Hot Chemical Science articles for September

Here are some of the latest referee-recommended articles published in Chemical Science – all are open access and free to read:

Design rationale of thermally responsive microgel particle films that reversibly absorb large amounts of CO2: fine tuning the pKa of ammonium ions in the particles
Mengchen Yue, Yu Hoshino and Yoshiko MiuraÂ
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC01978H, Edge Article

C5SC01978H GA


Singly and doubly ß-to-ß platinum-bridged porphyrin dimers and their reductive eliminations
Hua-Wei Jiang, Takayuki Tanaka and Atsuhiro OsukaÂ
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02553B, Edge Article

C5SC02553B GA


Fluorescent carbon dot–molecular salt hydrogels
Angelina Cayuela, Stuart R. Kennedy, M. Laura Soriano, Christopher D. Jones, Miguel ValcĂĄrcel and Jonathan W. SteedÂ
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC01859E, Edge Article

C5SC01859E GA


Molecular computing: paths to chemical Turing machines
Shaji Varghese, Johannes A. A. W. Elemans, Alan E. Rowan and Roeland J. M. NolteÂ
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02317C, Perspective

C5SC02317C GA


Lab on a single microbead: an ultrasensitive detection strategy enabling microRNA analysis at the single-molecule level
Xiaobo Zhang, Chenghui Liu, Lingbo Sun, Xinrui Duan and Zhengping LiÂ
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02641E, Edge Article

C5SC02641E GA

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Individual microRNA molecules detected with a single microbead

Christopher Barnard writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

An elegant strategy for detecting minuscule quantities of microRNA using just a single functionalised microbead could be an important innovation for biomedical research and molecular diagnostics.

Identifying biomolecules with vanishingly small copy numbers in cells is vital in deciphering the chemical blueprint for life. Homogeneous exponential amplification methods (such as the polymerase chain reaction), northern blotting, microarray detection and the isothermal exponential amplification reaction (EXPAR) are just some of the techniques that have undergone extensive tailoring to detect all manner of genetic material in cells as sensitively as possible. However, few approaches have even come close to reliably detecting nucleic acids at the single molecule level. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in Chemical Science – it’s open access:
Lab on a single microbead: an ultrasensitive detection strategy enabling microRNA analysis at the single-molecule level
Xiaobo Zhang, Chenghui Liu, Lingbo Sun, Xinrui Duan and Zhengping LiÂ
Chem. Sci., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02641E, Edge Article

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Probing for a better way to detect important antioxidants in cells

Iain Larmour is a guest web writer for ChemSci. He has researched a wide variety of topics during his years in the lab including nanostructured surfaces for water repellency and developing nanoparticle systems for bioanalysis by surface enhanced optical spectroscopies. He currently works in science management. In his spare time he enjoys reading, photography, art and inventing.

Glutathione is an antioxidant enzyme and the most abundant biothiol in human cells. It plays a crucial role in protecting cells against oxidative damage from various toxins that the body produces. However, abnormal levels of glutathione can lead to oxidative stress, which in turn can lead to premature aging and conditions such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease. 

There is, therefore, a need for the selective detection of glutathione, so that its role in biological systems can be better understood. However, it is challenging to design a selective fluorescent probe for a specific biothiol due to the structural and reactivity similarities with other biothiols. This is the challenge that David Churchill and team from the Department of Chemistry at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology set out to meet.

Fluorescence response seen in Hep3B cells treated with the probe molecule

The team has previously explored the use of fluorescent probes containing selenium as the reactive centre and they have taken a similar approach with this challenge, using a phenylselenide group. The images below show the phenylselenide probe reacting with cellular glutathione, which fluoresces green in the images. The intensity of the fluorescence was around a hundred times greater than for cysteine or homocysteine, which are closely related to glutathione.

Until now, there has been no probe that can selectively detect glutathione in real time, so it will be interesting to see what future results come from this advance.

To read the details, download the Chemical Science article and read it in full – it’s open access:
Exceptional time response, stability and selectivity in doubly-activated phenyl selenium-based glutathione-selective platform
Youngsam Kim, Sandip V. Mulay, Minsuk Choi, Seungyoon B Yu, Sangyong Jon and David G Churchill
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02090E 

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Antioxidant assumptions flipped for garlic thiosulfinates

Jessie-May Morgan writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

Garlic bulbs

Garlic is often called the world's oldest know medicine © Shutterstock

New mechanistic investigations at the interface of chemistry and biology reveal thiosulfinates of garlic and petiveria are not the superstars of the antioxidant world they were once thought to be.

Allicin, a thiosulfinate from garlic, well-known for its potent antimicrobial activity, is a popular molecule under investigation for its medicinal potential to treat diseases such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. It has long been hoped that its biocidal properties would translate into therapeutic effects in human cells. Previous studies carried out in organic solution indicated that allicin and petivericin, an analogous thiosulfinate derived from the South American plant Petiveria alliacea, were potent radical-trapping antioxidants because they decompose to give sulfenic acids that reduced free radicals and inhibited the undesirable oxidation of important biomolecules. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in Chemical Science:
The medicinal thiosulfinates from garlic and Petiveria are not radical-trapping antioxidants in liposomes and cells, but lipophilic analogs are
Bo Li, Feng Zheng, Jean-Philippe R. Chauvin and Derek A. PrattÂ
Chem. Sci., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02270C, Edge Article

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Streamlined synthesis yields longer sugar chains

Emma Cooper writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

By using bigger building blocks, scientists in the UK have shown they can make much longer oligosaccharide sequences than previously possible.

The traditional synthetic route to long chain oligosaccharides is drawn out and complicated; they require numerous steps to produce the precursor tetrasaccharides, then further steps to connect these precursors into long chains. Normally they’re made by an iterative two block process, generating chains up to 12 units long. Now, a four block approach, developed by John Gardiner and colleagues at the University of Manchester, significantly reduces the number of steps enabling longer sugar lengths from 16 up to 40 units. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in Chemical Science – it’s open access:
Making the longest sugars: a chemical synthesis of heparin-related [4]n oligosaccharides from 16-mer to 40-mer
Steen U. Hansen, Gavin J. Miller, Matthew J. Cliff, Gordon C. Jayson and John M. GardinerÂ
Chem. Sci., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02091C, Edge Article

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Top 25 Chemical Science articles April–June 2015

The 25 most-downloaded Chemical Science articles in the second quarter of 2015 were as follows: 

Copper-catalyzed intermolecular C(sp3)–H bond functionalization towards the synthesis of tertiary carbamates
Prasanna Kumara Chikkade, Yoichiro Kuninobu and Motomu Kanai
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00238A, Edge Article

Palladium(0) NHC complexes: a new avenue to highly efficient phosphorescence
Adam F. Henwood, Mathieu Lesieur, Ashu K. Bansal, Vincent Lemaur, David Beljonne, David G. Thompson, Duncan Graham, Alexandra M. Z. Slawin, Ifor D. W. Samuel, Catherine S. J. Cazin and Eli Zysman-Colman
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03914A, Edge Article

Rh-catalyzed decarbonylation of conjugated ynones via carbon–alkyne bond activation: reaction scope and mechanistic exploration via DFT calculations
Alpay Dermenci, Rachel E. Whittaker, Yang Gao, Faben A. Cruz, Zhi-Xiang Yu and Guangbin Dong
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00584A, Edge Article

Sulfonyl fluorides as privileged warheads in chemical biology
Arjun Narayanan and Lyn H. Jones
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00408J, Perspective

Computational discovery and experimental verification of tyrosine kinase inhibitor pazopanib for the reversal of memory and cognitive deficits in rat model neurodegeneration
Yongliang Yang, Guohui Li, Dongyu Zhao, Haoyang Yu, Xiliang Zheng, Xiangda Peng, Xiaoe Zhang, Ting Fu, Xiaoqing Hu, Mingshan Niu, Xuefei Ji, Libo Zou and Jin Wang
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03416C, Edge Article

A divergent route to core- and peripherally functionalized diazacoronenes that act as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors
Bo He, Jing Dai, Danylo Zherebetskyy, Teresa L. Chen, Benjamin A. Zhang, Simon J. Teat, Qichun Zhang, Linwang Wang and Yi Liu
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00304K, Edge Article

Spatial imaging of carbon reactivity centers in Pd/C catalytic systems
E. O. Pentsak, A. S. Kashin, M. V. Polynski, K. O. Kvashnina, P. Glatzel and V. P. Ananikov
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00802F, Edge Article

Chemical assay-guided natural product isolation via solid-supported chemodosimetric fluorescent probe
Hongjun Jeon, Chaemin Lim, Ji Min Lee and Sanghee Kim
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00360A, Edge Article

Very bright mechanoluminescence and remarkable mechanochromism using a tetraphenylethene derivative with aggregation-induced emission
Bingjia Xu, Jiajun He, Yingxiao Mu, Qiangzhong Zhu, Sikai Wu, Yifan Wang, Yi Zhang, Chongjun Jin, Changcheng Lo, Zhenguo Chi, Alan Lien, Siwei Liu and Jiarui Xu
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00466G, Edge Article

Stereocontrolled 1,2-cis glycosylation as the driving force of progress in synthetic carbohydrate chemistry
Swati S. Nigudkar and Alexei V. Demchenko
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00280J, Perspective

Combination of Ru(II) complexes and light: new frontiers in cancer therapy
Cristina Mari, Vanessa Pierroz, Stefano Ferrari and Gilles Gasser
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03759F, Perspective

Enantioselective synthesis of bicyclo[3.n.1]alkanes by chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed desymmetrizing Michael cyclizations
Alan R. Burns, Amaël G. E. Madec, Darryl W. Low, Iain D. Roy and Hon Wai Lam
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00753D, Edge Article

Ratiometric detection of pH fluctuation in mitochondria with a new fluorescein/cyanine hybrid sensor
Yuncong Chen, Chengcheng Zhu, Jiajie Cen, Yang Bai, Weijiang He and Zijian Guo
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC04021J, Edge Article

Enantioselective and diastereoselective azo-coupling/iminium-cyclizations: a unified strategy for the total syntheses of (−)-psychotriasine and (+)-pestalazine B
Qi Li, Tingting Xia, Licheng Yao, Haiteng Deng and Xuebin Liao
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00338E, Edge Article

Iron(II)-catalyzed asymmetric intramolecular olefin aminochlorination using chloride ion
Cheng-Liang Zhu, Jun-Shan Tian, Zhen-Yuan Gu, Guo-Wen Xing and Hao Xu
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00221D, Edge Article

Reversible photo-induced trap formation in mixed-halide hybrid perovskites for photovoltaics
Eric T. Hoke, Daniel J. Slotcavage, Emma R. Dohner, Andrea R. Bowring, Hemamala I. Karunadasa and Michael D. McGehee
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03141E, Edge Article

Evaluating metal–organic frameworks for natural gas storage
Jarad A. Mason, Mike Veenstra and Jeffrey R. Long
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52633J, Perspective

Enhancing H2 evolution performance of an immobilised cobalt catalyst by rational ligand design
Janina Willkomm, Nicoleta M. Muresan and Erwin Reisner
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03946G, Edge Article

Dialkylbiaryl phosphines in Pd-catalyzed amination: a user’s guide
David S. Surry and Stephen L. Buchwald
DOI: 10.1039/C0SC00331J, Perspective

Diverse reactivity of a tricoordinate organoboron L2PhB: (L = oxazol-2-ylidene) towards alkali metal, group 9 metal, and coinage metal precursors
Lingbing Kong, Rakesh Ganguly, Yongxin Li and Rei Kinjo
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00404G, Edge Article

Is a polymer semiconductor having a “perfect” regular structure desirable for organic thin film transistors?
Wei Hong, Shaoyun Chen, Bin Sun, Mark A. Arnould, Yuezhong Meng and Yuning Li
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00843C, Edge Article

Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling of α-bromocarbonyls and allylic alcohols for the synthesis of α-aryl dicarbonyl compounds
Yang Yu and Uttam K. Tambar
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00505A, Edge Article

Charging and discharging at the nanoscale: Fermi level equilibration of metallic nanoparticles
MicheĂĄl D. Scanlon, Pekka Peljo, Manuel A. MĂ©ndez, Evgeny Smirnov and Hubert H. Girault
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00461F, Perspective

A highly selective ratiometric near-infrared fluorescent cyanine sensor for cysteine with remarkable shift and its application in bioimaging
Zhiqian Guo, SeongWon Nam, Sungsu Park and Juyoung Yoon
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20540H, Edge Article

Virtual screening for high affinity guests for synthetic supramolecular receptors
William Cullen, Simon Turega, Christopher A. Hunter and Michael D. Ward
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00534E, Edge Article


Chemical Science is the Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship journal, publishing research articles of exceptional significance and high-impact reviews from across the chemical sciences. It has been Gold Open Access since January 2015. 

Submit your exceptional research to Chemical Science today!

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Join us in Brazil for Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy

Don’t miss out on great student rates: $80 for Royal Society of Chemistry/Brazilian Chemical Society members and $90 for non-members.

Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy ISACS17

It is just a few weeks until the International Symposia on Advancing the Chemical Sciences (ISACS) symposia take the series to Brazil for the first time.

Register by 1 September, 2015 to secure your place

We will have a lively programme discussing the current Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy with researchers from across the globe, incuding:

James Durrant (Imperial College London, UK)

Eduardo Falabella (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and PETROBRAS, Brazil)

Marc Fontecave (CollĂšge de France, France)

Hubert Girault (Federal Polytechnic School of Lausanne, Switzerland)

Ernesto R. Gonzalez (University of SĂŁo Paulo, Brazil)

Daniel Nocera (Harvard University, USA)

Erwin Reisner (University of Cambridge, UK)

Keith Waldron (Institute of Food Research, UK)

Karen Wilson (Aston University, UK)

Check out the full provisional programme on our website.

*Students, take advantage of a generous discount: $80 for Royal Society of Chemistry/Brazilian Chemical Society members and $90 for non-members!*

Our hope is that delegates will be exposed to new areas of research, encouraging the cross fertilization of ideas. We look forward to seeing you in Brazil!

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More hot Chemical Science articles for July

We’ve picked out a few more referee-recommended articles in Chemical Science for you to enjoy – all are open access:

Making the longest sugars: A chemical synthesis of heparin-related [4]n oligosaccharides from 16-mer to 40-mer
Steen Uldall Hansen, Gavin John Miller, Matthew John Cliff, Gordon C Jayson and John M GardinerÂ
Chem. Sci., 2015, Accepted Manuscript, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02091C, Edge Article

 


Cell paintballing using optically targeted coacervate microdroplets
James P.K. Armstrong, Sam Olof, Monika Jakimowicz, Anthony Hollander, Stephen Mann, Sean A Davis, Mervyn Miles, Avinash Patil and Adam PerimanÂ
Chem. Sci., 2015, Accepted Manuscript, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02266E, Edge Article


Well-defined silica supported aluminum hydride: another step towards the utopian single site dream?
Baraa Werghi, Anissa Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Julien Sofack-Kreutzer, Abdesslem Jedidi, Edy Abou-Hamad, Luigi Cavallo and Jean-Marie BassetÂ
Chem. Sci., 2015, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02276B, Edge Article

C5SC02276B GA


Interaction of silver metal clusters with living organisms: bactericidal effect of Ag3 clusters mediated by disruption of topoisomerase-DNA complexes
JosĂ© Neissa, Cristina PĂ©rez-Arnaiz, Vanessa Porto, Natalia Busto, Erea Borrajo, JosĂ© Maria Leal, M. Arturo Lopez-Quintela, Begona Garcia and Fernando DomĂ­nguezÂ
Chem. Sci., 2015, Accepted Manuscript, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02022K, Edge Article

 

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Boroles get a stability boost

Anisha Ratan writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

Scientists from Germany have reported a breakthrough in borole stability, using bulky fluoromesityl groups, which could help these anti-aromatic molecules realise their potential in optoelectronic devices.

Boroles are heterocycles with a 4π-electron BC4 ring and subsequent electron-accepting abilities. This makes them great candidates for electron-transporting and accepting materials in organic light-emitting diodes and photovoltaics. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in Chemical Science – it’s open access:
Taming the beast: fluoromesityl groups induce a dramatic stability enhancement in boroles
Zuolun Zhang, Robert M. Edkins, Martin Haehnel, Marius Wehner, Antonius Eichhorn, Lisa MailĂ€nder, Michael Meier, Johannes Brand, Franziska Brede, Klaus MĂŒller-Buschbaum, Holger Braunschweig and Todd B. MarderÂ
Chem. Sci., 2015, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02205C, Edge Article

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Photoredox catalysis mechanisms seen in new light

Richard Massey writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

A debate over whether photoredox-catalysed reactions proceed via chain processes may now be settled, thanks to new mechanistic insight brought to light by scientists in the US. The research, led by Tehshik Yoon at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, shows that commonly used light/dark experiments can result in mechanistic misdiagnosis.

Whilst interest in photoredox catalysis has recently burgeoned – the reactions are used in natural product and pharmaceutical synthesis – our understanding of their mechanisms hasn’t kept pace. In particular, the extent to which the reactions involve chain processes is not fully understood, leading to conflicting explanations. Several groups have reported that the final product-generating step proceeds only by reduction of the radical cation product by the reduced photocatalyst in a closed catalytic cycle, whilst others have reported that the product is formed by an additional chain propagation step involving another equivalent of substrate. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in Chemical Science – it’s open access:
Characterizing chain processes in visible light photoredox catalysis
Megan A. Cismesia and Tehshik P. YoonÂ
Chem. Sci., 2015, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02185E, Edge Article

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