry, how she comes up with ideas for new projects, and what she loves about her job.

Research
Professor Dong’s research group at UC Irvine is interested in new reaction methods, enantioselective catalysis, and natural product synthesis. Specifically, the group looks at finding ways to directly convert carbon-hydrogen bonds into other functional groups, use carbon dioxide as a raw material, and make biologically active heterocycles.

Publications
We’ve made some of the Dong Research Group’s Chemical Science articles free to access until 18th March – click on the titles below to get to the articles*:

Mechanistic insights into hydroacylation with non-chelating aldehydes
Stephen K. Murphy, Achim Bruch and Vy M. Dong
Chem. Sci., 2015,6, 174-180, DOI: 10.1039/C4SC02026J, Edge Article
OA icon Open Access

β-hydroxy ketones prepared by regioselective hydroacylation
Stephen K. Murphy, Matthew M. Coulter and Vy M. Dong
Chem. Sci., 2012,3, 355-358, DOI: 10.1039/C1SC00634G, Edge Article

Ru-catalyzed activation of sp3 C–O bonds: O– to N-alkyl migratory rearrangement in pyridines and related heterocycles
Charles S. Yeung, Tom H. H. Hsieh and Vy M. Dong
Chem. Sci., 2011,2, 544-551, DOI: 10.1039/C0SC00498G, Edge Article

Nitrogen-directed ketone hydroacylation: Enantioselective synthesis of benzoxazecinones
Hasan A. Khan, Kevin G. M. Kou and Vy M. Dong
Chem. Sci., 2011,2, 407-410, DOI: 10.1039/C0SC00469C, Edge Article

Vy is now accepting submissions to Chemical Science in the area of organic chemistry. Submit your high-impact research to her Editorial Office.

*Access is free through a registered RSC account

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Daniel Nocera – our new Chemical Science Editor-in-Chief

We are delighted to announce Professor Daniel Nocera as the new Editor-in-Chief of Chemical Science. Daniel Nocera, the Patterson Rockwood Professor of Energy at Harvard University, has a diverse research programme and is recognised, internationally, as a pioneer and leading expert in the field of solar energy conversion.

Professor Nocera’s group has recently accomplished a solar fuels process that captures many of the elements of photosynthesis – he has now translated this science to produce the artificial leaf. This exciting discovery sets the stage for a storage mechanism for the distributed deployment of solar energy.

As we thank Professor David MacMillan for his valuable contributions to Chemical Science since its launch in 2010, we extend a warm welcome to Professor Nocera as he leads the journal towards continued success and excellence.

Professor Nocera joins us in inviting you to read Chemical Science’s first Open Access articles in Issue 1 for 2015 – one hundred cutting-edge articles showcasing exceptional research across the chemical sciences. For a limited time, these have been gathered under broad subject areas to show significant breakthroughs in each field:

Analytical Chemistry

Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry

Organic Chemistry

Catalysis

Energy and Physical Chemistry

Materials

Nanoscience

Inorganic Chemistry

Chemical Science is the Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship journal, publishing research articles of exceptional significance and high-impact reviews from across the chemical sciences. The journal’s latest (2013) Impact Factor is 8.6. Research in Chemical Science is not only of the highest quality but also has excellent visibility; this is reflected in our latest citation profile.

Submit your exceptional research to Chemical Science today!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

A cut above the rest: the evolution and application of inteins

In this new Perspective, Chemical Science Associate Editor Tom Muir of Princeton University elucidates the biological role and evolutionary origin of inteins – a fascinating class of proteins which have the ability to “process”, or sever, their own peptide backbone. Usually, this type of post-translational modification is done enzymatically by proteases, but inteins contain a module which allows the spontaneous scission of peptide bonds with no external factor or energy source required. The only things needed are certain chemical functional groups in the neighbouring peptide residues, and the correct spatial folding of the domain.

Obviously, this is a truly interesting process, as the functions and actions of a protein are determined by its amino acid sequence and structure. By breaking peptide bonds and creating new ones, inteins essentially act as an on/off switch for the protein, the potential application for which is staggering.

The intein is flanked on either side by two exteins; during the “processing” reaction, the bonds between intein and exteins are broken, and a new bond between the exteins is created. Inteins share a common biochemical mechanism for this process, which is illustrated below. Crucially, all inteins must contain a cysteine or serine at their N-terminus which provides the nucleophile for the initial acyl shift. A subsequent trans(thio)esterification and an additional acyl shift forms the spliced product and the excised intein.

Mechanism of protein splicing

Mechanism of protein splicing

Muir and co-author Neel Shah investigate the evolutionary origin of inteins, which can be found in all domains of life – eukaryotes, bacteria, archaea and viruses. Although they are often found in proteins involved in genetic “housekeeping” – DNA replication, transcription, and maintenance – inteins have no obvious biological role, and do not provide any benefit to the host organism. As such, they are known as “selfish” genes. Despite the mystery of their purpose and origin, what is clear is that the future is bright for inteins.


The authors discuss a number of applications of inteins, the most exciting of which is conditional protein splicing (CPS) where inteins can be used as an on/off switch for the proteins they are splicing, even in vivo. CPS is currently achieved in a number of ways, shown below, in which the intein is kept in an inactive state – via (a) conformational distortion, (b) caging of the active site, or (c) the physical separation of a split intein – until activation is desired. Ligand binding, deprotection or dimerisation, respectively, then releases the active intein and triggers the peptide splicing. CPS is a promising tool for cell biology and should facilitate the development of “smart” protein therapeutics that are activated only at the target site.

All in all, this Perspective makes for an interesting read on a class of proteins with impressive potential. I think it’s a safe bet to predict that when it comes to future smart therapeutics, inteins will definitely make the cut.

Conditional protein splicing

Conditional protein splicing (CPS): a) Allosteric intein activation by ligand binding; b) Intein activation via deprotection of a photo-caged active site residue; c) Activation via chemically-induced dimerisation

For more, you can read Muir and Shah’s Chemical Science Perspective here:

Neel H. Shah and Tom W. Muir
Chem. Sci., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52951G

Professor Muir serves as one of Chemical Science‘s Associate Editors, handling submission in chemical biology – read more about him and what useful advice he wishes someone had told him as an undergraduate.

Our Associate Editors Tom Muir and Ben Davis have highlighted their recommended chemical biology papers on Chemical Science – read their Editor’s Choice selection for FREE today!

Find many more excellent articles on chemical biology here: Online collection: Chemical biology

Ruth E. Gilligan is a guest web-writer for Chemical Science. She recently completed her PhD in the group of Prof. Matthew J. Gaunt at the University of Cambridge, and is currently pursuing an internship at Science Foundation Ireland.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

5 minutes with Haw Yang, Chemical Science Associate Editor

Haw-201308_px180.jpgHaw Yang is Associate Professor of Chemistry and Director of Graduate Studies at Princeton University, USA.  Haw and his experimental physical chemistry group work on single-molecule chemical dynamics and develop new single-molecule- and single-nanoparticle-based methods for the study of complex systems.  His team’s ultimate goal is to arrive at a level of understanding that affords a quantitative prediction of the dynamics and how they contribute to systems behaviour.

Haw serves as one of Chemical Science’s Associate Editors, handling submissions in physical chemistry.

Who or what inspired you to study physical chemistry?

Madame Curie.  I really didn’t know who she was until, as a kid, I watched a movie about her, based on her daughter’s autobiography.  That movie left a very strong impression on me because I saw her dedication and her passion for science.  And she did it, not for personal gain, but for humankind – for years, she used her discovery to cure cancer.  She went from doing fundamental research to helping humanity, and that left an enduring mark on me.

She was also very good at maths and physics and chemistry, and – because I’m a geek – this impressed me enormously, which is another reason why she became my heroine.

For you, what is the biggest and most important unanswered question in the chemical sciences?

The quantitative prediction of complex systems behaviour from first-principles understanding of atomistic and molecular actions.

Outside of science, what would your dream job be?

As I said, I’ve been a nerd, a geek, since I was a kid – I’ve never been any good at anything else.  So, if I hadn’t been able to get a job in this profession, I would have been doomed! (Laughs)

So this – what I’m doing now – is my dream job.  If I had to do it all again, I would do it exactly the same way – I would come to Princeton, and do what I’m doing right now. People pay me to do what I enjoy doing; not everyone can have this kind of career! I feel extremely lucky. This is the dream.

What do you consider the most fulfilling part of your job?

To see my students and post-docs do extremely well, do something really creative after they leave my group – and to have them still remember me!  (Laughs)  That’s really awesome.  Sometimes I get emails or postcards from former students out of the blue, and I’d say, wow, I did not expect this.

“For me, the cello is a fitting instrument – it would let me be alone and be quiet, and at the same time, do something creative” – Haw Yang (Image © Shutterstock)

Making new discoveries in the lab – I don’t often get to do that anymore, but when I was still in the lab, I knew I was the first in the world to see those results and interpret them – that was extremely fulfilling.  And these days, I take joy in doing experiments that people have been telling me are impossible to do.  (Laughs)  I love a challenge, I love to change the way people think.

Which musical instrument do you, or wish you could, play?

I wish that I could learn to play cello – it’s on my to-do list when I get the time.  I guess I’m hitting that age when I’d like something more quiet, more introspective, and the cello has that quality, especially if one can play Bach’s unaccompanied cello concertos – those are my favourites.  In this line of work, we’re alone most of the time, and we think a lot – that is, if we’re lucky, we get time to think.  So for me, the cello is a fitting instrument – it would let me be alone and be quiet, and at the same time, do something creative.

Fire, earth, water, or air?

Water.

Describe Chemical Science in three words.

Breaking status quo

Your personal message to Chem Sci authors and readers?

What always gets me excited is original physical chemistry, broadly defined. It could be a new and relevant physical chemistry problem that’s well articulated, an ingenious approach that definitely answers an outstanding question, an innovative technique that enables new experiments to solve problems that matter, or a conceptual breakthrough that inspires new thinking.

We scientists are in the business of breaking the status quo, and we should do so with high scientific rigour.  I strongly believe scientists must never do work which merely repeats what is already known, for the sake of hype, of joining the bandwagon, or aiming to please.

So, if you agree with me that ground-breaking substance and genuine originality are more important than hype, I invite you to submit your most creative papers to Chemical Science – your work could help define the future of physical chemistry!

Haw Yang and our dynamic international team of Associate Editors make direct decisions on the content of Chemical Science and actively drive its scientific development – submit your best and most innovative work to any of their Editorial Offices.

Read Haw Yang’s latest article in Chemical Science:

Harnessing thermal fluctuations for purposeful activities: the manipulation of single micro-swimmers by adaptive photon nudging
Bian Qian, Daniel Montiel, Andreas Bregulla, Frank Cichos and Haw Yang
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 1420-1429
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC21263C, Edge Article

Our Associate Editors Haw Yang, Kopin Liu and Kazunari Domen have selected their recommended physical chemistry papers on Chemical Science read their Editors’ Choice selection today and find out why they think these are must-reads!

Online collection: Physical chemistry

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)