Archive for the ‘Article collection’ Category

Editors’ collection: Elegant Synthetic Routes to Indole Derivatives

RSC Advances are delighted to share our latest collection on Elegant Synthetic Routes to Indole Derivatives, guest edited by Dr. Sarbani Pal (MNR Degree and PG College, India) and Associate Editor Prof. Manojit Pal (Dr Reddy’s Institute of Life Sciences, India).

Indoles are attractive targets in organic synthesis because of not only their widespread existences in nature especially in alkaloids but also their importance as privileged structures in Medicinal / Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Drug Discovery. It is not surprising that the indole framework is a commonly found N-heteroarene moiety in many bioactive agents and drugs. Additionally, many indoles served as key precursors to a range of valuable compounds that find applications in various areas of science. Thus, enormous efforts have been devoted for the development of elegant synthetic routes to various indole derivatives or indole based complex structures. This current web collection is mainly a compilation of relevant important and interesting research papers already published in RSC Advances during last 7 years. The major focus of this compilation was on selection of the elegant synthetic methods including single or multi-step approaches, multi-component reactions, transition or other metal catalysed methods, cascade reactions, environmentally friendly approaches etc reported for indole derivatives. The reports on simple or mere derivatization / functionalization of indole ring are generally excluded. Some selected papers reporting synthesis as well as biological activities of indole derivatives are also included.

RSC Advances is most cited gold open access journal dedicated to the chemical sciences and all publications in our journal are free to access. We hope you enjoy reading these articles

Featured articles:

TCCA-mediated oxidative rearrangement of tetrahydro-β-carbolines: facile access to spirooxindoles and the total synthesis of (±)-coerulescine and (±)-horsfiline
Manda Sathish, Akash P. Sakla, Fabiane M. Nachtigall, Leonardo S. Santos and Nagula Shankaraiah
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 16537-16546

Dual C–H activation: Rh(iii)-catalyzed cascade π-extended annulation of 2-arylindole with benzoquinone
Qijing Zhang, Qianrong Li and Chengming Wang
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 13030-13033

l-Isoleucine derived bifunctional phosphine catalyses asymmetric [3 + 2]-annulation of allenyl-esters and -ketones with ketimines
Muthukumar G. Sankar, Miguel Garcia-Castro, Christopher Golz, Carsten Strohmann and Kamal Kumar
RSC Adv., 2016,6, 56537-56543

Read the full collection

If you would like to submit your research to this collection, and give your work the global visibility it deserves, you can do so now!

All submissions will be subject to an initial assessment by Associate Editors and, if suitable for the journal, they will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of RSC Advances.

Submit your research

Meet the Editors

Dr. Sarbani Pal (nee Das) is a faculty and Head of the Chemistry Department, MNR Degree and Post-Graduate College, Hyderabad, India. After receiving PhD degree from Jadavpur University, Kolkata (India) in 1996, she joined the Department of Chemistry, M.S. University, Baroda, Gujarat (India) where she worked as a Lecturer in Chemistry (1996–1997). Subsequently, she moved to Hyderabad (India), where she joined the MNR College (affiliated to Osmania University, Hyderabad) and continuing since then. Her research interests include the total synthesis of bicyclic and tricyclic sesquiterpenes, synthesis of organo-ruthenium complexes, click reactions, design and synthesis of anti-inflammatory agents and macrolide antibiotics etc. She has supervised several PhD students, authored / co-authored a book and a book chapter along with more than 60 research papers and 5 review articles in various international journals. She is a recipient of Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters Top 10 Cited Author award for 2011–2012, certificate for being outstanding reviewer for RSC Advances in 2017, Publons peer review awards 2017, certificate for top cited article 2020-2021 from Wiley etc. Her review article on macrolides and ketolides was recognized as a “top-50 most downloaded” article from Tetrahedron on ScienceDirect 2006. She is currently a member of board of Management of MNR University, Hyderabad, India.

 

Prof. Manojit Pal received his PhD degree from Jadavpur University, Kolkata (India) in 1995 under the guidance of Prof. Nitya G. Kundu and then worked in various industrial R & D centres including Alembic, Sun Pharma, Matrix Lab, and Dr Reddy’s Lab Ltd. In 2009, he joined the Dr. Reddy’s Institute of Life Science, Hyderabad and presently continuing as a Senior Professor of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry as well as Chief Scientist of CIMPS Department. He became Associate Editor of RSC Advances in 2015, FRSC in 2016, Adjunct Faculty-Manipal University in 2018 and member of Editorial Board-Bioorganic Chemistry in 2019. He also became invited member of ACS in 2019. His name is featured in Stanford’s list of top 2% scientists in the world 2020. In 2022, he received a certificate for publishing open access articles with Elsevier some of which were linked to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. His research interests include the development of new chemical entities under the new drug discovery programme in various therapeutic areas namely tuberculosis, inflammation, obesity, psoriasis and cancer. The other major areas of his focus include transition metal / non-metal catalysed reactions, sonochemical approaches, green chemistry, heterocycle synthesis etc. He has authored/co-authored more than 280 research publications, as well as 18 review articles, a number of patents, a book chapter and a book. So far he has reviewed more than 1200 manuscripts, a number of PhD thesis from both national and international universities and grant proposals at national and international level.

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RSC Advances Emerging Investigators series 2021 – Author spotlight

Welcome to our Emerging Investigator Series 2021. This series showcases some of the very best work from chemists in the early stages of their independent careers. In keeping with the theme of RSC Advances as a cross-cutting chemistry journal, in this inaugural issue with the help of our Series Editor Professor James Batteas, 23 papers were published as part of the collection spanning the breadth of chemistry on topics ranging from the development and application of analytical tools and devices for chemical analysis, to the design and synthesis of bioactive materials for disease treatments, to catalysis and synthesis of new materials. You can read all about the contributions in this accompanying Editorial, prepared by the 2021 Series Editor James Batteas.

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight an author from the series, Dr. Scott Tsai. We interviewed Scott to find out more about his area of research and his contribution to the series.

An ultrafast enzyme-free acoustic technique for detaching adhered cells in microchannels
Alinaghi Salari, Sila Appak-Baskoy, Imogen R. Coe, Scott S. H. Tsai and Michael C. Kolios
RSC Adv., 2021,11, 32824-32829

Dr. Scott Tsai is the Director of the Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University). His undergraduate training in Mechanical Engineering is from the University of Toronto, and his masters and PhD degrees in Engineering Sciences are from Harvard University. Dr. Tsai’s laboratory specializes in droplet and bubble microfluidics. His group also collaborates actively with hospital researchers to implement these technologies in medical applications related to kidney disease and prostate cancer. Dr. Tsai is a recipient of the United States’ Fulbright Visiting Research Chair Award, Government of Ontario’s Early Researcher Award, and Toronto Metropolitan University’s Deans’ Teaching Award.

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?

Our paper describes an acoustic force technique for detaching cells initially attached to a substrate. This approach is interesting because it is chemical-free, while conventional methods usually utilize enzymatic reactions that can damage the cell membrane.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
The impact may be significant for detaching adherent cells from microfluidic or lab-on-a-chip devices, where, due to the nature of the slow-moving flows, conventional detachment methods require multiple washing steps. Our acoustic technique enables single-step cell detachment.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
Adherent cultured cells are used ubiquitously in laboratories, and most of the time researchers use trypsinization (an enzymatic method) to detach cells from the substrate. We were motivated to create a non-enzymatic approach that detaches cells rapidly.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
We wanted to minimize the duration of the cells’ exposure to acoustic forces. This was realized since, due to the nature of the acoustic perturbation we introduced, the acoustic excitation exposure the cells experienced was greatly reduced as soon as the cells detached from the substrate.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
As a researcher with a background in engineering and physics, I found the most challenging aspect of this work to be figuring out what characteristics of a cell detachment method are important for other researchers. For example, we learned that it was critical to demonstrate the re-attachment ability of the cells, and whether they can spread and regain their original morphology within a short period of time.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
Right now, we are working using a similar approach to generate acoustic microstreaming flows from adherent cells, and using the microstreaming velocity to predict the mechanical properties (like stiffness) of the cells. This is very exciting because existing gold-standard methods for measuring cellular mechanical properties are complicated, and we are developing an approach that can potentially help reduce the complexity.

How has your research evolved from your first article to this particular article?
I was trained as a fluid mechanician, so my first articles were all about fundamental fluid mechanics. Since becoming an independent investigator, and having my lab located in a hospital building, I’ve collaborated a lot more with biological scientists and clinicians, and learned much more about important questions in biology and medicines. Many of my more recent articles feature the application of physics and engineering to address biological questions.

What is the next step? What work is planned?
My lab is continuing our work on microfluidics with microbubbles, acoustics, and aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). For now, we will continue developing these technologies while collaborating with hospital researchers to apply the technologies in pre-clinical and clinical settings.

Why did you want to publish in RSC Advances?
Several RSC journals, including Lab on a Chip, Soft Matter, and RSC Advances, are read broadly by researchers in my field. I wanted to publish in RSC Advances so that my colleagues throughout the world can see and read our article.

What are your thoughts on open access publishing?

I support the principle of open access publishing, but the publishing fees are painful to pay. As a result, I am only able to publish a small fraction of my papers with open access.

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

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RSC Advances Emerging Investigators series 2021 – Author spotlight

Welcome to our Emerging Investigator Series 2021. This series showcases some of the very best work from chemists in the early stages of their independent careers. In keeping with the theme of RSC Advances as a cross-cutting chemistry journal, in this inaugural issue with the help of our Series Editor Professor James Batteas, 23 papers were published as part of the collection spanning the breadth of chemistry on topics ranging from the development and application of analytical tools and devices for chemical analysis, to the design and synthesis of bioactive materials for disease treatments, to catalysis and synthesis of new materials. You can read all about the contributions in this accompanying Editorial, prepared by the 2021 Series Editor James Batteas.

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight an author from the series, Dr Abisola Egbedina. We interviewed Abisola to find out more about her area of research and her contribution to the series.

Green synthesis of ZnO coated hybrid biochar for the synchronous removal of ciprofloxacin and tetracycline in wastewater
Abisola O. Egbedina, Kayode O. Adebowale, Bamidele I. Olu-Owolabi, Emmanuel I. Unuabonah and Morenike O. Adesina
RSC Adv., 2021, 11, 18483-18492

Abisola Egbedina completed her PhD in Industrial Chemistry at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, under the supervision of Professor Kayode Adebowale and Professor Bamidele Olu-Owolabi. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Industrial Chemistry from Bowen University, Iwo, Nigeria (2009) and her master’s degree in Industrial Chemistry from the University of Ibadan (2012). She received the 2017 Commonwealth Science Conference follow-on grant from the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2018 to conduct research at the University of Toronto, Canada, under the supervision of Professor Ya-Huei (Cathy) Chin. Her research interests lie in the synthesis of low-cost and environmentally benign materials for applications in wastewater treatment. Specifically, she focuses on tuning the surface properties of these materials for optimum selectivity and efficiency. Her current research focuses on the synthesis of carbon materials from biomass for the removal of pharmaceuticals and other emerging contaminants from water. She has a number of peer-reviewed publications in international journals. She has also presented some of her research findings at various local and international conferences. Abisola Egbedina was appointed as an Assistant Lecturer in the Department of Chemistry, University of Ibadan in November 2016, and is currently a Lecturer II. Besides teaching and carrying out research, Abisola loves reading novels, watching movies, swimming and dancing.

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?
The goal of the study in the research article was to remove antibiotic contaminants from water sources utilizing an adsorption approach and low-cost, environmentally benign adsorbents.
Antibiotic resistance in organisms has been linked to the presence of these contaminants. Antibiotic resistance is increasing all over the world at an alarming rate, making common infectious diseases such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, blood poisoning and gonorrhoea more difficult to treat. The healthcare system has also been strained because of this. As a result, this research topic is timely since it aids in addressing these issues by looking for strategies to minimize the quantities of these harmful pollutants in the environment.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?
The findings described in the journal are just one in a series of studies that could lead to the identification of a cheaper alternative to activated carbon, which is now the most widely used and also the most expensive. Activated carbon is currently used in wastewater treatment plants and portable drinking water treatment systems. This raises the overall treatment cost due to its high cost. Demonstrating the effectiveness of the adsorbents presented in this work for a wide range of pollutants and their subsequent acceptance could result in lower water treatment costs and greater accessibility to clean water for everyone.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?
In Nigeria, kaolinite clay is the most common clay mineral. However, because it is a 1:1 clay it is non-expandable and hence has a low cation exchange capacity. The notion of mixing it with biomass arose as a result of this. Biomass has been widely used to remove pollutants from aqueous media, but its efficiency is rather low when compared to other materials and it frequently presents the problem of bleeding and separation difficulties. The goal was to see if by combining these two materials, the overall efficiency might be increased. Indeed, because this combination (kaolinite clay and pawpaw seeds) was proven to boost the heavy metal adsorption capability, we chose to use it to remove organic contaminants. We also used coconut husk instead of pawpaw seeds to test how this affected the overall results.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?
The initial priority, I believe, was to develop adsorbents that are more cost-effective and efficient than activated carbon, which is currently the industry standard. We did so by employing a system that ensured appropriate energy and reagent utilization and manufacturing. These are, in my opinion, critical points to examine as the world grapples with the effects of climate change and aims to adjust to conducting research in a “green” manner.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?
The analysis would be the most challenging aspect of the investigation. Accessing modern analytical instruments for the detection of pollutants at concentrations close to those seen in real water systems was not just expensive but unavailable. Finally, we had to use UV-Vis spectroscopy to determine this parameter which is accurate but has a limited detection limit when compared with LC-MS.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
It is a wonderful feeling to finally have your study published and available to millions of people. This comes after months of hard work in the lab and multiple drafts of the manuscript. What excites me most is seeing that others find the work intriguing enough to read. Individuals from all around the world have requested copies of my article. I also look at the number of citations and downloads and feel like I have accomplished something meaningful.

How has your research evolved from your first article to this particular article?
The use of watermelon rind as a stabilizing agent for magnetite for the removal of pollutants from water sources was the subject of my first article. Following that, I have been curious to investigate what additional effects modifying these biomasses with other low-cost and widely available natural materials, such as clay, has on the adsorption of these contaminants. It is envisaged that the modifications will give synergistic enhancement of these materials’ beneficial properties, ultimately resulting in increased adsorption capacity.

What is the next step? What work is planned?
Currently, I am working on a project that entails the application of low-cost adsorbents for the removal of organic contaminants from real-life industrial and hospital effluents to examine how well they perform in real-world environmental conditions. For my postdoctoral research, I am working on a proposal to examine how these adsorbents may be used to clean drinking water in households quickly, efficiently and at a cheap cost. The goal is to provide safe and clean drinking water to individuals at all levels without the need for expensive and time-consuming treatment.

Why did you want to publish in RSC Advances?
I chose RSC Advances because I wanted to publish in a high-quality publication that featured research in all fields of Chemistry, ensuring that my article would reach a wider audience. RSC Advances made it possible for me to publish open access by waiving the article processing charge [this is part of our commitment to waive the article processing charge for corresponding authors based at Research4Life countries, both groups A and B]. My research article’s readership and impact will grow as a result of its open access policy.

What are your thoughts on open access publishing?
Open access publishing, in my opinion, encourages access to free, high-quality and valuable research information, particularly for academics in developing countries who otherwise would be unable to obtain it. Open access, on the other hand, can require authors to pay to have their articles published which might be a problem in circumstances when research is primarily self-funded.

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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RSC Advances Emerging Investigators series 2021 – Author spotlight

Welcome to our Emerging Investigator Series 2021. This series showcases some of the very best work from chemists in the early stages of their independent careers. In keeping with the theme of RSC Advances as a cross-cutting chemistry journal, in this inaugural issue with the help of our Series Editor Professor James Batteas, 23 papers were published as part of the collection spanning the breadth of chemistry on topics ranging from the development and application of analytical tools and devices for chemical analysis, to the design and synthesis of bioactive materials for disease treatments, to catalysis and synthesis of new materials. You can read all about the contributions in this accompanying Editorial, prepared by the 2021 Series Editor James Batteas.

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight an author from the series, Dr. Christine Beemelmanns. We interviewed Christine to find out more about her area of research and her contribution to the series.

GNPS-guided discovery of xylacremolide C and D, evaluation of their putative biosynthetic origin and bioactivity studies of xylacremolide A and B
Felix Schalk, Janis Fricke, Soohyun Um, Benjamin H. Conlon, Hannah Maus, Nils Jäger, Thorsten Heinzel, Tanja Schirmeister, Michael Poulsen and Christine Beemelmanns
RSC Adv., 2021, 11, 18748-18756

Dr. Beemelmanns studied Chemistry at the RWTH Aachen. She then went to Japan for a one year research stay in the group of Prof.  Sodeoka at RIKEN. Back in Germany she worked at the FU Berlin with Prof. Reißig and received her PhD in Organic Chemistry. She then worked another six month in Japan at the University of Tokyo under the supervision of Prof K. Suzuki and joined shortly afterwards the group of Prof. Clardy at Harvard Medical School (Boston) in 2011. End of 2013, she received an offer from the Hans-Knöll Institute (HKI), where she established the Leibniz Junior Research Group in the field of Natural Products Chemistry and Chemical Biology. In 2021 she accepted a call from the Leipzig University for a Professorship Biochemistry of Microbial Physiology. Her research combines different aspects of chemical ecology and organic and natural product chemistry and aims to chemically and functionally characterize microbial signaling and defense molecules in different symbiotic model systems. By analyzing coevolved microbial interactions, unprecedented chemical core structures with potential pharmaceutical application are likely to appear.

Could you briefly explain the focus of your article to the non-specialist (in one or two sentences only) and why it is of current interest?

We are currently facing depleted antibiotic drug pipelines on a global scale. Our research article describes our quest to identify novel antimicrobials from termite symbionts and how they might be made.

How big an impact could your results potentially have?

Our chemical study motivated us to sequence the genome of the producing fungal species and related species. Our first genome mining result allowed us to interlink newly identified natural products with their putative biosynthetic origin and results point towards a promiscuous biosynthetic machinery present within certain fungal lineages.

Could you explain the motivation behind this study?

We were intrigued by the finding that microbes produce most often a bunch of structurally-related products of a promiscuous biosynthetic machinery. Here, we showcase the structural diversity of the natural product family xylacremolide and relate the structural diversity to their biosynthetic origin.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for your study?

It is important to carefully mine metabolomic datasets, and if necessary revisit these datasets if novel and more powerful methodologies become available.

Which part of the work towards this paper proved to be most challenging?

It is very challenging to elucidate the ecological function of isolated produced natural products. Here, we propose that the identified natural products might act as histone deacetylase inhibitors and show their antifungal activities. This suggests that this compound class might act as modulators of transcription and thus developmental processes maybe even within the producer organism.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

Fungal symbionts have undergone multiple adaptions strategies to survive within a highly evolved social insect system. I am very excited about elucidating the genomic and also the metabolic adaptation strategies.

How has your research evolved from your first article to this particular article?

Starting from classical natural product chemistry, we have spearheaded the fungus-fungus interaction-based discovery approaches, which are more and more complemented by comparative genome mining approaches.

What is the next step? What work is planned?

We are currently analyzing the abundance and diversity of the identified biosynthetic pathways to understand their origin but also the reason for their promiscuity. We are currently mining the obtained whole genome data to pin-point biosynthetic pathways to the identified structures.

Why did you want to publish in RSC Advances?

RSC Advances is a well-known peer-reviewed journal of the Royal Chemical Society and allows rapid open-access publication for a fair price.

What are your thoughts on open access publishing?

My research group and collaborators benefit from open access publishing and I support publishing open access.

RSC Advances Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest  Popular Advances articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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RSC Advances Emerging Investigators series 2021 – Meet the Authors

Welcome to our Emerging Investigator Series 2021. This series showcases some of the very best work from chemists in the early stages of their independent careers. In keeping with the theme of RSC Advances as a cross-cutting chemistry journal, in this inaugural issue with the help of our Series Editor Professor James Batteas, we have 23 papers spanning the breadth of chemistry on topics ranging from the development and application of analytical tools and devices for chemical analysis, to the design and synthesis of bioactive materials for disease treatments, to catalysis and synthesis of new materials. You can read all about the contributions in this accompanying Editorial, prepared by the 2021 Series Editor James Batteas.

You can read below the biographies of some of the brilliant authors who have been published in the 2021 collection:

Thiago Regis Longo Cesar da Paixão

Enhanced performance of pencil-drawn paper-based electrodes by laser-scribing treatment

Thiago Regis Longo Cesar da Paixão received a B.Sc. from the Institute of Chemistry of the University of São Paulo in 2001 and became a graduate student at the same institution, where he received his M.Sc. (2004) and Ph.D. (2007). For a year (2008/2009), he was a postdoctoral fellow at the same University. Following his postdoctoral fellowship, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor at the University Federal of ABC, where he stayed for two years. In 2011, he was hired as an assistant professor at the University of São Paulo and promoted to Associate Professor in 2016. At the beginning of 2018, he was nominated as an affiliate member of the Brazilian Academy of Science as a promising young researcher. His fields of interest include chemical sensors, paper-based devices, and electronic tongues aiming at forensic and clinical applications.

Zbigniew Pianowski

Selective release of a potent anticancer agent from a supramolecular hydrogel using green light

Zbigniew Pianowski received his PhD in chemistry in 2008 under the supervision of Prof. Nicolas Winssinger at the ISIS ULP Strasbourg, France, investigating peptide nucleic acids (PNA) – functional oligonucleotide analogues – for templated reactions and catalytic RNA sensing. Then, he joined the group of Prof. Donald Hilvert at the ETH Zürich, Switzerland, as a Marie-Curie postdoctoral fellow. There, he worked in the area of protein engineering, like de novo enzyme design and engineering of protein capsids. Since 2014 he has been an independent group leader at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany, and served as a deputy professor of organic chemistry at the University of Heidelberg (2017-2019). His current research interests are focused on applications of molecular photoswitches in smart materials and biological systems. Within this area, his group intensively explores photochromic supramolecular hydrogels reversibly disassembled with light, their use for light-controlled drug release, and other photopharmacology applications of photochromic cyclic dipeptides.

Darci Trader

Identification of a covalent binder to the oncoprotein gankyrin using a NIR-Based OBOC screening method

Prof. Trader obtained her Ph.D. under the mentorship of Erin E. Carlson while at Indiana University in 2013. She then went on to do a NIH-funded postdoc with Prof. Thomas Kodadek, where she was introduced to proteasome-related research. She began her independent career at Purdue University in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology in 2016. Her lab is focused on furthering the understanding of how small molecules can be used to perturb the activity of the proteasome. Her lab has developed activity probes for both the standard proteasome and immunoproteasome, and is actively applying these probes to discover proteasome inhibitors and stimulators.

Christine Beemelmanns

GNPS-guided discovery of xylacremolide C and D, evaluation of their putative biosynthetic origin and bioactivity studies of xylacremolide A and B

Dr. Beemelmanns studied Chemistry at the RWTH Aachen. She then went to Japan for a one year research stay in the group of Prof.  Sodeoka at RIKEN. Back in Germany she worked at the FU Berlin with Prof. Reißig and received her PhD in Organic Chemistry. She then worked another six month in Japan at the University of Tokyo under the supervision of Prof K. Suzuki and joined shortly afterwards the group of Prof. Clardy at Harvard Medical School (Boston) in 2011. End of 2013, she received an offer from the Hans-Knöll Institute (HKI), where she established the Leibniz Junior Research Group in the field of Natural Products Chemistry and Chemical Biology. In 2021 she accepted a call from the Leipzig University for a Professorship Biochemistry of Microbial Physiology. Her research combines different aspects of chemical ecology and organic and natural product chemistry and aims to chemically and functionally characterize microbial signaling and defense molecules in different symbiotic model systems. By analyzing coevolved microbial interactions, unprecedented chemical core structures with potential pharmaceutical application are likely to appear.

Abisola Egbedina

Green synthesis of ZnO coated hybrid biochar for the synchronous removal of ciprofloxacin and tetracycline in wastewater

Abisola Egbedina is a PhD student in Industrial Chemistry at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria under the supervision of Professor Kayode Adebowale and Professor Bamidele Olu-Owolabi. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Industrial Chemistry from Bowen University, Iwo, Nigeria (2009) and her master’s degree in Industrial Chemistry from the University of Ibadan (2012). She received the 2017 Commonwealth Science Conference follow-on grant from the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2018 to conduct research at the University of Toronto, Canada under the supervision of Professor Ya-Huei (Cathy) Chin.

Her research interests lie in the synthesis of low-cost and environmentally benign materials for applications in wastewater treatment. Specifically, she focuses on tuning the surface properties of these materials for optimum selectivity and efficiency. Her current research focuses on the synthesis of carbon materials from biomass for the removal of pharmaceuticals and other emerging contaminants from water. She has a number of peer-reviewed publications in international journals. She has also presented some of her research findings at various local and international conferences.

Abisola Egbedina was appointed as an Assistant Lecturer in the Department of Chemistry, University of Ibadan in November 2016, and is currently a Lecturer II. Besides teaching and carrying out research, Abisola loves reading novels, watching movies, swimming and dancing.

Kishor Sarkar

RAFT polymerization mediated core–shell supramolecular assembly of PEGMA-co-stearic acid block co-polymer for efficient anticancer drug delivery

Dr. Kishor Sarkar was awarded PhD in Polymer Science and Technology from University of Calcutta, India in August 2014. In 2016, he has joined as Assistant Professor in the Department of Polymer Science and Technology, University of Calcutta in June 2016. Before joining here, he worked as postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, USA (May 2015-April 2016). He was awarded Dr. D.S. Kothari Postdoctoral Fellowship in India and carried out his postdoctoral work under Prof. Giridhar Madras, Department of Chemical Engineering and Dr. Kaushik Chatterjee, Dept. Of Materials Engineering, IISc, Bangalore, India from Nov. 2013 to March 2015. Dr. Sarkar has broad background in Polymer Chemistry with specific training and expertise on the development of polymeric non-viral vectors for gene therapy application. After joining as Assistant Professor, Dr. Sarkar received Early Career Research Award from SERB, Govt. of India in March 2017. Presently, the main research area of Dr. Sarkar focuses on the development of efficient polymeric vector for drug delivery or gene therapy application and synthesis of novel biopolymers from recycled plastic wastes for Tissue Engineering applications.

Michiel Dusselier

On the key role of aluminium and other heteroatoms during interzeolite conversion synthesis

Prof. Michiel Dusselier obtained his Ph.D. degree in Bioscience Engineering (Catalytic Technology, 2013) at KU Leuven, Belgium, with Bert Sels, inventing new catalytic routes for bioplastics synthesis. In 2014–15, he did postdoctoral work with Mark Davis at Caltech, studying the synthesis of zeolites and methanol-to-olefins. In 2017, he accepted a tenure track professorship at KU Leuven and co-founded the new Center for Sustainable Catalysis and Engineering (CSCE) in 2019. He is focusing on zeolite synthesis methods, reactor design, functional biodegradable plastics and heterogeneous catalysis (CO2 activation). In particular, he is enthusiastic about elaborate synthesis-structure-activity relations and bottom-up catalyst design. He has (co)authored over 60 peer-reviewed papers and 7 patents, of which one transferred to industry. He is the holder of an ERC starting Grant (2020) called Z-EURECA, studying unusual reactors for zeolite synhtesis. In 2021, he received the alumni award in applied sciences of the Belgian American Educational Foundation.

Erin Leitao

The photophysical properties of naphthalene bridged disilanes

Dr Erin Leitao obtained her BSc degree in Chemistry from the University of Victoria (BC, Canada) in 2006.  Her final project, with Prof Scott McIndoe, involved the synthesis of electrospray active distannoxane catalysts.  Erin’s PhD degree was awarded from the University of Calgary (Alberta, Canada) in 2011 and was supervised by Prof Warren Piers. Her research project investigated the decomposition and re-design of an olefin metathesis catalyst. Erin was then a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Postdoctoral Research Fellow with Prof Ian Manners at the University of Bristol (UK) where she transitioned into researching catalysis of main-group compounds as well as polymer self-assembly. Erin has been at the University of Auckland for six years and in 2016 she was the NZ recipient of the L-Oréal-UNESCO for Women in Science fellowship. Members of the Leitao lab are working towards the synthesis of new main-group molecules and materials using catalysis.

Chandra Sekhar Tiwary

Development of a schwarzite-based moving bed 3D printed water treatment system for nanoplastic remediation

Chandra Sekhar Tiwary is a professor at Department of metallurgical and materials engineering, at Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur India. After receiving his Ph.D from Indian Institute of Science Bangalore India. He worked as postdoc at Rice University, Houston, USA. His group works on 3D printing, 2D materials, nanomaterials, development of new alloys and its applications in environment, energy, electronics and catalysis etc. Based on his contributions, all three Academies of India (Indian National Science Academy, National Science Academy, India and Indian National Academy of Engineers) awarded him the Young Scientist Awards. Apart from this, the Ministry of Steel, India, has awarded him the Young Metallurgist of the year 2020 for his contributions to metal research. Electron microscopy society of India has recognized his contribution to electron microscopy and awarded him the Excellent Microscopist of 2020. He has been also awarded the Alain Reza Yavari Young/Junior Scientist Award -International Society of ISMANAM and many more. For carrying out cutting-edge research in India, the Department of Science and Technology, India, has awarded Prof. Tiwary the Ramanujan Fellowship in 2018.

Jiangshui Luo

Phase-dependent dielectric properties and proton conduction of neopentyl glycol

Dr. Jiangshui Luo has been a Professor in College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University in China since 2020, where he is the Head of the team of Electrolytes and Phase Change Materials. He has been appointed by Sichuan province as a distinguished expert since 2021. He has also been appointed by KU Leuven in Belgium as a visiting professor.

He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Xiamen University and Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, respectively. From 2008 and 2011, he worked as a project researcher on high temperature electrolytes in EWE Research Center for Energy Technology in Germany. He completed his PhD study on protic salt electrolytes for fuel cells in KU Leuven within 2 years in November 2012.

His research interest includes electrolytes, phase change materials, electrocatalysts, heat transfer fluids, solid-state refrigeration, isotope effects and scientometrics. So far, he has published 52 journal papers and holds 10 patents. He proposed and demonstrated protic organic ionic plastic crystals (POIPCs) as a novel type of proton conductors for fuel cells. He has been the PI of 7 national projects and received several governmental awards. He is an Editorial Board Member of Journal of Ionic Liquids.

Daniel A. Heredia

Photoactive antimicrobial coating based on a PEDOT-fullerene C60 polymeric dyad

Daniel A. Heredia is an Adjunct Researcher of CONICET at National University of Río Cuarto (UNRC). He graduated in 2009 with a BSc and he received his PhD degree in material science and electrochemistry in 2014 from UNRC. He obtained a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Institute of Chemistry of Rosario, where he did research into the total synthesis of structurally relevant natural products. He was visiting researcher at Complutense University of Madrid, at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH and at Arizona State University. His interests are wide, ranging from organic synthesis to the development of new materials and their photophysical characterization. His current research activities focus on the synthesis of organic materials to apply in photodynamic inactivation and optoelectronic devices.

Frank Hahn

Cross-linking of a polyketide synthase domain leads to a recyclable biocatalyst for chiral oxygen heterocycle synthesis

Frank studied Chemistry at the Universities of Karlsruhe, Paris VI and Bonn and finished his PhD on solid phase synthesis and biological evaluation of polyamines in 2008. He then moved to the University of Cambridge (UK) to study polyketide biosynthetic pathways with Prof. Peter F. Leadlay. In 2011, he returned to Germany to start his independent career at the Leibniz University Hannover, where he became leader of a DFG-funded Emmy Noether Research Group in 2013. In 2016, he moved to his current position as a Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Bayreuth. His research interests are in the fields of natural product synthesis and biosynthesis as well as the biotechnological exploitation of the microbial secondary metabolism.

David J. Lewis

Preparation of solution processed photodetectors comprised of two-dimensional tin(ii) sulfide nanosheet thin films assembled via the Langmuir–Blodgett method

David J. Lewis (DJL, h = 31) is Deputy Head of Department, Head of Research & Reader in Materials Chemistry in the Department of Materials at The University of Manchester, UK. DJL leads a research group actively researching soft processing and applications of nanostructured and low-dimensional materials broadly related to energy generation. DJL’s research has led to over 100 publications and he has been the recipient of funding from EPSRC and The Royal Society as well as a number of industrially-sponsored grants. In 2021 he was elected by Members and Fellows to serve on the RSC Materials Chemistry Division council for 3 years.

Binju Wang

The molecular mechanism of P450-catalyzed amination of the pyrrolidine derivative of lidocaine: insights from multiscale simulations

Binju Wang obtained his PhD in 2012 from Xiamen University in China. After two periods of post-doctoral research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel (with Prof. Sason Shaik) and Universitat de Barcelona, Spain (with Prof. Carme Rovira), he joined Xiamen University in 2018 as a full professor. His current research interest focuses on the use of multiscale modeling to decipher the catalytic mechanisms of metalloenzymes, including O2 and H2O2 activations, electronic state and spin-state reactivities, protein environment effects, as well as the rational design of metalloenzymes for biocatalysis. Professor Wang has published over 50 peer reviewed publications.

Scott Tsai

An ultrafast enzyme-free acoustic technique for detaching adhered cells in microchannels

Dr. Scott Tsai is the Director of the Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University). His undergraduate training in Mechanical Engineering is from the University of Toronto, and his masters and PhD degrees in Engineering Sciences are from Harvard University. Dr. Tsai’s laboratory specializes in droplet and bubble microfluidics. His group also collaborates actively with hospital researchers to implement these technologies in medical applications related to kidney disease and prostate cancer. Dr. Tsai is a recipient of the United States’ Fulbright Visiting Research Chair Award, Government of Ontario’s Early Researcher Award, and Toronto Metropolitan University’s Deans’ Teaching Award.

Daniel Globisch

Investigation of the individual human sulfatome in plasma and urine samples reveals an age-dependency

Daniel Globisch is an Associate Professor in Analytical Chemistry at Uppsala University. He studied Chemistry at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern (Germany) and the University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark). He received his Ph.D. from the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (Germany) with Professor Thomas Carell in March 2011 and joined the laboratory of Professor Kim D. Janda at The Scripps Research Institute (CA, USA) for his postdoctoral studies for 4.5 years. He started his independent career in September 2015 at Uppsala University (Sweden) after recruitment as a Science For Life Laboratory Fellow. He was appointed as Associate Professor in 2017 and joined the Department of Chemistry – BMC after securing a tenured position in December 2020. Daniel has been elected as a board member of the Nordic Metabolomics Society for two terms and as an Editorial Board Member for the metabolomics society journal Metabolites. The interdisciplinary nature of his research projects is focused on the elucidation of the metabolic interaction between the gut microbiota and their human host. Towards this goal, his laboratory develops new Chemical Biology tools to extend the scope of metabolomics research for the selective discovery of unknown biomarkers and bioactive metabolites.

Tangxin Xiao

Efficient artificial light-harvesting system constructed from supramolecular polymers with AIE property

Tangxin Xiao was born in China in 1987. He obtained his B.Sc. degree in chemistry from Hubei Normal University in 2009. Then he joined the laboratory of Prof. Leyong Wang at Nanjing University and got his Ph.D. in supramolecular chemistry in 2014. After postdoctoral research on fine chemicals at Zhejiang University-NHU Company United R&D Center, he joined Changzhou University in 2017, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2020. Between March 2021 and June 2022, he worked as a visiting scholar in Prof. Oren Scherman group at University of Cambridge. His current research interests concern the supramolecular chemistry and luminescent materials. He has co-authored more than 50 publications with a total citation of more than 2700 times and his H-index is 23.

Xiao-Yu Hu

Influence of water-soluble pillararene hosts on Kemp elimination

Xiao-Yu Hu obtained her Ph.D. in pharmaceutical chemistry from the Chengdu Institute of Biology (CAS) in 2011. After postdoctoral research with Prof. Leyong Wang, she joined Nanjing University as an associate research professor in 2013. In 2016, she joined University of Duisburg-Essen as a senior AvH Fellow (“The Humboldt Fellowship for Experienced Researcher”) working with Prof. Carsten Schmuck. Since 2018, she has been appointed as the Full Professor of Organic Chemistry at Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Her current research interests are focused on supramolecular self-assembly and functional supramolecular materials. She is currently the associate editor of Frontiers in Chemistry, and an editorial board member of Chinese Chemical Letters, Green Synthesis & Catalysis, and Molecules.

She has authored and coauthored over 100 research publications, including Nat. Commun., J. Am. Chem. Soc., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., Acc. Chem. Res., CCS Chem. and so on. Moreover, has received many grants and awards, including the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province for Outstanding Young Scholar, the Humboldt Fellowship for Experienced Researcher, the Science and Technology Award of Jiangsu Province, the National New Star Award in Supramolecular Chemistry of Aromatic Macrocycles, and the Teaching and Research Achievement Award of Jiangsu Province.

 

 

We would like to give a huge thank you to Series Editor James Batteas, Associate Editors and to all our reviewers at RSC Advances for their ongoing support and contribution, helping us to bring together such a fantastic collection of articles.

 

Looking forward: Emerging Investigator Series 2022!

We are pleased to announce the Series Editors of the next Emerging Investigator series of 2022: Fabienne Dumoulin and Shirley Nakagaki, and we can’t wait to see what the next early career investigators have been working on in Chemistry! Selection for the Emerging Investigators series comes in part from the recommendations of our Editorial Board as well as our Associate Editors. Authors can also self-nominate for participation and review by our Associate Editors for the journal, articles can be submitted to the series at any time and will be accepted and published throughout the year.

If you would like to be involved in our up coming series, please look at our webpage here for more information or submit now!

For any questions do not hesitate to contact us at advances-rsc@rsc.org

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest Popular Advances, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Advancing with Advances- How to publish and not perish (Part 2)

Why did in-house editors reject my paper? 

From the perspective of two staff editors at RSC Advances

Research papers submitted to RSC Advances are subject to initial quality checks by in-house editors before they are passed on to our expert Associate Editors for assessment.  This week we are going to take a peek behind the curtain of the editing team at RSC Advances and see how in-house editors reject papers that do not meet the journal’s criteria.

Editors first check whether a manuscript is within the scope of the journal as described on the journal website. Papers published in RSC Advances must present insights that advance the chemistry field or be of interest to chemists.  Most of the manuscripts we reject for being out of scope may contain some chemistry (for example, a chemical compound used as a drug or for drug delivery) but with the primary scientific advance in a different field such as pharmacology, statistics, genetics, etc. Manuscripts that are out of the scope of the journal are rejected without peer-review no matter how sound the science is.

Once editors are satisfied that the paper fits within the scope of the journal, we go through your manuscript to ensure that all relevant and correct documents for submission are present. All our experimental data reporting requirements can be found online. The emails we most frequently send as editors are those requesting authors for supporting data as what was supplied did not meet our requirements. We cannot publish papers where the data provided does not meet our data standards. For example, all Western blot and other electrophoresis data should be supported by the underlying uncropped and unprocessed raw images, all new small molecule crystal data must be present in the  CIF (Crystallographic Information File) format, etc.

Burlington House, London (Headquarters of the Royal Society of Chemistry)

In addition, do keep in mind good publishing practices and follow the ethical guidelines that we have listed on our Author hub. Key points to keep in mind are:

  1. Make sure you address the scope of the paper in your cover letter or in your bibliography by citing previous work from the same journal and/or similar journals.
  2. Use your own words to describe previous work and experiments, and make that sure all your references are correct.
  3. Avoid making unsupported claims about your findings and provide all data supporting your findings either in the main paper or in the Electronic Supplementary Information. The Royal Society of Chemistry also strongly encourages authors to deposit the data underpinning their research in appropriate repositories.
  4. Only submit your manuscript to one journal at a time.

Thomas Graham House, Cambridge (where Royal Society of Chemistry Publishing is based)

If your paper has already been peer-reviewed at another Royal Society of Chemistry journal, please make sure to address the previous reviewer comments and revise the paper before submitting it to RSC Advances (and preferably include the point-by-point response to the previous referee comments as well). We feel that it is very important that the time and efforts of our reviewers are duly acknowledged in this manner, and this process should also help to improve the quality of work published in our journals. Be firm yet diplomatic in your responses to referee comments (even if the referees are confrontational).  There is nothing to be gained in responding aggressively, even if you are sure you are right.  Even if the referee reports are very negative, your paper may still be accepted if the Editor is convinced by your rebuttal letter.

In-house editors support external expert Associate Editors in their handling of papers, but we also support authors too. If you have any queries about data or scope pre- or post- submission of your paper, please do get in touch with the journal and we will be happy to help.

We hope that we have provided some clarity about why in-house editors at RSC Advances reject papers and what can be done to avoid this in any future submissions!

Tune in next week for interviews with three of our Associate Editors where they discuss their most common reasons for rejecting manuscripts and reveal their best publishing tips!

You are welcome to send in any questions you have about peer-review or publishing to advances-rsc@rsc.org or post them on Twitter @RSCAdvances #AdvancingWithAdvances.

 

 

 

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Advancing with Advances- How to publish and not perish (Part 1)

Why did the editor reject my manuscript? 

Guest post by Professor Robert Baker, Trinity College Dublin

Most of the readers of this blog are driven by curiosity. The question “why?” is something we have at the forefront of our scientific endeavours. Why did this reaction give black insoluble gunk? Why is the reaction yield 5% (rounded up)? Some of the more interesting results have come from questioning the “why?” of failed reactions – Vaska’s complex was discovered by accident, Kubas discovered the first dihydrogen complexes because of a poor yield, and there are many more examples from all branches of chemistry.  Then we spend ages analysing the data; “why?” did the NMR spectrum have too many peaks. After that we put all the answers to our “why?” on paper and send it to a journal for peer review. But how many times do we receive the following email from an editor rejecting our carefully crafted manuscript?

Dear author,

Thank you for your recent submission to RSC Advances, published by the Royal Society of Chemistry. All manuscripts are initially assessed by the editors to ensure they meet the criteria for publication in the journal.

After careful evaluation of your manuscript, I regret to inform you that I do not find your manuscript suitable for publication in RSC Advances because it does not meet the novelty and impact requirements of the journal. Therefore your article has been rejected from RSC Advances.

Yours sincerely,

The Editor

 

Professor Robert James Baker is an Assistant Professor at the School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin and an Associate Editor as well as Editorial Board member of RSC Advances

In this series we will explore some of the pitfalls of submission from an editor’s point of view and move your science forward. From experience, some of the common problems revolve around cover letters, how the manuscript is presented and how to respond to referees’ comments – “why” did they not get it? “why” didn’t I think of that?

Later on in this blog series, I will be sharing some of the cover letters and reviewer responses that accompanied rejected as well as successful manuscripts that I authored (and the stories behind them) in order to highlight that not only manuscripts require to be revised. As an Associate Editor in the areas of spectroscopy, homogenous catalysis and inorganic chemistry at RSC Advances, I come across several manuscripts with cover letters in the following format:

Dear Editor:

 Here we submit the paper entitled “XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX”. We would be grateful if the manuscript could be reviewed and considered for publication in RSC Advances. Thank you for your kind consideration.

Signed- The authors

Such redundant cover letters do not help the cause of the manuscript. At the very minimum, the cover letter should clearly state the advance made to literature in a manner that helps editors and reviewers evaluate the manuscript.

Here are my:

Most common reasons for rejecting a manuscript without review?

  1. Does the introduction set the scene – what is the problem the authors are looking at and why is it different to the literature. Context is key. So very short introductions with few references to the state-of-the-art are not good.
  2. Remember it is a results AND discussion section on a discussion of YOUR results. Again context – are your results good, bad or indifferent?
  3. Does the introduction and conclusion match the results? It is surprising how many manuscripts give a very ‘templated’ introduction on results from the last paper and not this current one.

Best piece of advice to a submitting author?

You are telling a story of WHY your results are important. Lead the reviewer and reader by the hand, explain everything that is important, but do it succinctly. The reader of your article wants to learn something new, so tell them what is new.

Having a manuscript rejected by an editor or peer reviewers is sometimes tough to take, especially in the early stages of your career. It’s frustrating and annoying but it happens to everyone; the comments are on your work, not you as a person or scientist. The best (though not necessarily easiest) way to look at it is as a learning experience. For example, I submitted a manuscript early in my career with the elemental analysis mixed up between two compounds; a referee picked up on this and the whole report was:

“The bulk purity of the compounds has not been proven, therefore none of the conclusions are remotely valid. Reject.”

I have not made the same mistake again!

You are welcome to send in any questions you have about peer-review or publishing to advances-rsc@rsc.org or post them on Twitter @RSCAdvances #AdvancingWithAdvances.

Tune in next week for our feature on how manuscripts are rejected by professional editors on scope and/or data concerns!

 

 

 

 

 

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Introduction to Advancing with Advances: How to publish and not perish?

 

A blog series on how manuscripts are rejected at RSC Advances.

Over the five next weeks, we will be releasing a new post every Wednesday in collaboration with Professor Robert Baker, Trinity College, Dublin who is an experienced Associate Editor and member of the RSC Advances Editorial Board. We will be shedding light on why manuscripts are rejected from RSC Advances and what you could do as an author to increase your chances of acceptance.

We have lined up for you:

  • An introduction from Prof. Baker, who will draw on his experiences as an author and Associate Editor on how editors assess manuscripts.
  • Perspectives from in-house Editors on why manuscripts are rejected without peer-review.
  • Associate Editors at RSC Advances, who work in different research areas, reveal why they reject manuscripts and share their best advice with authors.
  • Tip and tricks on how not to write cover letters and respond to reviewer reports.
  • And in our final post, Professor Baker will summarise how small changes in the way research is presented could improve your manuscript.

I hope you are as excited as we are about this series, and we hope it will be helpful to anyone hoping to submit to RSC Advances.  You are welcome to send in any questions you have about peer-review or publishing to advances-rsc@rsc.org.

Tune in next week for our first post from Professor Baker!

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Editors’ collection: Liquid Crystals Science and Technology by Associate Editor Giacomo Saielli

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection of recently published articles focusing on Liquid Crystals, handpicked by Associate Editor Dr Giacomo Saielli (Italian National Research Council and University of Padova).

Liquid Crystals (LCs) have been discovered serendipitously in 1888 by the botanist Friedrich Reinitzer. Their discovery sparked a great deal of debate during the first half of 1900 concerning their structural and dynamic properties and even their relationship with living organisms. They remained, however, mostly an academic curiosity until the second half of the last century when their possible application as displays became clear.

LC displays now represent a huge share of the display industry and many other applications based on LCs have been proposed and developed. At the same time, the LC science, mostly rooted in chemistry and physics but also touching mathematics, biology and engineering, has progressed significantly with new fields opening, e.g. ionic liquid crystals, polymeric liquid crystals, active matter systems, orienting phases for bio-NMR, LC-based membranes for separation. Moreover, new LC phases have been reported during the last recent decades renewing the scientific discussion on the fundamental properties and phase structure of these fascinating materials.

This themed collection highlights a series of papers published in the last two years concerning basic scientific investigations on LCs, from the synthesis of novel materials to structure-property relationships as well as applications in opto-electronic devices, thus attesting the breadth and vitality of the present research on liquid crystals.

As the world’s largest gold open access chemistry journal, all publications in RSC Advances are free to access. We hope you enjoy reading these articles.

We invite you to submit your research to this collection and give your work the global visibility it deserves.

 Submit your research now

Featured articles:

Photo-controllable rotational motion of cholesteric liquid crystalline droplets in a dispersion system
Yota Sakai, Woon Yong Sohn and Kenji Katayama
RSC Adv.
, 2020, 10, 21191-21197. DOI: 10.1039/D0RA03465G

The role of intermolecular interactions in stabilizing the structure of the nematic twist-bend phase
Katarzyna Merkel, Barbara Loska, Chris Welch, Georg H. Mehl and Antoni Kocot
RSC Adv., 2021, 11, 2917-2925 DOI: 10.1039/D0RA10481G

Textile materials inspired by structural colour in nature
Celina Jones, Franz J. Wortmann, Helen F. Gleeson and  Stephen G. Yeates
RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 24362-24367 DOI: 10.1039/D0RA01326A

Read the full collection here

Meet the Editor

Dr. Giacomo Saielli is currently Senior Researcher at the CNR Institute on Membrane Technology, Padova Unit, and contract Professor of Chemistry at the University of Padova. After obtaining his Ph.D. in Chemistry at the University of Padova in 1999, he spent two years as a post-doc at the University of Southampton, UK. He then received a JSPS short fellowship for a post-doc at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Tsukuba, Japan, in 2003. Moreover, he has been a visiting researcher at The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla CA (2010); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA (2013); and PIFI visiting scientist (President’s International Fellowship Initiative – Chinese Academy of Science) at the CAS Institute of Theoretical Physics in Beijing, in 2017. His research is mainly focussed on computational studies of ionic liquids, liquid crystals and computational spectroscopy.

 

 

About RSC Advances

As the world’s largest gold open access journal dedicated to the chemical sciences, we are here for everyone who wants to publish quality chemistry research and share it with the world. Published by the Royal Society of Chemistry and led by active researchers, we publish work in all areas of chemistry and our low article processing charges, discounts and waivers make publishing open access achievable and sustainable. Learn more.

To keep up to date with the latest articles and other journal news, sign up to the e-alerts.

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RSC Advances 10th Anniversary collections

Over the last 6 months, we have published a series of collections on selected topics to celebrate RSC Advances 10th Anniversary. The collections contain some outstanding work published in the journal over the 10 years.

All collections published so far have been collated below for everyone to browse and enjoy – all articles are free to read and access.

Many of these papers have been cited hundreds of times, providing valuable advances for further research, and some continue to be among the journal’s most downloaded articles as of today. Over the years, new findings in chemistry have been published in the journal but there are also high quality reviews – they truly are gifts between researchers serving as valuable sources of information for anyone needing an update or new to a field.

Would you like to submit a paper on a topic highlighted in our 10th Anniversary collections? Do you have a great idea for a review? Please submit here or contact the Editorial Office to discuss, we welcome work in every area of the chemical sciences and related disciplines.

Happy New Year – we hope you enjoy our 10th Anniversary collections!

RSC Advances Editorial team

 

Synthesis of nanomaterials

Nanostructures

Nanomaterial applications

 

RSC Advances Royal Society of ChemistrySubmit to RSC Advances today! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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