Author Archive

RSC Advances Emerging Investigators series 2021 – Author spotlight

Welcome to our Emerging Investigator Series 2021. This series showcases some of the very best work from chemists in the early stages of their independent careers. In keeping with the theme of RSC Advances as a cross-cutting chemistry journal, in this inaugural issue with the help of our Series Editor Professor James Batteas, 23 papers were published as part of the collection spanning the breadth of chemistry on topics ranging from the development and application of analytical tools and devices for chemical analysis, to the design and synthesis of bioactive materials for disease treatments, to catalysis and synthesis of new materials. You can read all about the contributions in this accompanying Editorial, prepared by the 2021 Series Editor James Batteas.

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight an author from the series, Dr. Scott Tsai. We interviewed Scott to find out more about his area of research and his contribution to the series.

An ultrafast enzyme-free acoustic technique for detaching adhered cells in microchannels
Alinaghi Salari, Sila Appak-Baskoy, Imogen R. Coe, Scott S. H. Tsai and Michael C. Kolios
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 32824-32829

Dr. Scott Tsai is the Director of the Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University). His undergraduate training in Mechanical Engineering is from the University of Toronto, and his masters and PhD degrees in Engineering Sciences are from Harvard University. Dr. Tsai’s laboratory specializes in droplet and bubble microfluidics. His group also collaborates actively with hospital researchers to implement these technologies in medical applications related to kidney disease and prostate cancer. Dr. Tsai is a recipient of the United States’ Fulbright Visiting Research Chair Award, Government of Ontario’s Early Researcher Award, and Toronto Metropolitan University’s Deans’ Teaching Award.

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?

Our paper describes an acoustic force technique for detaching cells initially attached to a substrate. This approach is interesting because it is chemical-free, while conventional methods usually utilize enzymatic reactions that can damage the cell membrane.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
The impact may be significant for detaching adherent cells from microfluidic or lab-on-a-chip devices, where, due to the nature of the slow-moving flows, conventional detachment methods require multiple washing steps. Our acoustic technique enables single-step cell detachment.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
Adherent cultured cells are used ubiquitously in laboratories, and most of the time researchers use trypsinization (an enzymatic method) to detach cells from the substrate. We were motivated to create a non-enzymatic approach that detaches cells rapidly.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
We wanted to minimize the duration of the cells’ exposure to acoustic forces. This was realized since, due to the nature of the acoustic perturbation we introduced, the acoustic excitation exposure the cells experienced was greatly reduced as soon as the cells detached from the substrate.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
As a researcher with a background in engineering and physics, I found the most challenging aspect of this work to be figuring out what characteristics of a cell detachment method are important for other researchers. For example, we learned that it was critical to demonstrate the re-attachment ability of the cells, and whether they can spread and regain their original morphology within a short period of time.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
Right now, we are working using a similar approach to generate acoustic microstreaming flows from adherent cells, and using the microstreaming velocity to predict the mechanical properties (like stiffness) of the cells. This is very exciting because existing gold-standard methods for measuring cellular mechanical properties are complicated, and we are developing an approach that can potentially help reduce the complexity.

How has your research evolved from your first article to this particular article?
I was trained as a fluid mechanician, so my first articles were all about fundamental fluid mechanics. Since becoming an independent investigator, and having my lab located in a hospital building, I’ve collaborated a lot more with biological scientists and clinicians, and learned much more about important questions in biology and medicines. Many of my more recent articles feature the application of physics and engineering to address biological questions.

What is the next step? What work is planned?
My lab is continuing our work on microfluidics with microbubbles, acoustics, and aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). For now, we will continue developing these technologies while collaborating with hospital researchers to apply the technologies in pre-clinical and clinical settings.

Why did you want to publish in RSC Advances?
Several RSC journals, including Lab on a Chip, Soft Matter, and RSC Advances, are read broadly by researchers in my field. I wanted to publish in RSC Advances so that my colleagues throughout the world can see and read our article.

What are your thoughts on open access publishing?

I support the principle of open access publishing, but the publishing fees are painful to pay. As a result, I am only able to publish a small fraction of my papers with open access.

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

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RSC Advances 2021 Outstanding Student Paper Award webinars

We are delighted to announce a series of webinars to celebrate the winners of our 2021 Outstanding Student Paper Awards.

RSC Advances Outstanding Student Paper Awards 2021 – these awards recognise outstanding work published in the journal in 2021, for which a substantial component of the research was conducted by a student. We received over 900 nominations, which were shortlisted, and the winning papers were then selected by our Editorial Board and Associate Editors.

You can view the winning contributions and hear more about the winners in our collection.

In a series of webinars, some of the award winners will present their research and there will be an opportunity to ask the winners questions about their work.

Registration is free, so sign up now to support our winners and hear about the exciting research that helped them to win the award!

RSC Advances Outstanding Student Award webinar part 1 – Tuesday 22nd November at 16:00-17:00 GMT

During this first webinar, we will hear from the following winners
Analytical chemistry winner: Vanessa N. Ataide, São Paulo University, Brazil
Energy chemistry winner: Alexandra H. Teodor, University of Tennessee at Knoxville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA
Inorganic chemistry winner: Aayushi Arora, Doon University, India

[Registration link]

RSC Advances Outstanding Student Award webinar part 2 – Wednesday 30th November at 09:00-10:00 GMT

During this second webinar, we will hear from the following winners
Environmental chemistry winner: Yin Sim Ng, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
Food chemistry winner: Yao Lu, Renmin University of China, China
Catalysis chemistry winner: Jairus L. Lamola, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
Organic chemistry winner: Ajaz Ahmed, Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, India

[Registration link]

RSC Advances Outstanding Student Award webinar part 3Wednesday 30th November at 16:00-17:00 GMT

During this third and final webinar, we will hear from the following winners
Materials chemistry winner: Shyam K. Pahari, University of Massachusetts, USA
Computational and theoretical chemistry winner: Abhishek T. Sose, Virginia Tech, USA

[Registration link]

We hope to see you there!

 

 

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Call for papers: Nano and microscale modifications of biomaterials

RSC Advances is delighted to announce a new themed collection titled ‘Nano and microscale modifications of biomaterials’. This collection is Guest Edited by Professor Andrzej Zeliński (Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland) and Professor Beata Majkowska-Marzec (Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland).

Scope:

The rapid development of research in biomaterials in recent years can be noticed. On the other side, even obtaining a new or improved biomaterial, or a novel fabrication method, is a difficult task, and as a rule, such materials must be created and possess specific properties. The bulk properties determine some mechanical and some physical properties, but also an interface between a biomaterial and a human environment, bones, and tissue, decides on biocompatibility, adhesion between an implant and a tissue, surface hardness, and Young`s modulus, and most importantly, bioactivity and cytotoxicity. Therefore, the role of the surface is the most important among all considered features of the biomaterial.

This themed collection in RSC Advances aims to demonstrate the most recent advances in nano and micro-scale modifications of biomaterials. Such surface treatments can be performed by several techniques such as fine polishing, acidic and alkaline etching, anodic and micro-arc oxidation, and ion bombardment of the surface outer layer, and as numerous ceramic, polymer, metallic, and in particular composite coatings. Each of them can possess different microstructure, thickness, adhesion, wettability, corrosion behaviour, bioactivity, cytotoxicity, and antibacterial efficiency, depending on process parameters. It is already proven that the most important features are microstructure and topography, in nano and micro dimensions, and chemical and phase compositions of the surface layer and deposits. Therefore, research progress in this specific field can be highly diverse, as demonstrated by recent literature. In this special issue the emphasis is placed on the demonstration of links between nano and micro-scale surface modifications, and their effects on mechanical, chemical, physical, and biological properties.

How to submit:
Both Papers and Review articles will be considered for this issue. All submissions will be subject to an initial assessment by Associate Editors and, if suitable for the journal, they will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of RSC Advances.

Our APC is among the lowest in the industry and there are no submission charges. Discounts and waivers are offered to authors from developing countries.

If you would like to submit to this issue the manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system anytime before the submission deadline of 15 June 2023. During submission, authors will be asked if they are submitting for a themed collection and should include the name of the themed collection. If you would like to submit but require additional time to prepare your article, please do let us know by contacting the journal.

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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August 2022 RSC Advances Review Articles

Welcome to August’s Review round up!

Every month we update our 2022 Reviews in RSC Advances collection to showcase all of the review articles published in RSC Advances in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest reviews.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Browse a selection of our August reviews below:

Value-added materials recovered from waste bone biomass: technologies and applications
Abarasi Hart, Komonibo Ebiundu, Ebikapaye Peretomode, Helen Onyeaka, Ozioma Forstinus Nwabor and KeChrist Obileke
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 22302-22330

The role of electrochemical biosensors in SARS-CoV-2 detection: a bibliometrics-based analysis and review
Shudan Mao, Li Fu, Chengliang Yin, Xiaozhu Liu and Hassan Karimi-Maleh
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 22592-22607

Electrophilic halogenations of propargyl alcohols: paths to α-haloenones, β-haloenones and mixed β,β-dihaloenones
Pakorn Bovonsombat, Punyanuch Sophanpanichkul and Satreerat Losuwanakul
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 22678-22694

Advanced developments in environmentally friendly lubricants for water-based drilling fluid: a review
Xiangyang Zhao, Daqi Li, Heming Zhu, Jingyuan Mab and Yuxiu An
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 22853-22868

Heterocyclic compounds as a magic bullet for diabetes mellitus: a review
Umme Farwa and Muhammad Asam Raza
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 22951-22973

Transition metal oxides as a cathode for indispensable Na-ion batteries
Archana Kanwade, Sheetal Gupta, Akash Kankane, Manish Kumar Tiwari, Abhishek Srivastava, Jena Akash Kumar Satrughna, Subhash Chand Yadav and Parasharam M. Shirage
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 23284-23310

Insight into nanocrystal synthesis: from precursor decomposition to combustion
Buzuayehu Abebe, Dereje Tsegaye and H. C. Ananda Murthy
RSC Adv., 2022, 12,  24374-24389

Adipogenesis or osteogenesis: destiny decision made by mechanical properties of biomaterials
Ting Su, Mimi Xu, Feng Lu and Qiang Chang
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 24501-24510

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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August 2022 Popular Advances Articles

Welcome to August’s Popular Advances article round up!

Every month we update our 2022 RSC Advances Popular Advances Article Collection to showcase all of the articles selected by our reviewers and handling editors as Popular Advances in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest Popular articles.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Preparation of sodium silicate/red mud-based ZSM-5 with glucose as a second template for catalytic cracking of waste plastics into useful chemicals
Xiaofeng Wang, Fuwei Li, Asad Ali, Hengshuo Gu, Hongbing Fu, Zhixia Li  and Hongfei Lin
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 22161-22174

Eight new phenolic acids from the leaves of Illicium dunnianum and their osteoprotective activities
Hai-bo Li, Sen-ju Ma, Ying-xin Shan, Ting Li, Zhen-zhong Wang, Wei Xiao, Zuo-cheng Qiu and Yang Yu
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 21655-21661

Synthesis of novel benzothiazole derivatives and investigation of their enzyme inhibitory effects against Alzheimer’s disease
Şevval Karaca, Derya Osmaniye, Begum Nurpelin Sağlık, Serkan Levent, Sinem Ilgın, Yusuf Özkay, Ahmet Çağrı Karaburun, Zafer Asım Kaplancıklı and Nalan Gundogdu-Karaburun
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 23626-23636

The remarkable performance of a single iridium atom supported on hematite for methane activation: a density functional theory study
Kefale Wagaw Yizengaw, Tigist Ayalew Abay, Delele Worku Ayele and Jyh-Chiang Jiang
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 23736-23746

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest  Popular Advances articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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RSC Advances Popular Advances – an interview with Ali Rauf

We are very pleased to introduce Dr Ali Rauf, the corresponding author of the RSC Advances article Theoretical investigation of the optoelectronic response of highly correlated Cu3P photocatalyst. This paper became one of the newest additions to our Popular Advances collection. The Popular Advances collection is a selection of well-received RSC Advances articles, handpicked by our reviewers and handling editors.

Ali told us more about the work that went into this article and what he hopes to achieve in the future. If you would like to explore more of our Popular Advances, please find the full online collection here.

Meet the Author:

Ali Rauf presently works as Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, LUMS. Ali completed his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Sungkyunkwan University, South Korea in 2018, and is now the PI of the Energy Materials groups at LUMS who specialize in materials design for energy environmental applications. During the initial years of Ali’s career, he has been more focused on experimental aspects of material design but over the period of time, he has realized the importance of theoretical study that actually compliments experimental results. Ali and his group have started studying various semiconductors using various DFT based approximations to find a theoretical explanation of experimental results. Ali and his group are very excited about this overlap between theoretical knowledge and experimentation, and will be employing DFT for the theoretical screening of suitable semiconductor materials for catalytic applications before the experimentation phase in any upcoming projects.

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?

The study focuses on finding the electronic and optical properties of a Cu3P semiconductor computationally using theoretical methods like Density Functional Theory (DFT). Moreover, advanced methods like the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) were also used to find the optical properties comprising excitonic effects.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?

Although Cu3P has found applications in visible light photocatalysis, theoretically, its optoelectronic response had not been extensively studied. We employed advanced theories (BSE and BSE@hyhrid functional) to understand the underlying electronic structure. These properties are vital to understanding Cu3P better and fine-tuning it for green energy applications.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?

The aim was to perform the theoretical study on Cu3P and compare the data with the experimentally obtained absorption data. We wanted to go beyond Independent Particle Approximation (IPA) and consider electron-hole interaction via BSE for the studied semiconductor. The BSE was solved not only after DFT + U, but also on top of hybrid functional (BSE@hybrid) to see the effect of the starting point in our optical results.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study.

The first thing was to select the material to probe. After the literature survey, we learned what was missing and determined our computational demand. We needed to apply several approximations in our study requiring various levels of computational resources, so the HPC cluster was used from the very start.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?

1: Computational cost: When performing hybrid functional calculations, we faced memory issues. Similarly, BSE can quickly lead to such issues if we increase the convergence parameters in the BSE kernel.

2: Moreover, in selecting the Hubbard potentials (U term in DFT + U), we tried to find these parameters from the first-principle methods. However, the current theory in the QE code was not sufficient for the full-shell d-electron systems (like Cu). Therefore, we had to go back to the empirical approach in DFT + U, where we arbitrarily picked “U” values for our system.  

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

In theory, we have seen such power to turn on/off interactions by applying approximations, when BSE (excitonic interactions turned on) performs much better than IPA (Independent Particle – without excitons). So, to get close to experimental absorption, excitonic physics is important in semiconductors (apart from low-dimensional systems).  

What is the next step? What work is planned?

We plan to form the heterostructure model of Cu3P with other suitable semiconductor photocatalysts to fine-tune the properties of the overall system or introducing the impurity to obtain something similar.

Theoretical investigation of the optoelectronic response of highly correlated Cu3P photocatalyst

Haseeb Ahmad, Ali Rauf and Shoaib Muhammad

RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 20721-20726

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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RSC Advances Emerging Investigators series 2021 – Author spotlight

Welcome to our Emerging Investigator Series 2021. This series showcases some of the very best work from chemists in the early stages of their independent careers. In keeping with the theme of RSC Advances as a cross-cutting chemistry journal, in this inaugural issue with the help of our Series Editor Professor James Batteas, 23 papers were published as part of the collection spanning the breadth of chemistry on topics ranging from the development and application of analytical tools and devices for chemical analysis, to the design and synthesis of bioactive materials for disease treatments, to catalysis and synthesis of new materials. You can read all about the contributions in this accompanying Editorial, prepared by the 2021 Series Editor James Batteas.

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight an author from the series, Dr Abisola Egbedina. We interviewed Abisola to find out more about her area of research and her contribution to the series.

Green synthesis of ZnO coated hybrid biochar for the synchronous removal of ciprofloxacin and tetracycline in wastewater
Abisola O. Egbedina, Kayode O. Adebowale, Bamidele I. Olu-Owolabi, Emmanuel I. Unuabonah and Morenike O. Adesina
RSC Adv., 2021, 11, 18483-18492

Abisola Egbedina completed her PhD in Industrial Chemistry at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, under the supervision of Professor Kayode Adebowale and Professor Bamidele Olu-Owolabi. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Industrial Chemistry from Bowen University, Iwo, Nigeria (2009) and her master’s degree in Industrial Chemistry from the University of Ibadan (2012). She received the 2017 Commonwealth Science Conference follow-on grant from the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2018 to conduct research at the University of Toronto, Canada, under the supervision of Professor Ya-Huei (Cathy) Chin. Her research interests lie in the synthesis of low-cost and environmentally benign materials for applications in wastewater treatment. Specifically, she focuses on tuning the surface properties of these materials for optimum selectivity and efficiency. Her current research focuses on the synthesis of carbon materials from biomass for the removal of pharmaceuticals and other emerging contaminants from water. She has a number of peer-reviewed publications in international journals. She has also presented some of her research findings at various local and international conferences. Abisola Egbedina was appointed as an Assistant Lecturer in the Department of Chemistry, University of Ibadan in November 2016, and is currently a Lecturer II. Besides teaching and carrying out research, Abisola loves reading novels, watching movies, swimming and dancing.

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?
The goal of the study in the research article was to remove antibiotic contaminants from water sources utilizing an adsorption approach and low-cost, environmentally benign adsorbents.
Antibiotic resistance in organisms has been linked to the presence of these contaminants. Antibiotic resistance is increasing all over the world at an alarming rate, making common infectious diseases such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, blood poisoning and gonorrhoea more difficult to treat. The healthcare system has also been strained because of this. As a result, this research topic is timely since it aids in addressing these issues by looking for strategies to minimize the quantities of these harmful pollutants in the environment.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
The findings described in the journal are just one in a series of studies that could lead to the identification of a cheaper alternative to activated carbon, which is now the most widely used and also the most expensive. Activated carbon is currently used in wastewater treatment plants and portable drinking water treatment systems. This raises the overall treatment cost due to its high cost. Demonstrating the effectiveness of the adsorbents presented in this work for a wide range of pollutants and their subsequent acceptance could result in lower water treatment costs and greater accessibility to clean water for everyone.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
In Nigeria, kaolinite clay is the most common clay mineral. However, because it is a 1:1 clay it is non-expandable and hence has a low cation exchange capacity. The notion of mixing it with biomass arose as a result of this. Biomass has been widely used to remove pollutants from aqueous media, but its efficiency is rather low when compared to other materials and it frequently presents the problem of bleeding and separation difficulties. The goal was to see if by combining these two materials, the overall efficiency might be increased. Indeed, because this combination (kaolinite clay and pawpaw seeds) was proven to boost the heavy metal adsorption capability, we chose to use it to remove organic contaminants. We also used coconut husk instead of pawpaw seeds to test how this affected the overall results.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
The initial priority, I believe, was to develop adsorbents that are more cost-effective and efficient than activated carbon, which is currently the industry standard. We did so by employing a system that ensured appropriate energy and reagent utilization and manufacturing. These are, in my opinion, critical points to examine as the world grapples with the effects of climate change and aims to adjust to conducting research in a “green” manner.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
The analysis would be the most challenging aspect of the investigation. Accessing modern analytical instruments for the detection of pollutants at concentrations close to those seen in real water systems was not just expensive but unavailable. Finally, we had to use UV-Vis spectroscopy to determine this parameter which is accurate but has a limited detection limit when compared with LC-MS.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
It is a wonderful feeling to finally have your study published and available to millions of people. This comes after months of hard work in the lab and multiple drafts of the manuscript. What excites me most is seeing that others find the work intriguing enough to read. Individuals from all around the world have requested copies of my article. I also look at the number of citations and downloads and feel like I have accomplished something meaningful.

How has your research evolved from your first article to this particular article?
The use of watermelon rind as a stabilizing agent for magnetite for the removal of pollutants from water sources was the subject of my first article. Following that, I have been curious to investigate what additional effects modifying these biomasses with other low-cost and widely available natural materials, such as clay, has on the adsorption of these contaminants. It is envisaged that the modifications will give synergistic enhancement of these materials’ beneficial properties, ultimately resulting in increased adsorption capacity.

What is the next step? What work is planned?
Currently, I am working on a project that entails the application of low-cost adsorbents for the removal of organic contaminants from real-life industrial and hospital effluents to examine how well they perform in real-world environmental conditions. For my postdoctoral research, I am working on a proposal to examine how these adsorbents may be used to clean drinking water in households quickly, efficiently and at a cheap cost. The goal is to provide safe and clean drinking water to individuals at all levels without the need for expensive and time-consuming treatment.

Why did you want to publish in RSC Advances?
I chose RSC Advances because I wanted to publish in a high-quality publication that featured research in all fields of Chemistry, ensuring that my article would reach a wider audience. RSC Advances made it possible for me to publish open access by waiving the article processing charge [this is part of our commitment to waive the article processing charge for corresponding authors based at Research4Life countries, both groups A and B]. My research article’s readership and impact will grow as a result of its open access policy.

What are your thoughts on open access publishing?
Open access publishing, in my opinion, encourages access to free, high-quality and valuable research information, particularly for academics in developing countries who otherwise would be unable to obtain it. Open access, on the other hand, can require authors to pay to have their articles published which might be a problem in circumstances when research is primarily self-funded.

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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RSC Advances Emerging Investigators series 2021 – Author spotlight

Welcome to our Emerging Investigator Series 2021. This series showcases some of the very best work from chemists in the early stages of their independent careers. In keeping with the theme of RSC Advances as a cross-cutting chemistry journal, in this inaugural issue with the help of our Series Editor Professor James Batteas, 23 papers were published as part of the collection spanning the breadth of chemistry on topics ranging from the development and application of analytical tools and devices for chemical analysis, to the design and synthesis of bioactive materials for disease treatments, to catalysis and synthesis of new materials. You can read all about the contributions in this accompanying Editorial, prepared by the 2021 Series Editor James Batteas.

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight an author from the series, Dr. Christine Beemelmanns. We interviewed Christine to find out more about her area of research and her contribution to the series.

GNPS-guided discovery of xylacremolide C and D, evaluation of their putative biosynthetic origin and bioactivity studies of xylacremolide A and B
Felix Schalk, Janis Fricke, Soohyun Um, Benjamin H. Conlon, Hannah Maus, Nils Jäger, Thorsten Heinzel, Tanja Schirmeister, Michael Poulsen and Christine Beemelmanns
RSC Adv., 2021, 11, 18748-18756

Dr. Beemelmanns studied Chemistry at the RWTH Aachen. She then went to Japan for a one year research stay in the group of Prof.  Sodeoka at RIKEN. Back in Germany she worked at the FU Berlin with Prof. Reißig and received her PhD in Organic Chemistry. She then worked another six month in Japan at the University of Tokyo under the supervision of Prof K. Suzuki and joined shortly afterwards the group of Prof. Clardy at Harvard Medical School (Boston) in 2011. End of 2013, she received an offer from the Hans-Knöll Institute (HKI), where she established the Leibniz Junior Research Group in the field of Natural Products Chemistry and Chemical Biology. In 2021 she accepted a call from the Leipzig University for a Professorship Biochemistry of Microbial Physiology. Her research combines different aspects of chemical ecology and organic and natural product chemistry and aims to chemically and functionally characterize microbial signaling and defense molecules in different symbiotic model systems. By analyzing coevolved microbial interactions, unprecedented chemical core structures with potential pharmaceutical application are likely to appear.

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?

We are currently facing depleted antibiotic drug pipelines on a global scale. Our research article describes our quest to identify novel antimicrobials from termite symbionts and how they might be made.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?

Our chemical study motivated us to sequence the genome of the producing fungal species and related species. Our first genome mining result allowed us to interlink newly identified natural products with their putative biosynthetic origin and results point towards a promiscuous biosynthetic machinery present within certain fungal lineages.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?

We were intrigued by the finding that microbes produce most often a bunch of structurally-related products of a promiscuous biosynthetic machinery. Here, we showcase the structural diversity of the natural product family xylacremolide and relate the structural diversity to their biosynthetic origin.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?

It is important to carefully mine metabolomic datasets, and if necessary revisit these datasets if novel and more powerful methodologies become available.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?

It is very challenging to elucidate the ecological function of isolated produced natural products. Here, we propose that the identified natural products might act as histone deacetylase inhibitors and show their antifungal activities. This suggests that this compound class might act as modulators of transcription and thus developmental processes maybe even within the producer organism.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

Fungal symbionts have undergone multiple adaptions strategies to survive within a highly evolved social insect system. I am very excited about elucidating the genomic and also the metabolic adaptation strategies.

How has your research evolved from your first article to this particular article?

Starting from classical natural product chemistry, we have spearheaded the fungus-fungus interaction-based discovery approaches, which are more and more complemented by comparative genome mining approaches.

What is the next step? What work is planned?

We are currently analyzing the abundance and diversity of the identified biosynthetic pathways to understand their origin but also the reason for their promiscuity. We are currently mining the obtained whole genome data to pin-point biosynthetic pathways to the identified structures.

Why did you want to publish in RSC Advances?

RSC Advances is a well-known peer-reviewed journal of the Royal Chemical Society and allows rapid open-access publication for a fair price.

What are your thoughts on open access publishing?

My research group and collaborators benefit from open access publishing and I support publishing open access.

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

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Call for papers: Photoluminescence of lanthanide-doped phosphor materials

RSC Advances is delighted to announce a new themed collection titled ‘Photoluminescence of lanthanide-doped phosphor materials’. This collection is Guest Edited by Dr Ram Sagar Yadav (Banaras Hindu University), Prof. Bryce S. Richards (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), Professor Joanna Pisarska (University of Silesia) and Professor Xinyu Ye (JiangXi University of Science and Technology).

Scope: 

The aim of this collection is to focus on the synthesis, as well as the structural and optical properties, of different types of lanthanide-doped phosphor materials, such as phosphors, nano-phosphors and phosphor composites. This collection welcomes primary research articles as well as review articles, related to the synthesis, characterization and applications of different types of the lanthanide-doped phosphor materials.

The lanthanide ions can produce multicolor photoluminescence, and contain various distinct energy levels in which some are meta-stable. Each energy level can be excited with a certain excitation wavelength, with the emitted light of lanthanide ions covering emissions in the ultraviolet, visible and near infrared regions. Due to the various properties of lanthanide ions, lanthanide-doped phosphor materials can be utilised for different technological applications in various fields, such as display devices, red-green-blue (RGB) emitting materials, light emitting diodes (LEDs), phosphor-converted LEDs (pc-LEDs), white LEDs, solar cell, optical heating, temperature sensing and bio-imaging.

Lanthanide ions also enable upconversion (UC) and downconversion (DC) of photons. The UC process is helpful for measuring the temperature sensing sensitivity of different phosphor materials, as it depends on the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) of the two thermally coupled (TC)/non-thermally coupled (NTC) emitting levels. In these cases, the emission intensity of one level is found to increase while that of the other decreases when the external temperature of the sample is increased, and vice-versa. This generates lattice vibration in the host lattice, which initiates a shift in the population of the excited ions from one level to the other. The plot between FIR-based sensitivity and external temperature gives temperature sensing, which can be examined in the other lanthanide-doped phosphor materials.

The aim of this collection is to focus on the synthesis, as well as the structural and optical properties, of different types of lanthanide-doped phosphor materials, such as phosphors, nano-phosphors and phosphor composites. This collection welcomes primary research articles as well as review articles, related to the synthesis, characterization and applications of different types of the lanthanide-doped phosphor materials.

Topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Advanced materials for wastewater treatment and desalination
  • Synthesis of green nanomaterials
  • Advanced nanocomposites from waste resources
  • Nanocomposite modification and functionalization
  • Computational studies of nanocomposite materials
  • Life-cycle analysis of nanocomposite materials

How to submit:
Both Papers and Review articles will be considered for this issue. All submissions will be subject to an initial assessment by Associate Editors and, if suitable for the journal, they will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of RSC Advances.

Our APC is among the lowest in the industry and there are no submission charges. Discounts and waivers are offered to authors from developing countries.

If you would like to submit to this issue the manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system anytime before the submission deadline of 30 January 2023. During submission, authors will be asked if they are submitting for a themed collection and should include the name of the themed collection. If you would like to submit but require additional time to prepare your article, please do let us know by contacting the journal.

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Welcome to our new Editorial Board members: Surajit Ghosh, Fabienne Dumoulin and Bob Baker

We are delighted to welcome Professor Surajit Ghosh, Dr Fabienne Dumoulin and Dr Bob Baker the RSC Advances team!

Surajit Ghosh was born in West Bengal, India. He studied Organic Chemistry at the University of Calcutta, India, and gained his Master of Science in Organic Chemistry in 2000. Then, he moved to Syngene International Pvt. Ltd (Biocon INDIA Group) and worked as a Scientist till July 2004 on a drug discovery project. Subsequently, he moved to the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur in August 2004 for his doctoral studies in the group of Prof. Sandeep Verma in the area of Peptide Self-assembly.

After completing his Ph.D. in July 2008, he received a postdoctoral fellowship at the Cell Biology and Biophysics Division of European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany with Dr Thomas Surrey (August 2008), where he worked on the organization of microtubule and molecular motor proteins till December 2010. He joined CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology Kolkata, India in 2011, and worked as a Principal Scientist till July 2019. Subsequently, he joined as a Professor in the Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering at the Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur in July 2019. He is a recipient of the BIOCON Tribute award, EMBL Fellowship, Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, Ramanujan Fellowship, Indian Peptide Society Young Scientist Award, Asima Chatterjee Young Scientist Award, Syamasri Gupta Young Scientist Award, CSIR-CDRI Award for Excellence in Drug Research (2020) and SERB-STAR Award (2020). He is an elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (2016), and the West Bengal Academy of Science and Technology (2018). At IIT Jodhpur he is leading his group with current research focus on the areas of Chemical Neuroscience, Chemical Biology and the Development of Biophysical Platform/Biosensor.

Browse a selection of Surajit’s RSC publications:

Designed hybrid anticancer nuclear-localized peptide inhibits aggressive cancer cell proliferation
Prasenjit Mondal, Saswat Mohapatra, Debmalya Bhunia, Prabir Kumar Gharai, Nabanita Mukherjee, Varsha Gupta, Satyajit Ghosh and Surajit Ghosh
RSC Med. Chem., 2022, 13, 196-201

An overview of key potential therapeutic strategies for combat in the COVID-19 battle
Gaurav Das, Surojit Ghosh, Shubham Garg, Satyajit Ghosh, Aniket Jana, Ramkamal Samat, Nabanita Mukherjee, Rajsekhar Roy and Surajit Ghosh
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 28243-28266

A bis-indole/carbazole based C5-curcuminoid fluorescent probe with large Stokes shift for selective detection of biothiols and application to live cell imaging
Pinaki Bhattacharjee, Sourav Chatterjee, Anushree Achari, Abhijit Saha, Debkumar Nandi, Chiranjit Acharya, Kasturi Chatterjee, Surajit Ghosh, Snehasikta Swarnakar and Parasuraman Jaisankar
Analyst, 2020, 145, 1184-1189

 

Fabienne Dumoulin is a faculty at the Department of Biomedical Engineering of Acibadem Mehmet Ali Aydınlar University. She studied first biology, graduated in biochemistry then completed her PhD with a European Label in Organic Chemistry at the Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, France (2002). After a post-doc in Pisa, Italy, she settled in Turkey in 2005. She has been awarded several Young Scientist Awards: TUBA-GEBİP from the Turkish Academy of Sciences (2015), BAGEP from the Bilim Akademisi (2015) and the Mustafa N Parlar Foundation of METU (2016). She guest-edited a themed issue ‘Nano- and Molecular Engineering of Photosensitisers’ for Photobiol. Photochem. Sci. (Nov 2018), has co-edited the book series “Porphyrin Science by Women” published in January 2021, and recently contributed to the book series Fundamentals of Porphyrin Chemistry: A 21st Century Approach. She has co-authored 85+ publications (research articles, reviews and book chapters), and has supervised a dozen of Master and PhD students so far. She is an associate editor of RSC Advances since 2015.

Her research interests focus on the design and synthesis of tetrapyrrolic derivatives, mainly phthalocyanines for photodynamic therapy to treat cancer and combat AMR, either molecular or with nanotechnology. She is also interested in the energy and catalytic applications of phthalocyanines.

Browse a selection of Fabienne’s RSC publications:

The unique features and promises of phthalocyanines as advanced photosensitisers for photodynamic therapy of cancer
Pui-Chi Lo, M. Salomé Rodríguez-Morgade, Ravindra K. Pandey, Dennis K. P. Ng, Tomás Torres and Fabienne Dumoulin
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2020, 49, 1041-1056

Phthalocyanine-based mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles: NIR photodynamic efficiency and siRNA photochemical internalization
Gülçin Ekineker, Christophe Nguyen, Sümeyra Bayır, Sofia Dominguez Gil, Ümit İşci, Morgane Daurat, Anastasia Godefroy, Laurence Raehm, Clarence Charnay, Erwan Oliviero, Vefa Ahsen, Magali Gary-Bobo, Jean-Olivier Durand and Fabienne Dumoulin
Chem. Commun., 2019, 55, 11619-11622

Photophysical properties of palladium/platinum tetrasulfonyl phthalocyanines and their application in triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion
Yuanyuan Che, Wenbo Yang, Geliang Tang, Fabienne Dumoulin, Jianzhang Zhao, Lang Liu and Ümit İşci
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2018, 6, 5785-5793

 

Dr Bob Baker was born in Blaenavon, South Wales. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Warwick and his PhD studies under the supervision of Prof. P. G. Edwards at Cardiff University (1997-2001) on early transition metal triphosphamacrocycles. He then worked as a postdoctoral research fellow with Prof. Cameron Jones (2001-2005), working on low oxidation state group 13 compounds, followed by an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship held at the Technische Universität Braunschweig, working with Prof. Dr. Matthias Tamm on substituted cyclohepatrienyl early transition metal complexes. From 2006-2008 he was a Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry at Nottingham Trent University, before moving to Trinity College in January 2009. His research interests are in fundamental and applied actinide chemistry and the development of new transition metal complexes for catalysis.

Browse a selection of Bob’s RSC publications:

A multi-technique study of altered granitic rock from the Krunkelbach Valley uranium deposit, Southern Germany
Ivan Pidchenko, Stephen Bauters, Irina Sinenko, Simone Hempel, Lucia Amidani, Dirk Detollenaere, Laszlo Vinze, Dipanjan Banerjee, Roelof van Silfhout, Stepan N. Kalmykov, Jörg Göttlicher, Robert J. Baker and Kristina O. Kvashnina
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 25529-25539

A computational investigation of orbital overlap: Versus energy degeneracy covalency in [UE2]2+ (E = O, S, Se, Te) complexes
James A. Platts and Robert J. Baker
Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 1077-1088

Perfluorinated phosphine and hybrid P–O ligands for Pd catalysed C–C bond forming reactions in solution and on Teflon supports
Farzana Begum, Muhammad Ikram, Brendan Twamley and Robert J. Baker
RSC Adv., 2019, 9, 28936-28945

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

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