Archive for the ‘ChemComm Anniversary’ Category

ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary – Yang Yang

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’ve brought together a collection featuring the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community. We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

To accompany the collection, we’ll be publishing interviews with contributing authors where they provide further insight into their research and reflect on their journey with ChemComm.

Check out our interview with Yang Yang (University of Central Florida) below!

    Prof. Yang Yang studied energy conversion & storage and obtained his Ph.D. from Tsinghua University in 2010. From 2010 to 2012 he was supported by the Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellowship and worked on solar energy harvesting and energy storage materials at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. From 2012 to 2015 he was supported by the Peter M. & Ruth L. Nicholas Postdoctoral Fellowship and worked on battery and catalysis at the Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Sci. & Tech., Rice University. Since 2015 he has been a principal investigator at the University of Central Florida. His research focuses on materials chemistry and electrochemistry at the nanoscale solid-gas-liquid interfaces for clean energy generation and storage, electrification, and decarbonization applications. He has been dedicated to resolving the challenges in many emerging areas, including but not limited to energy, sustainability, environmental issues, agriculture, artificial intelligence, and so forth. His research effort has made a significant impact on the environmentally benign nanomanufacturing of functional materials for green catalysis, clean energy conversion, and renewable energy storage. He has made many seminal breakthroughs in understanding the materials chemistry and interface engineering of new materials. His significant contributions to the communities have been demonstrated by publishing more than 140 peer-reviewed research articles, including Nature Energy, Nature Communications, Nature Reviews Chemistry, Chemical Reviews, etc.

 

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

My first ChemComm paper was published almost 13 years ago in 2011 when I was a postdoc and till now I have published 7 articles in ChemComm. I do see a steady growth of this journal.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

I changed my research directions slightly over the years but I can always submit my manuscripts to ChemComm. Because the journal covers almost all areas of chemistry-related energy and sustainability.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

The editorial handling time and peer-review process are pretty quick to publish very important articles that may change the fields

How would you describe the peer review process and interaction with the editorial team at ChemComm?

The reviewers always gave us very professional and in-depth suggestions to improve the manuscripts. The whole reviewing process is fantastic.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

Organize or sponsor conferences, hold workshops or seminars, and have campus visits to universities.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

My most recent review article published in ChemComm gave a comprehensive overview of the research progress in the electrosynthesis of H2O2 via a two-electron oxygen reduction reaction.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

H2O2 is a very important industrial chemical. My next step will be to consider developing a method that combines H2O2 production with energy storage and conversion.

 

Be sure to read Yang’s Highlight article, “Recent advances in electrosynthesis of H2O2via two-electron oxygen reduction reaction” to learn more!

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ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary – Ashlee Howarth

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’ve brought together a collection featuring the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community. We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

To accompany the collection, we’ll be publishing interviews with contributing authors where they provide further insight into their research and reflect on their journey with ChemComm.

Check out our interview with Ashlee Howarth (Concordia University) below!

  Ashlee J. Howarth is an Associate Professor and Concordia University Research Chair at Concordia University in Montréal. She was born and raised in London, Ontario. She obtained her undergraduate degree from the University of Western Ontario in 2009, and then went on to do her PhD in inorganic materials chemistry at the University of British Columbia under the supervision of Michael O. Wolf. Before joining the faculty at Concordia, she completed an NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship at Northwestern University with Joseph T. Hupp and Omar K. Farha. At Concordia, the Howarth group is focused on the design and synthesis of rare-earth cluster-based metal–organic frameworks targeting applications in pollution remediation, catalysis, drug delivery, X-ray detection, and chemical sensing.

 

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

My favourite thing about ChemComm is the communication format. I prefer reading short and high impact communications and I also prefer writing that style of manuscript. This also goes hand-in-hand with the fast review process at ChemComm, which is a bonus!

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

ChemComm has a strong reputation in the field of chemistry that has lasted many years. I remember researchers being very excited to publish in ChemComm when I was a graduate student, and that is still the case today 10-15 years later. ChemComm will always have name brand recognition in the field.

How would you describe the peer review process and interaction with the editorial team at ChemComm?

The editors at ChemComm are always very fair and professional. I often receive very useful comments from reviewers at ChemComm too, comments that are critical but fair and make our manuscript better.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

I think ChemComm is already doing a great job of this with their “emerging investigator” special issues, and blog/social media posts when researchers publish their first article in ChemComm. Perhaps another way to engage with future generations would be to also feature senior PhD students and postdocs who are publishing their work in ChemComm. A special issue or blog/social media post for emerging researchers that are not fully independent yet.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

In our most recent ChemComm publication, we show that rare-earth acetates can be used as precursors for the synthesis of rare-earth cluster-based metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). Traditionally, rare-earth nitrate precursors are used to make these MOFs, but it’s important to explore alternatives that are safer but also easier to handle (nitrates are very hygroscopic).

 

Be sure to read Ashlee’s Communication article, “Rare-earth acetates as alternative precursors for rare-earth cluster-based metal–organic frameworks” to learn more!

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ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary – Youhei Takeda

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’ve brought together a collection featuring the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community. We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

To accompany the collection, we’ll be publishing interviews with contributing authors where they provide further insight into their research and reflect on their journey with ChemComm.

For the first of these interviews, we caught up with Professor Youhei Takeda (Osaka University). Read the full interview below!

 

Youhei Takeda received his Ph.D. from Kyoto University in 2010 and thereafter joined the Timothy Swager group at MIT as a JSPS post-doctoral research fellow. He started his academic career as Assistant Professor at Osaka University in 2011, and he was promoted to Associate Professor in 2015. He received Incentive Award in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Japan (2019), The Young Scientists’ Prize from the MEXT (2020), The Nozoe Memorial Award for Young Organic Chemists (2020), and Thieme Chemistry Journals Award (2021). His research interests include the design, synthesis, and interdisciplinary applications of hetero-atom-embedded exotic π-conjugated organic compounds.

 

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

I believe that ChemComm has always been a source of cutting-edge research in the field of chemistry, continually inspiring researchers. The most noteworthy aspect is its publication of pioneering research.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

The process from submission to publication is handled very professionally and swiftly.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

The journal provides an approach that is attentive to the needs of the authors.

How would you describe the peer review process and interaction with the editorial team at ChemComm?

The peer review process at ChemComm is quick and scientifically fair, which helps maintain the quality of the journal. Additionally, the editorial team does its best to smooth the process from paper acceptance to publication.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

Of course, there are ways. To support the next generation of scientists, ChemComm could feature early-stage researchers, such as doctoral students and postdocs, who have published papers in the journal, in its articles.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

The recent paper I published in ChemComm discusses the development of luminescent π-conjugated molecules with an electron donor-acceptor-donor structure, which demonstrate good dispersibility in water. By utilizing this dispersibility, dispersion of the luminophore into hydrophilic polymers is also possible, and we were able to demonstrate humidity-responsive changes in the emission color in the thin films produced from the fabrication process.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

I believe that by further improving dispersibility in water and luminescence efficiency, it would be possible to apply the findings to humidity-responsive sensors and highly sensitive bioimaging within cells.

 

Be sure to read Youhei’s Open Access Communication, “Water-dispersible donor–acceptor–donor π-conjugated bolaamphiphiles enabling a humidity-responsive luminescence color change” to learn more!

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ChemComm 60th Anniversary Board Member Collection

 

Chemical Communications will be publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of these celebrations, we’ve brought together a special collection highlighting the latest work from the pioneering researchers who have supported the journal in reaching this milestone by serving on ChemComm’s Editorial and Advisory boards in the last two decades. Throughout the year, we’ll be catching up with these current and former Board Members to discuss their work and reflect on ChemComm’s 60th anniversary. Check out our interviews with current and former Advisory Board members, Professor David González Rodríguez and Professor Tim Bugg below!

David González-Rodríguez obtained his PhD degree in 2003 in the group of Prof. T. Torres. Between 2005 and 2008, he worked in the laboratories of Prof. E.W. Meijer at the Eindhoven University of Technology as a Marie Curie fellow. Since 2012, he leads the Nanostructured Molecular Systems and Materials (MSMn) group at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. He has been the recipient of numerous Grants, among them a ERC-Starting Grant and 2 ERC-Proof of Concept Grants, and awarded with several prizes: the 2011 RSEQ-Sigma Aldrich Emerging Investigator Award, the SPP-2012 Young Investigator Award, or the 2019 Barluenga Medal. His research interests focus on the development of versatile strategies to improve or create novel functions in organic materials by rationally ordering molecules at the nanoscale using the tools of self-assembly.

What attracted you to the role as Editorial Board Member for ChemComm?

In terms of scope, attractive contents, scholarly presentation and tradition in publishing excellent research results, ChemComm is clearly one of the top general chemistry journals

 

Read Davids’s full Open Access Communication here: Highly efficient grafting of hetero-complementary amidinium and carboxylate hydrogen-bonding/ionic pairs onto polymer surfaces by Ana M. Fernandes, Manuel C. Martos-Maldonado, Javier Araujo-Morera, Claudia Solek and David González-Rodríguez

 

Tim Bugg is Professor of Biological Chemistry at the University of Warwick. His academic career started at the University of Southampton in 1991, where his group studied enzymes involved in the bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds and enzymes involved in bacterial peptidoglycan assembly. Since moving to Warwick in 1999, his group has more recently studied enzymes involved in bacterial degradation of lignin, and the application of biocatalysis to convert lignin into renewable aromatic chemicals. He is the author of the undergraduate textbook “Introduction to Enzyme and Coenzyme Chemistry”.

What attracted you to the role as Editorial Board Member for ChemComm?

I had read Chem Comm as a PhD student and postdoc, and always considered it to be the flagship RSC journal, with high quality, innovative papers. It was therefore a journal that I aspired to publish in as an independent academic, and was delighted to join the Editorial Board.

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

Including some Feature articles was a nice addition to the Journal, raising the profile of certain areas of research. The move to 3 page articles allowed more space for articles with complex figures, which also helped the journal.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

Speed of reviewing and publication has always been something that academics really value and appreciate.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

Speed of reviewing and publication, as noted above. I’ve also always found the Editorial staff helpful and knowledgeable.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

Keep up the high standards. New areas will appear across Chemistry, but I think they can be dealt with perfectly well by the current system.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

The article discusses the interesting chemical mechanisms used by Nature to break down the aromatic polymer lignin found in plant biomass. Converting lignin into aromatic monomers has been a really challenging problem to solve since the 1980s when fungal lignin-oxidising enzymes were first studied, but since 2011 there has been a lot of progress in solving this problem, and developing new routes to aromatic chemicals from renewable lignin. The article sets out the major challenges in deconstructing lignin, and how they have been solved by Nature, and what the underlying Chemistry is.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

The challenge for the next 10 years is to translate these ideas into commercially viable processes that could be used industrially to convert lignin into high-value chemicals, which will require improvements in the titre of isolated products, or combining the best features of biocatalysis and chemocatalysis.

 

Read Tim’s Open Access Feature article here: The chemical logic of enzymatic lignin degradation by Timothy D. H. Bugg

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ChemComm 60th Anniversary Board Member Collection

 

Chemical Communications will be publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of these celebrations, we’ve brought together a special collection highlighting the latest work from the pioneering researchers who have supported the journal in reaching this milestone by serving on ChemComm’s Editorial and Advisory boards in the last two decades. Throughout the year, we’ll be catching up with these current and former Board Members to discuss their work and reflect on ChemComm’s 60th anniversary. Check out our interviews with current Associate Editor, Professor Marinella Mazzanti, and Advisory Board member, Professor Silvia Marchesan, below!

  Marinella Mazzanti was born in Vinci, Italy. She obtained a Master’s degree from the University of Pisa in 1985 and a PhD from the University of Lausanne in 1990. Shortly after she moved as a post-doc to the University of California, Berkely, before moving to the University of California, Davis. In 1994 she was awarded a Marie-Curie fellowship to work at the French National Laboratory, CEA, in Grenoble. In 1996 she took a research scientist and team leader position at the CEA Grenoble. In September 2014 she joined the EPFL as a Professor and founded the Group of Coordination Chemistry. Her research activities have been centered on f element coordination and supramolecular chemistry, redox reactivity, and small molecule activation.

She received the 2021 F. Albert Cotton Award in Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry and the LeCoq de Boisbaudran Senior Award in 2023.

What attracted you to the role as Editorial Board Member for ChemComm?

The possibility to contribute to the journal with my experience and the potential to attract more members of my community to publish in the journal. ChemComm is the journal where my very first work was published as a PhD student 40 years ago (J. Chem. Soc., Chem. Commun., 1984, 1116-1118) and that created a long lasting connection.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

The possibility of sharing very quickly  urgent results and the competence and efficiency of the editorial stuff.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

ChemComm has remained faithful to its original mission and gives the possibility to share important and impactful discoveries without wrapping up every single possible experiment. The format renders it a very accessible read that allow to attract attention to a single result

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

We isolated the first example of a trinuclear U(III) complex showing magnetic exchange and reported a rare magneto-structural study for a uranium system. Moreover, preliminary reactivity studies showed that the isolated trinuclear U(III) complex promotes the reduction of one molecule of dinitrogen in the presence of an external reducing agent. These studies demonstrate the versatility of the silsesquioxane scaffold for assembling polymetallic complexes of low valent uranium that possess unusual properties.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

The findings presented in this paper should stimulate the use of polydentate siloxides to build polynuclear complexes of uranium both for dinitrogen functionalization or for the development of uranium based single molecule magnets leading to important step forward in both fields.

 

Read Marinella’s full Communication here: A trinuclear metallasilsesquioxane of uranium(iii) by Maxime Tricoire, Nadir Jori, Farzaneh Fadaei Tirani, Rosario Scopelliti, Ivica Živković, Louise S. Natrajan and Marinella Mazzanti

 

Silvia Marchesan obtained her PhD in Chemistry at The University of Edinburgh (2008, UK). Prior to this, she obtained her Pharmaceutical Chemist (2007, UK) & Pharmacist (2006, Italy) qualifications and was an honorary researcher at UCL (London, 2005-2007). She conducted Postdoctoral research as an Academy of Finland Fellow at University of Helsinki (2008-2010) and a CRSS Fellow jointly at Monash University and Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organization, CSIRO (Melbourne, 2010-2012). In 2013 she returned as an Assistant Professor to the University of Trieste where her scientific adventure had started with the M.Sc. degree, (honours). In 2018 she became Associate Professor and received the Habilitation as Full Professor. In 2021-2022 (6 mo.) Silvia was a Visiting Academic at the University of Cambridge (UK). She is currently a member the Editorial Board of ACS Nano and of the Advisory Board of Chem, ChemComm, J. Mater. Chem. B, ACS Appl. Bio Mater., Chem. Eur. J., Soft Matter, Materials Advances.

What attracted you to the role as Editorial Board Member for ChemComm?

ChemComm gave me the opportunity to publish my first work as corresponding author on what then became my main research line. I truly enjoyed the constructive peer-review process and since then my desire grew to support the journal and emerging PIs in a similar way.

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

I appreciate ChemComm‘s simple format and speedy publishing process. Through the years it maintained its leading role in publishing concise and effective communications across the chemical sciences, giving more and more visibility to emerging PIs through Feature papers and Highlights. This is important to grow and shape the community and the leaders of the future.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

ChemComm embraces diversity and is an inclusive journal that strives to present research voices from all over the world, regardless of country, nationality, gender, or specific research line. This is very important to ensure that every chemist with a brilliant idea gets the chance to grow as a PI.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

The 4-page format and the wide readership of ChemComm make it an ideal journal to rapidly publish fresh ideas in a simple process. The number of referees involved in peer-review is consistent and appropriate. I have had articles in other journals being reviewed by as many as 5 referees and through iterative revisions that delayed the publication of our research by several months, if not years!

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

Ensuring the presence of ChemComm on the communication platforms and events where there is a large presence of junior chemists is an effective strategy as well as encouraging their active interaction with ChemComm. Associating ChemComm with their recognition, for instance through poster and student prizes, will certainly remind them of the opportunity to publish their best research results in ChemComm.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

The design rules for self-assembling simple molecules have been emerging recently, but often scientists are baffled by an unexpected macroscopic outcome, e.g., a crystal as opposed to a gel. This work reveals how that process is determined by the molecular conformations visited in aqueous solution, specifically depending whether they are folded or extended. We can expect opposite behavior in organic solvents, as described by Steed and colleagues using different techniques (doi:10.1039/D3SC03841F).

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

In our work we specifically analyzed dipeptides with hydrophobic sidechains. It would be very interesting to study how general is the process, depending not only on the nature of the gelator and the solvent, but also on the molecular size and type of design. High value lies in the identification of spectroscopic signatures that can be quickly assigned to specific conformers, so as to easily predict which type of solid will arise from self-assembly.

 

Read Silvia’s Communcation article here: Diverging conformations guide dipeptide self-assembly into crystals or hydrogels by M. Monti, E. Scarel, A. Hassanali, M. Stener and S. Marchesan

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ChemComm’s 60th Anniversary Celebrations

ChemComm is publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of these celebrations, we’ve brought together a number of special collections highlighting both historical and new work in the journal. Check out all of these collections below, with many more to come as the year develops!

 

ChemComm Emerging Investigators and Pioneering Investigators These annual collections highlight high quality research being carried out by researchers in the early and mid stages of their independent careers, respectively.
ChemComm 60th Anniversary Board Member Collection This special collection highlights the latest work from the pioneering researchers who by serving ChemComm’s Editorial and Advisory boards in the last two decades have together supported the journal in reaching this anniversary milestone.

Throughout the year, we’ll be catching up with these current and former Board Members to discuss their work and reflect on the anniversary. Read the first of these interviews here .

ChemComm 60th Anniversary Authors Collection This collection brings together the latest research from some of our most loyal and dedicated authors. From those marking the beginning of their independent academic career by publishing their first article with us, to the rising stars and established leaders publishing in our yearly ‘Emerging Investigators’ and ‘Pioneering Investigators’ collections, this collection champions the contributions of our worldwide author community.

We are proud many authors choose to support our journal by regularly publishing their best work with us. This collection also features papers from our ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship winners, and our Outstanding Reviewer awardees, whose invaluable feedback has shaped our published content through the years.

ChemComm contributions to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has published many important papers with the potential to contribute to a sustainable future.

This collection brings together historic work and more recent reviews published in ChemComm which demonstrate how chemistry can contribute to the United Nation’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals with the aim of ending poverty, improving health and education, all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our natural environment.

ChemComm 60th Anniversary Historic Papers from North America We’ve brought together 60 significant historic papers published in ChemComm from each region. This special collection highlights 60 pioneering papers that were most cited from the researchers in United States and Canada.
ChemComm 60th Anniversary Historic Papers from China This special collection highlights 60 pioneering papers that were among the most cited from researchers based in China. We hope you enjoy revisiting some of the papers that made ChemComm one of your most trusted venues for publication.
ChemComm 60th Anniversary Historic Papers from Japan & South Korea A special collection highlighting 60 pioneering papers that were among the most cited from researchers based in Japan & South Korea. We hope you enjoy this historic collection of the papers that made ChemComm one of your most trusted venues for publication.

 

Be sure to follow our LinkedIn page and X(Twitter) feed for further news on upcoming anniversary celebrations, including further regional collections of historic papers, and some personal reflections from authors and Board Members on what the ChemComm’s anniversary means to them!

 

 

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ChemComm 60th Anniversary Board Member Collection

 

Chemical Communications will be publishing its 60th volume in 2024. Over the past 60 years, ChemComm has been the RSC’s most cited journal, and one of the most trusted venues for rapid publication of short communications. In our anniversary year, we recognise the important contributions ChemComm has made, and continues to make, in advancing the chemical sciences.

As part of these celebrations, we’ve brought together a special collection highlighting the latest work from the pioneering researchers who have supported the journal in reaching this milestone by serving on ChemComm’s Editorial and Advisory boards in the last two decades. Throughout the year, we’ll be catching up with these current and former Board Members to discuss their work and reflect on ChemComm’s 60th anniversary. Check out our first interviews with current Editorial Board chair, Professor Doug Stephan, and Advisory Board member, Professor Eli Zysman-Colman, below!

 

Doug Stephan, born in Hamilton ON, graduated with his BSc at McMaster (1976) and PhD at UWO (1980). After a NATO PDF at Harvard, he began his independent career at the University of Windsor (1982). He was promoted to Associate Professor (1985), full Professor(1992) and named a NSERC Industrial Research Chair (2001), University Professor (2002) and Canada Research Chair (2005). In 2008 he moved to the University of Toronto as a Professor and Canada Research Chair, In 2018, he was appointed University Professor. In 2020, he established an additional satellite laboratory at Ningbo University as a Zhedong Scholar Chair Professor. He was an Associated Editor for Chemical Society Reviews for 6 years, the Chair of the editorial board and is now Chair of the editorial board of Chemical Communications

A world-leading researcher in inorganic chemistry/catalysis, he is best known as the founder of the field of “frustrated Lewis pair” (FLP) chemistry. He has received a number of National and International awards, including Humboldt and Killam Fellowships. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society (London), a Corresponding Member of North-Rhein-Westfaelia Academy of the Sciences and Arts (Germany) and was a Distinguished Adjunct Professor at King Abdulaziz University, and an Einstein Visiting Fellow at TU Berlin. More recently, he was the recipient of the 2019 J. C. Polanyi Award from NSERC of Canada, a 2020 Guggenheim Fellowship the 2021 Killam Prize in Science and the 2022 F.A Cotton Award from the American Chemical Society. In 2023, he wqs named the John C. Polanyi Chair in Chemistry at the University of Toronto.

What attracted you to the role as Editorial Board Chair for ChemComm?

There are a number of positives that drew me to this role. Firstly, the journal has a solid reputation for publishing quality communications. The associate editors and board members are great scientists whom I admire, and all of the RSC staff are a pleasure to work with.

How have you seen ChemComm evolve over the years, and what aspects do you find most noteworthy?

I think that ChemComm, like the discipline has evolved in sophistication and rigor.  Years ago, communications were very short reports of new concepts that were worthy of further study, and they were typically followed up with a fuller report. Today, communications go so much further, substantiating claims and providing much more credible proofs of principle. So much so that they most often stand on their own merit.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

I guess the thing I like the most is that as one scans the table of contents of an issue, one can find a very broad range of chemistry. Inorganic organic, materials, polymers, theoretical and physical chemistry are all covered. Thus, even if I do not read all the papers, I feel I am at least aware of important developments outside of my particular area.

In what ways do you think ChemComm stands out among other journals in your field?

As other journals take communications, full papers and numerous reviews, ChemComm stands out as the journal that focuses on  communications. These short but impactful papers cover areas across the discipline of Chemistry and beyond.

Are there ways in which the journal can further support and engage with future generations of scientists?

I think that young (and old) scientists want to engage with quality, quality papers, quality reviewing and quality editors. The sustained focus of ChemComm on these aspects augurs well for continuing engagement of the community through the generations.

I also believe that ChemComm’s efforts to continue to increase their presence and use of social media is critically important. This is a terrific tool for the rapid dissemination of information allowing scientist to ensure that their community is aware of their work.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

Our recent ChemComm describes a unique synthetic route to phosphorus analogues of β-lactams, exploiting FLP-type reactions.

In your opinion, what are the next steps or potential areas of research that could build upon the findings in this paper?

These compounds have potential to act as antimicrobial agents. We are developing collaborations to evaluate these species and related derivatives.

Read Doug’s full Communication here: Stannyl phosphaketene as a synthon for phosphorus analogues of β-lactams by Yong-an Luo, Zhao Zhao, Ting Chen, Yanguo Li, Yufen Zhao, Douglas Stephan and Yile Wu

Eli Zysman-Colman obtained his Ph.D. from McGill University in 2003 under the supervision of Prof. David N. Harpp as an FCAR scholar, conducting research in physical organic sulfur chemistry.  He then completed two postdoctoral fellowships, one in supramolecular chemistry with Prof. Jay Siegel at the Organic Chemistry Institute, University of Zurich as an FQRNT fellow and the other in inorganic materials chemistry with Prof. Stefan Bernhard at Princeton University as a PCCM fellow.  He joined the department of chemistry at the Université de Sherbrooke in Quebec, Canada as an assistant professor in 2007. In 2013, he moved to the University of St Andrews in St Andrews, UK, where he is presently Professor of Optoelectronic Materials, Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and a past holder of a Royal Society Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship.  His research program focuses on the rational design of: (I) luminophores for energy-efficient visual displays and flat panel lighting based on organic light emitting diode (OLED) and light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEEC) device architectures; (II) sensing materials employed in electrochemiluminescence; and (III) photocatalyst developing for use in organic reactions.

What is your favourite thing about ChemComm?

I enjoy the breadth of chemistry covered in Chem. Commun.

Could you provide a brief summary of your recent ChemComm publication?

Our paper demonstrates a new multiresonant thermally activated delayed fluorescence (MR-TADF) emitter design, DDiKTa-F wherein we annelate on either side of a fluorene a known MR-TADF moiety that we had previous studied, DiKTa. In doing so, we produced a narrower, brighter and red-shifted emission compared to a previous emitter we had developed, DDiKTa. We then demonstrated its utility as the emitter in an organic-light emitting diode.

Read Eli’s Open Access Communcation article here: A fluorene-bridged double carbonyl/amine multiresonant thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter for efficient green OLEDs by Sen Wu, Ya-Nan Hu, Dianming Sun, Kai Wang, Xiao-Hong Zhang and Eli Zysman-Colman

 

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