Congratulations to Pablo Martinez-Bulit!

Chemical Science poster prize winner at ISMSC/ISACS 2017

Pablo Martinez-Bulit next to his poster presented at ISMSC/ISACS

Congratulations to the Poster Prize winner at this year’s ISMSC/ISACS meeting.

The winner is Pablo Martinez-Bulit from the University of Windsor, Canada who is currently working as a graduate student in the group of Professor Stephen Loeb. His Ph.D. research focuses on the synthesis of [n]rotaxanes suitable for their incorporation into solid-state materials so we can use the dynamics inherent to these systems. He is especially interested in the rotation, translation, and conformational changes of the macrocyclic ring. Finally, the use of porphyrins provides an excellent scaffold to obtain robust materials.

The International Symposium on Macrocylic and Supramolecular Chemistry (ISMSC) which was run in 2017 in conjunction with ISACS: Challenges in Organic Materials & Supramolecular Chemistry took place in Cambridge, UK. The conference themes spread the breadth of macrocyclic and supramolecular chemistry from inorganic to organic chemistry and chemical biology, and the symposium provided an excellent opportunity for graduate students and postdocs to present their work in a multidisciplinary environment.

We wish Pablo all the best for his ongoing research and look forward to reading about his first results very soon.

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Christopher C. Cummins awarded the 2017 Linus Pauling award

We would like to congratulate Chemical Science Associate Editor Christopher C. Cummins (MIT), who was recently awarded the 2017 Linus Pauling award. Christopher will be presented with the award later on in the year at the 2017 Linus Pauling Medal Award Symposium at Portland State University. The Pauling Medal is sponsored jointly by the Portland, Puget Sound, and Oregon sections of the American Chemical Society. Congratulations from all of us at Chemical Science and the Royal Society of Chemistry!

Nominees for the award were chosen based on their history of making outstanding contributions to chemistry that are worthy of receiving worldwide recognition. Those who have previously received a Nobel Prize are not eligible for this award.

Christopher has been an Associate Editor for Chemical Science since the launch of the journal in 2010. Christopher specializes in the areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry and welcomes submissions in this area. Together with our dynamic international team of Associate Editors, he has been actively driving the journal’s scientific development by making direct decisions on its content – submit your best work to any of their Editorial Offices today!

Read Christopher Cummins’ latest articles in Chemical Science*:

On the incompatibility of lithium–O2 battery technology with CO2
Shiyu Zhang, Matthew J. Nava, Gary K. Chow, Nazario Lopez, Gang Wu, David R. Britt, Daniel G. Nocera and Christopher C. Cummins
Chem. Sci., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7SC01230F, Edge Article
Open Access

A family of cis-macrocyclic diphosphines: modular, stereoselective synthesis and application in catalytic CO2/ethylene coupling
Ioana Knopf, Daniel Tofan, Dirk Beetstra, Abdulaziz Al-Nezari, Khalid Al-Bahily and Christopher C. Cummins
Chem. Sci., 2017,8, 1463-1468
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC03614G, Edge Article
Open Access

Multi-electron reactivity of a cofacial di-tin(II) cryptand: partial reduction of sulfur and selenium and reversible generation of S3˙−
Julia M. Stauber, Peter Müller, Yizhe Dai, Gang Wu, Daniel G. Nocera and Christopher C. Cummins
Chem. Sci., 2016,7, 6928-6933
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC01754A, Edge Article
Open Access

Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of P2N3−: electron affinity and electronic structures of P2N3˙
Gao-Lei Hou, Bo Chen, Wesley J. Transue, David A. Hrovat, Christopher C. Cummins, Weston Thatcher Borden and Xue-Bin Wang
Chem. Sci., 2016,7, 4667-4675
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04667J, Edge Article
Open Access

*Access is free through a registered RSC account

 

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HOT Chemical Science articles for June

The referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 5th August 2017.

Formation and decay of negative ion states up to 11 eV above the ionization energy of the nanofabrication precursor HFeCo3(CO)12
Ragesh Kumar T P, Ragnar Bjornsson, Sven Barth and Oddur Ingólfsson
Chem. Sci., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7SC01927K, Edge Article

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Structural-functional analysis of engineered protein-nanoparticle assemblies using graphene microelectrodes
Jinglei Ping, Katherine W. Pulsipher, Ramya Vishnubhotla, Jose A. Villegas, Tacey L. Hicks, Stephanie Honig, Jeffery G. Saven, Ivan J. Dmochowski and A. T. Charlie Johnson
Chem. Sci., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7SC01565H, Edge Article

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Polar solvents promote halogen bonds over hydrogen ones

Solvent effects control competition between hydrogen bonding and halogen bonding in supramolecular systems, new research shows. The upshot of the finding is a potential new tool to direct supramolecular self-assembly.

During self-assembly, each molecule breaks its bonding interactions with neighbouring solvent molecules, then forms new interactions. To investigate competition between hydrogen bonding and halogen bonding when co-crystals form, researchers from an ongoing collaboration between the UK Universities of Sheffield, York and Cambridge chose seven solvents of different polarities to study three aromatic molecules known to self-assemble. The molecules’ functional groups included pairs of hydrogen bond and halogen bond donors that compete for a common acceptor group.

Solvent plays a critical role in directing self-assembly

Read the full story by Fiona Tscherny on Chemistry World.

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Light-driven catalytic process offers greener route to organic alcohols

Researchers in Spain have developed a light-driven catalytic process that offers a greener way to produce organic alcohols – important compounds used to manufacture pharmaceuticals and pesticides.

Researchers have developed a catalytic system to reduce aromatic ketones and both aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes that uses earth-abundant metals and light.

Read the full story by Jamie Durrani on Chemistry World.

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15th Host Guest Supramolecular Chemistry Annual Symposium RSC award winners

The Chemical Science was awarded at the 15th Host Guest Supramolecular Chemistry Annual Symposium in Kusatsu, Japan, 3-4 June 2017, along with the ChemComm poster prize, the Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry poster prize and 7 other poster prizes.

The Host Guest Supramolecular Chemistry Annual Symposium (website in Japanese) is an annual event that is organized by the Association of Research for Host-Guest and Supramolecular Chemistry. This year, the 15th occurrence of this symposium took place at the Ritsumeikan University on 3-4 June 2017. The event was attended by 230 people and counted 39 talks and 128 poster presentations.

The Chemical Science, ChemComm and Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry poster prizes were delivered to the 3 most outstanding poster presentations, along with 7 other poster prizes.

 

Nobuhiko Nishitani from Kyoto University was awarded the Chemical Science award for their poster titled: STM Observation of Cooperative Self-Assembly at the Liquid/Graphite Interface: Influence of Intercolumnar Interactions on Domain Size and Shape

Tsuyoshi Mashima from Osaka University was awarded the ChemComm award for their poster titled: Construction of Zn-substituted Hexameric Hemoprotein with Multiple Photosensitizers and Evaluation of its Light Harvesting Function

Tomokuni Kai from Tokyo Institute of Technology was awarded the Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry award for their poster titled: Polyaromatic Micelles: Emission Enhancement of Eu(III)-complexes in Water upon Encapsulation

From right to left: Prof. Tatsuya Nabeshima (University of Tsukuba), Nobuhiko Nishitani, Tsuyoshi Mashima, Tomokuni Kai, and the poster prize winners, along with Prof. Hiromitsu Maeda (Ritsumeikan University, left) (Click to enlarge)


Dr Hiromitsu Urakami, from the Royal Society Chemistry, gave a lauded presentation on Publishing on 3rd June.

Dr Hiromitsu Urakami

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First +5 praseodymium compound with PrN triple bond made

The first pentavalent praseodymium nitride–oxide that features a rare Pr≡N triple bond is the second ever lanthanide(V) complex to be made.

Lanthanide chemistry is dominated by the +3 oxidation state. There are some common +4 lanthanide complexes such as cerium oxide (CeO2), but +5 compounds have proven elusive. Praseodymium has long been considered as the most promising route to lanthanide(V) chemistry as it has five valence electrons, but the first pentavalent praseodymium complex, the oxide PrO2+, was only synthesised last year.

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry
Calculations led to these representations of the molecular orbitals of the praseodymium(V) compound, NPrO

Read the full story by Aurora Walshe on Chemistry World.

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15-minute test catches out flu virus

A team in the US has designed a test for detecting influenza viruses in just 15 minutes using a glucose meter – a cheap, handheld instrument that is widely available.

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry
Proteins sitting on the flu viruses’ surface cleave a carbon–oxygen bond in a modified sialic acid, releasing the sugar galactose

Suri S Iyer and colleagues from Georgia State University have now designed a test to detect influenza viruses A and B in just 15 minutes. The test only requires a nasal swab and a glucose meter – a simple instrument usually used for diabetes control. ‘Influenza virus can be deadly especially in weak or immunocompromised people. This diagnostic can help these people as vaccines for flu are not perfect,’ Iyer explains.

Read the full story by Adrian Robinson on Chemistry World.

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Molecular suit provides basic protection

Scientists have designed a macrocycle that can completely surround a small molecule like a suit and protect it from a strong base. This reversible suiting strategy could find applications as protecting groups in organic synthesis and the design of molecular machines.


Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry
The suit-1-ane: a macrocycle (orange) completely encloses a benzimidazolium cation (blue)

Protecting groups alter the reactivity of organic molecules by shielding functional groups from other reactants. Mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) are linked structures that require a covalent bond to be broken to separate them, which could make them useful protecting groups.

Read the full story by Harriet Brewerton on Chemistry World.

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Chemical Science lighting talk prize winner at UCCS 2017

March 27-29, 2017 at the UCLA Lake Arrowhead Conference Center

The 2017 University of California Symposium for the Chemical Sciences (UCSCS) was held on March 27-29, 2017 at the UCLA Lake Arrowhead Conference Center and was attended by over 100 University of California graduate students and postdoctoral scholars.

The UCCS is a symposium for current graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in all fields of chemistry from all campuses of the University of California. The whole conference is organised by graduate students and postdocs from the UC campuses. The first UCCS meeting was held in March 2016, at the Lake Arrowhead conference center in Lake Arrowhead.

Chemical Science is proud to announce that the Chemical Science lighting tak prize was awarded to Dr Noelle Catarineu from University of California Berkeley. The prize was awarded by Dr Jennifer Griffiths.

Dr Catarineu’s talk was on Reticular Chemistry of Asymmetric Organic Linkers and One-Dimensional Secondary Building Units in Metal-Organic Frameworks.
Congratulations Noelle!

Dr Jennifer Griffiths (left) awarding the Chemical Science prize to Dr Noelle Catarineu (right)

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