RSC Advances HOT articles – a feature interview with Gerrard Marangoni

Meet the Author
gerrard-marangoniWe are very pleased to introduce Gerrard Marangoni, corresponding author of the paper ‘m-s-m cationic gemini and zwitterionic surfactants – a thermodynamic analysis of their mixed micelle formation‘ with Aleisha McLachlan, Kulbir Singh, Michael McAlduff, Samantha Shortall and Shawn D. Wettig. His article has been very well received and handpicked by our reviewers and handling editors as one of our HOT articles.

Gerrard was kind enough to tell us more about the work that went into this article and what he hopes to achieve in the future. You can find out more about Gerrard and his article below and find more HOT articles in our online collection.

Dr. Gerrard Marangoni is a Professor of Chemistry at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada. He began his research career in colloid science as an undergraduate and graduate student; he subsequently worked with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited the thermodynamics of radioactive compounds, and since 1992 has been at StFX University in the Department of Chemistry studying self-assembly of amphiphilic compounds. He has over 25 years of experience in surfactant and colloidal chemistry, a number of highly cited publications, and is a named author on close to 100 research papers, reports, patents and patent applications. Dr. Marangoni is a co-founder of two startup companies a member of several scientific advisory committees.

 

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?

Mixed surfactants systems are important in a number of commercial applications – understanding how they interact on a molecular level is a first step to learning how to improve their performance.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?

For gemini surfactants, researchers are keenly aware of the contribution of the spacer groups towards their self-assembly – we now also appreciate that it can play a significant role in the self-assembly of mixed surfactants system with gemini and other surfactants.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?

Synergism is often discussed from a thermodynamic standpoint, but rarely are the appropriate excess thermodynamic functions measured experimentally. From our previous investigation with these same systems, we observed some key differences in the synergistic effects due to a slight change in the length of the spacer group. We were eager to see how those differences (conclusions drawn from 2D NMR NOESEY and conductivity experiments) showed up in the thermodynamic parameters of micelle formation; hence the calorimetry study.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?

Calorimetric titration studies require careful attention to the design of each experiment with respect to concentration(s) of titrant, the size of each injection, and the number of injections. Poor design often results in a great deal of “trial and error” in order to obtain high quality thermodynamic/binding data.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?

While our group has a great deal of experience with the calculation of the various thermodynamic parameters described in this work, the number of calculations involved, combined with the multiple thermodynamic models utilized make the calculations challenging.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

How well the results from the nmr experiments and calorimetry complemented each other!

What is the next step? What work is planned?

We are currently examining how the synergism extends to other key aspects and applications of surfactants (drug delivery, solubilization).

 

m-s-m cationic gemini and zwitterionic surfactants – a thermodynamic analysis of their mixed micelle formation
Aleisha McLachlan, Kulbir Singh, Michael McAlduff, D. Gerrard Marangoni, Samantha Shortall and Shawn D. Wettig
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 3221-3232
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09432F, Paper

m-s-m cationic gemini and zwitterionic surfactants – a thermodynamic analysis of their mixed micelle formation

 

 

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

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“Witnessing wonderful, innovative and exciting science”: an associate editor’s insight

Dr Donna Arnold, Associate Editor of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s RSC Advances, believes it’s vital that scientists contribute to their community by getting involved in the process of publishing high quality research.

Dr Donna Arnold is Senior Lecturer in Chemistry and Forensic Science at the University of Kent. Her PhD, undertaken at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, focussed on the structure and electronic properties of porous manganese oxides. She has since worked at the Foundation for Research and Technology in Crete and undertaken postdoctoral research at the University of St Andrews. Her research on functional nanomaterials at University College Cork earned her national recognition for her role in the design of the first patterned substrates manufactured by Intel to meet key research needs.

Q. What is your personal research focus, and what aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

I focus on new multifunctional materials for next-generation devices. In particular, my team are interested in synthesising materials with both magnetic and ferroelectric properties. Realising commercially useful materials of this kind would allow us to build memory devices which offer faster read/write capabilities while simultaneously requiring less energy to operate.

Q. What do you find most challenging about your research?

Research should be challenging. Without challenge there is no reward. That said, often the trickiest part is knowing when to share it with the scientific community. Do you wait until you have a complete picture, or do you share your findings as they come? There are pros and cons to both approaches and these vary depending on the project.

Q. Why did you decide to become an Associate Editor for RSC Advances?

I wanted to understand more about the publishing process, contribute to my community, improve my own submissions, and share knowledge and best practice. I applied to RSC Advances because it has a truly global readership across all areas of chemistry.

My role as Associate Editor gives me an opportunity to see the extensive, excellent work being performed in my area of expertise and to play a part in sharing this work with the wider research community.

Q. What is your favourite thing about the Associate Editor role?

It’s got to be witnessing the wonderful, innovative and exciting science being done worldwide. As researchers, our focus often becomes very narrow and we end up only reading within our direct area of interest. Being an Associate Editor means that I read a broad range of science. I’m constantly amazed by the innovative experiments that scientists perform!

Q. How does your role contribute to the journal and to the scientific community?

We all strive to publish our work and rely on these mechanisms to share knowledge and communicate our ideas – something that’s only achievable through the sensitive handling of papers by editorial staff and peer reviewers.

I hope that my contribution to the publishing of excellent science in RSC Advances inspires researchers and continues to drive science to new and exciting heights.

Q. If you had one piece of advice for authors submitting to RSC Advances, what would it be?

Include a cover letter with your submission which allows us to see where you think your work falls in the field and gives us a sense of the paper before we read it. Tell us why your work is cutting-edge and how it extends the current state of the art. What are the highlights? Why is it exciting? How does it fit within the scope of the journal?

Q. Who were your role models as a child, and did you always want to be a scientist?

I always wanted to be a scientist, although initially I wanted to be a pathologist (inspired by the TV show Quincy)! I later realised my true passion was for materials chemistry and that I really wanted to be an academic. I’ve been fortunate to have had some wonderful teachers and an incredibly supportive family, without whom this path would have been impossible.

Q. Which profession would you choose if you weren’t a researcher?

I’d like to think that I would have become a rock star or racing-car driver – although I lack the talent for both!

More realistically, I would have become a primary school teacher so that I could have inspired the next generation of researchers and scientists.

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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RSC Advances highlight article – beetles’ bumpy backs inspire a new way to extract water from air

Harvesting drinking water by making it jump out of foggy air sounds far-fetched, but that is exactly what is achieved by some clever chemistry inspired by the water-gathering exoskeletons of desert beetles.

Research published in the journal RSC Advances reveals how surface coatings with water-attracting and water-repelling regions make water droplets form and jump together into larger droplets that can be collected. The system offers an inexpensive and efficient route to condensing much-needed drinking water from air in arid and semi-arid regions of the world.

Xikui Wang and Youfa Zhang and their colleagues at Southeast University in Nanjing, China, took inspiration from the bumpy surfaces of desert beetles to develop their new technology. The bumps on the beetle’s back promote the formation of water droplets from foggy air. The water is then channelled into the beetle’s mouth, allowing it to survive in the dry wilderness of South West Africa.

To adapt the beetle’s trick for human use, the researchers built a hybrid material by adding silicon carbide particles to a superhydrophobic silicon dioxide coating on aluminium sheets. This created a rough surface with interspersed and interacting water-attracting and water-repelling regions that encouraged tiny water droplets to form.

The water-gathering power of the beetles was then improved by bringing two layers of the synthetic material close together. Remarkably, the forces on the smallest droplets made them jump off the surface and collide. This makes the system more than twice as effective at catching water from the air as single surfaces alone.

Other methods for harvesting water from air do already exist, but the researchers say the new process is easier and will cost less.

While their proof-of-concept work paves the way for building better watercollectors, they also see possible applications for desalination systems to extract drinking water from the sea, and applications in other fields involving heat exchange and water purification.

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Article details:

Beetle-like droplet-jumping superamphiphobic coatings for enhancing fog collection of sheet arrays
Xikui Wang, Jia Zeng, Xinquan Yu, Caihua Liang and Youfa Zhang
RSC Advances, 2020, 10, 282-288
DOI: 10.1039/c9ra09329j

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Career in Polymers XII Workshop, 17-18 July, Prague

career in polymers XII

 

We are delighted to be sponsoring the Career in Polymers XII Workshop, 17-18 July at the Insitute of Macromoleculer Chemistry.

 

Career in Polymers is a workshop for young scientists and PhD students at the start of their professional career. Participants will have the opportunity to meet with other young scientists, discuss their research, and receive valuable feedback. It will cover all aspects of polymer science – chemistry, physics, characterization and applications of polymers (organic, inorganic, hybrid or composite materials) and related topics. It is a satellite meeting of the Prague Meetings on Macromolecules (PMM) and is organised by the Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Czech Academy of Sciences.

The opening lecture entitled “Reflections on my 54 Years of Academic Career in Polymer Colloids” will be given by Professor Mohamed El-Aasser.

PhD students and young researchers from both industry and academia are invited to participate in this two-day event. The best presentation will be awarded.

 

Registration is now open!

Abstract Submission deadline – 10 April
Registration deadline – 5 May

 

You can find out more on the website

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

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84th Prague Meeting On Macromolecules, 12-16 July

84th Prague meeting

 

RSC Advances is very pleased to be sponsoring the 84th Prague Meeting on Macromolecules at the Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 12 – 16 July, Prague, along with MSDE and Soft Matter.

 

The 84th Prague Meeting on Macromolecules – “Frontiers of Polymer Colloids: From Synthesis to Macro-Scale and Nano-Scale Applications” will focus on the latest innovative development in synthesis and characterization of polymer colloids both for life sciences and industry. The meeting will bring together multi-disciplinary experts from both academia and industry in the areas of polymer and material science, pharmaceutics, imaging, biology, and medicine.

Topics

  • Preparation of advanced polymer and/or inorganic colloids, living polymerization systems, kinetics and mechanism, micro- and nano-encapsulation, core-shell and hollow particles, engineered surfaces, computer simulations.
  • Biomedical aspects: particles for life sciences, drug and gene delivery, biomedical diagnostics, sensors. Colloids in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine.
  • Stimuli-responsive colloids, self-assembled systems, interfacial phenomena, characterization and physicochemical properties.
  • New trends in industrial applications: coatings, adhesives, catalysis, paper, textile, optical devices, energy storage.

 

The program will consist of oral presentations of invited as well as contributed lectures. Two sessions are planned for poster presentations.

 

Registration is open now!

 

Important Dates

Registration and abstract submission deadline – 10 April

Standard registration fee deadline – 5 May

Late registration fee – from 6 May

 

You can find out more on the website

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

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Celebrating Women In Science Day 2020

To celebrate Women In Science Day, we have collected some excellent articles by our female editorial board members and associate editors.

We hope you enjoy reading these articles! As always, they’re all free to read & download.

 

Lamellar zeolites: an oxymoron?
F. Solânea O. Ramos, Mendelssolm K. de Pietre and Heloise O. Pastore
RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 2084-2111
DOI: 10.1039/C2RA21573J, Review Article

UV light promoted ‘Metal’/‘Additive’-free oxidation of alcohols: investigating the role of alcohols as electron donors
Preet Kamal Walia, Manik Sharma, Manoj Kumar and Vandana Bhalla
RSC Adv., 2019, 9, 36198-36203
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA06490G, Paper

Biorefinery of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) using non-thermal and clean emerging technologies: an update on the curcumin recovery step
Maria Isabel Landim Neves, Monique Martins Strieder, Renata Vardanega, Eric Keven Silva and M. Angela A. Meireles
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 112-121
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08265D, Paper

Multimodal theranostic assemblies: double encapsulation of protoporphyrine-IX/Gd3+ in niosomes
F. Baris Barlas, Bilal Demir, Emine Guler, A. Murat Senisik, H. Armagan Arican, Perihan Unak and Suna Timur
RSC Adv., 2016, 6, 30217-30225
DOI: 10.1039/C5RA26737D, Paper

Effects of optical and magnetic fields on the electrical characteristics of colloidal graphene quantum dots
Sukanta Nandi, Shanmukh Naidu Majji and Abha Misra
RSC Adv., 2016, 6, 40577-40584
DOI: 10.1039/C6RA03205B, Paper

Gas-phase UV absorption spectra and OH-oxidation kinetics of 1H-1,2,3-triazole and pyrazole
Brahim Samir, Carmen Kalalian, Estelle Roth, Rachid Salghi and Abdelkhaleq Chakir
RSC Adv., 2019, 9, 27361-27368
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA04235K, Paper

Towards the electrochemical diagnosis of cancer: nanomaterial-based immunosensors and cytosensors
Ülkü Anik and Suna Timur
RSC Adv., 2016, 6, 111831-111841
DOI: 10.1039/C6RA23686C, Review Article

Nickel hydroxide coated carbon nanoparticles mediated hybrid three-dimensional graphene foam assembly for supercapacitor
Buddha Deka Boruah and Abha Misra
RSC Adv., 2016, 6, 36307-36313
DOI: 10.1039/C6RA04918D, Paper

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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RSC Advances HOT articles – a feature interview with Peige Wang

Meet the Author
We are very pleased to introduce Peige Wang, co-author of the paper ‘A polypropylene mesh coated with interpenetrating double network hydrogel for local drug delivery in temporary closure of open abdomen‘ with Ze Li, Changliang Wu, Zhen Liu, Zhenlu Li, Xingang Peng, Jinjian Huang and Jianan Ren. His article has been very well received and handpicked by our reviewers and handling editors as one of our HOT articles. Peige was kind enough to tell us more about the work that went into this article and what he hopes to achieve in the future. You can find out more about Peige and his article below and find more HOT articles in our online collection.

Peige Wang is currently the Director of Emergency Department and Emergency Surgery at the Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao and works at the Department of Infectious Diseases and Critical Care, Chinese Medical Association Surgery Branch. He is also Vice Chairman of the Professional Committee of Parenteral Fistula of the Surgical Branch of Chinese Medical Association and Deputy Chief of the Perioperative Group, China Anorectal Board.

 

 

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?
The double-network hydrogel combined the stiffness and elastic ability as well as in situ forming property. It can significantly reduce the inflammatory irritation caused by temporary abdominal closure friction and greatly reduce complications of the open abdomen.

The double-network hydrogel has great potential for practical application in medicine, especially in the treatment of open abdomen through temporary abdominal closure.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
Our study provides an advantagous temporary abdominal closure (TAC) biomaterial with good mechnical strength, drug releasing ability and wound healing for management of defected abdominal wall, and will have great potential clinical applications.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
Temporary abdominal closure (TAC) technology is prone to complications such as intestinal fistulas when treating open abdomen (OA). We hope to design hydrogels with appropriate stiffness and elasticity to reduce local inflammation and reduce the occurrence of complications in patients.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
The reaction substrate of the double-network hydrogel and appropriate reaction ratio.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
Results and discussion. Being a doctor requires knowledge of polymer material to process relevant data and conduct analysis and discussion.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
The emergence and commercialization of more related hydrogels can greatly reduce the incidence of complications of open abdomen (OA) in patients, speed up the recovery time of patients, reduce the length of hospital stay and medical costs.

What is the next step? What work is planned?
We will further study OA-related hydrogels and promote the commercialization of hydrogels for their use in OA patients.

 

A polypropylene mesh coated with interpenetrating double network hydrogel for local drug delivery in temporary closure of open abdomen
Ze Li, Changliang Wu, Zhen Liu, Zhenlu Li, Xingang Peng, Jinjian Huang, Jianan Ren and Peige Wang
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 1331-1340
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10455K Paper

A polypropylene mesh coated with interpenetrating double network hydrogel for local drug delivery in temporary closure of open abdomen

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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January 2020 Reviews

We have just updated our Recent Reviews collection! This rolling collection showcases all of the review articles published in RSC Advances in the last 6 months and now includes January 2020. We update it every month so don’t forget to keep coming back.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Check out the full collection!

Browse our January reviews below:

Antimicrobial peptides from Bombyx mori: a splendid immune defense response in silkworms
Jannatun Nesa, Abdul Sadat, Danieli F. Buccini, Ahmet Kati, Amit K. Mandal and Octavio L. Franco
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 512-523
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA06864C, Review Article

A review of fibrous materials for soft body armour applications
Unsanhame Mawkhlieng, Abhijit Majumdar and Animesh Laha
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 1066-1086
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA06447H, Review Article

Recent developments in detoxication techniques for aristolochic acid-containing traditional Chinese medicines
Yang Fan, Zongming Li and Jun Xi
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 1410-1425
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08327H, Review Article

Colorectal cancer stem cells: a review of targeted drug delivery by gold nanoparticles
Manali Haniti Mohd-Zahid, Rohimah Mohamud, Che Azurahanim Che Abdullah, JitKang Lim, Halima Alem, Wan Nurhidayah Wan Hanaffi and Iskandar Z. A.
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 973-985
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08192E, Review Article

SGLT inhibitors as antidiabetic agents: a comprehensive review
Rahul P. Kshirsagar, Abhishek A. Kulkarni, Rashmi S. Chouthe, Shahebaaz K. Pathan, Hemant D. Une, G. Bhanuprakash Reddy, Prakash V. Diwan, Siddique Akber Ansari and Jaiprakash N. Sangshetti
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 1733-1756
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08706K, Review Article

The effect of magnetic field pretreatment on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in static seawater
Shuanzhu Zhao, Yaxin Wang, Yunxiu Zhao, Xiaotong Sun, Huijuan Zhang, Hong-Guang Piao, Yujiao Zhang and Yanliang Huang
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 2060-2066
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09079G, Review Article

Asymmetric catalysis in direct nitromethane-free Henry reactions
Lin Dong and Fen-Er Chen
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 2313-2326
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10263A, Review Article

Therapeutic potential of dithiocarbamate supported gold compounds
Christian K. Adokoh
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 2975-2988
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09682E, Review Article

Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics in health and medical science: a systematic review
Xi-wu Zhang, Qiu-han Li, Zuo-di Xu and Jin-jin Dou
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 3092-3104
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08985C, Review Article

Recent developments on oximes to improve the blood brain barrier penetration for the treatment of organophosphorus poisoning: a review
Mohd Nor Faiz Norrrahim, Mas Amira Idayu Abdul Razak, Noor Aisyah Ahmad Shah, Herdawati Kasim, Wan Yusmawati Wan Yusoff, Norhana Abdul Halim, Siti Aminah Mohd Nor, Siti Hasnawati Jamal, Keat Khim Ong, Wan Md Zin Wan Yunus, Victor Feizal Knight and Noor Azilah Mohd Kasim
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 4465-4489
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08599H, Review Article

Recent developments in the synthesis of regioregular thiophene-based conjugated polymers for electronic and optoelectronic applications using nickel and palladium-based catalytic systems
Bibi Amna, Humaira Masood Siddiqi, Abbas Hassan and Turan Ozturk
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 4322-4396
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09712K, Review Article

Challenges and opportunities in the recovery of gold from electronic waste
Mudila Dhanunjaya Rao, Kamalesh K. Singh, Carole A. Morrison and Jason B. Love
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 4300-4309
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA07607G, Review Article

Recent synthetic efforts in the preparation of 2-(3,4)-alkenyl (aryl) quinoline molecules towards anti-kinetoplastid agents
Dayana Orozco, Vladimir V. Kouznetsov, Armando Bermúdez, Leonor Y. Vargas Méndez, Arturo René Mendoza Salgado and Carlos Mario Meléndez Gómez
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 4876-4898
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09905K, Review Article

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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January 2020 HOT Articles

We have recently updated our HOT article collection to include all of the articles handpicked by our reviewers and handling editors as HOT. The collection showcases articles published in RSC Advances in the last 6 months, now including January 2020. We update the collection every month so remember to keep coming back!

We hope you enjoy reading these articles and congratulations to all the authors whose articles are featured. As always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

 

Check out the full collection today!

 

Browse our January selection below:

Evaluation of curcumin-mediated photodynamic therapy on the reverse of multidrug resistance in tumor cells
Ying Li, Pei Xiao, Zipeng Huang, Xinru Chen, Xia Yan, Junqiu Zhai and Yan Ma
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 298-306
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09996D, Paper

Therapeutic potency of fermented field water-dropwort (Oenanthe javanica (Blume) DC.) in ethanol-induced liver injury
Dong Hun Lee, Jong Sung Lee, Il Ho Leeb and Jin Tae Hong
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 1544-1551
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA08976D, Paper

A polypropylene mesh coated with interpenetrating double network hydrogel for local drug delivery in temporary closure of open abdomen
Ze Li, Changliang Wu, Zhen Liu, Zhenlu Li, Xingang Peng, Jinjian Huang, Jianan Ren and Peige Wang
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 1331-1340
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10455K, Paper

Sandwich-structured poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) composite film containing a boron nitride nanosheet interlayer
Fujia Chen, Yujiu Zhou, Jimin Guo, Song Sun, Yuetao Zhao, Yajie Yang and Jianhua Xu
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 2295-2302
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09780E, Paper

Synthesis and characterization of thermoresponsive ZIF-8@PNIPAm-co-MAA microgel composites with enhanced performance as an adsorption/release platform
Juan A. Allegretto, Juan M. Giussi, Sergio E. Moya, Omar Azzaroni and Matias Rafti
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 2453-2461
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09729E, Paper

m-s-m cationic gemini and zwitterionic surfactants – a thermodynamic analysis of their mixed micelle formation
Aleisha McLachlan, Kulbir Singh, b Michael McAlduff, D. Gerrard Marangoni, Samantha Shortall and Shawn D. Wettig
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 3221-3232
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA09432F, Paper
RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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IUPAC-MACRO2020, ICC Jeju, Korea 5 – 9 July

IUPAC-MACRO2020

We are delighted to be sponsoring the 48th World Polymer Congress IUPAC-MACRO 2020, at ICC Jeju in Korea on 5 – 6 July along with Polymer Chemistry.

The IUPAC-World Polymer Congress is the largest biennial international multi-symposium conference dedicated to all aspects of polymer science and engineering. Over the years, the MACRO conference has developed a strong reputation for bringing together cutting edge research from top international scientists in the field of polymer science.

The 48th World Polymer Congress will be hosted by the Polymer Society of Korea (PSK) to facilitate exchange and encourage cooperation in our common field. The PSK was founded in 1976 and consists of over 4,500 members from diverse polymer-related fields including polymer chemistry, physics, biology and engineering.

For IUPAC-MACRO2020, seven distinguished plenary speakers and more than 200 renowned speakers will be invited from all over the world including many active female scientists. We expect more than 500 contributed presentations across ten different areas in polymer science.

 

Early Bird Registration and Abstract Submissions are available now!

 

Important Dates
Online Abstract Submission Deadline: 31 March
Early Bird Registration Deadline: 10 May
Pre-Registration Deadline: 20 June

 

Find out more on the website

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

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