October 2022 RSC Advances Review Articles

Welcome to September’s Review round up!

Every month we update our 2022 Reviews in RSC Advances collection to showcase all of the review articles published in RSC Advances in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest reviews.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Browse a selection of our October reviews below:

Recent development and challenges in fuel cells and water electrolyzer reactions: an overview
Rasu Ramachandran, Tse-Wei Chen, Pitchaimani Veerakumar, Ganesan Anushya, Shen-Ming Chen, Ramanjam Kannan, Vinitha Mariyappan, Selvam Chitra, Nagappan Ponmurugaraj and Muthusamy Boominathan
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 28227-28244

Microplastics in aquatic systems, a comprehensive review: origination, accumulation, impact, and removal technologies
Antonio Tursi, Mariafrancesca Baratta, Thomas Easton, Efthalia Chatzisymeon, Francesco Chidichimo, Michele De Biase and Giovanni De Filpo
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 28318-28340

1,4-Dihydropyridine: synthetic advances, medicinal and insecticidal properties
Parthiban A. and Parameshwar Makam
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 29253-29290

Nickel sulfide and phosphide electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction: challenges and future perspectives
Ali Shahroudi, Mahsa Esfandiari and Sajjad Habibzadeh
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 29440-29468

Electrochemical creatinine detection for advanced point-of-care sensing devices: a review
Carlos Luis Gonzalez-Gallardo, Noé Arjona, Lorena Álvarez-Contreras and Minerva Guerra-Balcázar
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 30785-30802

Antimicrobial potentials of natural products against multidrug resistance pathogens: a comprehensive review
Abeer H. Elmaidomy, Nourhan Hisham Shady, Khaled Mohamed Abdeljawad, Mohamed Badran Elzamkan, Hussein Hykel Helmy, Emad Ashour Tarshan, Abanoub Nabil Adly, Yasmin Hamdy Hussien, Nesma Gamal Sayed, Ahmed Zayed and Usama Ramadan Abdelmohsen
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 29078-29102

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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October 2022 Popular Advances Articles

Welcome to October’s Popular Advances article round up!

Every month we update our 2022 RSC Advances Popular Advances Article Collection to showcase all of the articles selected by our reviewers and handling editors as Popular Advances in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest Popular articles.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

 

Evaluation of mesoporous borosilicate glass–ceramic composites as frits in reference electrodes
Ibrahim H. A. Badr and Osama A. S. Rafe
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 28878-28885

3,4,3′-Tri-O-methylellagic acid as an anticancer agent: in vitro and in silico studies
Andika Pramudya Wardana, Muhammad Ikhlas Abdjan, Nanik Siti Aminah, Mochamad Zakki Fahmi, Imam Siswanto, Alfinda Novi Kristanti, Mirza Ardella Saputra and Yoshiaki Takaya
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 29884-29891

Review on fluorinated nucleoside/non-nucleoside FDA-approved antiviral drugs
Magda M. F. Ismail and Mohammed Salah Ayoup
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 31032-31045

 

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest  Popular Advances articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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A Decade of Progress in Click Reactions Based on CuAAC

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection on A Decade of Progress in Click Reactions Based on CuAAC, guest edited by Associate Editor Prof. Manojit Pal (Dr Reddy’s Institute of Life Sciences, India).

We are inviting submissions of new papers and review articles to this collection!

About the Collection

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2022 was awarded jointly to Prof. Carolyn R. Bertozzi, Prof. Morten Meldal and Prof. K. Barry Sharpless for their work in the development of biorthogonal and click chemistry. Bioorthogonal chemistry has made it possible to monitor the chemical processes occurring in living cells, without interfering with native biochemical systems or causing cellular toxicity. Click chemistry has revolutionized the routes of molecular construction and has applications in drug discovery and development, medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry, analytical chemistry, materials science, surface science, and more!

However, click chemistry has not gone unnoticed over the years; many chemists have made contributions (both big and small) to this exciting area of research. So, in celebration of the Nobel Prize, we are excited to announce a new collection comprising of relevant papers published over last 10 years. The collection, handpicked by Prof. Pal, predominantly covers the application of click reactions in the areas of bioorganic and medicinal chemistry, with papers devoted to the development of methodologies also included.

RSC Advances is most cited gold open access journal dedicated to the chemical sciences and all publications in our journal are free to access. We hope you enjoy reading these articles!

Read the full collection

If you would like to submit your research to this collection, and give your work the global visibility it deserves, you can do so now!

All submissions will be subject to an initial assessment by Associate Editors and, if suitable for the journal, they will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of RSC Advances.

Submit your research

Meet the Editor

Manojit Pal received his PhD from Jadavpur University, India in 1995 under the guidance of Prof. Nitya G. Kundu. He then worked in various industrial R&D centres including Alembic, Sun Pharma, Matrix Lab, and Dr Reddy’s Lab Ltd. In 2009, he joined Dr. Reddy’s Institute of Life Science where he now continues as a Professor of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry, as well as Chief Scientist of the CIMPS Department.

Prof. Pal became an Associate Editor at RSC Advances in 2015, FRSC in 2016, Adjunct Faculty-Manipal University in 2018, and member of Editorial Board – Bioorganic Chemistry in 2019. He also became an invited member of ACS in 2019. Furthermore, in 2020, his name was featured in Stanford’s top 2% list of scientists in the world, and in 2022, he received a certificate for publishing open access articles with Elsevier, four of which were linked to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

His research interests include development of new chemical entities under the new drug discovery programme in various therapeutic areas, namely tuberculosis, inflammation, obesity, psoriasis, and cancer. Other major areas of focus include transition metal / non-metal catalysed reactions, sonochemical approaches, green chemistry, heterocycle synthesis, and more! He has authored/co-authored more than 280 research publications, as well as 18 review articles, several patents, a book chapter, and a book.

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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RSC Advances Emerging Investigators series 2021 – Author spotlight

Welcome to our Emerging Investigator Series 2021. This series showcases some of the very best work from chemists in the early stages of their independent careers. In keeping with the theme of RSC Advances as a cross-cutting chemistry journal, in this inaugural issue with the help of our Series Editor Professor James Batteas, 23 papers were published as part of the collection spanning the breadth of chemistry on topics ranging from the development and application of analytical tools and devices for chemical analysis, to the design and synthesis of bioactive materials for disease treatments, to catalysis and synthesis of new materials. You can read all about the contributions in this accompanying Editorial, prepared by the 2021 Series Editor James Batteas.

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight an author from the series, Dr. Scott Tsai. We interviewed Scott to find out more about his area of research and his contribution to the series.

An ultrafast enzyme-free acoustic technique for detaching adhered cells in microchannels
Alinaghi Salari, Sila Appak-Baskoy, Imogen R. Coe, Scott S. H. Tsai and Michael C. Kolios
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 32824-32829

Dr. Scott Tsai is the Director of the Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University). His undergraduate training in Mechanical Engineering is from the University of Toronto, and his masters and PhD degrees in Engineering Sciences are from Harvard University. Dr. Tsai’s laboratory specializes in droplet and bubble microfluidics. His group also collaborates actively with hospital researchers to implement these technologies in medical applications related to kidney disease and prostate cancer. Dr. Tsai is a recipient of the United States’ Fulbright Visiting Research Chair Award, Government of Ontario’s Early Researcher Award, and Toronto Metropolitan University’s Deans’ Teaching Award.

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?

Our paper describes an acoustic force technique for detaching cells initially attached to a substrate. This approach is interesting because it is chemical-free, while conventional methods usually utilize enzymatic reactions that can damage the cell membrane.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
The impact may be significant for detaching adherent cells from microfluidic or lab-on-a-chip devices, where, due to the nature of the slow-moving flows, conventional detachment methods require multiple washing steps. Our acoustic technique enables single-step cell detachment.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
Adherent cultured cells are used ubiquitously in laboratories, and most of the time researchers use trypsinization (an enzymatic method) to detach cells from the substrate. We were motivated to create a non-enzymatic approach that detaches cells rapidly.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
We wanted to minimize the duration of the cells’ exposure to acoustic forces. This was realized since, due to the nature of the acoustic perturbation we introduced, the acoustic excitation exposure the cells experienced was greatly reduced as soon as the cells detached from the substrate.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
As a researcher with a background in engineering and physics, I found the most challenging aspect of this work to be figuring out what characteristics of a cell detachment method are important for other researchers. For example, we learned that it was critical to demonstrate the re-attachment ability of the cells, and whether they can spread and regain their original morphology within a short period of time.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
Right now, we are working using a similar approach to generate acoustic microstreaming flows from adherent cells, and using the microstreaming velocity to predict the mechanical properties (like stiffness) of the cells. This is very exciting because existing gold-standard methods for measuring cellular mechanical properties are complicated, and we are developing an approach that can potentially help reduce the complexity.

How has your research evolved from your first article to this particular article?
I was trained as a fluid mechanician, so my first articles were all about fundamental fluid mechanics. Since becoming an independent investigator, and having my lab located in a hospital building, I’ve collaborated a lot more with biological scientists and clinicians, and learned much more about important questions in biology and medicines. Many of my more recent articles feature the application of physics and engineering to address biological questions.

What is the next step? What work is planned?
My lab is continuing our work on microfluidics with microbubbles, acoustics, and aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). For now, we will continue developing these technologies while collaborating with hospital researchers to apply the technologies in pre-clinical and clinical settings.

Why did you want to publish in RSC Advances?
Several RSC journals, including Lab on a Chip, Soft Matter, and RSC Advances, are read broadly by researchers in my field. I wanted to publish in RSC Advances so that my colleagues throughout the world can see and read our article.

What are your thoughts on open access publishing?

I support the principle of open access publishing, but the publishing fees are painful to pay. As a result, I am only able to publish a small fraction of my papers with open access.

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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RSC Advances Popular Advances Interview with Abdu Saeed

We are very pleased to introduce Dr Abdu Saeed who is the corresponding author of the RSC Advances article, antibacterial activity of the micro and nanostructures of the optical material tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum and its application as an antimicrobial coating. This was well received by reviewers and was handpicked by our handling editors to be part of our Popular Advances collection – a big congratulations to all the authors!

Dr Saeed told us more about the work that went into this study and what he hopes to achieve in the future. You can explore other articles in our 2022 Popular Advances online collection here!

 

Meet the Author:

Abdu Saeed was born in Ibb, Yemen, in 1979. After obtaining two degrees in physics (from Ibb University and Taiz University, respectively) he was selected as a teaching assistant at Thamar University. Afterwards, he pursued an MSc and PhD in applied experimental physics at King Abdulaziz University, Saudia Arabia, where he was selected as the best postgraduate student! Nowadays, Dr Saeed works in multidisciplinary fields including energy, electrical properties, nanotechnology, and polymer science. Currently, Dr Saeed and his group are studying the bio applications of the optical material tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum.

 

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist and why it is of current interest?
This research focuses mainly on estimating the antibacterial activity of Alq3, but the effect of particle size (micro- and nano- structures) of the Alq3 powders was also investigated. Furthermore, we successfully incorporated this material with polystyrene to form an antibacterial composite for coating purposes.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
Alq3 is one of the most famous small molecular semiconductors with efficient electroluminescence and fluorescence properties. Since this material was used to manufacture the first OLED, it has been utilized massively in fabricating optoelectrical devices. However, it has not been used in bio applications. Therefore, we think use as an antibacterial coating could bring more interest to Alq3 in bio applications. 

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
I was studying the toxicity of this material and found two things: Firstly, this material has high toxicity and, when used as a dye for fluorescence bioimaging, the captured images had high fluorescence. These results gave the motivation to utilize this material in new bio applications. Secondly, we spent three months overcoming bacterial contamination in the lab while doing the cell viability experiments. These two things motivated us to study whether Alq3 can be used as an antibacterial agent.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
Alq3 is an attractive and exciting material. It has different crystal structures, and it is considered the most popular organometallic semiconductor in OLED. Its molecular structure has a conjugated π-electron system, which is advantageous for many applications. This material has electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) properties. EL properties make it an excellent material for optoelectronics devices; PL properties make it a good material for optical applications. Its diverse properties and current applications make it an excellent candidate for more investigations into new applications.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
We tested the antibacterial activity of the Alq3 samples on seven different human pathogenic bacterial strains representing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli ATCC 11775 (EC), Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 (EF), Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 (KP), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 33591 (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 (PA), Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600 (SA), and Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 (ST). Estimating the IC50 for this material against the bacterial strains was the most challenging part of this study.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
We are most excited about using Alq3 in biosensor applications, particularly in bioimaging. We believe that it will be interesting to make modifications, such as using an appropriate material as a surface modifier containing optimized ligands to synthesize Alq3 into a core-shell form. This could further reduce Alq3’s toxicity whilst maintaining its impressive fluorescence.

What is the next step? What work is planned?
We will use what we have achieved to identify and obtain further uses for Alq3. We will study its antifungal activity and incorporate it with suitable polymers for its antifungal tests. Additionally, we hope to check its interaction with different viruses. The first use of Alq3 for bioimaging was by us – we believe there is still much more effort to be made to optimize the use of Alq3 in bioimaging. 

 

Antibacterial activity of the micro and nanostructures of the optical material tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum and its application as an antimicrobial coating

Graphical abstract: Antibacterial activity of the micro and nanostructures of the optical material tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum and its application as an antimicrobial coating

 

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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RSC Advances 2021 Outstanding Student Paper Award webinars

We are delighted to announce a series of webinars to celebrate the winners of our 2021 Outstanding Student Paper Awards.

RSC Advances Outstanding Student Paper Awards 2021 – these awards recognise outstanding work published in the journal in 2021, for which a substantial component of the research was conducted by a student. We received over 900 nominations, which were shortlisted, and the winning papers were then selected by our Editorial Board and Associate Editors.

You can view the winning contributions and hear more about the winners in our collection.

In a series of webinars, some of the award winners will present their research and there will be an opportunity to ask the winners questions about their work.

Registration is free, so sign up now to support our winners and hear about the exciting research that helped them to win the award!

RSC Advances Outstanding Student Award webinar part 1 – Tuesday 22nd November at 16:00-17:00 GMT

During this first webinar, we will hear from the following winners
Analytical chemistry winner: Vanessa N. Ataide, São Paulo University, Brazil
Energy chemistry winner: Alexandra H. Teodor, University of Tennessee at Knoxville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA
Inorganic chemistry winner: Aayushi Arora, Doon University, India

[Registration link]

RSC Advances Outstanding Student Award webinar part 2 – Wednesday 30th November at 09:00-10:00 GMT

During this second webinar, we will hear from the following winners
Environmental chemistry winner: Yin Sim Ng, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
Food chemistry winner: Yao Lu, Renmin University of China, China
Catalysis chemistry winner: Jairus L. Lamola, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
Organic chemistry winner: Ajaz Ahmed, Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, India

[Registration link]

RSC Advances Outstanding Student Award webinar part 3Wednesday 30th November at 16:00-17:00 GMT

During this third and final webinar, we will hear from the following winners
Materials chemistry winner: Shyam K. Pahari, University of Massachusetts, USA
Computational and theoretical chemistry winner: Abhishek T. Sose, Virginia Tech, USA

[Registration link]

We hope to see you there!

 

 

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Advancing with Advances- How to write a Cover Letter?

The role of Cover Letters

With insights from Professor Robert Baker, Trinity College Dublin

This week we are discussing the role of cover letters and the impact they have on your manuscript. Your cover letter is the first thing the handling Associate Editor and reviewers will read so it is important to provide a cover letter that explains the importance of your work.

Editorial prescreening (reject without peer review): Most journals (especially high profile / high impact) pre-screen manuscripts on the basis of scope, novelty, originality, and expected impact/relevance/significance of the work. The cover letter is the best opportunity to convince the editor to send your manuscript out for peer review. The cover letter should not be only a summary of the paper or copied over from the abstract/conclusions and should focus on what advance over literature has been made.

The cover letter should describe (in no more than 1 page) why your article is new and important, and how it fits into the journal.

Professor Robert James Baker is an Assistant Professor at the School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin and an Associate Editor as well as Editorial Board member of RSC Advances

Examples of ‘non-ideal’ cover letters:

  1. ‘lazy and template’ cover letters:

Pay attention to detail… note recent submission “blunders” reported below:

Dear Editor of RSC Advances,

We would like to submit our manuscript titled “XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX” for consideration in Journal of XYZ.”

  1. Cover letter as a summary of the paper and not set in context of literature:

Dear Editor

We are hereby submitting the manuscript titled “XXX” to RSC Advances. This paper explains the first-time synthesis of XXXXXXXXXX using XXXXXXXXX method. In this work, XXXXXXXXXXXXX is calculated for the first time using XXXXXXXX theory and the value obtained is XXXXXXXXXX. The size of XXXXXXX from XXXXXXXXXX analysis is XXXnm. The material exhibits XXXXXXXXXXX. The imaging experiments showed XXXXXXXXXXXX. This work is original and has not been submitted elsewhere.  Please do contact us in case you need any other information.

Signed

The authors

  1. Cover letter listing the past achievements of the authors

Dear Editor

Please find herewith enclosed a manuscript, entitled “XXXXXXXXXX” to be considered for the publication in RSC Advances. The above entitled manuscript is an original work and is not under consideration for publication elsewhere. All the authors are aware of the submission and agree for its publication. Suitability for publication in this journal may be justified as follows:

Our group has been dedicated to synthesizing XXXXXXXXXX for more than 25 years. We have published 150 scientific articles in Journal X, Journal Y, Journal Z etc. Our strong expertise underpins this manuscript.

Thanking You,

The Authors

  1. Cover letter for a review and work not set in context of other reviews on this topic

Dear Editor,

We wish to submit an original research article entitled “XXXXXXXXXXX” for consideration by the journal of RSC Advances. We believe this manuscript is appropriate for publication in the journal because it covers the innovative strategies of XXXXXXXX in XXX, YYY, and ZZZ COVID-19. COVID-19 has become the worst pandemic disease of the current millennium, and XXXXXXXXX is a promising strategy that addresses this crisis. This article reviews the role of XXXX in three categories: (1) XXX, (2) YYY, and (3) ZZZ. Moreover, it intends to be a comprehensive and valuable review by covering notable and vital applications of XXX strategies for improving health and environmental sanitation. We also confirm that this work is original and has not been published elsewhere, nor is it currently under consideration for publication elsewhere.

Signed

The authors

An example of a ‘good’ cover letter:

Dear Editor,                                                                                                            02/06/2022

 

Insights into the solution structure of the hydrated uranyl ion from neutron scattering and EXAFS experiments

 

Samuel J. Edwards, Daniel T. Bowron, * and Robert J. Baker*

 

Recent events in Russia and Ukraine have forced politicians to confront the issues of energy security, which also lie at the heart of sustainable energy production. Nuclear power could supply energy during a national or international switch from fossil fuels to renewables whilst retaining the advantages of power generation not being so impacted by geopolitical forces, it has a problem with waste. Current thinking is to dispose of legacy, current and future waste in a geological repository for hundreds of thousands of years. How these radiotoxic, heterogeneous mixtures interact with the environment is therefore an important consideration but there are significant knowledge gaps in even the basic chemistry of the actinides. As water will be an inescapable part of the environment, the aqueous chemistry becomes very important to understand, but even simple questions like what the coordination number in solution has not been answered. Given that many countries are advanced in their disposal planning (e.g. Forsmark in Sweden and Onkalo in Finland), it becomes even more critical to understand these issues and to add evidence to back up safety cases for repositories.

In this contribution we report on the use of neutron diffraction in solution to give insight into the aqueous structure of the uranyl ion. Solution studies are generally conducted using EXAFS, but whilst bond lengths are consistent, EXAFS struggles to give reliable coordination numbers, due in part to the inherent assumptions made by this technique. We reasoned that by using a probe excellently suited for the light elements, namely neutron diffraction, then a clearer picture would emerge. The neutron data can be combined with the previously published EXAFS data to produce a model that covers both bulk and local diffraction that gives a coherent solution structure based on bond metrics, coordination numbers and stability constants. We also conclusively show that the -yl oxygen is not involved in hydrogen bonding to bulk water, something that has been inferred from solid state structures and vibrational spectroscopy by many authors, but not irrefutably shown in solution. It is worth noting that the stability constants are readily extracted from our data, and this is of much importance as it is difficult to measure these very small thermodynamic properties by more conventional means.

Putting our work into a broader context, this is the first example where neutron diffraction has been used on any actinide and, given the importance of aqueous chemistry in migration behaviour and selective Ln/An extractions, we believe that our manuscript has sufficient novelty, impact and applicability to a broad area in actinide coordination and environmental chemistry to be considered for publication in Chemical Communications.

All authors have contributed to this work and have agreed on the submitted version.

Yours sincerely,

The authors

 

To summarize, our top tips for a good cover letter include:

  • Provide a succinct summary of your work that includes a statement of importance, this is your chance to ‘sell’ your work to the editor (and reviewers).
  • Explain the impact on the community – why is the work important?
  • Future potential – where does your work lead?
  • Make sure you address the correct journal! This is a common mistake
  • Do not copy and paste chunks of text from your abstract or introduction
  • Always write BOTH for the expert (e.g. referee) AND for an interested reader working in an adjacent area. This is particularly applicable for the highest-impact journals where appeal to non-specialists is emphasized.

We hope that you find these insights from useful while writing your next paper!

Check out other publishing tips and tricks from our academic Associate Editors here.

RSC Advances looks forward to advancing the chemical sciences with you!

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RSC Advances Popular Advances Interview with James Knight

We are excited to introduce Dr James Knight, who is the corresponding author of the RSC Advances article, The influence of degree of labelling upon cellular internalisation of antibody-cell penetrating peptide conjugates. The manuscript was well received by reviewers and was handpicked by our handling editors to be part of our Popular Advances collection.

Dr Knight told us more about the work that went into this paper and what he hopes to achieve in the future. You can explore other articles in our 2022 Popular Advances online collection here!

Meet the Author:

Dr James Knight is lecturer in radiochemistry at the School of Natural and Environmental Sciences at Newcastle University. His research surrounds the synthesis and preclinical evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging and therapeutic applications. Additionally, he is the Degree Programme Director for MSc Drug Chemistry and the lead for radiochemistry within the Discovery of Medicines research theme in the Faculty of Medical Sciences. Interestingly, he also recently co-authored two textbooks on click chemistry and its role in radiochemistry!

The first author, Toni Pringle, is a PhD student who led the research in this paper!

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist and why it is of current interest?
In the present era of precision medicine, antibodies have emerged as an important class of highly target-specific therapeutic drugs, particularly in oncology, yet their inefficient cellular internalisation limits their scope of application to disease targets situated on the exterior side of the cell membrane. This article is based on research led by PhD student Toni Pringle who modified Herceptin (an antibody used to treat HER2-positive breast and gastric cancers) with a peptide that confers cell-penetrating properties and examined how the extent of this modification affected the uptake of Herceptin in human breast cancer cells, resulting in data that advances our understanding of the cell-internalising properties of these constructs.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
The results of our study shine a light on the significant influence of a fundamental molecular design parameter – the degree of cell-penetrating peptide labelling. Notably, we found that a radiolabelled analogue of Herceptin modified with five cell-penetrating peptides had uptake in HER2-expressing cells 14.7-fold higher after 48 hours compared to an equivalent analogue with no peptide modification. The scale of this enhancement is exciting when you consider its implications for enhancing the therapeutic index of antibody-drug conjugates, as well as its potential to expand the scope of antibody-based positron emission tomography imaging agents to include disease biomarkers located in the intracellular environment.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
The main focus of our research is the development of radiopharmaceuticals that can be used as imaging and/or therapeutic agents for cancer. We are particularly interested in radiopharmaceuticals based on antibody-cell penetrating peptide conjugates (Ab-CPPs) and our motivation in this case was to understand the extent to which cellular internalisation of cancer target-specific Ab-CPP is affected by the degree of peptide labelling. Our group is keen to expand in this area and we felt it was crucial to get a firm handle on this important parameter.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
To allow us to determine the degree of peptide labelling, we decided to use a bioconjugation strategy based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition as this provided a convenient way to measure this parameter by depletion of the alkyne absorbance in the UV region. We also had to think carefully about how to approach the cell-based assays which were fairly complex due to the need to consider several factors, such as the specific activity of the radiolabelled Ab-CPPs, cell numbers and how these would change over the course of the experiment (and how to account for this), the sensitivity of the gamma counter, and of course, radio-protection measures at each stage etc. I must say that Toni did a fabulous job here in the planning and implementation of these experiments.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
Working with radioisotopes can be challenging as the agents we put so much effort into making are continually and irretrievably disappearing from the moment we make them! As a result, we have to plan our work very carefully, and often this involves coordinating the activities of several people!

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
Radiochemistry and imaging at Newcastle University is thriving and enjoying a period of expansion. The imminent opening of our radiopharmaceutical GMP suite will grant us the ability to readily translate our probes into the clinic, and we have a dedicated network of academics and clinicians supporting us in this endeavour. For me, this is an incredibly exciting prospect!

What is the next step? What work is planned?
We’re taking this forward in two ways. First, we are applying this approach to antibody-drug conjugates to examine the influence of DOL upon therapeutic efficacy in target cell populations. Second, we are developing PET radioligands based on Ab-CPPs to target intracellular biomarkers that arise early in the development of pancreatic cancer to facilitate early detection. In each case, we are applying new, improved cell penetrating peptides. We are looking forward to sharing the results of these investigations soon!

 

The influence of degree of labelling upon cellular internalisation of antibody-cell penetrating peptide conjugates.

Graphical abstract: The influence of degree of labelling upon cellular internalisation of antibody-cell penetrating peptide conjugates

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September 2022 RSC Advances Review Articles

Welcome to September’s Review round up!

Every month we update our 2022 Reviews in RSC Advances collection to showcase all of the review articles published in RSC Advances in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest reviews.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Browse a selection of our September reviews below:

The diversity and utility of arylthiazoline and aryloxazoline siderophores: challenges of total synthesis
Karolina Kamińska, Andrzej Mular, Evgenia Olshvang, Nils Metzler Nolte, Henryk Kozłowski, Elżbieta Wojaczyńska and Elżbieta Gumienna-Kontecka
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 25284-25322

Optical bio-sensing of DNA methylation analysis: an overview of recent progress and future prospects
Mina Adampourezare, Mohammad Hasanzadeh and Farzad Seidi
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 25786-25806

Synthesis and pharmacological activities of azo dye derivatives incorporating heterocyclic scaffolds: a review
Kibrom Mezgebe and Endale Mulugeta
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 25932-25946

Electrochemical Detection of selected Heavy Metals in Water: a case study of African experiences
Enyioma C. Okpara, Omolola E. Fayemi, Olanrewaju B. Wojuola, Damian C. Onwudiwe and Eno E. Ebenso
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26319-26361

Nanozyme-based sensors for detection of food biomarkers: a review
Fareeha Arshad, Noor Faizah Mohd-Naim, Rona Chandrawati, Daniel Cozzolino and Minhaz Uddin Ahmed
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26160-26175

Mechanism and behavior of caffeine sorption: affecting factors
Merve Fakioğlu and Yasemen Kalpaklı
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26504-26513

Recovery and utilization of crude glycerol, a biodiesel byproduct
Yujia Liu, Biqi Zhong and Adeniyi Lawal
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 27997-28008

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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September 2022 Popular Advances Articles

Welcome to September’s Popular Advances article round up!

Every month we update our 2022 RSC Advances Popular Advances Article Collection to showcase all of the articles selected by our reviewers and handling editors as Popular Advances in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest Popular articles.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Efficient and practical synthesis of monoalkyl oxalates under green conditions
Tatiana Barsukova, Takeyuki Sato, Haruki Takumia and Satomi Niwayama
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 25669-25674

A simple and direct ionic chromatography method to monitor galactose oxidase activity
Eden Kaddouch, Maria E. Cleveland, David Navarro, Sacha Grisel, Mireille Haon, Harry Brumer, Mickaël Lafond, Jean-Guy Berrin and Bastien Bissaro
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26042-26050

Enhanced transformation of CO2 over microporous Ce-doped Zr metal–organic frameworks
Juan Bai, Ziwei Song, Lijuan Liu, Xu Zhu, Faming Gao and Raghunath V. Chaudhari
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26307-26318

Stereoselective synthesis of C3-tetrasubstituted oxindoles via copper catalyzed asymmetric propargylation
Jiao-Mei Wang, Yu Zhao, Chang-Sheng Yao and Kai Zhang
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 26727-26732

Synthesis and Hybridizing Properties of P Stereodefined Chimeric [PS]-{DNA:RNA} and [PS]-{DNA:(2’-OMe)-RNA} Oligomers
Katarzyna Jastrzębska, Anna Maciaszek, Rafał Dolot, Agnieszka Tomaszewska-Antczak, Barbara Mikołajczyk and Piotr Guga
RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 26815-26824

Antibacterial activity of the micro and nanostructures of the optical material tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum and its application as an antimicrobial coating
Abdu Saeed, Aysh Y. Madkhli, Rami Adel Pashameah, Noor M. Bataweel, Mir Ali Razvi and Numan Salah
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 27131-27144

The influence of degree of labelling upon cellular internalisation of antibody-cell penetrating peptide conjugates
Toni A. Pringle, Oliver Coleman, Akane Kawamura and James C. Knight
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 27716-27722

One-pot synthesis of chromenes in the presence of nano-cellulose/Ti(IV)/Fe3O4 as natural-based magnetic nano-catalysts under solvent free conditions
Raziyeh Gholami, Abdolhamid Bamoniri and Bi Bi Fatemeh Mirjalili
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 27555-27563

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest  Popular Advances articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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