Archive for the ‘Hot Articles’ Category

Tuning the Size of Metal-Organic Framework Crystals by Decoupling Nucleation and Growth Processes

A group of scientists from Tsinghua University in China have made a breakthrough in enhancing the controllability of the metal-organic framework (MOF) crystal size.

MOF represents a family of microporous crystals consisting of metal node-organic ligand coordination networks. They have shown potential in versatile applications including hydrogen storage, catalysis and electrochemical energy storage. Since their performance strongly correlates to the crystal size, synthesizing MOF crystals with tunable sizes and high yields is necessary to allow fundamental studies on the size-performance relationship. Unfortunately, the conventional size-controlling methods either require complex operations or exhibit low yields.

Now in ChemComm, Tiefeng Wang and coworkers demonstrate a method that can easily tune the size of MOF crystals. The mechanism is based on decoupling nucleation and growth processes. Unlike traditional strategies that mingle all metal precursors and organic ligands together in a solvent, this newly developed protocol initially mixes only a small portion of metal precursors with organic ligands. The metal precursors quickly coordinate with surrounding ligands to form small MOF clusters (the “nucleation” stage). Due to the limited supply of the metal precursors, the growth of these clusters into large crystals is unfavorable. Subsequently, the remaining metal precursors are introduced into the cluster-containing solution. The clusters then continue to grow into MOF crystals (the “growth” stage). Because the crystals develop directly from the small clusters (i.e. the seeds), the number of the seeds and the total concentration of the added metal precursors control the resulting MOF crystal size (Figure 1).

 

Figure 1. A schematic illustration of the growth of MOF crystals via a typical conventional method (top) and the reported decoupling method (down).

Using this method, the authors prepared a series of Pt@ZIF-8 MOF crystals (with sizes ranging from 45 nm to 440 nm) and investigated their ability to catalyze the reaction of 1-hexene hydrogenation. The catalytic activity of different sized crystals was quantified, with a linear correlation observed between the size and the activity (Figure 2).

Figure 2. The linear relationship between the Pt@ZIF-8 MOF size (r) and the hydrogenation reaction rate (D). r0 and D0 represent the size and the reaction rate of the smallest MOF (45 nm).

This reported approach is expected to be applicable for synthesizing MOF crystals other than Pt@ZIF-8. The availability of size-tunable MOFs will facilitate mechanistic studies in determining the optimal crystal size for different applications.

To find out more please read:

A General and Facile Strategy for Precisely Controlling the Crystal Size of Monodispersed Metal-Organic Frameworks via Separating the Nucleation and Growth

Xiaocheng Lan, Ning Huang, Jinfu Wang and Tiefeng Wang

Chem. Commun. 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c7cc08244d

About the blogger:

Tianyu Liu obtained his Ph.D. (2017) in Physical Chemistry from University of California, Santa Cruz in United States. He is passionate about scientific communication to introduce cutting-edge research to both the general public and scientists with diverse research expertise. He is an online blog writer for Chem. Commun. and Chem. Sci. More information about him can be found at http://liutianyuresearch.weebly.com/.

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Suzuki–Miyaura–hydrogenation targets 3D drugs

Scientists in the UK have unveiled a way to make pharmaceutical molecules with increased 3D characteristics. The single pot Suzuki–Miyaura–hydrogenation reaction results in sp2–sp3 linked pharmaceutically relevant molecules.

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry
A single pot Suzuki–Miyaura-hydrogenation can be used to furnish lead and fragment-like products in good to excellent yields

The number of tetrahedral carbon atoms, or how 3D a molecule is, is one factor that determines the success of a molecule in clinical drug trials. Molecules with a high sp3 fraction are in demand, however current methods to make them suffer drawbacks. The Suzuki–Miyaura reaction is common for the cross-coupling of sp2–sp3 systems, but alkyl boron or alkyl halides are prone to β-elimination and other side reactions, producing mixtures of products.

Read the full story by Suzanne Howson on Chemistry World.

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In-Vivo Visualization of Glucose Metabolism with a Two-Color Imaging Technique

A group of scientists from Columbia University in United States have developed a state-of-the-art probing technique that can simultaneously map glucose uptake and incorporation activities in living cells.

Glucose is a ubiquitous “fuel” for most living organisms. Its metabolism, including uptake and incorporation, is vital to sustain the energy consumption of living organisms. Visualization of glucose metabolism is of critical importance for clinical diagnostics and fundamental biological researches. However, current imaging techniques are destructive to living cells, poorly resolved or incapable of probing uptake and incorporation at the same time.

Now in ChemComm, Prof. Min Wei’s research team demonstrates a breakthrough based on a vibrational imaging technique coupled with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy. This technique utilizes two glucose analogues to present the glucose metabolism, the 13C-labelled 3-O-propargyl-D-glucose (3-OPG-13C3) for glucose uptake and the D7-glucose for glucose incorporation. Conventional Raman spectroscopy is unable to distinguish the aforementioned two species due to their overlapping Raman peaks. The authors addressed this challenge by labelling 3-OPG with 13C that exhibits a blue shifted Raman peak, thus separating it from the peak of D7-glucose. Decoupling of the two peaks allows in-vivo imaging and simultaneous observation of glucose uptake and incorporation in cells with sub-cellular resolution.

Figure 1 shows the two-color mapping images collected for human cancer cells, PC-3. The blue (panel a) and red (panel b) areas display the regions where glucose incorporation and uptake are taking place, respectively. The two images can be easily obtained by tuning the wavenumber of the incident light to match with corresponding Raman peak positions. Use of light with other wavenumbers results in the black image (panel c) containing virtually no colored regions, showing the excellent selectivity of the technique. Additionally, this approach differentiates between cancer cells and healthy cells by comparing the blue to red color intensity ratio.

This novel and versatile imaging technique is expected to serve as a useful tool in advanced bio-imaging and future cancer diagnostics.

Figure 1. Two-color mapping images of PC-3 cells highlighting the (a) glucose-incorporation regions (Raman peak: 2133 cm-1) and (b) glucose-uptake regions (Raman peak: 2053 cm-1). (c) An image collected with a wavenumber (2000 cm-1) that does not match with either of the Raman peaks. Scale bar: 20 µm.

 

To find out more please read:

Two-color Vibrational Imaging of Glucose Metabolism Using Stimulated Raman Scattering

Rong Long, Luyuan Zhang, Lingyan Shi, Yihui Shen, Fanghao Hu, Chen Zeng and Wei Min

Chem. Commun. 2018, DOI: 10.1039/C7CC08217G

About the blogger:

Tianyu Liu obtained his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from University of California, Santa Cruz in United States. He is passionate about scientific communication to introduce cutting-edge research to both the general public and scientists with diverse research expertise. He is a web blog writer for Chem. Commun. and Chem. Sci. More information about him can be found at http://liutianyuresearch.weebly.com/.

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Binder-free Integration of Bismuth Nanoflakes onto Nickel Foams for Sodium-ion Batteries

A new type of bismuth-based electrode material for sodium-ion batteries has been synthesized. This electrode consists of bismuth metal nanoflakes seamlessly integrated onto nickel foams. The electrode contains no polymer binders, a crucial component required to retain the structural integrity of most battery electrodes. This binder-free feature improves the amount of charge being stored (i.e. capacity) at fast charging rates.

Sodium-ion batteries are attracting worldwide research efforts as electric energy storage devices, in addition to the prevalent lithium-ion batteries, due to the abundance of sodium. Similar to the preparation of other battery electrodes, fabricating sodium-ion battery electrodes generally requires binders, e.g. polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), to hold powdered electrode materials together and glue them to metal supporting substrates. However, the electrically insulating nature of the binders impedes fast electron transport between electrode materials and supporting substrates, consequently degrading the capacity of the batteries at fast charging rates.

Now in ChemComm, researchers from Nankai University & the Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering in China demonstrate a bismuth-based electrode material that does not involve a binder. This characteristic is realized by the in-situ growth of bismuth nanoflakes onto nickel foams through a solution-based replacement reaction (Figure 1). Because the nanoflakes grow directly from the nickel foam surface and firmly anchor onto nickel (Figure 2a), the resultant Bi/Ni composite can be directly used as an electrode. Specifically, the bismuth nanoflakes and nickel foam serve as the active material and supporting substrate, respectively.

The Bi/Ni composite exhibited excellent electrochemical performance. It achieved a high capacity of 377.1 mAh/g at a current density of 20 mA/g. Significantly, when the current density increased 100-fold, its capacity could still retain 206.4 mAh/g, which is more than half of the capacity obtained at 20 mA/g (Figure 2b). This outstanding capacity retention is a benefit of the binder-free characteristic that reduces the resistance of electron transport.

The authors then elucidated the working mechanism of the bismuth nanoflakes by in-situ Raman spectroscopy. They concluded that a two-step alloying process was responsible for the charge storage activity.

Figure 1. A schematic illustration showing the synthetic process of the binder-free Bi/Ni electrode. By inserting a piece of nickel foam into an ethylene glycol (EG) solution containing bismuth(III) nitrate, Bi3+ can replace Ni metal, be reduced to Bi metal and deposit on the Ni metal surface.

 

Figure 2. (a) A scanning electron microscopy image of the bismuth nanoflakes. (b) A plot showing the capacity of the Bi/Ni electrode at different current densities.

 

The successful synthesis of the binder-free electrode is expected to encourage future works on the design and synthesis of integrated electrode materials to advance the performance of sodium-ion batteries.

 

To find out more please read:

In situ Synthesis of Bi Nanoflakes on Ni Foam for Sodium-ion Batteries

Liubin Wang, Chenchen Wang, Fujun Li, Fangyi Cheng and Jun Chen

Chem. Commun. 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c7cc08341f

About the blogger:

Tianyu Liu obtained his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from University of California, Santa Cruz in United States. He is passionate about scientific communication to introduce cutting-edge research to both the general public and scientists with diverse research expertise. He is a web blog writer for Chem. Commun. and Chem. Sci. More information about him can be found at http://liutianyuresearch.weebly.com/.

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HOT ChemComm articles for November

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 5th January 2018.

Long-wavelength fluorescent boronate probes for the detection and intracellular imaging of peroxynitrite
Adam C. Sedgwick, Hai-Hao Han, Jordan E. Gardiner, Steven D. Bull, Xiao-Peng He and Tony D. James
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 12822-12825
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC07845E, Communication

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Towards broad spectrum activity-based glycosidase probes: synthesis and evaluation of deoxygenated cyclophellitol aziridines
Sybrin P. Schröder, Jasper W. van de Sande, Wouter W. Kallemeijn, Chi-Lin Kuo, Marta Artola, Eva J. van Rooden, Jianbing Jiang, Thomas J. M. Beenakker, Bogdan I. Florea, Wendy A. Offen, Gideon J. Davies, Adriaan J. Minnaard, Johannes M. F. G. Aerts, Jeroen D. C. Codée, Gijsbert A. van der Marel and Herman S. Overkleeft
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 12528-12531
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC07730K, Communication

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Forged and fashioned for faithfulness—ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts bearing ammonium tags
Anupam Jana and Karol Grela
Chem. Commun., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC06535C, Feature article

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Nanostructured silicon ferromagnet collected by a permanent neodymium magnet
Takahisa Okuno, Stephan Thürmer and Hirofumi Kanoh
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 12882-12885
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC07372K, Communication

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Biofilm dispersal using nitric oxide loaded nanoparticles fabricated by photo-PISA: influence of morphology
Zahra Sadrearhami, Jonathan Yeow, Thuy-Khanh Nguyen, Kitty K. K. Ho, Naresh Kumar and Cyrille Boyer
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 12894-12897
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC07293G, Communication

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Creating Defects to Enhance Oxygen Evolution Activity: A Case Study using CoFe Layered Double Hydroxides

A group of scientists recently made a breakthrough in promoting the oxygen evolution activity of metal hydroxides. They developed a simple yet efficient strategy of immersing the metal hydroxides in diluted acid solutions.

The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is a critical component for solar-driven water splitting that can sustainably acquire a clean fuel hydrogen gas by solar energy. Certain noble metal oxides, such as iridium dioxide (IrO2) and ruthenium dioxide (RuO2), work extremely well for catalyzing OERs. However, their scarcity restricts their potential for large-scale applications. To address the cost bottleneck, inexpensive alternatives such as metal hydroxides are being investigated worldwide. Unfortunately, their performance cannot compete with IrO2 or RuO2, partly due to their limited active sites for oxygen evolution. As such, there is a current need to develop strategies to promote the oxygen evolution activity of these metal hydroxides.

Figure 1. A schematic illustration showing the structural change of CoFe layered double hydroxide after being immersed in diluted nitric acid. Acid soaking creates Fe, Co and O defects (represented by VFe, VCo, and VO in the illustration, respectively) as well as separating the hydroxide layers.

Recently, Zhou et al. from Hunan University and Shenzhen University in China, demonstrated an easy acid-etching method that is capable of significantly improving the oxygen evolution activity of CoFe layered double hydroxide. When the hydroxide comes into contact with the nitric acid, protons remove some Co, Fe and O atoms and leave behind vacancies. These vacancies are named defects (Figure 2). Oxygen gas prefers to evolve at these defects and thus the defective hydroxide exhibits improved oxygen evolution activity. In addition, the nitrate anions can intercalate in between the metal hydroxide layers and break adjacent layers apart, exposing a large number of defect-containing surfaces and thus further boosting the oxygen evolution activity (Figure 1).

Figure 2. Transmission electron microscopy images of untreated CoFe layered double hydroxide (a, b) and acid-etched CoFe layered double hydroxide (c, d). After etching, the hydroxide nanoplates crack (due to layer separation) and surfaces become rough (due to creation of defects).

This method is expected to be applicable for a wide range of other metal hydroxides. The simplicity and efficiency of this method could make oxygen evolution catalysts cost-effective for commercialization.

 

To find out more please read:

Acid-etched Layered Double Hydroxides with Rich Defects for Enhancing the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

Peng Zhou, Yanyong Wang, Chao Xie, Chen Chen, Hanwen Liu, Ru Chen, Jia Huo and Shuangyin Wang

Chem. Commun. 2017, 53, 11778-11781

About the blogger:

Tianyu Liu obtained his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from University of California, Santa Cruz in United States. He is passionate about scientific communication to introduce cutting-edge research to both the general public and scientists with diverse research expertise. He is an online blog writer for Chem. Commun. and Chem. Sci. More information about him can be found at http://liutianyuresearch.weebly.com/.

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Negative press is not always a bad thing: a novel anode material for sodium-ion batteries

At a product launch in California last week Elon Musk introduced Tesla’s new electric semi-trailer truck. Musk sells a tantalising future: one where an electric fleet replaces vehicles which currently rely on fossil fuels. Central to this fleet are powerful rechargeable batteries. Lithium-ion batteries are favoured for many current applications, such as portable electronic devices and the current offerings of full and hybrid vehicles. In coming years they are projected to be the technology of choice for the large-scale applications mentioned above and for storing power generated from intermittent renewable energy sources.

A limiting factor in the widespread roll-out of lithium batteries is that lithium is an expensive resource with low natural abundance. Sodium offers a possible alternative and has the obvious benefits of being both very cheap, and one of the most abundant elements in the earth’s crust. The electrode materials used in lithium batteries cannot be used to make the sodium variant because the sodium ion is larger (1.02 Å compared to 0.76 Å for lithium) and damages the crystalline materials optimised for lithium.

Researchers Gu, Gu and Yang at Beihang University in Beijing have reported the synthesis and performance of a novel anode material optimised for sodium. The material is a graphene-tetrahydroxybenzoquinone (Na4C6O6) hybrid, and is comprised of a porous graphene-oxide scaffold decorated with nanocrystals of Na4C6O6. Furthermore, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the homogenous distribution of sodium throughout this conducting material.

The electrochemical performance contrasts with previously reported materials of this type by exhibiting high cyclic stability. The reversible capacity of graphene-Na4C6O6 at a current density of 74.4 mA g-1 is 268 mA h g-1, a value which is steady over 60 cycles. This is competitive with the graphite anode materials found in lithium batteries, which have specific capacities between 200 and 400 mA h g-1. Furthermore the material performs well over a range of current densities, with reversible capacities of 95 – 211 mA h g-1 measured over a range of 3720 – 186 mA g-1.

With this work the authors contribute, at most, a viable candidate for the next rechargeable sodium battery and, at the very least, continued research into sustainable technologies. This ensures that in addressing our current energy challenges we are solving the problem, not delaying it.

To find out more please read:

3D organic Na4C6O6/graphene architecture for fast sodium storage with ultralong cycle life
Jianan Gu, Yue Gua and Shubin Yang
Chem. Commun., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC08045J, Communication

About the author

Zoë Hearne is a PhD candidate in chemistry at McGill University in Montréal, Canada, under the supervision of Professor Chao-Jun Li. She hails from Canberra, Australia, where she completed her undergraduate degree. Her current research focuses on transition metal catalysis to effect novel transformations, and out of the lab she is an enthusiastic chemistry tutor and science communicator.

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HOT ChemComm articles for October

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 13th December 2017.

Boron–nitrogen main chain analogues of polystyrene: poly(B-aryl)aminoboranes via catalytic dehydrocoupling
Diego A. Resendiz-Lara, Naomi E. Stubbs, Marius I. Arz, Natalie E. Pridmore, Hazel A. Sparkes and Ian Manners
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 11701-11704
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC07331C, Communication

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Photosensitised regioselective [2+2]-cycloaddition of cinnamates and related alkenes
Santosh K. Pagire, Asik Hossain, Lukas Traub, Sabine Kerresa and Oliver Reiser
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 12072-12075
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC06710K, Communication

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Acid-etched Layered Double Hydroxides with Rich Defects for Enhancing the Oxygen Evolution Reaction
Peng Zhou, Yanyong Wang, Chao Xie, Chen Chen, Hanwen Liu, Ru Chen, Jia Huo and Shuangyin Wang
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 11778-11781
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC07186H, Communication

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Selenoureas for anion binding as molecular logic gates
Arianna Casula, Paloma Begines, Alexandre Bettoschi, Josè G. Fernandez-Bolaños, Francesco Isaia, Vito Lippolis, Óscar López, Giacomo Picci, M. Andrea Scorciapino and Claudia Caltagirone
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 11869-11872
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC07148E, Communcation

This article is part of the themed collection: Chemosensors and Molecular Logic

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Neutron spectroscopy as a tool in catalytic science
Alexander J. O’Malley, Stewart F. Parker and C. Richard A. Catlow
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 12164-12176
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC05982E, Feature Article

This article is part of the themed collection: Commemorating Michael Faraday (1791-1867)

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D-Serine enzymatic metabolism induced formation of a powder-remoldable PAAM–CS hydrogel
Shuang Zhang, Qingcong Wei, Yinghui Shang, Qi Zhang and Qigang Wang
Chem. Commun., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC06733J, Communication

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HOT ChemComm articles for September

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 6th November 2017.

High Performance Capacitive Deionization Electrode Based on Ultrathin Nitrogen-Doped Carbon/Graphene Nano-Sandwiches
Miao Wang, Xingtao Xu, Jing Tang, Shujin Hou, Md. Shahriar A. Hossain, Likun Pan and Yusuke Yamauchi
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 10784-10787
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC05673G, Communication

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Acetylene hydrochlorination using Au/carbon: a journey towards single site catalysis
Grazia Malta, Simon J. Freakley, Simon A. Kondrat and Graham J. Hutchings
Chem. Commun., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC05986H, Feature Article

This article is part of the themed collection: Commemorating Michael Faraday (1791-1867)

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Sydnone–alkyne cycloaddition: applications in synthesis and bioconjugation
Elodie Decuypère, Lucie Plougastel, Davide Audisio and Frédéric Taran
Chem. Commun., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC06405E, Feature Article

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Assembly of the active center of organophosphorus hydrolase in metal–organic frameworks via rational combination of functional ligands
Mengfan Xia, Caixia Zhuo, Xuejuan Ma, Xiaohong Zhang, Huaming Sun, Quanguo Zhai and Yaodong Zhang
Chem. Commun., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC06270B, Communication

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Inclusion of a dithiadiazolyl radical in a seemingly non-porous solid
Varvara I. Nikolayenko, Leonard J. Barbour, Ana Arauzo, Javier Campo, Jeremy M. Rawson and Delia A. Haynes
Chem. Commun., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC06678C, Communication

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Synthesis of Trinorbornane
Lorenzo Delarue Bizzini, Thomas Müntener, Daniel Häussinger, Markus Neuburger and  Marcel Mayor
Chem. Commun., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC06273G, Communication

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Synthesis of Tin Dioxide Nanotubes for Lithium-ion Batteries with “A Grain of Oxalate Salt”

Preparation of tube-shaped electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries is a trending topic. Tubes with hollow cylindrical bodies allow exposure of the electrodes’ interior surface and can accommodate the large volumetric expansion commonly observed when lithium ions diffuse (either via intercalation or alloying) into the electrodes. The aforementioned two characteristics improve the specific capacity (a measure of how much electric energy one electrode can hold) and lifetime of electrodes.

Recently, the Mai research group from Wuhan University of Technology, China demonstrated a straightforward method for the synthesis of tin dioxide nanotubes as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries. They adopted manganese(III) oxyhydroxide (MnOOH) nanowires as the sacrificial templates and immersed them in a batch of aqueous solutions containing tin(II) cations and oxalate anions (C2O42-). Afterwards, they warmed the mixture at 60 oC under constant magnetic stirring for 4 h and collected a white precipitate consisting of tin dioxide nanotubes. These nanotubes were then washed and coated with carbon thin films to improve their electrical conductivity and structural stability before being subjected to performance evaluations.

The presence of oxalate anions was crucial for producing the nanotubes with a well-defined shape. The function of these anions was revealed through a series of experiments. Oxalate anions first reduced MnOOH to manganese(II) cations and consumed protons in the vicinity of the MnOOH surface. The consumption of local protons increased the local pH and triggered precipitation and oxidation (by dissolved oxygen) of Sn2+ to tin dioxide. The two reactions proceeded, and eventually the MnOOH nanowires disappeared but tubes of tin dioxide formed around their surfaces (Figure 1). Samples obtained without oxalate salts were irregularly shaped.

Figure 1. (a) The schematic illustration of the synthesis steps of the tin dioxide nanotubes. (b) Scanning electron microscopy and (c) transmission electron microscopy images of the as-prepared tin dioxide nanotubes.

The carbon-coated tin dioxide nanotubes showed superior stability performance to bare tin dioxide nanotubes, as shown from the slower capacity-fading rate depicted in Figure 2a. In addition, carbon coating did not significantly sacrifice nanotubes’ charge-storage performance as both electrodes with and without a coating exhibited comparable capacity at all tested current densities (Figure 2b).

Figure 2. Performance comparison between carbon-coated tin dioxide nanotubes (SnO2@C NTs) and bare tin dioxide nanotubes (SnO2 NTs): (a) long-term stability and (b) capacity achieved at different current densities and charge-discharge cycle numbers.

To find out more please read:

Oxalate-assisted Formation of Uniform Carbon-confined SnO2 Nanotubes with Enhanced Lithium Storage

Chunhua Han, Baoxuan Zhang, Kangning Zhao, Jiashen Meng, Qiu He, Pan He, Wei Yang, Qi Li and Liqiang Mai

DOI: 10.1039/c7cc05406h

About the blogger:

Tianyu Liu is a Ph.D. in chemistry graduated from University of California, Santa Cruz in United States. He is passionate about scientific communication to introduce cutting-edge researches to both the general public and the scientists with diverse research expertise. He is a web blogger for the Chem. Commun. and Chem. Sci. blog websites. More information about him can be found at http://liutianyuresearch.weebly.com/.

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