Archive for the ‘Meet our authors’ Category

ChemComm 60th Anniversary Board Member Collection – Hiromitsu Maeda

 

Chemical Communications will be publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of these celebrations, we’ve brought together a special collection highlighting the latest work from the pioneering researchers who have supported the journal in reaching this milestone by serving on ChemComm’s Editorial and Advisory boards in the last two decades. Throughout the year, we’ll be catching up with these current and former Board Members to discuss their work and reflect on ChemComm’s 60th anniversary.

Check out our interview with current Advisory Board Member, Professor Hiromitsu Maeda below!

  Hiromitsu Maeda received his Ph.D. degree in 2004 from Kyoto University, under the guidance of Prof. Hiroyuki Furuta (Kyushu University) and Prof. Atsuhiro Osuka, after spending three months in the Sessler group, the University of Texas at Austin, in 2001.  In 2004, he started an academic career in Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University.  In 2008, he was transferred to College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, wherein he was promoted to a professor in 2014.  In 2016, he moved to Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Life Sciences.  He has been awarded several prizes, including ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship (2012) and Fellow of the RSC (2015).

What attracted you to the role as Advisory Board Member for ChemComm?

I have reported my several important works in ChemComm and I was selected as a winner of ChemComm emerging investigator lectureship award in 2012. As a ChemComm advisory board member, I can contribute to the journal by peer-reviewing submitted reports and recommending emerging young scientists for the special issues.

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

ChemComm publishes fascinating results in a wide range of fields of chemistry.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

The reports in ChemComm show cutting-edge and attractive results in just four pages.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

Many high-quality reports as communications are published in ChemComm, which scientists including me think of as a high impact journal.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

Efforts by the authors and referees in ChemComm to publish high-quality reports would provide young scientists with an appropriate forum for publication of their significant research results. ChemComm symposia for young scientists would also support their research activity via publicizing their research findings and also communicating with participants.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

In my recent ChemComm publication (DOI: 10.1039/d4cc00806e), new aspects of core-modified porphyrins as building blocks of ion-pairing materials are reported. Metal complexation and peripheral modifications of thiaporphyrins have been investigated for preparing polarized π-electronic cations with anion-dependent ion-pairing assembling modes, including charge-segregated structures exhibiting electric conductive property.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

The results of this paper, including the arrangement of charged π-electronic systems via iπ–iπ interactions, would facilitate the development of new supramolecular assemblies and functional materials.

 

Be sure to read Professor Maeda’s recent communication – “Substitution-pattern- and counteranion-dependent ion-pairing assemblies of heteroporphyrin-based π-electronic cations” by Masaki Fujita, Yohei Haketa, Shu Seki and Hiromitsu Maeda

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ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary – Thimmaiah Govindaraju

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’ve brought together a collection featuring the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community. We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

To accompany the collection, we’ll be publishing interviews with contributing authors where they provide further insight into their research and reflect on their journey with ChemComm.

Check out our interview with Professor Thimmaiah Govindaraju (Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research) below!

 

Thimmaiah Govindaraju is a Professor at the Bioorganic Chemistry Laboratory, New Chemistry Unit, JNCASR, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. He received his M.Sc. from Bangalore University and PhD in Chemistry from the National Chemical Laboratory and University of Pune, India. He carried out postdoctoral research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Dortmund, Germany as an Alexander von Humboldt postdoctoral fellow. His research interests are at the interface of chemistry, biology, and biomaterials science, including Alzheimer’s disease, peptide chemistry, molecular probes, theranostics, molecular architectonics, and silk and cyclic dipeptide derived biomimetics.

 

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has evolved into a premier journal for publishing pioneering research in chemistry and related fields, in the form of short communications. Its transformation is highlighted by the inclusion of feature articles, two to four page communication format and inclusivity. ChemComm is aptly celebrating its 60th anniversary as a milestone of excellence.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

ChemComm’s broad appeal across multiple disciplines at the chemistry interface is particularly noteworthy. Since my initial publication in 2004, I have consistently contributed to the journal, valuing its wide-reaching impact.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

ChemComm stands out as a leading journal for the expedited publication of urgent and innovative studies. It has cemented its position as a top-tier journal for original, high-quality research communications.

How would you describe the peer review process and interaction with the editorial team at ChemComm?

The peer review process at ChemComm is notably smooth, swift, and author-centric. The journal’s commitment to a transparent and double-anonymized review system, along with the unique option for authors to choose between associate editor or editorial office manuscript handling, is commendable.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

ChemComm actively supports both emerging and established authors through special issues and awards. However, there is a continuous need to engage with and inspire future generations of chemists, emphasizing the excitement of chemical research and its societal relevance.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

Our recent ChemComm publication as part of ChemComm 60th Anniversary collection, explores the modulation of tau protein liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPS), which is crucial for both normal physiological functions and pathological aggregations such as Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies. Our findings suggest that small polyphenolic compounds can modulate tau phase transitions, potentially offering a new therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

Building upon our findings, future research should delve deeper into the role of phase transitions of proteins in normal and pathological processes, with a focus on developing treatments for neurodegenerative diseases using small phenolic or polyphenolic compounds. The potential of targeting phase transition pathways in disease treatment is an exciting and underexplored area.

 

Be sure to read the Communication, “Biphasic modulation of tau liquid–liquid phase separation by polyphenols” to learn more!

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ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary – Chen Zhu

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’ve brought together a collection featuring the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community. We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

To accompany the collection, we’ll be publishing interviews with contributing authors where they provide further insight into their research and reflect on their journey with ChemComm.

Check out our interview with Professor Chen Zhu (Shanghai Jiao Tong University) below!

 

  Chen Zhu received a BS degree from Xiamen University in 2003, and a PhD degree from Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry in 2008 under the supervision of Prof. Guo-Qiang Lin. After postdoctoral research in Gakushuin University, Japan with Prof. Takahiko Akiyama, he moved to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, working with Prof. John R. Falck and Prof. Chuo Chen as postdoctoral fellow. He was appointed as full professor at Soochow University in Dec. 2013, and joined Shanghai Jiao Tong University in July 2022. His research interests include radical-mediated transformations and the applications in the construction of biologically active compounds and polymers.

 

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

Rapid publication, interdisciplinary fields, broad readership and high visibility

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

The work describes an unusual Z-selective radical difunctionalization of aromatic alkynes by the strategy of functional group migration,leading to a range of valuable triarylethenes. A novel spin-trapping reagent is developed based on the synthesized product.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

More challenging transformations in radical chemistry could be solved with the inspiration of functional group migration.In addition,valuable molecules such as bioactive compounds,organic optoelectronic materials,and spin-trapping reagents could be developed based on the triarylethene products.

 

Be sure to read Chen’s Communication, “Z-selective radical difunctionalization of aromatic alkynes: synthesis of multi-substituted triarylethenes” to learn more!

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ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary – Arturo Jiménez-Sánchez

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’ve brought together a collection featuring the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community. We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

To accompany the collection, we’ll be publishing interviews with contributing authors where they provide further insight into their research and reflect on their journey with ChemComm.

Check out our interview with Arturo Jiménez-Sánchez (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) below!

  Arturo Jiménez-Sánchez, a Principal Investigator at the Institute of Chemistry, UNAM, Mexico City, holds a Chemical Engineering degree and a PhD in Chemistry from Cinvestav, Mexico City. He completed postdoctoral fellowships at the Faculty of Chemistry-UNAM with Prof. Anatoly Yatsimirsky and at the University of Toronto with Prof. Shana Kelley. Additionally, he conducted research stays at ENS-Cachan in Paris and LCC in Toulouse, France. His research centers on innovating bioanalytical protocols for assessing subcellular chemical interactions using fluorophore chemistry.

 

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

ChemComm has evolved into a premier platform for rapid dissemination of cutting-edge research in chemistry. Its transition to online publishing and adoption of open access options have been particularly noteworthy, facilitating global accessibility and collaboration among researchers.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

My favorite aspect of ChemComm is its commitment to publishing high-impact research across all areas of chemistry. The journal’s dedication to maintaining rigorous standards while ensuring rapid publication is commendable.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

ChemComm distinguishes itself through its rapid publication times, broad scope covering all sub-disciplines of chemistry, and its reputation for publishing groundbreaking research. Additionally, its strong editorial team ensures fair and rigorous peer review, maintaining the journal’s high quality standards.

How would you describe the peer review process and interaction with the editorial team at ChemComm?

The peer review process at ChemComm is thorough and efficient. The editorial team provides constructive feedback and maintains clear communication throughout the review process. Their professionalism and dedication contribute to the overall positive experience of publishing in the journal.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

To further support and engage future generations of scientists, ChemComm could consider initiatives such as mentorship programs, early career researcher forums, and highlighting diverse voices in chemistry through special thematic issues or features.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

Our recent publication in ChemComm titled “Exploring Mitochondrial Targeting: Innovative Fluorescent Probe Reveals Nernstian Potential and Partitioning Combination” introduces a groundbreaking method for optimizing mitochondrial targeting. Using a novel fluorescent probe strategy, the study reveals the combined impact of Nernst potential (W) and partitioning (P) contributions. By synthesizing new benz[e]indolinium-derived probes, the research redefines the landscape of mitochondrial localization, enhancing the retention of mitochondrial probes in primary cortical neurons under normoxia and oxygen-glucose deprivation conditions. This methodology not only deepens our comprehension of subcellular dynamics but also offers transformative potential for biomedical research and therapeutic development.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

In my opinion, the findings in this paper lay a solid foundation for several potential avenues of future research. One promising direction could involve further optimization and refinement of fluorescent probes that are not meant to exhibit pyrene-type excimer formation. Furthermore, investigating the mechanistic underpinnings of the observed effects on mitochondrial localization could uncover novel molecular pathways and cellular processes involved in subcellular dynamics. Finally, investigating the potential of novel mechanisms for targeting organelles using small molecule probes that are independent of membrane potential, such as targeting lysosomes to circumvent lysosomotropic effects (pH imbalance).

 

Be sure to read Arturo’s Communication, “Exploring mitochondrial targeting: an innovative fluorescent probe reveals Nernstian potential and partitioning combination” to learn more!

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ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary – Saurabh Chitnis

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’ve brought together a collection featuring the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community. We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

To accompany the collection, we’ll be publishing interviews with contributing authors where they provide further insight into their research and reflect on their journey with ChemComm.

Check out our interview with Saurabh Chitnis (Dalhousie University) below!

    Saurabh Chitnis obtained his PhD with Neil Burford at the University of Victoria (2015) as an NSERC and Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar, where his doctoral thesis was recognized with a Governor General’s Gold Medal. He then performed postdoctoral research with Ian Manners at the University of Bristol as a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow (2015-2017) and later with Doug Stephan at the University of Toronto (2017-2018). He started his independent career in main group chemistry at Dalhousie University in July 2018, where in 2023 he received tenure and was promoted to Associate Professor. He has been profiled in Chemical Communications as an Emerging Investigators (2020) and in Dalton Transaction as a New Talents (2020). More recently, he recieved the Dalhousie Faculty of Science Killam Prize (2023), the CNC-IUPAC Travel Award (2023), and the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship (2023). In his free time, Saurabh enjoys exploring the coastline of Atlantic Canada with his partner and pretending that he is a master chef, despite evidence to the contrary.

 

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

ChemComm has consistently kept up with the latest developments in the publishing and peer review process, whether it be adopting double-anonymized review, or permitting pre-prints, ChemComm, along with other RSC journals, is continually pushing the community towards better and faster publication practices.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

The fast review process and wide range of expertise represented on the editorial board.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

ChemComm really stands out because it has the word “communications” directly in its name. At a time when most journals expect researches to cram in as much as possible in each article to meet the bar for significance and novelty and reviewer demands, ChemComm’s focus on the communication format reminds reviewers and editors that brief and accurate descriptions of impactful science are more valuable to the community than (often unnecessarily) lengthy articles where it can be difficult to find the most important parts quickly.

How would you describe the peer review process and interaction with the editorial team at ChemComm?

Excellent!

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

I was fortunate to have a cover selected for one of my early papers. This provided higher visibility for work at a critical stage. The cost of the cover was quite high and while I was able to secure funds, I think early career researchers should not be charged for covers.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

We showed that the phosphine-azide Staudinger reaction can be used to make phosphorus-nitrogen cages that can be subsequently used to assemble crystalline metal-inorganic frameworks, or amorphous networks that show solvent and gas porosity. This represents a major step in our exploration of how hard and soft matter with differing long-range order can be accessed from simple phosphorus-nitrogen cages and reliable reactions.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

While this research dealt with the synthesis of crystalline or amorphous networks starting with phosphorus-nitrogen cages, we believe that linear polymers could also be accessed, diversifying the family of macromolecules accessible form the same basis set of PN cages and reliable Staudinger reaction. One of the key molecules in the paper, a rigid 3-dimensional di-carboxyllic acid is also being used for assembling new classes of functional porous materials.

 

Be sure to read Saurabh’s Communication, “Rigid PN cages as 3-dimensional building blocks for crystalline or amorphous networked materials” to learn more!

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ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary – Yang Yang

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’ve brought together a collection featuring the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community. We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

To accompany the collection, we’ll be publishing interviews with contributing authors where they provide further insight into their research and reflect on their journey with ChemComm.

Check out our interview with Yang Yang (University of Central Florida) below!

    Prof. Yang Yang studied energy conversion & storage and obtained his Ph.D. from Tsinghua University in 2010. From 2010 to 2012 he was supported by the Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellowship and worked on solar energy harvesting and energy storage materials at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. From 2012 to 2015 he was supported by the Peter M. & Ruth L. Nicholas Postdoctoral Fellowship and worked on battery and catalysis at the Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Sci. & Tech., Rice University. Since 2015 he has been a principal investigator at the University of Central Florida. His research focuses on materials chemistry and electrochemistry at the nanoscale solid-gas-liquid interfaces for clean energy generation and storage, electrification, and decarbonization applications. He has been dedicated to resolving the challenges in many emerging areas, including but not limited to energy, sustainability, environmental issues, agriculture, artificial intelligence, and so forth. His research effort has made a significant impact on the environmentally benign nanomanufacturing of functional materials for green catalysis, clean energy conversion, and renewable energy storage. He has made many seminal breakthroughs in understanding the materials chemistry and interface engineering of new materials. His significant contributions to the communities have been demonstrated by publishing more than 140 peer-reviewed research articles, including Nature Energy, Nature Communications, Nature Reviews Chemistry, Chemical Reviews, etc.

 

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

My first ChemComm paper was published almost 13 years ago in 2011 when I was a postdoc and till now I have published 7 articles in ChemComm. I do see a steady growth of this journal.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

I changed my research directions slightly over the years but I can always submit my manuscripts to ChemComm. Because the journal covers almost all areas of chemistry-related energy and sustainability.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

The editorial handling time and peer-review process are pretty quick to publish very important articles that may change the fields

How would you describe the peer review process and interaction with the editorial team at ChemComm?

The reviewers always gave us very professional and in-depth suggestions to improve the manuscripts. The whole reviewing process is fantastic.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

Organize or sponsor conferences, hold workshops or seminars, and have campus visits to universities.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

My most recent review article published in ChemComm gave a comprehensive overview of the research progress in the electrosynthesis of H2O2 via a two-electron oxygen reduction reaction.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

H2O2 is a very important industrial chemical. My next step will be to consider developing a method that combines H2O2 production with energy storage and conversion.

 

Be sure to read Yang’s Highlight article, “Recent advances in electrosynthesis of H2O2via two-electron oxygen reduction reaction” to learn more!

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ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary – Ashlee Howarth

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’ve brought together a collection featuring the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community. We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

To accompany the collection, we’ll be publishing interviews with contributing authors where they provide further insight into their research and reflect on their journey with ChemComm.

Check out our interview with Ashlee Howarth (Concordia University) below!

  Ashlee J. Howarth is an Associate Professor and Concordia University Research Chair at Concordia University in Montréal. She was born and raised in London, Ontario. She obtained her undergraduate degree from the University of Western Ontario in 2009, and then went on to do her PhD in inorganic materials chemistry at the University of British Columbia under the supervision of Michael O. Wolf. Before joining the faculty at Concordia, she completed an NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship at Northwestern University with Joseph T. Hupp and Omar K. Farha. At Concordia, the Howarth group is focused on the design and synthesis of rare-earth cluster-based metal–organic frameworks targeting applications in pollution remediation, catalysis, drug delivery, X-ray detection, and chemical sensing.

 

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

My favourite thing about ChemComm is the communication format. I prefer reading short and high impact communications and I also prefer writing that style of manuscript. This also goes hand-in-hand with the fast review process at ChemComm, which is a bonus!

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

ChemComm has a strong reputation in the field of chemistry that has lasted many years. I remember researchers being very excited to publish in ChemComm when I was a graduate student, and that is still the case today 10-15 years later. ChemComm will always have name brand recognition in the field.

How would you describe the peer review process and interaction with the editorial team at ChemComm?

The editors at ChemComm are always very fair and professional. I often receive very useful comments from reviewers at ChemComm too, comments that are critical but fair and make our manuscript better.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

I think ChemComm is already doing a great job of this with their “emerging investigator” special issues, and blog/social media posts when researchers publish their first article in ChemComm. Perhaps another way to engage with future generations would be to also feature senior PhD students and postdocs who are publishing their work in ChemComm. A special issue or blog/social media post for emerging researchers that are not fully independent yet.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

In our most recent ChemComm publication, we show that rare-earth acetates can be used as precursors for the synthesis of rare-earth cluster-based metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). Traditionally, rare-earth nitrate precursors are used to make these MOFs, but it’s important to explore alternatives that are safer but also easier to handle (nitrates are very hygroscopic).

 

Be sure to read Ashlee’s Communication article, “Rare-earth acetates as alternative precursors for rare-earth cluster-based metal–organic frameworks” to learn more!

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ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary – Youhei Takeda

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’ve brought together a collection featuring the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community. We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

To accompany the collection, we’ll be publishing interviews with contributing authors where they provide further insight into their research and reflect on their journey with ChemComm.

For the first of these interviews, we caught up with Professor Youhei Takeda (Osaka University). Read the full interview below!

 

Youhei Takeda received his Ph.D. from Kyoto University in 2010 and thereafter joined the Timothy Swager group at MIT as a JSPS post-doctoral research fellow. He started his academic career as Assistant Professor at Osaka University in 2011, and he was promoted to Associate Professor in 2015. He received Incentive Award in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Japan (2019), The Young Scientists’ Prize from the MEXT (2020), The Nozoe Memorial Award for Young Organic Chemists (2020), and Thieme Chemistry Journals Award (2021). His research interests include the design, synthesis, and interdisciplinary applications of hetero-atom-embedded exotic π-conjugated organic compounds.

 

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

I believe that ChemComm has always been a source of cutting-edge research in the field of chemistry, continually inspiring researchers. The most noteworthy aspect is its publication of pioneering research.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

The process from submission to publication is handled very professionally and swiftly.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

The journal provides an approach that is attentive to the needs of the authors.

How would you describe the peer review process and interaction with the editorial team at ChemComm?

The peer review process at ChemComm is quick and scientifically fair, which helps maintain the quality of the journal. Additionally, the editorial team does its best to smooth the process from paper acceptance to publication.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

Of course, there are ways. To support the next generation of scientists, ChemComm could feature early-stage researchers, such as doctoral students and postdocs, who have published papers in the journal, in its articles.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

The recent paper I published in ChemComm discusses the development of luminescent π-conjugated molecules with an electron donor-acceptor-donor structure, which demonstrate good dispersibility in water. By utilizing this dispersibility, dispersion of the luminophore into hydrophilic polymers is also possible, and we were able to demonstrate humidity-responsive changes in the emission color in the thin films produced from the fabrication process.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

I believe that by further improving dispersibility in water and luminescence efficiency, it would be possible to apply the findings to humidity-responsive sensors and highly sensitive bioimaging within cells.

 

Be sure to read Youhei’s Open Access Communication, “Water-dispersible donor–acceptor–donor π-conjugated bolaamphiphiles enabling a humidity-responsive luminescence color change” to learn more!

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2016 ChemComm Emerging Investigators issue – now published

We are delighted to announce the publication of the 2016 ChemComm Emerging Investigators issue.

Now on its sixth year, this annual special issue showcases internationally recognised, up-and-coming scientists who are making outstanding contributions to their respective fields.

This year’s issue includes a selection of Feature articles and Communications, as well as a Profile of this year’s contributors, with interesting photos to spotlight our authors at work or at play – look out for a cool plasma ball, white-water rafting, a cute canine friend, and loads of lovely shots in the great outdoors!

You can also take a look at our previous Emerging Investigator issues in 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015.


Read our Emerging Investigators 2016 collection today

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Meet our authors: an interview with Kamil Godula

Welcome to a new entry on our series of interviews in the ChemComm blog! We want you to know more about some of the early career investigators who choose to publish their exciting work with us.

Next in this series is Dr Kamil Godula, from the University of California San Diego. Read the full interview below.

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What inspired you to become a scientist?Kamil Godura

For me, it was my curiosity in finding out how the world around me works. My science teachers seemed to be the ones that had the answers to many of my questions and that had inspired me to pursue a scientific path.

I’ve always been intrigued by the ability of biologists, physicists and mathematicians to describe our world and try to pinpoint its fundamental principles. But ultimately, it was chemistry that captured my imagination for being a transformative science rather than a descriptive one. Becoming a chemist has allowed me to unleash my creativity and imagination.

Follow us on Twitter!How did you find out about ChemComm?

I became familiar with ChemComm as a new graduate student. Ever since, I’ve enjoyed the high quality of the research papers and the broad scope of topics that appear in the journal. Reading ChemComm is always a great way to gain a fresh perspective on and a new inspiration for my research.

What was the motivation behind the work described in your article? What interested you in this area?

My research team is interested in studying the role of carbohydrates in modulating biological events at the boundary between cells and their surrounding environment. The structures of these glycans, as they are called, can be recognized by protein receptors and many pathogens have evolved to target glycans to gain entry into their hosts.

What is interesting is the fact that the interactions of individual glycans and proteins are typically rather weak to be specific in a biological setting. To compensate for that, multiple copies of glycans are typically displayed by lipids and proteins found on cell membranes. My lab is interested in understanding how the three dimensional presentation of glycans on our cells affects the ability of influenza viruses to bind and initiate infection.

Once we gain a better understanding of these higher-order binding interactions between the virus and our cells, we may be able to design better drugs to fight influenza.

Reading ChemComm is always a great way to gain a fresh perspective on and a new inspiration for my research.

Dr Kamil Godula, University of California San Diego

Why did you choose ChemComm to publish your work?

Our research is very interdisciplinary and involves carbohydrate and polymer synthesis, microarray platform development, as well as virus production and biological assays. At the same time, chemistry is always the central enabling science in all of our research. Therefore, ChemComm was a natural choice to publish our study.

Where do you see your research heading next?

Wikipedia

Our microarray platform has begun to reveal very interesting effects of glycan organization on their recognition by intact influenza viruses. We are currently investigating how the initial binding of the viruses to the “sugar landing pad” on epithelial cells correlates with their ability to enter the cells and initiate infection. We are also expanding this platform to enable the discovery of more effective antiviral drugs.

If you could not be a scientist, but could be anything else, what would you be?

Definitely a jazz musician. Benny Goodman has always been my great inspiration; I’m fascinated by the complexity and beauty of his improvisations and wonder what it’d feel like to master the clarinet the way he did.

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Did you enjoy Kamil’s story, or do you have your own memorable story about your first ChemComm paper? Tweet us @ChemCommun (#meetCCauthors) or reply in the comments below!

ChemComm fully supports researchers in the early stage of their careers, and remains the leading journal for urgent high-quality communications from across the chemical sciences.

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