Archive for the ‘RSC Advances’ Category

RSC Advances Science Communications: Detection and quantification of dioxins and furans in foods

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are harmful compounds resistant to biological, chemical and photolytic degradation. They are persistent in the environment especially in soils, sediments and air for several decades. Due to their toxicity, they pose a significant threat to animal, human and environmental health, as they accumulate in the fatty tissues of humans and animals. In humans, POPs have been linked to adverse health effects, such as alterations in the development of reproductive, endocrine, neurological, and immune behavior. In animals, they have caused disease and abnormalities, including certain types of birds, fish and mammals.

Dioxin-like compounds have been classified as POPs by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) due to their hazardous properties including long shelf life, global distribution, accumulation and bioamplification in food chains; and its toxicological effects in humans, such as teratogenesis, tumor promotion, and modulation of the immune system. The POPs present in the environment have generated great interest within the scientific community due to their toxic effect, both for animal and human health.

Polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDFs) are compounds with similar chemical properties: they are organic solids, with high melting points and low vapor pressure, have extremely low solubility in water and are adsorbed strongly on particulate matter surfaces. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of organic chemical compounds that can cause a number of different adverse effects, and there are no known natural sources of PCBs in the environment. Although biphenyls are oily liquids or solids with an appearance that varies from colorless to light yellow, some PCBs are volatile and can exist as vapor in the air. PCBs have no known odor or taste, they enter the environment as mixtures containing a variety of individual components of polychlorinated biphenyls. They do not degrade easily and therefore remain for a long time, and can be easily detected in air, water and soil. Among the harmful effects they cause on human health, such as immune and neurological dysfunctions, they are also classified as possible human carcinogens and toxic in reproduction.

Currently, there are numerous gaps with respect to knowledge about these substances, in particular about methodologies for their detection and quantification, as well as about the levels that are potentially dangerous for humans. For this reason, the development, fine-tuning and validation of new methodologies that allow innovation and improvement of novel traceability systems for these compounds is of great interest. With the advent of sophisticated chromatography techniques, the development of innovative and alternative highly sensitive analytical methods for trace analysis of these compounds is a challenge.

Finally, it is of great importance to note that there are no laboratories in Argentina with analytical methodologies that detect and quantify these analytes, which is why they become so important and of great interest to study. In this way, it would allow to have the first bases for the quality control of products of agri-food origin for export and/or of the domestic market, and the great economic impact that it generates on their traceability.

Read the article:

https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2021/ra/d1ra00599e

Ying Li, Yanan Han, Zhuochao Teng, Xianwei Zhao, Yanhui Sun, Fei Xu, Qingzhu Zhang and Wenxing Wang. RSC Adv., 2021, 11, 12626-12640.

 

About the Web Writer:

 

BIOGRAPHY

Cristian M. O. Lépori is Doctor in Chemical Sciences and is currently a researcher at JLA Argentina S.A., General Cabrera – Argentina. He researched and developed analytical methods for the detection of contaminants in food, water, and soil. He likes to plan, organize and carry out science dissemination activities. You can find him on Twitter at @cristianlepo.

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Welcome to our new Associate Editor: Hideko Nagasawa

We are delighted to welcome Professor Hideko Nagasawa to the RSC Advances team this month!

Hideko Nagasawa

 

Dr Hideko Nagasawa is a Professor in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry at Gifu Pharmaceutical University, where she heads the Laboratory of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry. She completed her PhD at Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University. Her research mainly focuses on drug discovery and chemical biology targeting the tumor microenvironment (TME). Projects pursued in her laboratory include the development of selective cancer therapies in TMEs of hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, and the creation of unique functional molecules such as fluorescent probes and caged compounds for the study of diverse cellular stresses.

Nagasawa says, “I am excited to join RSC Advances as an Associate Editor and look forward to contributing to the field of Chemical Biology and Medicinal”.

Browse a selection of Hideko’s RSC publications:

Asymmetric bismuth-rhodamines as an activatable fluorogenic photosensitizer
Akari Mukaimine, Tasuku Hirayama and Hideko Nagasawa
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2021, 19, 3611-3619
DOI: 10.1039/D0OB02456B

A 19F-MRI probe for the detection of Fe(ii) ions in an aqueous system
Ryo Kakiuchi, Tasuku Hirayama, Daijiro Yanagisawa, Ikuo Tooyama and Hideko Nagasawa
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2020, 18, 5843-5849
DOI: 10.1039/D0OB00903B

A Golgi-targeting fluorescent probe for labile Fe(ii) to reveal an abnormal cellular iron distribution induced by dysfunction of VPS35
Tasuku Hirayama, Masatoshi Inden, Hitomi Tsuboi, Masato Niwa, Yasuhiro Uchida, Yuki Naka, Isao Hozumi and Hideko Nagasawa
Chem. Sci., 2019, 10, 1514-1521
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC04386H

Organelle-specific analysis of labile Fe(ii) during ferroptosis by using a cocktail of various colour organelle-targeted fluorescent probes
Tasuku Hirayama, Ayaji Miki and Hideko Nagasawa
Metallomics, 2019, 11, 111-117
DOI: 10.1039/C8MT00212F

 

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Welcoming our new Associate Editors: Carmen L Gomes, Patrícia Valentão & Yu Wang

We are delighted to welcome Professors Carmen Gomes, Patrícia Valentão & Yu Wang to the RSC Advances team this week!

Carmen Gomes RSC Advances Associate EditorDr. Carmen Gomes is currently an Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Iowa State University where she is leading a successful research program on the design of novel nanoscale materials using carbon-based nanomaterials and polymers for food safety and agricultural applications. Projects pursued in her laboratory range from fabrication of polymeric nanomaterials and nanostructured devices for biosensors to bioactive delivery systems. Dr. Gomes has over 14 years of experience working in the research area of nanotechnology applied to food processing, food safety and food quality to develop effective solutions in food and agriculture production.

Gomes says, “I am excited for the opportunity to join RSC Advances as an associate editor and look forward to working with the food science and engineering community”.

 

Patrícia Valentão RSC Advances Associate Editor

Patrícia Valentão is Associate Professor with Habilitation at the Faculty of Pharmacy of University of Porto. She completed her PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Porto for work on Pharmacognosy in 2003. She is an Integrated Member of the Associated Laboratory for Green Chemistry (LAQV) of the Network of Chemistry and Technology (REQUIMTE), the Portuguese Research Centre for Sustainable Chemistry, within the “Natural Products – Chemistry and Bioactivity” group. Her research has been focused on the development and application of analytical methods for the study of terrestrial and non-terrestrial natural matrices, and on the chemical and biological characterization of natural and hemi-synthetic compounds in a context of drug discovery, to modulate diabetes, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Her expertise is evidenced in more than 30 book chapters and more than 300 articles published in international peer-reviewed journals (h-index = 56).

 

Yu Wang RSC Advances Associate EditorDr. Yu Wang is an Assistant Professor of Food Chemistry at the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department and Citrus Research and Education Center, University of Florida. Dr. Wang’s research mainly focuses on flavor chemistry and natural product chemistry, emphasizing the flavor (aroma and taste) of fruits, herbs and other agricultural commodities, and use of citrus by-product for health benefits. She got her PhD in Food Chemistry, at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Dr. Wang had her postdoc. training at Massachusetts Institute of Technology focusing on “Omics” techniques for early diagnosing inflammation bowel disease (IBD). Dr. Wang received the Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship to work in the Chair of Food Chemistry and Molecular Sensory Science at the Technical University of Munich. Her research experience includes flavor chemistry, sensory science and food/plant metabolomics. Before joining University of Florida, Dr. Wang was a Flavor Chemist at Mars Chocolate Inc, working in global R&D directing flavor application, developing novel flavor profiles, analyzing cocoa and chocolate flavor, setting up flavor training program, and providing technical guidance.

 

Browse a selection of Yu, Patrícia & Carmen’s RSC publications:

All-graphene-based open fluidics for pumpless, small-scale fluid transport via laser-controlled wettability patterning
Lucas S. Hall, Dohgyu Hwang, Bolin Chen, Bryan Van Belle, Zachary T. Johnson, John A. Hondred, Carmen L. Gomes, Michael D. Bartlett and Jonathan C. Claussen
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, 6, 24-32
DOI: 10.1039/D0NH00376J, Communication

Novel styrylpyrazole-glucosides and their dioxolo-bridged doppelgangers: synthesis and cytotoxicity
Ana R. F. Carreira, David M. Pereira, Paula B. Andrade, Patrícia Valentão, Artur M. S. Silva, Susana Santos Braga and Vera L. M. Silva
New J. Chem., 2019, 43, 8299-8310
DOI: 10.1039/C9NJ01021A, Paper

Preventive mechanism of bioactive dietary foods on obesity-related inflammation and diseases
Jeehye Sung, Chi-Tang Ho and Yu Wang
Food Funct., 2018, 9, 6081-6095
DOI: 10.1039/C8FO01561A, Review Article

Actuation of chitosan-aptamer nanobrush borders for pathogen sensing
Katherine D. Hills, Daniela A. Oliveira, Nicholas D. Cavallaro, Carmen L. Gomes and Eric S. McLamore
Analyst, 2018, 143, 1650-1661
DOI: 10.1039/C7AN02039B, Paper

Tuning protein folding in lysosomal storage diseases: the chemistry behind pharmacological chaperones
David M. Pereira, Patrícia Valentão and Paula B. Andrade
Chem. Sci., 2018, 9, 1740-1752
DOI: 10.1039/C7SC04712F, Perspective

Protective effects of theasinensin A against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in mice
Wei-Lun Hung, Guliang Yang, Yu-Chuan Wang, Yi-Shiou Chiou, Yen-Chen Tung, Meei-Ju Yang, Bi-Ni Wang, Chi-Tang Ho, Yu Wang and Min-Hsiung Pan
Food Funct., 2017, 8, 3276-3287
DOI: 10.1039/C7FO00700K, Paper

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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Welcome to our new Associate Editor: Lubomír Rulíšek

We are delighted to welcome Dr Lubomír Rulíšek to the RSC Advances team this month!

Lubomir Rulisek RSC Advances Associate Editor RSC

Lubomír Rulíšek is a Senior Research Group Leader at the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (IOCB). He completed his master’s degrees at the Charles University, Prague and obtained his Ph.D. at IOCB in 2001 (supervised by Dr. Zdeněk Havlas). He was a postdoctoral research fellow at Lund University, Sweden, with Prof. Ulf Ryde who introduced him into theoretical bioinorganic chemistry which has been one of his favorite research themes since then. In addition, the research in the Rulíšek group encompasses various applications of quantum chemistry and quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) modelling: physico-chemical principles of protein structures, protein–ligand interactions, computational electrochemistry, theoretical spectroscopy, organic reactivity, computational homogeneous catalysis, and biomolecular design. He is a true believer in indispensable and integral role of computations in contemporary chemical and biological research.

Rulíšek says, “I am grateful for the opportunity to join RSC Advances as an associate editor and look forward to serve to a large community of chemists and biologists”.

Browse a selection of Lubomír’s RSC publications:

Conformational Energies and Equilibria of Cyclic Dinucleotides In Vacuo and In Solution: Computational Chemistry vs. NMR Experiments
Gutten, O., Jurečka, P., Aliakbar Tehrani, Z., Budešínský, M., Řezáč, J., Rulíšek, L.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2021, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/D0CP05993E

Solvatochromic fluorene-linked nucleoside and DNA as color-changing fluorescent probes for sensing interactions
Dmytro Dziuba, Petr Pospíšil, Ján Matyašovský, Jiří Brynda, Dana Nachtigallová, Lubomír Rulíšek, Radek Pohl, Martin Hof and Michal Hocek
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 5775-5785
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC02548J

The non-planarity of the benzene molecule in the X-ray structure of the chelated bismuth(iii) heteroboroxine complex is not supported by quantum mechanical calculations
Jindřich Fanfrlík, Robert Sedlak, Adam Pecina, Lubomír Rulíšek, Libor Dostál, Ján Moncóľ, Aleš Růžička and Pavel Hobza
Dalton Trans., 2016, 45, 462-465
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT04381F

How simple is too simple? Computational perspective on importance of second-shell environment for metal-ion selectivity
Ondrej Gutten and Lubomír Rulíšek
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 14393-14404
DOI: 10.1039/C4CP04876H

A new insight into the zinc-dependent DNA-cleavage by the colicin E7 nuclease: a crystallographic and computational study
Anikó Czene, Eszter Tóth, Eszter Németh, Harm Otten, Jens-Christian N. Poulsen, Hans E. M. Christensen, Lubomír Rulíšek, Kyosuke Nagata, Sine Larsen and Béla Gyurcsik
Metallomics, 2014, 6, 2090-2099
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00195H

Theoretical calculations of physico-chemical and spectroscopic properties of bioinorganic systems: current limits and perspectives
Tibor András Rokob, Martin Srnec and Lubomír Rulíšek
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 5754-5768
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12423H

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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RSC Advances Science Communications: In the search of a tangible product for healthcare

Treatment for cancer and bacterial infections is challenging to approach due to various reasons such as the development of resistant and unwanted side effects. Development of new chemotherapeutic agents often ends up with a blunt end. Therefore, finding a new formulation and an effective delivery method for the currently available agents is a gold alternative.

Curcumin and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO Nps) are such compounds that have enormous advantages. Of the potent bioactive metabolites that have been identified from plant sources, curcumin is one of the most-investigated safe chemical compounds. Research over the last two decades has shown it to be a potent anticancer and antimicrobial agent in cell- and animal studies. But inheritably, curcumin has low efficacy mainly due to the poor bioavailability, contributed to by its insolubility, instability, poor absorption, and rapid biotransformation. ZnO Np is a well-investigated biocompatible and apparently nontoxic nanomaterial that has shown promising anticancer and antimicrobial activity as well. In the article “Curcumin loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles for activity-enhanced antibacterial and anticancer applications”, different shapes of curcumin loaded ZnO Nps were investigated for their effectiveness and safety as an anticancer and antibacterial agent. The results indicate that curcumin loaded ZnO Nps are low toxic and a highly effective combination compared with their bare counterparts. Moreover, since nanoparticles show different absorption mechanisms through the gastrointestinal tract, it is a good alternative to mask compound which has low absorption capacity. In this study, other than the synergetic effect of curcumin loaded Nps, ZnO Nps act as a carrier system for curcumin, which has bioavailability issues.

Graphical abstract: Curcumin loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles for activity-enhanced antibacterial and anticancer applications

Of particular note is the potential of this platform to act as an antibiotic-free formulation for use against infections caused by a range of different bacterial pathogens. Given the anticancer activity of the platform, it may prove to be of great use as an oncotherapy supplement, helping manage both the disease condition and opportunistic bacterial infections. The findings of this research open doors for different angles of curcumin and ZnO Np research. Therefore, the responsibility of the scientists is to use this finding to develop appropriate dosage foam for curcumin loaded ZnO Np.

I thank Dr. Ranga K. Dissanayake for his cordial responses.

Read the article:

Curcumin loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles for activity-enhanced antibacterial and anticancer applications

W. P. T. D. Perera, Ranga K. Dissanayake, U. I. Ranatunga, N. M. Hettiarachchi, K. D. C. Perera, Janitha M. Unagolla, R. T. De Silva and L. R. Pahalagedara. RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 30785–30795.

 

About the Web Writer:

Cristian M. O. Lépori is Doctor in Chemical Sciences and currently has a postdoctoral position at the Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina. He works in the area of green chemistry. He likes to plan, organize and carry out science dissemination activities. You can find him on Twitter at @cristianlepo.

 

 

 

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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RSC Advances Science Communications: For a safer earth for us and for the next generation

Current increasing demands for the effective photocatalytic system for the treatment of industrial effluent with low cost and highly effective tools influenced the use of systems based on TMO (tri-metal oxide) that work in both acidic and basic pH systems, and that combat resistance to multiple drugs in bacterial infections and cancer. To solve the global environmental problems and save people from carcinogenic exposure, work has been done to establish highly effective, highly reliable and sensitive electrochemical methods involving the I–V approach for the detection of toxins present in environmental samples as well as in food/drinks or in their containers.

Dyes are extensively used in the textile industry, and considerable amounts are discharged into natural water reservoirs without any treatment. To treat wastewater, many catalysts have been investigated. However, it is tough to find an effective and efficient system for the waste- effluent treatment. The TMO system reported in the article “Photocatalysis, photoinduced enhanced antibacterial functions and development of a selective m-tolyl hydrazine sensor based on mixed Ag∙NiMn2O4 nanomaterials” was designed to meet the current need of industrial waste water treatment problem world-wide. For industrial effluent, especially from fabric and other industries where huge amounts of dyes are used, a proper treatment system is needed. This TMO system is very effective and highly efficient for the treatment of industrial waste water, it can degrade dyes present in waste water naturally in presence of sunlight. In particular, Ag·NiMn2O4 TMO can degrade dyes in both acidic and basic medium (in a wide pH range) in presence of sunlight. So, this TMO is useful for the treatment of varieties of industrial waste water. Further, its activity can be boosted by the use of a catalytic amount of H2O2 (as catalyst booster).

Graphical abstract: Photocatalysis, photoinduced enhanced anti-bacterial functions and development of a selective m-tolyl hydrazine sensor based on mixed Ag·NiMn2O4 nanomaterials

Ag·NiMn2O4 TMO is highly effective against both Gram positive and Gram negative MDR (multi drug resistant bacteria). This result is very promising because it is highly challenging to kill both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria with a single drug (compound). It is expected that this compound can be a promising sterilizing agent for numerous industrial uses.

The authors also reports on a highly reliable and sensitive electrochemical method involving the I–V approach for the detection of hydrazine. Hydrazine is used as an industrial raw material to produce pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, corrosion inhibitors, pharmaceutical intermediates, dyestuffs, antioxidants, explosives, catalysts, fuel cells and rocket fuel, and it is a carcinogenic compound. In this study, the development of an electrochemical sensor using Ag·NiMn2O4 TMO nanomaterial on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was developed. The m-tolyl hydrazine chemical sensor was fabricated with GCE coated with the Ag·NiMn2O4 TMO nanomaterial. The stability of the sensor probe was implemented by applying conductive Nafion (5% in ethanol) as a chemical glue under ambient conditions.

Finally, various real samples (collected from various environmental sources) were analyzed to check the applicability as well as the validity of the chemical sensor probe. As a potential sensor, it is reliable due to its good reproducibility, rapid response, high sensitivity, working stability for long duration and efficiency in the analysis of real environmental samples. Therefore, this method introduces a new route to develop selective chemical sensors using TMO nanomaterials for safety in the environmental and healthcare fields.

The authors strongly believe that the TMO research will have a tremendous effect on current as well as upcoming health and environmental global issues. Specifically, for a sustainable environment, medical and other health care issues.

I thank Dr. Md Abdus Subhan for his cordial responses.

Read the article:

“Photocatalysis, photoinduced enhanced antibacterial functions and development of a selective m-tolyl hydrazine sensor based on mixed Ag∙NiMn2O4 nanomaterials”. Md Abdus Subhan, Pallab Chandra Saha, Md Anwar Hossain, M. M. Alam, Abdullah M. Asiri, Mohammed M. Rahman, Mohammad Al-Mamun, Tanjila Parvin Rifat, Topu Raihan A. K. Azad. RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 30603–30619.

 

About the Web Writer:

Cristian M. O. Lépori is Doctor in Chemical Sciences and currently has a postdoctoral position at the Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina. He works in the area of green chemistry. He likes to plan, organize and carry out science dissemination activities. You can find him on Twitter at @cristianlepo.

 

 

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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RSC paper mill retractions

Below is a list of papers retracted in connection with what we believe is a paper mill. Please see http://rsc.li/paper-mill-response for more information.

1. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90011K
2. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90018H
3. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90019F
4. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90023D
5. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90020J
6. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90015C
7. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90013G
8. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90006D
9. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90007B
10. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90010B
11. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90008K
12. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90012A
13. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90014E
14. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90016A
15. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90017J
16. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90021H
17. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90022F
18. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90024B
19. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90025K
20. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90026A
21. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90027G
22. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90028E
23. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90030G
24. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90031E
25. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90046C
26. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90033A
27. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90034J
28. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90035H
29. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90032C
30. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90036F
31. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90037D
32. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90038B
33. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90039K
34. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90040D
35. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90047A
36. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90048J
37. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90049H
38. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90050A
39. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90051J
40. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90052H
41. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90041B
42. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90042K
43. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90043A
44. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90044G
45. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90045E
46. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90054D
47. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90055B
48. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90056K
49. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90057A
50. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90058G
51. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90059E
52. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90060A
53. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90061G
54. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90062E
55. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90063C
56. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90064A
57. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90065J
58. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90071D
59. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90072B
60. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90073K
61. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90074A
62. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90075G
63. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90076E
64. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90066H
65. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90067F
66. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90068D
67. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90069B
68. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90070F
69. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1FO90004H
70. https://doi.org/10.1039/D1MD90001C

The associated Editorial published in RSC Advances can be found at the following url: https://doi.org/10.1039/D1RA90009A

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The year in review – Physical chemistry in RSC Advances 2020

Looking back at 2020, we would like to share with you some of the great research that has been published in RSC Advances over the year. We are proud to present a selection of the most popular 2020 physical chemistry papers, reviews and HOT articles published so far.

We hope you enjoy reading these articles and as always, all our articles are open access – free to read and accessible to everyone.

RSC Advances in the news

The miscibility and spatial distribution of the components in electrospun polymer–protein mats
Elizaveta Pavlova, Dmitry Bagrov et al. DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10910B

Elizaveta Pavlova and colleauges have blended two incompatible components, a protein and a polymer, in one electrospun fiber. They also demonstrated prolonged release of the protein from the electrospun mat, making the blended mat promising for biomedical applications.

The study was published in January and has been covered in several news outlets, including a piece published in The Medical News.

 

2020 HOT articles

Over the year, our reviewers and Associate Editors have handpicked articles of particular interest and marked them as HOT. We are very pleased to highlight some outstanding 2020 physical chemistry HOT articles:

Deep eutectic solvent in water pickering emulsions stabilised by cellulose nanofibrils
Saffron J. Bryant, Karen J. Edler et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA07575B

Pickering emulsions are interesting as they can be highly stable and do not require use of surfactants which can be irritants or toxic to aquatic life. Demonstrating the formation of Pickering emulsions using sustainable cellulose particles as a stabiliser for an emulsion, where the “oil” components are also bio-derived molecules, shows the potential of these systems in more sustainable, less environmentally harmful formulations which could be replacements for products people use in large quantities every day such as creams and lotions. This would have obvious benefits in reducing harm to our water systems and the environment.’

Read the interview with the authors about their article here.

 

 

More HOT articles

Dust removal from a hydrophobic surface by rolling fizzy water droplets
Bekir Sami Yilbas, Abba Abdulhamid Abubakar et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA03215H

Anomalous boron isotope effects on electronic structure and lattice dynamics of CuB2O4
Rea Divina Mero, Hsiang-Lin Liu et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA08200G

m-s-m cationic gemini and zwitterionic surfactants – a thermodynamic analysis of their mixed micelle formation
Aleisha McLachlan, Shawn D. Wettig et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09432F

Read the full HOT article collection

Most popular 2020 articles

Reviews

Graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a new material for emerging applications
Oleksandr Stroyuk, Dietrich R. T. Zahn et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA05580H

Two-photon absorption and two-photon-induced isomerization of azobenzene compounds
Marta Dudek, Katarzyna Matczyszyn et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA07693G

Papers

New wide-stability four-ring azo/ester/Schiff base liquid crystals: synthesis, mesomorphic, photophysical, and DFT approaches
Nagwa H. S. Ahmed, Mohamed Hagar et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10499B

Organic template-assisted green synthesis of CoMoO4 nanomaterials for the investigation of energy storage properties
Irum Shaheen, Mohammad Azad Malik et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09477F

Corrosion protection mechanism of Ce4+/organic inhibitor for AA2024 in 3.5% NaCl
Mohamed Gobara, Mahmoud Zorainy et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09552G

Adverse effects of a hybrid nanofluid in a wavy non-uniform annulus with convective boundary conditions
Hina Sadaf and Sara I. Abdelsalam, DOI: 10.1039/D0RA01134G

Synergistic effect of potassium iodide and sodium dodecyl sulfonate on the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in HCl medium: a combined experimental and theoretical investigation
Jianhong Tan, Youness El Bakri et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA02011G

The antioxidant activity of natural diterpenes: theoretical insights
Quan V. Vo, Adam Mechler et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA02681F

Evaporation and drying kinetics of water-NaCl droplets via acoustic levitation
Yutaro Maruyama and Koji Hasegawa, DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09395H

First principles study of electronic and nonlinear optical properties of A–D–π–A and D–A–D–π–A configured compounds containing novel quinoline–carbazole derivatives
Muhammad Khalid, Muhammad Safwan Akram et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA02857F

Copper halide diselenium: predicted two-dimensional materials with ultrahigh anisotropic carrier mobilities
Fazel Shojaei, Gilles Frapper et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10380E

The influence of dopants on aW-phase antimonene: theoretical investigations
Qingxiao Zhou, Jiahui Li et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10772J

Fast diffusion mechanism in Li4P2S6 via a concerted process of interstitial Li ions
Andreas R. Stamminger, Ralf Drautz et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA00932F

Interaction of cellulose and nitrodopamine coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with alpha-lactalbumin
Fakhrossadat Mohammadi, Sabine Szunerits et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09045B

The influence of molecular vicinity (expressed in terms of dielectric constant) on the infrared spectra of embedded species in ices and solid matrices
Pilling S. and Bonfim V. S., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10136E

Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced degradation of groutellite and ramsdellite, two cathode materials of technological interest
Simone Bernardini, Armida Sodo et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08662E

Searching for double σ- and π-aromaticity in borazine derivatives
Ricardo Pino-Rios, William Tiznado et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA05939K

Wavelength modulation of ZnO nanowire based organic light-emitting diodes with ultraviolet electroluminescence
Runze Chen, Yun Liu et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA04058D

An all solid-state Li ion battery composed of low molecular weight crystalline electrolyte
Prerna Joshi, Noriyoshi Matsumi et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09559D

Dynamic response study of Ti3C2-MXene films to shockwave and impact forces
Shreyas Srivatsa, M. M. Nayaket al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA04879HRSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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The year in review – Organic chemistry in RSC Advances 2020

Looking back at 2020, we would like to share with you some of the great research that has been published in RSC Advances over the year. We are proud to present a selection of the most popular 2020 organic chemistry papers, reviews and HOT articles published so far.

We hope you enjoy reading these articles and as always, all our articles are open access – free to read and accessible to everyone.

2020 HOT articles

Over the year, our reviewers and Associate Editors have handpicked articles of particular interest and marked them as HOT. We are very pleased to highlight some outstanding 2020 organic chemistry HOT articles:

Fluoxetine scaffold to design tandem molecular antioxidants and green catalysts
Giovanni Ribaudo, Laura Orian et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA03509B

Giovanni Ribaudo, Marco Bortoli, Alberto Ongaro, Erika Oselladore, Alessandra Gianoncelli, Giuseppe Zagotto and Laura Orian

‘In this paper, we describe the synthesis of some fluoxetine analogues incorporating a selenium nucleus. Selenium is the key oligoelement present in the enzymes involved in the antioxidant endogenous defense system. We have chosen fluoxetine because it is a very important antidepressant, better known with its commercial name ‘Prozac’. The mechanistic details of the enhanced antioxidant potential of our designed compounds were unraveled combining nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and quantum chemistry calculations.’

Read the interview with the authors about their article here.

More HOT articles

One-pot synthesis of indoles and quinolinones from ortho-tosylaminophenyl-substituted para-quinone methides
Junwei Wang, Lihong Hu et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA05497F

Copper-catalyzed synthesis of α-ketoamides using water and dioxygen as the oxygen source
Yuanyuan Xiao, Fang Xiao et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA05921H

Direct access to multi-functionalized benzenes via [4 + 2] annulation of α-cyano-β-methylenones and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes
Qianfa Jia, Qiao Ren et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA05251E

One-pot method for the synthesis of 1-aryl-2-aminoalkanol derivatives from the corresponding amides or nitriles
Jan Otevrel, Pavel Bobal et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA04359A

Iodine-catalyzed efficient synthesis of xanthene/thioxanthene-indole derivatives under mild conditions
Weihang Miao, Xuequan Wang et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA05217E

Synthesis of highly substituted tetrahydroquinolines using ethyl cyanoacetate via aza-Michael–Michael addition
Arunan Palanimuthu, Gene-Hsian Lee et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA01264E

Read the full HOT article collection

 

Most popular 2020 articles

Reviews

CuAAC-ensembled 1,2,3-triazole-linked isosteres as pharmacophores in drug discovery: review
Alisha Rani, Jandeep Singh et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09510A

Asymmetric catalysis in direct nitromethane-free Henry reactions
Lin Dong and Fen-Er Chen, DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10263A

Phosphorus-containing amino acids with a P–C bond in the side chain or a P–O, P–S or P–N bond: from synthesis to applications
Mathieu Arribat, Emmanuelle Rémond et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10917J

Papers

A molecular electron density theory study of the participation of tetrazines in aza-Diels–Alder reactions
Luis R. Domingo, Patricia Pérez et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA01548B

Self-assembly and multifunctionality of peptide organogels: oil spill recovery, dye absorption and synthesis of conducting biomaterials
Monikha Chetia, Sunanda Chatterjee et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10395C

K2S2O8 mediated C-3 arylation of quinoxalin-2(1H)-ones under metal-, photocatalyst- and light-free conditions
Nibedita Baruah Dutta, Gakul Baishya et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA00013B

A concise method for fully automated radiosyntheses of [18F]JNJ-46356479 and [18F]FITM via Cu-mediated 18F-fluorination of organoboranes
Gengyang Yuan, Anna-Liisa Brownell et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA04943C

Rhodium-catalyzed phosphorylation reaction of water-soluble disulfides using hypodiphosphoric acid tetraalkyl esters in water
Mieko Arisawa, Masahiko Yamaguchi et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA02377A

Cu/TEMPO catalyzed dehydrogenative 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition in the synthesis of spirooxindoles as potential antidiabetic agents
Chitrala Teja, Fazlur Rahman Nawaz Khan et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA01553A

Photoinitiated decarboxylative C3-difluoroarylmethylation of quinoxalin-2(1H)-ones with potassium 2,2-difluoro-2-arylacetates in water
Yanhui Gao, Lei Wang et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA02059A

Cembrane-type diterpenoids from the gum resin of Boswellia carterii and their biological activities
Xiaowei Sun, Jinqian Yu et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09776G

The mechanochemical Scholl reaction as a versatile synthesis tool for the solvent-free generation of microporous polymers
Annika Krusenbaum, Lars Borchardt et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA05279E

Synthesis of a coumarin derivative of resorcin[4]arene with solvent-controlled chirality
Anna Szafraniec and Waldemar Iwanek, DOI: 10.1039/D0RA00368A

Microwave-assisted synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular docking studies of new coumarin-based 1,2,3-triazoles
Ravinder Dharavath, G. Prashanthi et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA01052A

Third-generation ionic liquids with N-alkylated 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane cations and pelargonate anions
Anna Turguła, Juliusz Pernak et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA00766H

Chiral mono- and dicarbamates derived from ethyl (S)-lactate: convenient chiral solvating agents for the direct and efficient enantiodiscrimination of amino acid derivatives by 1H NMR spectroscopy
Federica Balzano and Gloria Uccello-Barretta, DOI: 10.1039/D0RA00200C

Fluorene benzothiadiazole co-oligomer based aqueous self-assembled nanoparticles
J. Schill, L. Brunsveld et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09015K

Isosorbide bis(methyl carbonate) synthesis from isosorbide and dimethyl carbonate: the key role of dual basic–nucleophilic catalysts
José R. Ochoa-Gómez, Olga Gómez-Jiménez-Aberasturi et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA03552A

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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The year in review – Nanoscience in RSC Advances 2020

Looking back at 2020, we would like to share with you some of the great research that has been published in RSC Advances over the year. We are proud to present a selection of the most popular 2020 nanoscience papers, reviews and HOT articles published so far.

We hope you enjoy reading these articles and as always, all our articles are open access – free to read and accessible to everyone.

RSC Advances in the news

Adhesion and bactericidal properties of nanostructured surfaces dependent on bacterial motility
Keisuke Jindai, Takeshi Ito et al. DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08282D

Picture: © Shutterstock

To combat antmicrobial resistance, Takeshi ito and colleagues have been researching natural and artificial instances of nanostructured surfaces – including cicada wings, gecko feet and black silicon – which are bactericidal, with the ability to break the cell membranes of bacteria.

The study was published in February and was covered in a piece published in The Times newspaper.

 

 

2020 HOT articles

Over the year, our reviewers and Associate Editors have handpicked articles of particular interest and marked them as HOT. We are very pleased to highlight some outstanding 2020 nanoscience HOT articles:

Versatile magnetic microdiscs for the radio enhancement and mechanical disruption of glioblastoma cancer cells
Selma Leulmi Pichot, Russell Cowburn et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA00164C

Selma PichotThe study by Selma Leulmi Pichot (University of Cambridge) and colleagues describes the use of a new type of magnetic microparticle to improve the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive form of brain cancer.

‘Our results demonstrate that we have powerful tools that can efficiently contribute to improve the current treatment of glioblastoma. Moreover, when used as an adjunct to surgery, the magnetic microdiscs have the potential to shorten the course of radiation therapy in countries where access to radiation therapy is scarce.’

Read the interview with Selma Leulmi Pichot about her article here.

 

More HOT articles

Directly writing flexible temperature sensor with graphene nanoribbons for disposable healthcare devices
Xue Gong, Liqiang Liet al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA02815K

Read the full HOT article collection

 

Most popular 2020 articles

Reviews

Progress in the functional modification of graphene/graphene oxide: a review
Wang Yu, Luo Jie et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA01068E

Developments and applications of nanomaterial-based carbon paste electrodes
Somayeh Tajik, Mohammadreza Shokouhimehr et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA03672B

Papers

Identification of preferentially exposed crystal facets by X-ray diffraction
Liping Zhang, Mietek Jaroniec et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA00769B

Study of 223Ra uptake mechanism on hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles as a function of pH
Petra Suchánková, Ján Kozempel et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08953E

The structure and photoelectrochemical activity of Cr-doped PbS thin films grown by chemical bath deposition
Ashour M. Ahmed, Mohamed Shaban et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA11042A

The fabrication of a chemical sensor with PANI-TiO2 nanocomposites
Mohammad R. Karim, Mohammed M. Rahman et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09315J

Antibacterial potential of Ni-doped zinc oxide nanostructure: comparatively more effective against Gram-negative bacteria including multi-drug resistant strains
Atanu Naskar, Kwang-sun Kim et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09512H

Investigation of strain and doping on the electronic properties of single layers of C6N6 and C6N8: a first principles study
Asadollah Bafekry, Mohsen Shafieirad et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA04463F

Projection method as a probe for multiplexing/demultiplexing of magnetically enriched biological tissues
Mohammad Reza Zamani Kouhpanji and Bethanie J. H. Stadler, DOI: 10.1039/D0RA01574A

PLGA nanoparticle preparations by emulsification and nanoprecipitation techniques: effects of formulation parameters
Karol Yesenia Hernández-Giottonini, Armando Lucero-Acuña et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10857B

Atomic scale study of black phosphorus degradation
Changbae Hyun, Kwang S. Kim et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08029E

Efficient removal of Cu(II) from aqueous systems using enhanced quantum yield nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots
Mohammed Abdullah Issa, Hamid Zentou et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA02276D

Continuous syntheses of carbon-supported Pd and Pd@Pt core–shell nanoparticles using a flow-type single-mode microwave reactor
Masato Miyakawa, Masateru Nishioka et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10140C

Hollow Au@TiO2 porous electrospun nanofibers for catalytic applications
Labeesh Kumar, Bhanu Nandan et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10487A

Beetle-like droplet-jumping superamphiphobic coatings for enhancing fog collection of sheet arrays
Xikui Wang, Youfa Zhang et al., DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09329J

Sorption capacity of seaweed-like sodium titanate mats for Co2+ removal
Yoshifumi Kondo, Tohru Sekino et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA06662A

Hybrid red blood cell membrane coated porous silicon nanoparticles functionalized with cancer antigen induce depletion of T cells
Antti Rahikkala, Hélder A. Santos et al., DOI: 10.1039/D0RA05900E

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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