Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

RSC Advances Editors’ Collections

Have you been enjoying our monthly Editors’ Collections? We’ve certainly loved putting them together! Each collection is curated by one of our expert Associate Editors, focuses on a specific topic and includes lots of great articles from RSC Advances.

In case you’ve missed any, we have collected all of our Editors’ collections over the last year in one place.

If you would like to submit your work to any of these collections, please contact the Editorial Office – we invite you to submit your research to these collection and give your work the global visibility it deserves

Environmental chemistry: Pollution control

This collection, guest-edited by RSC Advances Associate Editor Professor Feng Zhao (Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences) features articles on the theme ‘pollution control’, illustrating the notability, quality and variety of publications in RSC Advances. These articles are already among the most highly cited research articles in the journal, illustrating their impact. Subject areas include absorptive materials, photocatalytic materials, bio-magnetic membranes and method development.

Ferroelectric and multiferroic materials

In this collection, guest edited by RSC Advances Associate Editor Dr Donna Arnold (University of Kent), we look at some of the contributions to the fields of multiferroic and ferroelectric materials published in the journal. The articles featured here focus on experimental studies of inorganic solid-state ceramics and thin films (including heterostructures and devices). The collection showcases the significance of not only the search for new materials with enhanced properties but also the importance of understanding the structure-property correlations in both powders and films as well as demonstrating their application in environments closer to commercial use. These articles demonstrate the continued growth of these areas as we strive towards next generation devices based on ferroelectric and multiferroic materials.

 

Ferroelectric and multiferroic materials continue to attract extensive attention within the literature due to the potential of these materials to have an increased impact in our everyday lives. Research covers a whole plethora of chemistry and physics from the search for Pb-free ferroelectrics and new energy storage materials to demonstration of real-world device applications based on inorganic and/or organic materials including experimental and computational studies.

Fluorine chemistry in medicinal chemistry and chemical biology

This collection, guest-edited by RSC Advances Editorial Board member Professor Norio Shibata (Nagoya Institute of Technology), features articles published in the journal on fluorine chemistry related to medicinal chemistry and chemical biology.

Organofluorine compounds are revealed in the extensive use of key materials in diverse industrial areas of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, specialty materials, and polymers. In particular, the high demand for organofluorine compounds on the drug market has been evidenced by the sharp increase in the number of fluoro-pharmaceuticals approved each year. Fluorine-related papers published in the journal span over various research fields, including synthetic methodology, medicinal chemistry, chemical biology, and materials science.

Supramolecular polymers

Sebastien Ulrich RSC Advances Associate EditorThis collection, guest-edited by RSC Advances Associate Editor Dr Sébastien Ulrich (CNRS, Université de Montpellier), features articles published in the journal on the topic of Supramolecular Polymers. Supramolecular polymers results from the poly-association of molecules through non-covalent interactions. Uniquely and because they are self-assembled through reversible linkages, these materials are dynamic and can therefore adapt to different conditions and respond to different stimuli. Although supramolecular polymers were first seen as a lab curiosity, they have now demonstrated their utility in a wide range of applications from material to biological sciences. Recent breakthroughs such as the discovery of living supramolecular polymerization make the field very active and opens up exciting new opportunities.

The collection of selected articles witnesses this blooming activity, by reporting on i) the design of new molecular building blocks that impart new structures and functions, ii) the expansion to new types of self-assembly processes, which affect the dynamic feature of the corresponding adaptive materials, iii) our understanding, modelling and characterization of the mechanism of self-assembly, and iv) on the application of these smart systems in a wide range of area from biomedicine to material science.

Food Engineering, science, technology, and nutrition

Angela Meireles. RSC Advances Associate Editor RSCGuest-edited by RSC Advances Associate Editor Professor Maria Angela A. Meireles, this collection features research with the area of food engineering, science, technology, and nutrition, illustrating the multidisciplinary aspects of this field that produces exciting research.

The collection shows a fascinating relationship between the various fields involved in the subject area of food. From articles that deal with the cultivation, livestock, etc. to articles dealing with the effects of metabolites in the human gut microbiota including articles on new sources of fibers and other bioactive compounds.

Physical chemistry of colloids and interfaces

Guest-edited by RSC Advances Associate Editor Dr Juan J. Giner-Casares, this collection features exciting research with the core in physical chemistry of interfaces, illustrating a vibrant field that in itself produces stimulating research.

The physical chemistry of colloids and interfaces is enjoying a fruitful interaction with a vast number of fields; joint ventures with the biomedical discipline constitute undoubtedly a prominent topic, in which chemical and biomedical researchers highly benefit from each other. There are also many other subjects that profit from interactions with physical chemistry.

Antimicrobial polymers

Roberto Rosal, RSC Advances Associate Editor, Antimicrobial polymersGuest-edited by RSC Advances Associate Editor Professor Roberto Rosal, this collection features remarkable contributions on antimicrobial polymers published in the journal and aims to highlight recent work published on the design, characterization, and efficiency of antimicrobial polymers.

Antimicrobial polymers are materials aimed at inhibiting or killing different types of microorganisms. The importance of developing new antimicrobial substances and materials arises from the health problem posed by multidrug-resistant microbes.

This set of articles describes some recent developments on the use of different types of antimicrobial polymers. They include antimicrobial nanomaterials, antimicrobial fibres and surfaces and drug-delivery systems with a focus on potentially pathogenic bacterial strains.

 Photodynamic therapy

Fabienne Dumoulin, RSC Advances Associate Editor, Royal Society of ChemistryThis collection, guest-edited by Associate Editor Dr Fabienne Dumoulin (Gebze Technical University), features articles published in the journal from 2018 on photodynamic therapy that comprise biological experiments. As an alternative therapeutic modality, recognised as an efficient way to treat not only several cancers but also infections, it has inspired the development of different treatment strategies.

The collection reflects the variety of photosensitising systems, and the significant amount of nanophotosensitisers, including carbon nanomaterials. Various targeted approaches are being developed; theranostics are significantly expanding, as well as synergistic effects and specific activation in the tumour microenvironment. Related photothermal and sonodynamic therapies, even at less mature development stages, have proved their efficiency. Photochemical internalisation is also an excellent means to improve drug delivery and drug efficiency. Photodynamic therapy is undoubtedly a valuable way to save lives, and this collection aims at highlighting its achievements and promises.

Carbon Dioxide Capture/Reduction

This collection is edited by Associate Editor Professor Carlos D. Garcia (Clemson University) and contains selected Reviews, Communications and full Papers published since 2018. The collection features the most remarkable contributions published in the journal and aims to highlight recent work published and raise awareness of the most current strategies to mitigate the impact of CO2 on the atmosphere.

These articles describe strategies to either promote the capture of CO2 or its reduction to yield organic compounds of higher value (methane, methanol, carbon monoxide, and short-chain organic acids). Although most of these articles describe clever chemical reactivity, their main focus ranges from biomimetic approaches to electrochemistry and photocatalysis.

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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RSC Advances Science Communications: Power and safety – a controversial drama between the properties of energetic materials

From gunpowder to modern energetic materials, the so-called science of explosive research has renovated the potential capability to discover a wide range of novel energetic materials exclusively used in both military and civilian sectors. However, the controversial drama between the properties of energetic materials, namely, the power-safety contradiction, constitutes a great challenge in the design of new energetic materials. The desired energetic materials need to be balanced between these two inherently contradicting properties, which restricts their usage in practical applications, even though many energetic materials are synthesized every year.

Structure-properties-performance inter-relationship of BTO-based energetic materials

In order to obtain a fine balance between the properties of energetic materials, we have studied how the microstructures and intermolecular interactions influence the macroscopic behaviour of explosives. With the help of large-scale clusters, a broad range of theory, modelling and simulations, we have been able to understand the potential capabilities of energetic materials for possible real time applications.

Most of the energetic solids that I have studied are molecular crystals held together by inter-molecular interactions. By smartly incorporating the energetic groups as proton acceptors, we could form the strong hydrogen bonding networks crucial for the construction of high energy density materials. As improved intra- and intermolecular interactions tightly pack the crystal and thereby reduces its volume, the density and stability of the energetic materials is enhanced. This is therefore a highly efficient strategy to improve the performance and stability of explosives. The main objective of our studies is to understand the fundamental physical and chemical properties and the thermodynamic equation of the state of energetic crystals.

My focus is on the understanding of various properties of solid energetic materials using van der Waals density functional methods, including van der Waals interactions, structural stability, pressure induced structural phase transformations and vibrational properties of green energetic materials. In our recent work on a series of 5,5′-bitetrazole-1,1′-diolate based energetic ionic salts, we were able to provide a precise correlation between intermolecular interactions and impact sensitivity of energetic materials, in combination with molecular stability that can be set as a base for molecular and crystal design. In 2018, this work was recognized as a HOT article published in PCCP (1) and more recently, our research demonstrating the importance of high pressure studies was published in RSC Advances (2). Overall, our approach may provide a fundamental knowledge in designing the next-generation explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics prior to the actual experiments.

References:

  1. Moses Abraham, Vikas D. Ghule and G. Vaitheeswaran, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 20, 29693, 2018
  2. Moses Abraham, RSC Adv., 2020,10, 24867-24876

About the Web Writer:

Dr. B. Moses Abraham recently received his Ph.D from the University of Hyderabad, India. He obtained a Bachelor of Science degree from Noble College, Machilipatnam, which is one of the first four educational institutions opened in India by the British Government in 1843.  Moses Abraham has been inducted as an Associate Member in Royal Society of Chemistry. His recent work on BTO-based energetic salts was recognized as HOT article for the year 2018 by Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. He has received various prestigious travel grants including the Royal Society of Chemistry and Science and Engineering Research Board travel grants to present his research on international scientific platforms. You can find him on Twitter @mosesabrahamb.

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Meet RSC Advances Associate Editors: Editor Viewpoints

Professor Feng Zhao

Editor viewpoints: Continuing to contribute to the scientific community under lockdown

In the first of a new series, Professor Feng Zhao tells us that greatest reward for being Associate Editor of RSC Advances is seeing manuscripts become high-profile papers on the international stage.

 

 

Dr Qin Wang Picture: © Edwin Remsberg

 

Editor viewpoints: Maintaining quality, consistency and impact through difficult times

Dr Qin Wang, Associate Editor of RSC Advances, tells us about her role, and shares her thoughts on the impact of the current pandemic on the future of research.

 

 

 

Professor Manojit Pal

Editor viewpoints: Choose RSC Advances for fast publication, global reach and high impact

Maintaining high standards and communicating decisions to authors promptly is key, says Professor Manojit Pal.

 

 

 

Dr Pablo Denis

 

Editor Viewpoints: Keeping the planets aligned during difficult times

Dr Pablo Denis, Associate Editor of RSC Advances, talks to us about his research, and his advice for authors submitting their work.

 

 

Dr Donna Arnold

 

Witnessing wonderful, innovative and exciting science”: an associate editor’s insight

Dr Donna Arnold, Associate Editor of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s RSC Advances, believes it’s vital that scientists contribute to their community by getting involved in the process of publishing high quality research.

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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RSC Advances Science Communications: Recycling ideas – from the ionic liquids to the reuse of agricultural waste

When I set out to write this blog, I thought of a laboratory story to be able to share with readers the experience from the generation of ideas to the final results, but I decided to share how my desire to work in a laboratory, my little “scientific history”, to introduce you from the beginning the theme that I am beginning to develop today. It all started in the year 2000 when at school we carried out a project called “Proyecto Ecológico”, which aimed to treat solid household waste, to reduce urban pollution in my hometown of Villa Valeria and raise awareness among the population that the waste generated can be reused.

This project lasted only two years, but for me it lasted a lifetime, because it was the reason why I chose a profession related to the natural sciences and the environment. My first scientific steps were in the area of green chemistry, studying ionic liquids, but in the search to develop a more applied theme and to solve environmental problems that currently concern my country, I decided to work with dairy farm wastes to generate organic amendments, which enable the recovery and improvement of productive soils.

Considering that dairy activity is very important in Argentina, ranking as 2nd producer of milk in Latin America and 11th worldwide, but it generates a lot of waste, so that it is a constant concern. Only 17% of these are disposed as fertilizer to some kind of crop or pasture, while the rest is discarded without being treated, being very dangerous for the environment, since they contaminate both to the ground and to the watersheds. But if these wastes are treated, they can add value, and instead of being pollutants, they become recuperators and soil improvers. In this way, said agricultural production would be more sustainable.

The objectives of my research work are to compost with the solid fraction of dairy farm wastes, for the generation of organic amendments of agricultural quality. Then determine the physicochemical characteristics, the composition and classify the quality of the amendments generated, and evaluate the effect of its application to agricultural use soils. And finally, to generate areas of dissemination of the results obtained, both with producers, technicians, professionals and companies in the agricultural sector, as with the scientific community, so I started writing this blog. I wanted to start by sharing my little “scientific history”, to show that the dreams and vocations that one has been building since childhood should never be abandoned because they forge us as professionals. Soon I will be sharing the first results obtained from this research.

About the Web Writer:

Cristian M. O. Lépori is Doctor in Chemical Sciences and currently has a postdoctoral position at the “Enrique Gaviola” Institute of Physics, CONICET, National University of Córdoba (Argentina). He works in the area of nuclear magnetic resonance studying hybrid materials formed with porous matrices and ionic liquids for use in lithium batteries. He likes to plan, organize and carry out science dissemination activities. You can find him on Twitter at @cristianlepo.

 

 

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Open call: Web Writers!

Are you interested in scientific writing? Would you like to write about chemistry on the journal blog?

We would like to invite PhD students and postdocs in the chemical sciences to write pieces for the RSC Advances blog. This is an opportunity for those interested in practicing their skills in scientific writing/communicating science effectively with a broader audience. We would be happy to consider publishing contributions on a range of topics related to chemistry.

Suggested topics are stories on:

  • articles published in the journal
  • “the story” behind the science
  • the breakthroughs in my research field
  • the process of writing a scientific article – from idea to manuscript
  • workshops and conferences
  • a day in the lab

The length of a story would ideally be approximately 300-400 words and the story should be sent to advances-rsc@rsc.org. If your story is selected for publication, we will ask  for your photo and a short biography to be published together with the blog text.

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RSC Advances HOT articles – a feature interview with Jian-Ping Lang

We are very pleased to introduce Professor Jian-Ping Lang, the corresponding author of the paper Ultrathin sulfate-intercalated NiFe-layered double hydroxide nanosheets for efficient electrocatalytic oxygen evolution. His article has been very well received and handpicked by our reviewers and handling editors as one of our May HOT articles. Jian-Ping was kind enough to tell us more about the work that went into this article and what he hopes to achieve in the future. You can find out more about the author and their article below and find more HOT articles in our online collection.

Meet the Author

Jian-Ping Lang received his Ph.D. degree in 1993 from Nanjing University. During 1995-2001, he was a postdoc at Nagoya University and at Harvard University working on Mo/Fe/S chemistry related to the FeMoco structure in nitrogenases. In 2001, he returned to Soochow University and was promoted to a full Professor of the College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science. He was promoted as a Chung Kong Scholar Professor by the Ministry of Education of China (2012), a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC) of UK (2014), a Foreign Fellow of European Academy of Sciences (2018) and a Chair Professor of Chemistry at Soochow University (2018). His research interests cover the synthesis, structural chemistry and third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of metal sulfide clusters, photochemical cycloaddition of olefinic ligands within crystalline preformed MOFs, nano-scaled MOFs and other nanomaterials for the transformation of small molecules, and so on. He has published more than 440 research papers in the journals such as Chem. Soc. Rev., JACS, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. and applied 25 Chinese patents. Currently he is working as the vice-chairman of Academic Degree Evaluation Committee and vice-director of Academic board of Soochow University. He is also serving as the vice-chairman of Crystal Chemistry Specialized Committee of Chinese Chemical Society, a member of Inorganic Chemistry Disciplinary Committee of Chinese Chemical Society and a member of Molecular Sieve Specialized Committee of Chinese Chemical Society. He was awarded the Distinguished Young Scholar Fund by the National Natural Science Foundation, the second prizes of the Science and Technology Advancement of Jiangsu Province (2010), and Natural Science by Ministry of Education of China (2011). He is a member of International Advisory Board of Dalton Transactions (2010-date) and an Editorial Board Member of Scientific Reports of Springer Nature Limited (2015-date).

Picture of the research group (group leader: Jian-Ping Lang)

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?
Our article introduced a facile and promising method for the synthesis and modification of ultrathin NiFe-layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as the highly efficient oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrocatalysts.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
Compared with traditional synthetic methods, our results demonstrated that ultrathin NiFe-LDHs can be directly prepared without adding additive (alkali, surfactant), and even large-scale synthesis of such LDHs can also be achieved. Moreover, we revealed the influence of solvent water and sulfate ion on the morphology and electrocatalytic performance of our NiFe-LDHs through a series of detailed structural and electrochemical characterization, which provided a new insight into the design and preparation of LDHs and other 2D lamellar materials.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
•Current commercial OER electrocatalysts mostly focus on precious metal materials, but the scarcity and high cost greatly hinder their large-scale synthesis and application.
•Although the reported NiFe-LDHs possess good performance for OER, the facile and efficient large-scale synthesis of ultrathin nanosheets with uniform morphology represents a highly challenging job.
•Considering the negative effect of additives (alkali, surfactant) on the active sites of the electrocatalyst, our initial design idea was direct control of the morphology of NiFe-LDHs through solvents (H2O) or anions (SO42-), thereby ensuring the cleanliness of the as-prepared catalyst surface.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
Well, to conduct such a study, we must precisely regulate the reaction conditions of NiFe-LDHs. This includes the type and ratio of the metal salt selected, the combination of mixed solvents, reaction temperature and time, pH, etc. The whole reaction process involves multiple variables, and thus the key to design considerations is to find the optimal synthesis conditions of ultrathin NiFe-LDHs nanosheets.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
Overall, except for the fine characterization of the electrocatalyst, we consider the study of catalytic mechanisms to be the most challenging, especially the in-situ changes in the structure of NiFe-LDHs during the catalytic process and the determination of the active sites.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
We have acquired a simple and promising method for synthesizing ultrathin LDHs nanosheets. In particular, we are very excited about the universality of the synthesis of different two-dimensional materials that are widely used in the field of energy storage and conversion.

What is the next step? What work is planned?
Regarding the work related to the present article, the first thing we are going to do is to explore specific reaction process, focusing on the corresponding relationship between structure and performance of the electrocatalysts. Besides, we are currently examining the universality of this synthetic strategy, such as the synthesis of ultrathin MOFs materials.

 

Ultrathin sulfate-intercalated NiFe-layered double hydroxide nanosheets for efficient electrocatalytic oxygen evolution
Xiao-Xiao Jiang, Jiang-Yan Xue, Zhong-Yin Zhao, Cong Li, Fei-Long Li, Chen Cao, Zheng Niu, Hong-Wei Gu and Jian-Ping Lang
RSC Adv., 2020,10, 12145-12150
DOI: 10.1039/D0RA00845A, Paper

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Electrochemistry Northwest 2020, 1st July 2020

RSC Advances is very pleased to be sponsoring the upcoming webinar:  Electrochemistry Northwest 2020 on Wednesday 1st July, 10:00 – 16:00 BST.

The Applied Material Chemistry Group and the Manchester Local Section are delighted to host the 2020 iteration of the Electrochemistry Northwest event on GoToWebinar. Electrochemistry Northwest is an annual meeting of the electrochemistry community, coming together within an informal atmosphere to share their latest research projects and ideas, build collaborations and provide a networking opportunity particularly for early career and PhD students.

The event this year will discuss the latest developments in fundamental and applied electrochemistry, with a focus on advanced materials and energy storage. Dr Mark Symes (University of Glasgow) and Professor Angel Cuesta (University of Aberdeen) have confirmed as a plenary speakers. Find out more here.

Registration Deadline: 30th June

Register today for free!

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Challenges in the Recycling of Lithium-Ion Batteries Webinar

RSC Advances is very pleased to be sponsoring the upcoming webinar:  Challenges in the Recycling of Lithium-Ion Batteries on Monday 6th July, 15:00 – 17:00 BST.

This webinar is hosted by the Applied Materials Chemistry Group for all members to discover and discuss the challenges faced in the recycling and recovery of lithium-ion batteries. With the increase in uptake of electric vehicles, the intended pathway towards greener transportation will inevitably spring up waste and recycling issues for batteries, as well as resource depletion issues for critical raw materials such as lithium. The webinar will discuss the current waste and recycling industry for batteries, share information on the latest research in lithium-ion battery recycling and set challenges in the field for researchers to adopt in the pursuit of a greener future. You can find out more here.

Speakers:

Dr Linda Gaines, Argonne National Laboratory, United Kingdom
Evi Petavratzi, British Geological Survey, United Kingdom
Professor Andrew Abbott, Faraday Institute, University of Leicester, United Kingdom

Registration Deadline: 3rd July

Register today – Free! 

 

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RSC Advances HOT articles – a feature interview with Laura Orian

We are very pleased to introduce Laura Orian, the corresponding author of the paper Fluoxetine scaffold to design tandem molecular antioxidants and green catalysts. Her article has been very well received and handpicked by our reviewers and handling editors as one of our May HOT articles. Laura was kind enough to tell us more about the work that went into this article and what she hopes to achieve in the future. You can find out more about the author and their article below and find more HOT articles in our online collection.

Meet the Author

Laura Orian graduated cum laude and got her PhD in Chemical Sciences at the University of Padova in the Theoretical Chemistry group. She is currently Associate Professor of Physical Chemistry in Padova. Her research interest aims at elucidating central physical phenomena in chemistry rooted in the properties of atoms, molecules, and materials. A deep rationalization and interpretation of experimental evidence is pursued through improvement of the fundamental description of chemical systems (chemical theory), and the applications of new and existing techniques to chemical, physical and biological problems (chemical computation), with particular attention to health and sustainability. The ultimate goal of her research is to predict the chemical properties of a chemical system in advance of the experiment, for a rational design of functional molecules and materials assisted by computer.

 

The research team

Giovanni Ribaudo, Marco Bortoli, Alberto Ongaro, Erika Oselladore, Alessandra Gianoncelli and Giuseppe Zagotto

 

Our collaborative research aims at designing novel multi-functional antioxidant bioactive molecules, structurally inspired to known drugs and investigate their mechanism of action. The rationale behind this study relies on the growing pieces of evidence suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress in central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Particularly, our purpose was to modify an existing psychotropic drug in order to enhance its antioxidant potential with positive impact on the medical treatment.

In this paper, we describe the synthesis of some fluoxetine analogues incorporating a selenium nucleus. Selenium is the key oligoelement present in the enzymes involved in the antioxidant endogenous defense system. We have chosen fluoxetine because it is a very important antidepressant, better known with its commercial name ‘Prozac’. The mechanistic details of the enhanced antioxidant potential of our designed compounds were unraveled combining nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and quantum chemistry calculations.

Our collaborative team is composed of researchers with different backgrounds, and the investigation that laid the basis for this paper was carried out combining theoretical, synthetic, and analytical skills. As far as we are concerned, this research work represents an outstanding example of multidisciplinarity, which is itself an intriguing and challenging task.

 

Fluoxetine scaffold to design tandem molecular antioxidants and green catalysts
Giovanni Ribaudo, Marco Bortoli, Alberto Ongaro, Erika Oselladore, Alessandra Gianoncelli, Giuseppe Zagotto and Laura Orian
RSC Adv., 2020,10, 18583-18593
DOI: 10.1039/D0RA03509B, Paper

 

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Surfaces and interfaces – The year in review

Looking back at 2019, we would like to highlight some of the great research that has been published in RSC Advances over the year. We are proud to present a selection of the most popular 2019 articles published on surfaces and interfaces so far.

We hope you enjoy reading these articles – free to read and accessible to everyone.

Happy New Year from the RSC Advances team!

Philic–phobic chemical dynamics of a 1st tier dendrimer dispersed o/w nanoemulsion
Naveen Kumari, Man Singh, Hari Om and K. M. Sachin
RSC Adv., 2019,9, 12507-12519. DOI: 10.1039/c9ra00728h

Hydrogen evolution reaction activity related to the facet-dependent electrocatalytic performance of NiCoP from first principles
Jie Mou, Yuyue Gao, Jingbo Wang, Jianyi Ma and Haisheng Ren
RSC Adv., 2019,9, 11755-11761. DOI: 10.1039/c9ra01560d

Light induced reversible structuring of photosensitive polymer films
Joachim Jelken and Svetlana Santer
RSC Adv., 2019,9, 20295-20305. DOI: 10.1039/c9ra02571e

Light-driven locomotion of a centimeter-sized object at the air–water interface: effect of fluid resistance
Hisato Kawashima, Akihisa Shioi, Richard J. Archer, Stephen J. Ebbens, Yoshinobu Nakamura and Syuji Fujii
RSC Adv., 2019,9, 8333-8339. DOI: 10.1039/c9ra01417a

Adsorption and anticorrosive behavior of aromatic epoxy monomers on carbon steel corrosion in acidic solution: computational studies and sustained experimental studies
Omar Dagdag, Zaki Safi, Hamid Erramli, Omar Cherkaoui, Nuha Wazzan, Lei Guo, Chandrabhan Verma, E. E. Ebenso and Ahmed El Harfi
RSC Adv., 2019,9, 14782-14796. DOI: 10.1039/c9ra01672d

Study of the reaction of ninhydrin with tyrosine in gemini micellar media
Dileep Kumar and Malik Abdul Rub
RSC Adv., 2019,9, 22129-22136. DOI: 10.1039/c9ra03557e

Insight into the DNA adsorption on nitrogen-doped positive carbon dots
Fenglan Li, Qianqian Cai, Xiaoli Hao, Chengfei Zhao, Zhengjun Huang, Yanjie Zheng, Xinhua Lin and Shaohuang Weng
RSC Adv., 2019,9, 12462-12469. DOI: 10.1039/c9ra00881k

The influence of gradient and porous configurations on the microwave absorbing performance of multilayered graphene/thermoplastic polyurethane composite foams
Chaozhi Wang, Jiang Li and Shaoyun Guo
RSC Adv., 2019,9, 21859-21872. DOI: 10.1039/c9ra04735b

The electronic properties and band-gap discontinuities at the cubic boron nitride/diamond hetero-interface
Dehe Zhao, Wei Gao, Yujing Li, Yuyuan Zhang and Hong Yin
RSC Adv., 2019,9, 8435-8443. DOI: 10.1039/c9ra00784a

Acridine-based thiosemicarbazones as novel inhibitors of mild steel corrosion in 1 M HCl: synthesis, electrochemical, DFT and Monte Carlo simulation studies
Ekemini D. Akpan, Ibanga O. Isaac, Lukman O. Olasunkanmi, Eno E. Ebenso and El-Sayed M. Sherif
RSC Adv., 2019,9, 29590-29599. DOI: 10.1039/c9ra04778f

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