Archive for the ‘RSC Advances’ Category

RSC Advances Welcomes Stephen Ojwach as a New Associate Editor

The RSC Advances team are delighted to welcome Professor Stephen Ojwach as our newest Associate Editor!

Professor Stephen Ojwach, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Research Areas: organometallic chemistry, homogeneous catalysis, coordination chemistry, ligand design, transition metal chemistry, and green chemistry.

Prof Ojwach obtained his PhD in Organometallic Chemistry and Homogeneous Catalysis from the University of Johannesburg, South Africa under the supervision of Professor James Darkwa. Currently a professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, he is also a visiting professor at a number of institutions: the University of Lethbridge, Canada, RWTH Aachen University and Technical University of Kaiserslautern, Germany, and University of Strasbourg, France, among others.

Prof Ojwach has made exemplary contribution to the design and development of transition metal complexes as catalysts for various organic transformations, including, but not limited to, oligomerization, polymerization, carbonylation, and hydrogenation reactions. His research involves careful manipulation of ligand design to optimize the catalytic properties (Structure-Property-Activity-Relationship, SPAR) of complexes in given transformation. Kinetics, mechanistic and theoretical studies are undertaken to offer insights for rationale future catalyst designs.

Prof Ojwach has published over 100 research articles in the fields of inorganic chemistry, organometallic chemistry, and catalysis in a broad scope of journals such as RSC Advances, Dalton Transactions, Organometallics, Molecular Catalysis, and Inorganic Chemistry.

Check out Prof Ojwach’s latest RSC publications!

Structural and ethylene oligomerization studies of chelating (imino)phenol Fe(ii), Co(ii) and Ni(ii) complexes: an experimental and theoretical approach
Makhosonke Ngcobo, Holliness Nose, Arumugam Jayamani and Stephen O. Ojwach
New J. Chem., 2022,46, 6219-6229

Carboxamide carbonyl-ruthenium(II) complexes: detailed structural and mechanistic studies in the transfer hydrogenation of ketones
Robert T. Kumah, Paranthaman Vijayan and Stephen O. Ojwach
New J. Chem., 2022,46, 3146-3155

Role of π-conjugation on the coordination behaviour, substitution kinetics, DNA/BSA interactions, and in vitro cytotoxicity of carboxamide palladium(II) complexes
Reinner O. Omondi, Nicole R. S. Sibuyi, Adewale O. Fadaka, Mervin Meyer, Deogratius Jaganyi and Stephen O. Ojwach.
Dalton Trans., 2021,50, 8127-8143

Prof Ojwach is looking forward to receiving your papers! Submit to RSC Advances today. Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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RSC Advances Science Communications: Potential use of exopolysaccharides

The group of Dr. Lin Zhou have a research interest in Schizophyllan (SPG). As a biological macromolecule polysaccharide, SPG demonstrates good biological activity such as anti-tumor, anti-aging, antioxidant and moisturizing etc. The large molecular weight and high viscosity of SPG can also affect the level of dissolved oxygen in the later stage of fermentation, which limits the yield of SPG. In addition, separation and purification of SPG is time and cost intensive. The traditional herbal medicine contains great health value. Therefore, researchers have focused on the overall activity of the fermentation broth to expand the application of S. commune liquid fermentation.

In the article “Enhanced exopolysaccharide yield and antioxidant activities of Schizophyllum commune fermented products by the addition of Radix Puerariae, the medicinal edible fungus Schizophyllum commune (S. commune) was used as the starting strain, and the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Puerariae (RP) was used as the medicinal substrate to expand the application of the S. commune fermentation liquids. The results showed that the addition of Pueraria did not affect the structure of Schizophyllan (SPG), the exopolysaccharide of S. commune, but the yield of SPG was significantly improved, which provided a theoretical basis for the industrial production of SPG. In addition, RP can also increase the antioxidant activity of the fermented supernatant from the S. commune fermentation system. These antioxidant activities mainly come from the puerarin from RP and some new ingredients that are synthesized during the fermentation process such as resveratrol. Therefore, this study proves the feasibility of the Schizophyllum liquid fermentation system as a bioreactor and provides a reference for the biotransformation of edible medicinal fungi such as Cordyceps militaris and Ganoderma lucidum etc.

Resumen gráfico: Mayor rendimiento de exopolisacáridos y actividades antioxidantes de los productos fermentados de Schizophyllum commune mediante la adición de Radix Puerariae

Firstly, this research confirmed the feasibility of using the liquid fermentation of Schizophyllum commune as a biotransformer, and provided a reference for the expanded application of Schizophyllum commune and other medicinal and edible fungi. The results also shed light on the comprehensive utilization of traditional herbal medicine and plant substrates.

For the bidirectional fermentation system, monitoring of the fermentation process and evaluation of the biological activity of the fermentation products are the hotspots of future research. Follow up work about the anti-aging activity and underlying mechanisms of fermented S. commune by a Caenorhabditis elegans model will be reported in the near future. 

I thank Dr. Lin Zhou for his cordial responses.

 

Read the article:

Enhanced exopolysaccharide yield and antioxidant activities of Schizophyllum commune fermented products by the addition of Radix Puerariae. Yongfei Deng, Qian Huang, Lu Hu, Tao Liu, Bisheng Zheng, Dengjun Lu, Chaowan Guo and Lin Zhou. RSC Adv., 2021, 11, 38219–38234.

 

About the web writer:

 

Cristian M. O. Lépori is a Doctor in Chemical Sciences and is currently a CONICET researcher at the Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Argentina. His research area is “Comprehensive approach through the articulation of knowledge and new strategies for the development of innovative products and processes applicable to health and the environment”. He likes to plan, organize and carry out science dissemination activities. You can find him on Twitter at @cristianlepo.

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A Decade of Progress in Click Reactions Based on CuAAC

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection on A Decade of Progress in Click Reactions Based on CuAAC, guest edited by Associate Editor Prof. Manojit Pal (Dr Reddy’s Institute of Life Sciences, India).

We are inviting submissions of new papers and review articles to this collection!

About the Collection

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2022 was awarded jointly to Prof. Carolyn R. Bertozzi, Prof. Morten Meldal and Prof. K. Barry Sharpless for their work in the development of biorthogonal and click chemistry. Bioorthogonal chemistry has made it possible to monitor the chemical processes occurring in living cells, without interfering with native biochemical systems or causing cellular toxicity. Click chemistry has revolutionized the routes of molecular construction and has applications in drug discovery and development, medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry, analytical chemistry, materials science, surface science, and more!

However, click chemistry has not gone unnoticed over the years; many chemists have made contributions (both big and small) to this exciting area of research. So, in celebration of the Nobel Prize, we are excited to announce a new collection comprising of relevant papers published over last 10 years. The collection, handpicked by Prof. Pal, predominantly covers the application of click reactions in the areas of bioorganic and medicinal chemistry, with papers devoted to the development of methodologies also included.

RSC Advances is most cited gold open access journal dedicated to the chemical sciences and all publications in our journal are free to access. We hope you enjoy reading these articles!

Read the full collection

If you would like to submit your research to this collection, and give your work the global visibility it deserves, you can do so now!

All submissions will be subject to an initial assessment by Associate Editors and, if suitable for the journal, they will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of RSC Advances.

Submit your research

Meet the Editor

Manojit Pal received his PhD from Jadavpur University, India in 1995 under the guidance of Prof. Nitya G. Kundu. He then worked in various industrial R&D centres including Alembic, Sun Pharma, Matrix Lab, and Dr Reddy’s Lab Ltd. In 2009, he joined Dr. Reddy’s Institute of Life Science where he now continues as a Professor of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry, as well as Chief Scientist of the CIMPS Department.

Prof. Pal became an Associate Editor at RSC Advances in 2015, FRSC in 2016, Adjunct Faculty-Manipal University in 2018, and member of Editorial Board – Bioorganic Chemistry in 2019. He also became an invited member of ACS in 2019. Furthermore, in 2020, his name was featured in Stanford’s top 2% list of scientists in the world, and in 2022, he received a certificate for publishing open access articles with Elsevier, four of which were linked to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

His research interests include development of new chemical entities under the new drug discovery programme in various therapeutic areas, namely tuberculosis, inflammation, obesity, psoriasis, and cancer. Other major areas of focus include transition metal / non-metal catalysed reactions, sonochemical approaches, green chemistry, heterocycle synthesis, and more! He has authored/co-authored more than 280 research publications, as well as 18 review articles, several patents, a book chapter, and a book.

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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RSC Advances Popular Advances Interview with Abdu Saeed

We are very pleased to introduce Dr Abdu Saeed who is the corresponding author of the RSC Advances article, antibacterial activity of the micro and nanostructures of the optical material tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum and its application as an antimicrobial coating. This was well received by reviewers and was handpicked by our handling editors to be part of our Popular Advances collection – a big congratulations to all the authors!

Dr Saeed told us more about the work that went into this study and what he hopes to achieve in the future. You can explore other articles in our 2022 Popular Advances online collection here!

 

Meet the Author:

Abdu Saeed was born in Ibb, Yemen, in 1979. After obtaining two degrees in physics (from Ibb University and Taiz University, respectively) he was selected as a teaching assistant at Thamar University. Afterwards, he pursued an MSc and PhD in applied experimental physics at King Abdulaziz University, Saudia Arabia, where he was selected as the best postgraduate student! Nowadays, Dr Saeed works in multidisciplinary fields including energy, electrical properties, nanotechnology, and polymer science. Currently, Dr Saeed and his group are studying the bio applications of the optical material tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum.

 

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist and why it is of current interest?
This research focuses mainly on estimating the antibacterial activity of Alq3, but the effect of particle size (micro- and nano- structures) of the Alq3 powders was also investigated. Furthermore, we successfully incorporated this material with polystyrene to form an antibacterial composite for coating purposes.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
Alq3 is one of the most famous small molecular semiconductors with efficient electroluminescence and fluorescence properties. Since this material was used to manufacture the first OLED, it has been utilized massively in fabricating optoelectrical devices. However, it has not been used in bio applications. Therefore, we think use as an antibacterial coating could bring more interest to Alq3 in bio applications. 

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
I was studying the toxicity of this material and found two things: Firstly, this material has high toxicity and, when used as a dye for fluorescence bioimaging, the captured images had high fluorescence. These results gave the motivation to utilize this material in new bio applications. Secondly, we spent three months overcoming bacterial contamination in the lab while doing the cell viability experiments. These two things motivated us to study whether Alq3 can be used as an antibacterial agent.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
Alq3 is an attractive and exciting material. It has different crystal structures, and it is considered the most popular organometallic semiconductor in OLED. Its molecular structure has a conjugated π-electron system, which is advantageous for many applications. This material has electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) properties. EL properties make it an excellent material for optoelectronics devices; PL properties make it a good material for optical applications. Its diverse properties and current applications make it an excellent candidate for more investigations into new applications.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
We tested the antibacterial activity of the Alq3 samples on seven different human pathogenic bacterial strains representing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli ATCC 11775 (EC), Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 (EF), Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 (KP), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 33591 (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 (PA), Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600 (SA), and Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 (ST). Estimating the IC50 for this material against the bacterial strains was the most challenging part of this study.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
We are most excited about using Alq3 in biosensor applications, particularly in bioimaging. We believe that it will be interesting to make modifications, such as using an appropriate material as a surface modifier containing optimized ligands to synthesize Alq3 into a core-shell form. This could further reduce Alq3’s toxicity whilst maintaining its impressive fluorescence.

What is the next step? What work is planned?
We will use what we have achieved to identify and obtain further uses for Alq3. We will study its antifungal activity and incorporate it with suitable polymers for its antifungal tests. Additionally, we hope to check its interaction with different viruses. The first use of Alq3 for bioimaging was by us – we believe there is still much more effort to be made to optimize the use of Alq3 in bioimaging. 

 

Antibacterial activity of the micro and nanostructures of the optical material tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum and its application as an antimicrobial coating

Graphical abstract: Antibacterial activity of the micro and nanostructures of the optical material tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum and its application as an antimicrobial coating

 

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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RSC Advances Popular Advances Interview with James Knight

We are excited to introduce Dr James Knight, who is the corresponding author of the RSC Advances article, The influence of degree of labelling upon cellular internalisation of antibody-cell penetrating peptide conjugates. The manuscript was well received by reviewers and was handpicked by our handling editors to be part of our Popular Advances collection.

Dr Knight told us more about the work that went into this paper and what he hopes to achieve in the future. You can explore other articles in our 2022 Popular Advances online collection here!

Meet the Author:

Dr James Knight is lecturer in radiochemistry at the School of Natural and Environmental Sciences at Newcastle University. His research surrounds the synthesis and preclinical evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging and therapeutic applications. Additionally, he is the Degree Programme Director for MSc Drug Chemistry and the lead for radiochemistry within the Discovery of Medicines research theme in the Faculty of Medical Sciences. Interestingly, he also recently co-authored two textbooks on click chemistry and its role in radiochemistry!

The first author, Toni Pringle, is a PhD student who led the research in this paper!

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist and why it is of current interest?
In the present era of precision medicine, antibodies have emerged as an important class of highly target-specific therapeutic drugs, particularly in oncology, yet their inefficient cellular internalisation limits their scope of application to disease targets situated on the exterior side of the cell membrane. This article is based on research led by PhD student Toni Pringle who modified Herceptin (an antibody used to treat HER2-positive breast and gastric cancers) with a peptide that confers cell-penetrating properties and examined how the extent of this modification affected the uptake of Herceptin in human breast cancer cells, resulting in data that advances our understanding of the cell-internalising properties of these constructs.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
The results of our study shine a light on the significant influence of a fundamental molecular design parameter – the degree of cell-penetrating peptide labelling. Notably, we found that a radiolabelled analogue of Herceptin modified with five cell-penetrating peptides had uptake in HER2-expressing cells 14.7-fold higher after 48 hours compared to an equivalent analogue with no peptide modification. The scale of this enhancement is exciting when you consider its implications for enhancing the therapeutic index of antibody-drug conjugates, as well as its potential to expand the scope of antibody-based positron emission tomography imaging agents to include disease biomarkers located in the intracellular environment.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
The main focus of our research is the development of radiopharmaceuticals that can be used as imaging and/or therapeutic agents for cancer. We are particularly interested in radiopharmaceuticals based on antibody-cell penetrating peptide conjugates (Ab-CPPs) and our motivation in this case was to understand the extent to which cellular internalisation of cancer target-specific Ab-CPP is affected by the degree of peptide labelling. Our group is keen to expand in this area and we felt it was crucial to get a firm handle on this important parameter.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
To allow us to determine the degree of peptide labelling, we decided to use a bioconjugation strategy based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition as this provided a convenient way to measure this parameter by depletion of the alkyne absorbance in the UV region. We also had to think carefully about how to approach the cell-based assays which were fairly complex due to the need to consider several factors, such as the specific activity of the radiolabelled Ab-CPPs, cell numbers and how these would change over the course of the experiment (and how to account for this), the sensitivity of the gamma counter, and of course, radio-protection measures at each stage etc. I must say that Toni did a fabulous job here in the planning and implementation of these experiments.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
Working with radioisotopes can be challenging as the agents we put so much effort into making are continually and irretrievably disappearing from the moment we make them! As a result, we have to plan our work very carefully, and often this involves coordinating the activities of several people!

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
Radiochemistry and imaging at Newcastle University is thriving and enjoying a period of expansion. The imminent opening of our radiopharmaceutical GMP suite will grant us the ability to readily translate our probes into the clinic, and we have a dedicated network of academics and clinicians supporting us in this endeavour. For me, this is an incredibly exciting prospect!

What is the next step? What work is planned?
We’re taking this forward in two ways. First, we are applying this approach to antibody-drug conjugates to examine the influence of DOL upon therapeutic efficacy in target cell populations. Second, we are developing PET radioligands based on Ab-CPPs to target intracellular biomarkers that arise early in the development of pancreatic cancer to facilitate early detection. In each case, we are applying new, improved cell penetrating peptides. We are looking forward to sharing the results of these investigations soon!

 

The influence of degree of labelling upon cellular internalisation of antibody-cell penetrating peptide conjugates.

Graphical abstract: The influence of degree of labelling upon cellular internalisation of antibody-cell penetrating peptide conjugates

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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September 2022 RSC Advances Review Articles

Welcome to September’s Review round up!

Every month we update our 2022 Reviews in RSC Advances collection to showcase all of the review articles published in RSC Advances in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest reviews.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Browse a selection of our September reviews below:

The diversity and utility of arylthiazoline and aryloxazoline siderophores: challenges of total synthesis
Karolina Kamińska, Andrzej Mular, Evgenia Olshvang, Nils Metzler Nolte, Henryk Kozłowski, Elżbieta Wojaczyńska and Elżbieta Gumienna-Kontecka
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 25284-25322

Optical bio-sensing of DNA methylation analysis: an overview of recent progress and future prospects
Mina Adampourezare, Mohammad Hasanzadeh and Farzad Seidi
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 25786-25806

Synthesis and pharmacological activities of azo dye derivatives incorporating heterocyclic scaffolds: a review
Kibrom Mezgebe and Endale Mulugeta
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 25932-25946

Electrochemical Detection of selected Heavy Metals in Water: a case study of African experiences
Enyioma C. Okpara, Omolola E. Fayemi, Olanrewaju B. Wojuola, Damian C. Onwudiwe and Eno E. Ebenso
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26319-26361

Nanozyme-based sensors for detection of food biomarkers: a review
Fareeha Arshad, Noor Faizah Mohd-Naim, Rona Chandrawati, Daniel Cozzolino and Minhaz Uddin Ahmed
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26160-26175

Mechanism and behavior of caffeine sorption: affecting factors
Merve Fakioğlu and Yasemen Kalpaklı
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26504-26513

Recovery and utilization of crude glycerol, a biodiesel byproduct
Yujia Liu, Biqi Zhong and Adeniyi Lawal
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 27997-28008

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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September 2022 Popular Advances Articles

Welcome to September’s Popular Advances article round up!

Every month we update our 2022 RSC Advances Popular Advances Article Collection to showcase all of the articles selected by our reviewers and handling editors as Popular Advances in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest Popular articles.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Efficient and practical synthesis of monoalkyl oxalates under green conditions
Tatiana Barsukova, Takeyuki Sato, Haruki Takumia and Satomi Niwayama
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 25669-25674

A simple and direct ionic chromatography method to monitor galactose oxidase activity
Eden Kaddouch, Maria E. Cleveland, David Navarro, Sacha Grisel, Mireille Haon, Harry Brumer, Mickaël Lafond, Jean-Guy Berrin and Bastien Bissaro
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26042-26050

Enhanced transformation of CO2 over microporous Ce-doped Zr metal–organic frameworks
Juan Bai, Ziwei Song, Lijuan Liu, Xu Zhu, Faming Gao and Raghunath V. Chaudhari
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26307-26318

Stereoselective synthesis of C3-tetrasubstituted oxindoles via copper catalyzed asymmetric propargylation
Jiao-Mei Wang, Yu Zhao, Chang-Sheng Yao and Kai Zhang
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26727-26732

Synthesis and Hybridizing Properties of P Stereodefined Chimeric [PS]-{DNA:RNA} and [PS]-{DNA:(2’-OMe)-RNA} Oligomers
Katarzyna Jastrzębska, Anna Maciaszek, Rafał Dolot, Agnieszka Tomaszewska-Antczak, Barbara Mikołajczyk and Piotr Guga
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 26815-26824

Antibacterial activity of the micro and nanostructures of the optical material tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum and its application as an antimicrobial coating
Abdu Saeed, Aysh Y. Madkhli, Rami Adel Pashameah, Noor M. Bataweel, Mir Ali Razvi and Numan Salah
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 27131-27144

The influence of degree of labelling upon cellular internalisation of antibody-cell penetrating peptide conjugates
Toni A. Pringle, Oliver Coleman, Akane Kawamura and James C. Knight
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 27716-27722

One-pot synthesis of chromenes in the presence of nano-cellulose/Ti(IV)/Fe3O4 as natural-based magnetic nano-catalysts under solvent free conditions
Raziyeh Gholami, Abdolhamid Bamoniri and Bi Bi Fatemeh Mirjalili
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 27555-27563

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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Welcome to our new Associate Editors: Shivani Bhardwaj Mishra and Chiharu Tokoro

The RSC Advances team are delighted to welcome Professor Shivani Bhardwaj Mishra and Professor Chiharu Tokoro as our new Associate Editors!

Professor Shivani Bhardwaj Mishra, University of South Africa

Research Areas: Sol-gel technology, nanomaterials, ceramics and water treatment.

Professor Shivani Bhardwaj Mishra is Founder and Director of Academy of Nanotechnology and Waste water Innovations [ANWWI]. She is serving as an Adjunct Professor at Hebei University of Science and Technology, China and as International Advisory Board member at TU Wien, Austria. This has boosted her academic career allowing her to expand her research expertise with joint projects, publications and knowledge exchange activities. Over twenty years of her academic experience accounts for teaching organic chemistry and research in the field of nanomaterials, nanocomposites and its various environmental and material applications. Besides, her core research interest is waste valorization to promote sustainability and circular economy growth. Her educational background involves a PhD in Chemistry from Jamia Millia Islamia, Master of Science [Organic Chemistry] and Bachelor of Science [Chemistry] from University of Madras, India.

For her outstanding profile and academic achievements, she was inducted as prestigious Fellow member of Royal Society of Chemistry in 2015 and is a member of American Chemical Society, USA, South African Chemical Society and many others. She is the recipient of many accolades and among these are, Distinguished Woman Scientist award from Department of Science and Technology, South Africa, Woman in Research Leadership Award from University of South Africa and recognised as Top 10 researchers at University of Johannesburg. She is Associate Editor for Frontiers for Green and sustainable chemistry and Guest Associate Editor for Medicinal and Pharmaceutical chemistry, editorial board member and reviewer for various journals. She has more than hundred publications in renowned journals.

Read Shivani’s recent RSC Advances publication: 

Mechanistic pathways for the degradation of SMX drug and floatation of degraded products using F-Pt co-doped TiO2 photocatalysts, M Jahdi, SB Mishra, EN Nxumalo, SD Mhlanga, AK Mishra, RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 27662-27675, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1039/D0RA05009A

 

Professor Chiharu Tokoro, Waseda University

 

Research Areas: Mineral processing, resource recycling, environmental purification, powder technologies and chemical engineering.

Professor Chiharu Tokoro received her Dr. Eng from the University of Tokyo in 2003. She then went on to work at Waseda University where she has currently held the position of Professor since 2015. From 2021 she also became a Professor at Professor at the School of Engineering at the University of Tokyo.

Professor Chiharu Tokoro is currently on the Editorial Board for Elsevier’s Advanced Powder Technology. She has won the 2020 Waseda Research Award, was a finalist for the Falling Walls Science Breakthroughs of the Year 2021 in Engineering and Technology and won the Waseda University Best Paper award in 2021.

The Tokoro Lab is currently focusing their efforts into three research areas, developing recycling systems, using powder simulations to explore various powder processes and developing technologies for recovering metals from wastewater.

 

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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RSC Advances Popular Advances – an Interview with Takashi Morii

We are very pleased to introduce Professor Takashi Morii, who is the corresponding author of the RSC Advances article, A two-step screening to optimize the signal response of an auto-fluorescent protein-based biosensor. The manuscript was well received by reviewers and was handpicked by our reviewers and handling editors to be part of our Popular Advances collection.

Professor Mori told us more about the work that went into this article and what he hopes to achieve in the future. You can explore other articles in our 2022 Popular Advances online collection here.

Meet the author:

Takashi Morii was born in 1959 in Hyogo, Japan. He studied Chemistry at Kyoto University (B. Eng., 1982, Ph.D. 1988) with Prof. T. Matsuura and Prof. I. Saito. He conducted postdoctoral research with Prof. J. K. Barton at Columbia University and California Institute of Technology. In 1992, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor at Kyoto Institute of Technology and subsequently moved to Institute for Chemical Research at Kyoto University. In 1998, he moved to Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, where he was promoted to Professor in 2005.

 

 

 

 

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest? 

Construction of an auto-fluorescent protein (AFP)-based biosensor consisting of a recognition, or a reaction, module and AFP often encounters difficulty owing to the lack of structural information for the recognition module and requirement of laborious tasks for functional optimization. This study describes a two-step screening strategy that allows facile optimization of the optical response of AFP-based biosensor for nitric oxide (NO), which is also applicable for many types of AFP-based biosensors.

How big an impact could your results potentially have? 

Our two-step, first in silico and second in vitro, screening strategy provides a convenient and high-throughput screening method for the optimization of the signal response of AFP-based biosensors. Especially, our strategy has an advantage for cases when the detailed information on the structural change of recognition module is not available. AFP-based biosensors are quite useful in visualizing the dynamics of cellular important factors because of their suitability for high spatiotemporal resolution and long-time imaging. Our strategy would accelerate the development of various types of biosensors for the factors of interest in the cell.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?

We have previously constructed a fusion of a segment of the putative NO-sensing module of the TRPC5 channel with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to evaluate this putative NO-induced structural change in TRPC5. While the construct successfully detected the putative structural change by the reaction with NO as a change in the fluorescence intensity ratio of EGFP, the observed response was quite weak. We considered that the TRPC5 loop-EGFP construct could be converted to a cellular NO sensor by enhancing its response through the mutation and screening. In addition, developing a general strategy to construct AFP-based biosensors that visualize various kinds of second messengers would promote further investigation of signal transduction.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?  

An AFP-based biosensor is designed by conjugating an appropriate recognition or reaction module for a given target to an AFP transduction module. Structural changes in the recognition module induced by the recognition/reaction event are transduced to a change of fluorescence signal of AFP. To obtain usable AFP-based biosensors, many sensor candidates must be constructed and evaluated their responses, which are time consuming and required laborious tasks. We consider that a screening to select candidates showing larger structural changes at the reaction module upon the reaction based on in silico simulation in the first step would reduce these tasks. Structural change of the reaction modules of candidates are evaluated by root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of the coordinates for the backbone of reaction module between before and after the reaction based on in silico simulation.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging? 

The most challenging part of this work is whether the in silico screening evaluated by using the RMSD values could select candidates with reasonable signal responses because it is very difficult to predict the exact structural change of candidates upon the reaction in silico. Fortunately, the second in vitro screening revealed that RMSD values could successfully provide indexes for the signal response of the candidates, although large RMSD values did not always correspond to the large signal response.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment? 

It was quite exciting to find that the sensor candidates from the first in silico screening showed enhanced signals in the in vitro second screening. It was also exciting to confirm that a construct obtained from the two-step screening showed a reasonable signal response in living mammalian cells. This result demonstrated that our screening strategy can be applied to enhance the signal response sufficient for cellular applications.

What is the next step? What work is planned?

The reaction module of selected AFP-based biosensor changes its structure upon formation of a disulphide bond to emit the signal. We anticipated a certain selectivity for the disulphide bond formation by NO, but apparently the selected AFP-based biosensor showed similar response to NO and H2O2. The next step is to develop a convenient strategy to install a selectivity to NO and H2O2 on the AFP-based biosensor selected in this work.

A two-step screening to optimize the signal response of an auto-fluorescent protein-based biosensor

Shunsuke Tajima,a Eiji Nakata,a Reiko Sakaguchi,b Masayuki Saimura,a Yasuo Moric and Takashi Morii*a

RSC Adv., 2022,12, 15407-15419

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July 2022 Popular Advances Articles

Welcome to July’s Popular Advances article round up!

Every month we update our 2022 RSC Advances Popular Advances Article Collection to showcase all of the articles selected by our reviewers and handling editors as Popular Advances in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest Popular articles.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Theoretical investigation of the optoelectronic response of highly correlated Cu3P photocatalyst,
Haseeb Ahmad, Ali Rauf and Shoaib Muhammad, RSC Adv., 2022,12, 20721-20726, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1039/D2RA02472A

Phenoxy pendant isatins as potent α-glucosidase inhibitors: reciprocal carbonyl⋯carbonyl interactions, antiparallel π⋯π stacking driven solid state self-assembly and biological evaluation,
Saba Mehreen, Mehwash Zia, Ajmal Khan, Javid Hussain, Saeed Ullah, Muhammad U. Anwar, Ahmed Al-Harrasi and Muhammad Moazzam Naseer, RSC Adv., 2022,12, 20919-20928, https://doi.org/10.1039/D2RA03307K

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest  Popular Advances articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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