Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Research infographic – “Greening the synthesis of peptide therapeutics: an industrial perspective”

As of 2017 over 60 peptide drugs have been approved in the US, Europe and Japan.

The Sejer Pederson group at Novo Nordisk realise the importance of greening the synthesis of peptide therapeutics within industry, and identify methods on how we can achieve this.

Find out more in the Open Access article:

“Greening the synthesis of peptide therapeutics: an industrial perspective”

Vincent Martin et al. RSC Advances, 2020, 10, 42457-42492 DOI:10.1039/D0RA07204D

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February & March 2022 RSC Advances Reviews

Welcome to February and March’s review round up!

Every month we update our 2022 Reviews in RSC Advances collection to showcase all of the review articles published in RSC Advances in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest reviews.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Browse a selection of our February and March reviews below:

Selective strategies for antibacterial regulations of nanomaterials
Jinliang Ma, Kexin Li and Shaobin Gu
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 4852-4864
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA08996J

Identifying surface degradation, mechanical failure, and thermal instability phenomena of high energy density Ni-rich NCM cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries: a review
Fikadu Takele Geldasa, Mesfin Abayneh Kebede, Mergersa Wodajo Shura and Fekadu Gashaw Hone
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 5891-5909
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA08401A

Synthesis of wool roll-like silver nanoflowers in an ethanol/water mixture and their application to detect traces of the fungicide carbendazim by SERS technique
Manh Cuong Nguyen, Truc Quynh Ngan Luong, Thi Thu Vu, Cao Tuan Anh and Tran Cao Dao
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 11583-11590
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA09286C

Recent advances in photochemical and electrochemically induced thiocyanation: a greener approach for SCN-containing compound formation
Pran Gopal Karmaker, Md. Asraful Alam and Feng Huo
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 6214-6233
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA09060G

Encapsulation of bioactive peptides: a strategy to improve the stability, protect the nutraceutical bioactivity and support their food applications
J. E. Aguilar-Toalá, D. Quintanar-Guerrero, A. M. Liceaga and M. L. Zambrano-Zaragoza
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 6449-6458
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA08590E

Photochemical modifications for DNA/RNA oligonucleotides
Amirrasoul Tavakoli and Jung-Huyn Min
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 6484-6507
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA05951C

Defects in graphene-based heterostructures: topological and geometrical effects
Lei Fan, Jin Xu and Yihong Hong
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 6772-6782
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA08884J

Reviewing a plethora of oxidative-type reactions catalyzed by whole cells of Streptomyces species
Sara Salama, Mohamed H. Habib, Rajni Hatti-Kaul and Yasser Gaber
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 6974-7001
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA08816E

Progress in perylene diimides for organic solar cell applications
Jin Cao and Shaopeng Yang
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 6966-6973
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA08484D

Biotechnological approach for improvement of Crambe species as valuable oilseed plants for industrial purposes
Nadia Pushkarova and Alla Yemets
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 7168-7178
DOI: 10.1039/D2RA00422D

Tannic acid: a crosslinker leading to versatile functional polymeric networks: a review
Chen Chen, Hao Yang, Xiao Yang and Qinghai Ma
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 7689-7711
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA07657D

Insight into prognostics, diagnostics, and management strategies for SARS CoV-2
Umay Amara, Sidra Rashid, Khalid Mahmood, Mian Hasnain Nawaz, Akhtar Hayat and Maria Hassan
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 8059-8094
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA07988C

Molecularly imprinted polymers via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer synthesis in sensing and environmental applications
Irvin Veloz Martínez, Jackeline Iturbe Ek, Ethan C. Ahn and Alan O. Sustaita
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 9186-9201
DOI: 10.1039/D2RA00232A

A minireview on the synthesis of single atom catalysts
Jiawen Guo, Huimin Liu, Dezheng Li, Jian Wang, Xavier Djitcheu, Dehua He, Qijan Zhang
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 9373-9394
DOI: 10.1039/D2RA00657J

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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February & March 2022 HOT Articles

Welcome to February and March’s HOT article round up!

Every month we update our 2022 RSC Advances HOT Article Collection to showcase all of the articles selected by our reviewers and handling editors as HOT in 2022. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest HOT articles.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

 

Hydrophilic oxygen radical absorbance capacity values of low-molecular-weight phenolic compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen
Shuhei Sakura, Akito Kikuchi and Hiroaki Gotoh
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 4094-4100
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA08918H

Green solvent free epoxidation of olefins by a heterogenised hydrazone-dioxidotungsten(vi) coordination compound
Neda Heydari, Rahman Bikas, Maryam Shaterian and Tadeusz Lis
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 4813-4827
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA09217K

Photocatalytic turnover of CO2 under visible light by [Re(CO)3(1-(1,10) phenanthroline-5-(4-nitro-naphthalimide))Cl] in tandem with the sacrificial donor BIH
Alyssa Spear, Robson L. Schuarca, Jesse Q. Bond, Timothy M. Korter, Jon Zubieta and Robert P. Doyle
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 5080-5084
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA08261B

A multi pathway coupled domino strategy: I2/TBHP-promoted synthesis of imidazopyridines and thiazoles via sp3, sp2 and sp C–H functionalization
Yishou Wang, Shichen Li, Xifeng Wang, Yiming Yao, Lei Feng and Chen Ma
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 5919-5927
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA07438E

Facile synthesis of ZnMoO4/AlPO4-5 nanorod composites as visible-light-driven photocatalysts and high-performance energy storage materials
Delvin Aman, Samira Abdel-Azim and Saad G. Mohamed
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 7120-7132
DOI: 10.1039/D2RA00268J

Basic features of Ne*–HX (X = Cl, Br) chemi-ionization reactions
Stefano Falcinelli, Franco Vecchiocattivi, Brunetto Giovanni Brunetti, Marco Parriani, Giovanni Gigliotti, Stefano Stranges and Fernando Pirani
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 7587-7593
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA08904H

Dendritic structured palladium complexes: magnetically retrievable, highly efficient heterogeneous nanocatalyst for Suzuki and Heck cross-coupling reactions
Safoora Sheikh, Mohammad Ali Nasseri, Mohammad chakhandi, Oliver Reiser and Ali Allahresani
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 8833-8840
DOI: 10.1039/D2RA00487A

Theoretical study of a derivative of chlorophosphine with aliphatic and aromatic Grignard reagents: SN2@P or the novel SN2@Cl followed by SN2@C?
Nandini Savoo, Lydia Rhyman and Ponnadurai Ramasami
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 9130-9138
DOI: 10.1039/D2RA00258B

Experimental and theoretical study of ZrMo-KIT-6 solid acid catalyst with abundant Brønsted acid sites
Jinglin Mu, Manfen Liang, Hong Huang, Jian Meng, Leilei Xu, Zhiling Song, Mei Wu, Zhichao Miao, Shuping Zhuo and Jin Zhou
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 9310-9322
DOI: 10.1039/D2RA00586G

Synthesis, biological and computational studies of flavonoid acetamide derivatives
Daniel K. Isika,
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 10037-10050
DOI: 10.1039/D2RA01375D

19F-centred NMR analysis of mono-fluorinated compounds
Alan J. R. Smith, Richard York, Dušan Uhrín and Nicholle G. A. Bell
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 10062-10070
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA08046F

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Welcome to our new Associate Editor: P. Sujatha Devi

We are delighted to welcome Dr P. Sujatha Devi to the RSC Advances team!

Dr. P. Sujatha Devi received her Ph.D in Chemistry from the Inorganic and Physical Chemistry department,  Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore in 1991. Dr. Devi has made outstanding research contributions in frontier and diverse areas of solid state chemistry, spanning from material synthesis, surface functionalization and characterization through to application and device development.  Dr. Devi’s main research contributions are essentially in the synthesis, processing and study of the properties of functional materials, alongside assessment of their structure-property correlations.

Her contributions in processing and characterization of functional nanomaterials for applications ranging from fuel cell, dye sensitized solar cell, chemical and biosensors and drug delivery are noteworthy.

She is currently Chief Scientist and was heading the Chemical Sciences and Technology Division at CSIR-National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India prior to taking up this position.

She was Editor of the Taylor & Francis Journal Transactions of the Indian Ceramic Society from 2015 to 2018. She is also very active in contributing to the enhancement of science in the society through being a member of the Executive Council of the major scientific societies in India, CRSI and MRSI.

P. Sujatha was elected as a Fellow of the RSC in 2017, and was featured in the cross journal themed collection Celebrating Excellence in Research: 100 Women of Chemistry.

Browse a selection of P. Sujatha’s RSC publications: 

Redistribution of native defects and photoconductivity in ZnO under pressure
Partha Pratim Das, Sudeshna Samanta, Lin Wang, Jaeyong Kim, Thomas Vogt, P. Sujatha Devi and Yongjae Lee
RSC Adv., 2019, 9, 4303-4313
DOI: 10.1039/C8RA10219H

Water soluble blue-emitting AuAg alloy nanoparticles and fluorescent solid platforms for removal of dyes from water
Srikrishna Pramanik, Arindam Saha and Parukuttyamma Sujatha Devi
RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 33946-33954
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA14176H

Frequency dependent energy storage and dielectric performance of Ba–Zr Co-doped BiFeO3 loaded PVDF based mechanical energy harvesters: effect of corona poling
Abhishek Sasmal, Shrabanee Sen and P. Sujatha Devi
Soft Matter, 2020, 16, 8492-8505
DOI: 10.1039/D0SM01031F

Role of suppressed oxygen vacancies in the BiFeO3 nanofiller to improve the polar phase and multifunctional performance of poly(vinylidene fluoride)
Abhishek Sasmal, Shrabanee Sen and P. Sujatha Devi
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2019, 21, 5974-5988
DOI: 10.1039/C8CP07281G

Submit your research or reviews to P. Sujatha, she will be delighted to receive them! See our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Welcome to our new Associate Editor: Xi Chen

We are delighted to welcome Dr Xi Chen to the RSC Advances team!

Xi Chen received her Bachelor (2010) and Master (2012) degrees in Chemistry from Wuhan University in China. She then obtained her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the National University of Singapore (NUS) under the supervision of Prof. Ning Yan in 2016, where she stayed as a postdoc. She joined the China-UK Low Carbon College at Shanghai Jiao Tong University as Assistant Professor in 2018 and promoted to Associate Professor in 2020. Her research focuses on the chemical transformations of various waste streams including biomass, plastics and CO2 into high-value chemicals, materials and fuels.

Browse a selection of Xi’s RSC publications: 

Conversion of chitin and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine into a N-containing furan derivative in ionic liquids
Xi Chen, Yi Liu, Francesca M. Kerton and Ning Yan
RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 20073-20080
DOI: 10.1039/C5RA00382B

Haber-independent, diversity-oriented synthesis of nitrogen compounds from biorenewable chitin
Thuy Trang Pham, Xi Chen, Tilo Söhnel, Ning Yan and Jonathan Sperry
Green Chem., 2020, 22, 1978-1984
DOI: 10.1039/C5RA00382B

Room temperature, near-quantitative conversion of glucose into formic acid
Can Wang, Xi Chen, Man Qi, Jianeng Wu, Gökalp Gözaydın, Ning Yan, Heng Zhong and Fangming Jin
Green Chem., 2019, 21, 6089-6096
DOI: 10.1039/C9GC02201E

Submit your research or reviews to Xi, she will be delighted to receive them! See our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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November 2021 RSC Advances Reviews

Welcome to November’s review round up!

Every month we update our 2021 Reviews in RSC Advances collection to showcase all of the review articles published in RSC Advances in 2021. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest reviews.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Browse a selection of our November reviews below:

Recent progresses in the synthesis of MnO2 nanowire and its application in environmental catalysis
Huikang Song, Leilei Xu, Mindong Chen, Yan Cui, Cai-e Wu, Jian Qiu, Liang Xu, Ge Chenga and Xun Hu
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 35494-35513
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA06497E

Journey of anthraquinones as anticancer agents – a systematic review of recent literature
M. Shaheer Malik, Reem I. Alsantali, Rabab S. Jassas, Abdulrahman A. Alsimaree, Riyaz Syed, Meshari A. Alsharif, Kulkarni Kalpana, Moataz Morad, Ismail I. Althagafia and Saleh A. Ahmed
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 35806-35827
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA05686G

Recent advances in dye and metal ion removal using efficient adsorbents and novel nano-based materials: an overview
Ahmad K. Badawi, M. Abd Elkodousb and Gomaa A. M. Ali
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 36528-36553
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA06892J

Additive manufacturing technology of polymeric materials for customized products: recent developments and future prospective
Akhilesh Kumar Pal, Amar K. Mohanty and Manjusri Misra
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 36398-36438
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA04060J

Recent advances in the transition-metal-free synthesis of quinoxalines
Biplob Borah and L. Raju Chowhan
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 37325-37353
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA06942J

Deciphering the sensing of α-amyrin acetate with hs-DNA: a multipronged biological probe
Amol V. Pansare, Amol A. Shedge, Maryappa C. Sonawale, Shubham V. Pansare, Akshay D. Mahakal, Shyam R. Khairkar, Shraddha Y. Chhatre, Dnyaneshwar K. Kulalb and Vishwanath R. Patil
RSC Adv., 2022,12, 1238-1243
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA07195E

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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November 2021 HOT Articles

Welcome to November’s HOT article round up!

Every month we update our 2021 RSC Advances HOT Article Collection to showcase all of the articles selected by our reviewers and handling editors as HOT in 2021. Don’t forget to come back next month to check out our latest HOT articles.

We hope you enjoy reading and as always, all of our articles are open access so you can easily share your favourites online and with your colleagues.

Explore the full collection!

Browse a selection of our November HOT articles below:

New triterpenes from Cimicifuga yunnanensis down-regulating the mRNA expression of CD147, MMP-2, and MMP-9
Ni-Hong Lu, Jie Li, Yong-Rui Yang, Hong-Lu Liua and Ying-Rong Du
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 36978-36988
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA07828C

A catalytic ozonation process using MgO/persulfate for degradation of cyanide in industrial wastewater: mechanistic interpretation, kinetics and by-products
Ali Behnami, Jean-Philippe Croué, Ehsan Aghayanic and Mojtaba Pourakbar
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 36965-36977
DOI: 10.1039/D1RA07789A

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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RSC Advances HOT articles – a feature interview with Frédéric-Georges Fontaine

We are very pleased to introduce Frédéric-Georges Fontaine, corresponding author of the paper ‘Boric acid as a precatalyst for BH3-catalyzed hydroboration‘. His article has been very well received and handpicked by our reviewers and handling editors as one of our HOT articles. Frédéric-Georges told us more about the work that went into this article and what he hopes to achieve in the future. You can find out more about the author and his article below and find more HOT articles in our online collection.

Meet the author

Frédéric-Georges Fontaine got his B.Sc. in Chemistry from Université de Montréal in 1998 and a Ph.D. in Organometallic Chemistry from the same institution in 2002 under the supervision of Davit Zargarian. After a NSERC postdoctoral fellowship at UC Berkeley with T. Don Tilley, he started at Université Laval (Quebec City, Canada) in 2004, where he is a Full Professor since 2013. His research is focused on the development of metal-free catalysts for the C-H functionalization and CO2 reduction. He is a Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science alumni and holds a Canada Research Chair in Green Catalysis and Metal-Free Processes since 2018. He is the director of the NSERC CREATE Center for Innovation and Research on Carbon Utilization in Industrial Technologies (CIRCUIT) since 2020.

The research group

The co-authors; Hoang-Minh To and Julien Légaré Lavergne

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?
We demonstrate in this article that air-stable boric acid can convert into reactive BH3 under catalytic conditions. This study is of interest because it provides a safer way to do BH3 type transformations, like the hydroboration of esters as reported herein.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
This discovery could affect the way BH3-catalyzed reactions are carried out. In the last decade, boranes have been playing an important role as metal-free catalysts for important transformations like C-H bond functionalization and hydroboration catalysis, and this chemistry could provide insights on developing greener and safer catalytic systems.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
Initially, we wanted to explore the reactivity of Frustrated Lewis pair aminoborane catalysts for the reduction of esters. By doing our control experiments, we discovered that BH3 is the active catalyst. In our attempt to simplify the catalytic system, we found out that boric acid could do this transformation as well as BH3.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
We are looking for green precatalysts that are air-stable, cheap, safe and easy to handle. Boric acid fills all these parameters.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
Monitoring the conversion of the esters over time while using microwave irradiation as the energy source was challenging. It required performing an experiment for each single condition and reaction time, which was quite time consuming. However, the results are worth the efforts.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
The consumption of boric acid in the presence of pinacolborane made us realized that the functional groups on boron undergo rapid exchange. This kind of process, called transborylation in recent reports, has the potential to widen the extend of boron chemistry.

What is the next step? What work is planned?
Using pinacolborane to convert boric acid into BH3 is interesting, but this process could be much more compelling if a milder and cheaper hydride source was used instead of pinacolborane. We intend to try find more convenient hydride sources.

 

Boric acid as a precatalyst for BH3-catalyzed hydroboration
Julien Légaré Lavergne, Hoang-Minh To and Frédéric-Georges Fontaine
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 31941-31949

DOI: 10.1039/D1RA05945A, Paper

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Feature interview with RSC Advances Executive Editor Laura Fisher

Laura Fisher is Executive Editor for RSC Advances at the Royal Society of Chemistry. She is responsible for the strategic development of the journal, working with members of the Editorial Board and Associate Editors to ensure RSC Advances upholds its standards of quality and impact, and supports the global chemistry community. She kindly agreed to talk about her career in publishing and her aspirations for RSC Advances in the future.

You started as Managing Editor for RSC Advances in June 2019 and in January this year, you were appointed as Executive Editor. Going forward, what is your vision for the journal? What can authors and readers expect of RSC Advances in the future?

I’ve really enjoyed working with the RSC Advances team for the past year. My previous role was across five journals, all of which were much smaller and more subject-specific, as well as not being open access. RSC Advances offers completely different challenges in terms of the size of the journal and engaging with authors across a much broader subject range, and I have learned a lot in the past year! I have really enjoyed the Open Access focus, and working with our huge team of Associate Editors who cover so many different subjects and geographies, but are all so engaged with what we are doing.

In the future I would like us to engage with more and more early career researchers, and give them opportunities to be involved in the journal, whether it is as web writers on our blog, as reviewers, or as Associate Editors. I’d also really like to engage with more people who are really passionate about open access publishing, as I really believe it is the future of our field.

Soon after you started as Executive Editor, the COVID-19 pandemic hit the world. How has this affected you and the journal? What has been most challenging?

From a personal standpoint the biggest transitions have been working from home rather than seeing my colleagues and teammates in the office every day, and also the lack of international travel. I was lucky to get out to China and meet some of the community there last November, but it has been really strange not getting to meet authors and readers in person at conferences over the past year.

From a journal point of view we saw a big spike in submissions at the start of lockdown, when I guess more people had time for writing, and more recently a slight dip as labs are opening up and people are focussing on getting their research back on track. We are also seeing funding being limited in certain regions, which can be challenging for open access.

I also think there have been some positives though, such as the way we have learned to communicate with each other remotely through various means, and that could have a really big benefit going forwards both in terms of collaboration, but also in limiting the amount of international travel for conferences, which is a big part of both my role as an Executive Editor, as well as those of our authors, editors, and readers.

It is the International Open Access Week and you are leading one of the largest gold open access chemistry journals in the world. What makes RSC Advances an important journal in the work towards open research?

The main thing for me is that we are really trying to make open access publishing as inclusive as possible. Our APCs are some of the lowest in the industry, and we offer waivers and discounts to authors from developing countries. To me that shows that we really are doing this for the researchers, and to make chemical science more accessible for everyone.

What would you say to researchers who are on the fence about open access?

It really depends on their reasoning. For those who have concerns about whether the research is reliable and of high quality, I would highlight the fact that at RSC Advances our standards have not changed since before we were open access. Our reject rate has been steady at ~55% for the past 7 years, and this shows that we are applying the same quality standards to open access work as we were previously. 

It is also important to clarify that at the RSC we keep our editorial decisions very separate from any decisions about discounts or waivers. We do that for a good reason – so that we are only judging people’s research on the research itself, and not on the author’s ability to pay an APC. That is the way it should always be.

Finally I would tell people that one of the main benefits of open access is that your research can be read by more people. Under the subscription model only people at institutions with subscription access, or those who pay per article, can read articles, whereas with Open Access anyone can read your work. That includes people at institutions with lower budgets, people in developing countries who don’t generally have broad access to research, and people working in different fields. This means more opportunities for citation and collaboration.

You have a background in research yourself, a PhD in chemistry. Please could you tell us about that?

I did my undergraduate degree and my PhD at the University of Bath. Technically my PhD is in chemical engineering, but it had a quite heavy chemistry focus – synthesising and characterising MOFs, and then measuring their hydrogen adsorption capacity for potential use in fuel cells. After leaving Bath I completed a postdoc at Stellenbosch University, South Africa. However, I have to say I was never a very good practical chemist, and my accident-prone nature made me realise that being in the lab probably wasn’t the best career path for me. I really wanted to stay involved in science though, which is why I applied to work at the Royal Society of Chemistry.

In the past, you have worked on several different journals as well as been involved in the launching of new journals. What made you interested in a career in publishing in the first place? What do you find most exciting with RSC Advances?

As I said in the previous question, it was mostly wanting to stay involved in science but recognising that a career in research didn’t really suit me. I also really enjoy writing, and initially was attracted to the language editing side of the role – helping authors improve their papers. As my career developed I realised I was better at the more outward-facing side of the editor role, and I really enjoy getting to work directly with members of the scientific community on a daily basis. The breadth of scope in RSC Advances makes that even better, because there are so many people who have published in, reviewed for, or read the journal, and each has a different insight.

What is the most common question people ask you about RSC Advances and what is your response to it?

I get a lot of questions from people who have been offered a transfer to RSC Advances from another RSC journal, asking why this is. The main reason is that we get a lot of really great work submitted to all of our journals at the RSC, but sometimes that work isn’t suitable for the journal it was submitted to, whether that is because it isn’t in scope, or because it doesn’t meet the novelty or impact standards of that journal. However, that doesn’t mean it isn’t great work, and we want to keep as much of that great work as we can at the RSC, by offering the authors the option to publish in a more suitable journal. 

We see this as a service for authors, because the transfer is automatic once they approve it, so they don’t have to go through the submission process from the beginning again, and if their paper has already been through peer review, we can often use the same referees, or even the same referee reports, saving the authors time.

Sometimes a transfer offer will be made to one of our subscription journals, and sometimes it will be an open access journal, such as RSC Advances. The only criterion driving transfer offers is the suitability of the venue for the paper in question. And of course, these transfer offers are always optional! 

Do you have any favourite RSC Advances articles? If so, which ones and why?

There was a paper earlier in the year where the authors had been inspired by the way beetles capture water from the air in deserts, and had used the same concept to design a surface that could capture water from fog, with the potential to generate drinking water in arid regions. I really do love how nature can inspire scientists in so many ways!

Back in 2016–2018 when I was working on the journal Soft Matter there was a series of papers in RSC Advances and Soft Matter where the authors were engineering edible microballoons that could be used to deliver nutritional supplements to babies in developing countries. The work they had published with us helped them secure a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant. It’s really great when publications in our journals lead to work that can make such a difference in the world.

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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Meet RSC Advances Associate Editors: Editor Viewpoints

Professor Feng Zhao

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Dr Qin Wang Picture: © Edwin Remsberg

 

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Professor Manojit Pal

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Dr Pablo Denis

 

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Dr Donna Arnold

 

Witnessing wonderful, innovative and exciting science”: an associate editor’s insight

Dr Donna Arnold, Associate Editor of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s RSC Advances, believes it’s vital that scientists contribute to their community by getting involved in the process of publishing high quality research.

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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