Serena DeBeer joins Chemical Science as an Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce that Professor Serena DeBeer has joined Chemical Science as an Associate Editor.

Serena is a Professor and Director at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion in Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany. She is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Cornell University, an honorary faculty member at Ruhr University in Bochum, and the group leader of the PINK Beamline at the Energy Materials In‐Situ Laboratory at Helmholtz Zentrum in Berlin. She received her B.S. in Chemistry at Southwestern University in 1995 and her Ph.D. from Stanford University in 2002. From 2002-2009, she was a staff scientist at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, before moving to her faculty position at Cornell.

Serena’s research interests lie in the development and application of advanced X-ray spectroscopic tools for understanding processes in biological, heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. This includes advances to X-ray spectroscopy techniques as well as applications focused on understanding electronic structural changes in catalytic processes such as N2 reduction, CH4 oxidation, H2O oxidation and H2 production.

Serena looks forward to receiving submissions in the areas of (bio)inorganic chemistry, heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis and spectroscopy.

Below is a selection of articles published in Chemical Science which Serena would like to highlight – all free to read! We hope you enjoy them.

 

Excited state electron and energy relays in supramolecular dinuclear complexes revealed by ultrafast optical and X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy
Dugan Hayes, Lars Kohler, Ryan G. Hadt, Xiaoyi Zhang, Cunming Liu, Karen L. Mulfort and Lin X. Chen
Chem. Sci., 2018, 9, 860-875
DOI: 10.1039/C7SC04055E, Edge Article

Infrared spectroscopy of the nitrogenase MoFe protein under electrochemical control: potential-triggered CO binding
P. Paengnakorn, P. A. Ash, S. Shaw, K. Danyal, T. Chen, D. R. Dean, L. C. Seefeldt and K. A. Vincent
Chem. Sci., 2017, 8, 1500-1505
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC02860H, Edge Article

Metal oxidation states in biological water splitting
Vera Krewald, Marius Retegan, Nicholas Cox, Johannes Messinger, Wolfgang Lubitz, Serena DeBeer, Frank Neese and Dimitrios A. Pantazis
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 1676-1695
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03720K, Edge Article

Structurally characterized terminal manganese(IV) oxo tris(alkoxide) complex
Robert L. Halbach, David Gygi, Eric D. Bloch, Bryce L. Anderson and Daniel G. Nocera
Chem. Sci., 2018, 9, 4524-4528
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC01164H, Edge Article

Magnetic circular dichroism and computational study of mononuclear and dinuclear iron(IV) complexes
Shengfa Ye, Genqiang Xue, Itana Krivokapic, Taras Petrenko, Eckhard Bill, Lawrence Que Jr and Frank Neese
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 2909-2921
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03268C, Edge Article

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HOT Chemical Science articles for November

We are happy to present a selection of our HOT articles over the past month. To see all of our HOT referee-recommended articles from 2018, please find the collection here.

As always, Chemical Science articles are free to access.

Carbon-supported Ni nanoparticles for efficient CO2 electroreduction

Mingwen Jia, Changhyeok Choi, Tai-Sing Wu, Chen Ma, Peng Kang, Hengcong Tao, Qun Fan, Song Hong, Shizhen Liu, Yun-Liang Soo, Yousung Jung, Jieshan Qiu and Zhenyu Sun

Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article

DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03732A, Edge Article

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Rare “Janus”-Faced {FeII7} Single-Molecule Magnet Exhibiting Intramolecular Ferromagnetic Interactions

Dimitris I Alexandropoulos, Kuduva R. Vignesh, Theocharis Stamatatos and Kim R. Dunbar

Chem. Sci., 2019, Accepted Manuscript

DOI: 10.1039/C8SC04384A, Edge Article

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Lytic Reactions of Drugs with Lipid Membranes

Hannah Mary Britt, Clara Antia García-Herrero, Paul W Denny, Jackie A. Mosely and John M Sanderson

Chem. Sci., 2019, Accepted Manuscript

DOI: 10.1039/C8SC04831B, Edge Article

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A Catalytic Antioxidant for Limiting Amyloid-Beta Peptide Aggregation and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

Luiza M. F. Gomes, Atif Mahammed, Kathleen E Prosser, Jason R. Smith, Michael A. Silverman, Charles John Walsby, Zeev Gross and Tim Storr

Chem. Sci., 2019, Accepted Manuscript

DOI: 10.1039/C8SC04660C, Edge Article

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A bio-inspired approach to ligand design: folding single-chain peptoids to chelate a multimetallic cluster

Andy I. Nguyen, Ryan K. Spencer, Christopher L. Anderson and Ronald N. Zuckermann

Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article

DOI: 10.1039/C8SC04240C, Edge Article

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Single Ru atoms with precise coordination on a monolayer layered double hydroxide for efficient electrooxidation catalysis

Zelin Wang, Si-Min Xu, Yanqi Xu, Ling Tan, Xian Wang, Yufei Zhao, Haohong Duan and Yu-Fei Song

Chem. Sci., 2019, Advance Article

DOI: 10.1039/C8SC04480E, Edge Article

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HOT Chemical Science articles for October

We are happy to present a selection of our HOT articles over the past month. To see all of our HOT referee-recommended articles from 2018, please find the collection here.

As always, Chemical Science articles are free to access.

Enhanced annihilation electrochemiluminescence by nanofluidic confinement
Hanan Al-Kutubi, Silvia Voci, Liza Rassaei, Neso Sojic and Klaus Mathwig
Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03209B, Edge Article

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Mechanistic investigation into the C(sp3)–H acetoxylation of morpholinones
Cornelia S. Buettner, Darren Willcox, Ben. G. N. Chappell and Matthew J. Gaunt
Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03434F, Edge Article

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Ir(III)-catalyzed ortho C–H alkylations of (hetero)aromatic aldehydes using alkyl boron reagents
Xiao-Yang Chen and Erik J. Sorensen
Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03606C, Edge Article

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Direct observation of the intermediate in an ultrafast isomerization
Tyler M. Porter, Jiaxi Wang, Yingmin Li, Bo Xiang, Catherine Salsman, Joel S. Miller, Wei Xiong and Clifford P. Kubiak
Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03258K, Edge Article

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Structural control of polyelectrolyte/microemulsion droplet complexes (PEMECs) with different polyacrylates
Miriam Simon, Patrick Krause, Leonardo Chiappisi, Laurence Noirez and Michael Gradzielski
Chem. Sci., 2019, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC04013C, Edge Article

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Reversibility and reactivity in an acid catalyzed cyclocondensation to give furanochromanes – a reaction at the ‘oxonium-Prins’ vs. ‘ortho-quinone methide cycloaddition’ mechanistic nexus
Christian D.-T. Nielsen, Wouter J. Mooij, David Sale, Henry S. Rzepa, Jordi Burés and Alan C. Spivey
Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC04302G, Edge Article

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Chemical Science symposia on sustainable energy

Registration is now open for our Chemical Science symposia, which are to be held in two locations in China (Harbin and Xiamen) in December.

The NSFC-RSC International Symposium on Energy Chemistry will be held in Harbin, China from 7th-9th of December, you can register now here.

The Chemical Science Symposium on Sustainable Energy will be held in Xiamen, China on 10th of December, you can register now here.

The theme of the Chemical Science Symposium will be renewable energy and sustainability, bringing together leading researchers in the field of energy science and related subjects. The primary focus will be on recent advances in sustainable and renewable energy including solar energy conversion, artificial photosynthesis, photocatalysts, water splitting, gas capture, separation and storage and fuel cells. The symposia will also cover interdisciplinary studies at the energy interface with other subjects such as the properties and applications of materials for energy and sustainability, nanotechnology, photocatalysis, photonics and biotechnology.

Chemical Science Associate Editors Vincent Artero, Kazunari Domen, James McCusker and Jihong Yu will be speaking at both symposia, and Executive Editor May Copsey will be attending.

We look forward to seeing you there!

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Mutant Enzymes and Frankenstein Catalysts

I know what you’re thinking: “Autumn is here! Who needs sunny weather and optimism? Sign me up for grey skies and vitamin D supplements!”. Oh you weren’t thinking that? Me neither. Well perhaps Halloween gives you more joy, along with the chance to see one of your colleagues dressed up like Freddy Mercury (‘Hg’ emblazoned on their chest, classic) at the departmental party?

In the spirit of Halloween, Simone Morra and Anca Pordea at the University of Nottingham have synthesized a mutant alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme turned Frankenstein catalyst, by replacing the zinc catalytic site with a covalently-bound rhodium(III) complex. The resulting mutant/transition-metal composite was used in combination with the wild-type enzyme to synthesize the chiral alcohol (S)-4-phenyl-2-butanol.

Like many hybrid systems, the purpose of combining enzymatic with transition metal catalysis is to take advantage of the benefits of each. Millions of years of evolution have produced enzymatic catalysts that function under mild conditions, in aqueous solvents, with impressive selectivity and high catalytic efficiency. But the narrow range of conditions that enzymes operate under can be disadvantageous in a synthetic setting. On the other hand, transition metal catalysts are versatile and can be easily customised, reacting with a liberty that would make the most promiscuous of enzymes blush.

Unfortunately, developing multi-component systems that utilise both transition metal and enzymatic catalysis is not as simple as combining them in a single mixture, as mutual deactivation often results. The authors found that encasing the transition metal complex in an enzyme provided a physical shield against inhibition, and preserved the activity of both the wild type enzyme and the rhodium(III) complex.

Synthesis of chiral alcohols via two interconnected cycles: the wild type enzyme (native ADH) reduces the ketone to the alcohol using NADPH as a reducing agent. NADPH is regenerated using the mutant enzyme containing a rhodium active site (chemically modified ADH) with formic acid as the terminal reductant. Alcohol dehydrogenase

Synthesis of chiral alcohols via two interconnected cycles: the wild type enzyme (native ADH) reduces the ketone using NADPH as a reducing agent. NADPH is regenerated by the mutant enzyme containing a catalytically-active rhodium complex (chemically modified ADH) with formic acid as the terminal reductant.

Two interconnected catalytic cycles were responsible for synthesis of the chiral alcohol. In the first, the wild type enzyme effected reduction of 4-phenyl-2-butanol, a process that relies on the biological reductant nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). In the second cycle, NADPH was recycled using the composite rhodium(III) complex/mutant enzyme, with formic acid as the stoichiometric reductant. The rate of alcohol formation was slow (turnover frequency of 0.02 s-1) and the transition-metal catalysed process was deemed to be rate limiting (compare to turnover frequencies of 4.8 s-1 for enzymatic systems). However, near perfect enantioselectivity was obtained (>99% ee).

This research demonstrates one way that transition metal catalysts can augment the scope of co-factor-dependent enzymes. Furthermore, devising strategies to prepare metal-complex/enzyme bioconjugates might have value for small molecule synthesis due to the second coordination sphere that enzymes offer; an encased steric environment to guide the reaction outcome is a valuable approach to improving selectivity in catalytic reactions.

To find out more please read:

Biocatalyst-artifical metalloenzyme cascade based on alcohol dehydrogenase

Simone Morra, Anca Pordea.
Chem. Sci., 2018, 9, 7447-7454
DOI: 10.1039/c8sc02371a

About the author

Zoë Hearne is a PhD candidate in chemistry at McGill University in Montréal, Canada, under the supervision of Professor Chao-Jun Li. She hails from Canberra, Australia, where she completed her undergraduate degree. Her current research focuses on transition metal catalysis to effect novel transformations, and out of the lab she is an enthusiastic chemistry tutor and science communicator.

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HOT Chemical Science articles for September

We are happy to present a selection of our HOT articles over the past month. To see all of our HOT referee-recommended articles from 2018, please find the collection here.

As always, Chemical Science articles are free to access.

Selective and catalytic carbon dioxide and heteroallene activation mediated by cerium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes
Polly Louise Arnold, Ryan Kerr, Catherine Weetman, Scott Doherty, Julia Rieb, Kai Wang, Christian Jandl, Max McMullon, Alexander Pöthig, Fritz Elmar Kühn and Andrew D Smith
Chem. Sci., 2018, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03312A, Edge Article

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Ratiometric fluorescent probes for capturing endogenous hypochlorous acid in the lungs of mice
Xinfu Zhang, Weiyu Zhao, Bin Li, Wenqing Li, Chengxiang Zhang, Xucheng Hou, Justin Jiang and Yizhou Dong
Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03226B, Edge Article

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Surprising solvent-induced structural rearrangements in large [N⋯I+⋯N] halogen-bonded supramolecular capsules: an ion mobility-mass spectrometry study
Ulrike Warzok, Mateusz Marianski, Waldemar Hoffmann, Lotta Turunen, Kari Rissanen, Kevin Pagel and Christoph A. Schalley
Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03040E, Edge Article

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Advanced microRNA-based cancer diagnostics using amplified time-gated FRET
Xue Qiu, Jingyue Xu, Jiajia Guo, Akram Yahia-Ammar, Nikiforos-Ioannis Kapetanakis, Isabelle Duroux-Richard, Julia J. Unterluggauer, Nicole Golob-Schwarzl, Christophe Regeard, Catherine Uzan, Sébastien Gouy, Michael DuBow, Johannes Haybaeck, Florence Apparailly, Pierre Busson and Niko Hildebrandt
Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03121E, Edge Article

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Atomic structure of boron resolved using machine learning and global sampling
Si-Da Huang, Cheng Shang, Pei-Lin Kang and Zhi-Pan Liu
Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03427C, Edge Article

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Spontaneous growth of 2D coordination polymers on functionalized ferromagnetic surfaces 
Michele Mattera, Víctor Rubio-Giménez, Sophie Delprat, Richard Mattana, Pierre Seneor, Sergio Tatay, Alicia Forment-Aliaga and Eugenio Coronado
Chem. Sci., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03067G, Edge Article

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4th International Conference on Energy and Biological Materials

The University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei, China hosted the 4th International Conference on Energy and Biological Materials last month, September 16-18. The meeting was organised by Yi Cui (Stanford University, USA), Shuhong Yu, Jinlong Yang and Xinhe Bao (USTC) and also commemorated USTC’s 60th anniversary. The invited talks covered a wide range of topics, including materials for energy storage and conversion, catalysis and medicine, and bio-inspired materials. Chemical Science Deputy Editor Jeremy Allen, shown below, was also in attendance and talked to the delegates about ‘How to Publish’, speaking about the role of a publisher and giving a few tips about how to help get your papers noticed!

Left: Chemical Science Deputy Editor Jeremy Allen. Right: Delegates of the 4th International Conference on Energy and Biological Materials

 

The Royal Society of Chemistry was proud to support the meeting, offering 5 poster prizes. The winners of the prizes were:

  • Qiaofeng Yao (National University of Singapore) for ‘Toward total synthesis of functional metal materials’
  • Chengbin Jin (Zhejiang University of Technology) for ‘Green biomass for Li metal batteries’
  • Wen Luo (Wuhan University of Science and Technology) for ‘Encapsulating segment-like antimony nanorod in hollow carbon nanotube as a high-performance anode for rechargeable K-ion battery’
  • Hongliang Li (University of Science and Technology of China) for ‘Strong metal-support interaction in single-atom catalysts’
  • Xiuqiang Li (Nanjing University) for ‘Enhancement of interfacial solar vapor generation by environmental energy’

From Left to Right: Qiaofeng Yao, Chengbin Jin, Wen Luo, Hongliang, Li, Xiuqiang Li, Jeremy Allen

 

Well done to all of the prize winners from everyone at Chemical Science!

 

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UK-India Symposium on Advances in Organic Chemistry

The fourth RSC-CRSI (Royal Society of Chemistry – Chemical Research Society of India) meeting in the UK was on Advances in Inorganic Chemistry, held in Manchester on 26th September, and Advances in Organic Chemistry, held in Oxford on 28th September. Chemical Science Assistant Editor, Sarah Whitbread, attended the event at Jesus College, Oxford.

The symposium brought together Indian and UK researchers to share their knowledge and facilitate discussions regarding future UK-India collaborations. The event was very successful with interesting talks from both UK and Indian researchers. After the talks and posters there was an insightful discussion on potential areas of collaboration in Chemical Sciences and interdisciplinary between India and the UK with a panel of top scientists in UK and India, including Royal Society of Chemistry President, Professor Carol Robinson.

Daniele Antermite from Imperial College London was awarded the Chemical Science poster prize for his work on the C(sp3)–H Arylation of Pyrrolidines and Piperidines with C(3) Directing Groups. Congratulations Daniele!

UK-India Symposium on Advances in Organic Chemistry Chemical Science Poster Prize Winner

From left to right: Daniele Antermite, Imperial College London; Sarah Whitbread, Royal Society of Chemistry; Ed Anderson, University of Oxford

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TPCB Symposium poster prize winner

The 14th Annual Tri-Institutional Chemical Biology Symposium took place on 11th September at The Rockefeller University in New York. The Symposium was a great success and we look forward to supporting it again next year.

The winner of the Chemical Science poster prize was Chen Chen, pictured below.  Congratulations to Chen!

You can keep up to date with the plans for 2019 by following the TPCB website here.

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Nanotechnology for Energy and the Environment Symposium 2018

The RSC Chemical Nanoscience & Nanotechnology Group Annual Symposium 2018 was held at Burlington House, London on 6th-7th September. The Royal Society of Chemistry were delighted to support this event, which featured an excellent line up of speakers.

Congratulations to:

Qian Guo (Queen Mary University of London) on winning the Chemical Science poster prize

Amira Alazmi (KAUST) on winning the Nanoscale poster prize

Christopher Windle (University College London) on winning the Nanoscale Horizons poster prize

The Chemical Nanoscience & Nanotechnology Group also offered an award for the best early career researcher talk. Congratulations to Jijia Xie (University College London) on winning this prize.

Qian Guo receiving the Chemical Science poster prize Amira Alazmi receiving the Nanoscale poster prize
Christopher Windle receiving the Nanoscale Horizons poster prize Jijia Xie receiving the CNN group talk prize

Well done to all of the prize winners from everyone at Chemical Science!

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