Chemical Science Impact Factor rises to 8.6

Chemical Science is dedicated to publishing research of exceptional significance from across the chemical sciences.  For us, it’s all about giving our authors the visibility and recognition their research deserves. http://blogs.rsc.org/sc/files/2013/06/Small-Sunflower.jpg

We are delighted to announce that our 2013 Impact Factor* has risen to an impressive 8.601. This fantastic result further demonstrates that Chemical Science is one of the leading general chemistry journals.

Thank you to all who have contributed to the journal’s success so far – our authors, referees, readers and Editorial and Advisory Boards – we are very grateful for your support.

Our unique combination of high quality articles, flexible format and excellent Associate Editors, makes it clear why so many leading scientists have already chosen to publish in Chemical Science.  You can see our most highly cited articles listed below.

We invite you to submit your exceptional research to Chemical Science today.

Chemical Science is moving to Gold Open Access from Issue 1, 2015. It will be the world’s first high-quality Open Access chemistry journal.

By moving Chemical Science to Gold Open Access, we are giving the global community access to some of the very best research. Read our Press Release to find out more.

Find out how other Royal Society of Chemistry journals are ranked in the latest Impact Factor release

Top cited Chemical Science articles:

Perspectives

Synergistic catalysis: A powerful synthetic strategy for new reaction development

Anna E. Allen and David W. C. MacMillan

Ruthenium-catalyzed direct oxidative alkenylation of arenes through twofold C–H bond functionalization
Sergei I. Kozhushkov and Lutz Ackermann

Rethinking the term “pi-stacking”
Chelsea R. Martinez and Brent L. Iverson

Minireviews

Graphene-based electronic sensors
Author(s): He, Qiyuan; Wu, Shixin; Yin, Zongyou; et al.

Changing and challenging times for service crystallography
Simon J. Coles and Philip A. Gale

Cooperative Lewis acid/N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis
Daniel T. Cohen and Karl A. Scheidt

Edge Articles

Fullerene crystallisation as a key driver of charge separation in polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells
Fiona C. Jamieson, Ester Buchaca Domingo, Thomas McCarthy-Ward, Martin Heeney, Natalie Stingelin and James R. Durrant

A highly selective ratiometric near-infrared fluorescent cyanine sensor for cysteine with remarkable shift and its application in bioimaging
Zhiqian Guo, SeongWon Nam, Sungsu Park and Juyoung Yoon

A solvent-driven molecular spring
Zibin Zhang, Chengyou Han, Guocan Yu and Feihe Huang

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper.  Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years.  Data based on 2013 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2014).

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Blame the “messenger”

This issue’s cover article features the development of a method which the researchers hope will help with the early diagnosis of diseases caused by oxidative damage.

 A team led by Tony James, Steven Bull and Juyoung Yoon have developed a method they hope will help with the early diagnosis of diseases caused by oxidative damage. 

The research team is made up of Tony James, Steven Bull, Stephen Flower, John Lowe and Xiaolong Sun from the University of Bath. They are joined on this project by John Fossey from the University of Birmingham, Juyoung Yoon, Qingling Xu and Gyoungmi Kim from Ewha Woman’s University and Xu-Hong Qian from East China University of Science and Technology. 

The key to the research is the detection of the chemical peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite is a signalling molecule associated with many diseases associated with oxidative damage but is difficult to detect since it is very short-lived. 

Led by James, Bull and Yoon, the team began by using a water soluble fluorescence probe to successfully detect peroxynitrite in cancer cells. They are now hoping to use this technique as the basis for tests for the early diagnosis of other diseases. 

A paper on their research – A water soluble boronate-based fluorescence probe for the selective detection of peroxynitrite and imaging in living cells – has just been published in Chemical Science and features as the cover image for the latest issue, Issue 9. 

Chemical Science 

About the image:
 Given that Peroxynitrite is an important cellular signalling “messenger” molecule, the core concept and design of their cover revolves around stamps to convey the idea of “messaging”.
“We used three stamps to represent the three countries (China, South Korea and the UK) involved in the collaboration” says Tony James. The Chinese Stamp contains a painting of the Tree Peony. Extracts from the Tree Peony (Paeonia suffruticosa) have been used as antioxidants as part of Natural and traditional Medicines (nutraceticals) for diseases caused by oxidative damage. The Tree Peony “king of flowers” is also a very important symbol and image of China and still maintains deep cultural significance.

The Korean stamp depicts the metric system, the group of Juyoung Yoon at Ewha Womans University in Seoul Korea carried out the cell imaging “measurements” of the cells. 

The UK stamp is the 2010 Dorothy Hodgkin Stamp released to celebrate 350 years of the Royal Society. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin was awarded the 1964 Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for her determinations by X-ray techniques of the structures of important biochemical substances”. In particular she determined the structure of Vitamin B12. The structure of this molecule helped to understand the role and function of Vitamin B12 in the metabolism. Vitamin B12 has a key role in the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system, including nerve signalling and “messaging” 

James and co-workers explained that they designed the cover to pay homage to Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin and celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Award of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Therefore, the Chinese and Korean Stamps are both 1964 vintage. The UK stamp celebrates Dorothy Hodgkin’s Nobel Prize in 1964 and clearly links the “50 Years” Anniversary and “messaging” theme of our Cover.

We would also like to take this opportunity to wish our three corresponding Authors a very Happy 50th Birthday, as Juyoung Yoon, Steve Bull and Tony James are all celebrating their 50th birthdays during 2014. 

Read the full article for free today! 

A water-soluble boronate-based fluorescence probe for the selective detection of peroxynitrite and imaging in living cells
Xiaolong Sun, Qingling Xu, Gyoungmi Kim, Stephen E. Flower,  John P Lowe, Juyoung Yoon, John S Fossey, Xu-Hong Qian, Steven Bull and Tony D James 

DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01417K

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Uranium complexes unlock feedstock potential of carbon dioxide

Polly Wilson writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

European scientists have synthesised uranium complexes that take them a step closer to producing commodity chemicals from carbon dioxide.

Widespread fossil fuel depletion and concerns over levels of climatic carbon dioxide are motivating research to convert this small molecule into value-added chemicals. Organometallic uranium complexes have successfully activated various small molecules before. However, there were no reports of an actinide metal complex that could reductively couple with carbon dioxide to give a segment made from two carbon dioxide molecules – an oxalate dianion.


Read the full article in Chemistry World»

Read the original journal article in Chemical Science - it’s free to access until 3rd September:
Controlling selectivity in the reductive activation of CO2 by mixed sandwich uranium(III) complexes
Nikolaos Tsoureas, Ludovic Castro, Alexander F. R. Kilpatrick, F. Geoffey N. Cloke and Laurent Maron  
Chem. Sci., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01401D, Edge Article

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Polymer changes colour in the heat of the moment

Charlie Quigg writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

Scientists in China, the UK and the Netherlands have engineered a polydiacetylene polymer that reversibly changes colour within 1 second of being heated or cooled

Thermochromic polymers have a wide range of potential uses, from biological sensors to smart windows. However, the irregular structure and weak molecular interactions in established thermochromic polymers results in long response times, slow reversibility and a narrow working temperature range. 

The peptide linkers are stable, while the conjugated bonds within the alkyl chain undergo a reversible conformational transition

 


 

Read the full article in Chemistry World» 

Read the original journal article in Chemical Science – it’s free to access until 28th August:
Ultrafast and Reversible Thermochromism of Conjugated Polymer Material Based on Assembling of Peptide Amphiphiles
Zhengzhong Shao, Hui Guo, Jinming Zhang, David Porter, Huisheng Peng, Dennis Lowik, Yu Wang, Zhidong Zhang and Xin Chen  
Chem. Sci., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01696C, Edge Article

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Successful poster sessions attract the crowds at ISACS13

Two lively poster sessions saw the room packed out at the recent ISACS13 meeting on “Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry”, held in Dublin. Over 120 posters were presented, attracting large crowds and yielding 5 winners.   

Katie-Louise Finney of Durham University, UK was awarded the first prize, sponsored by Chemistry World, for her poster on PARASHIFT proton magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. She receives £250 and a Chemistry World mug.  

Katie-Louise Finney with Neil Withers (Chemistry World Features Editor)  L-R: Lily Dixon, Pierre Sutra, Jane Hordern (Chemical Science Deputy Editor), Paolo Pirovano 

Lily Dixon (University of Cambridge, UK), Pierre Sutra (Université de Toulouse, France) and Dariusz Matoga (Jagiellonian University, Poland) each received a Chemical Science Poster Prize, while Paolo Pirovano (Trinity College Dublin, Ireland) was awarded a Dalton Transactions Poster Prize.  

The runners-up all receive a certificate and a copy of ‘The Case of the Poisonous Socks’ from the Royal Society of Chemistry’s popular science collection. 

Delegates at ISACS13 pack out the room at one of the poster sessions

You can find out more about ISACS13 and view the full programme online. 

The ISACS (International Symposia on Advancing the Chemical Sciences) series is organised in partnership with Chemical Science and brings together leading scientists from across the world. Find out more about upcoming conferences on the website, and view the speakers and programmes for previous events.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Hot Chemical Science articles for July

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 20th August 2014

Aqueous photoinduced living/controlled polymerization: tailoring for bioconjugation
Jiangtao Xu, Kenward Jung, Nathaniel Alan Corrigan and Cyrille Boyer  
Chem. Sci., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01309C, Edge Article


Electric field control of the optical properties in magnetic mixed-valence molecules
Andrew Palii, Juan M. Clemente-Juan, Boris Tsukerblat and Eugenio Coronado  
Chem. Sci., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01056F, Edge Article


Multi-step and multi-component organometallic synthesis in one pot using orthogonal mechanochemical reactions
José G. Hernández, Ian S. Butler and Tomislav Friščić  
Chem. Sci., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01252F, Edge Article


Non-equilibrium transition state rate theory
Haidong Feng, Kun Zhang and Jin Wang  
Chem. Sci., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00831F, Edge Article

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Lighting Up the Polymer World, Reversibly

Researchers from the UK have developed a polymeric system that exhibits reversible fluorescent behaviour. Anthea Blackburn writes more…

Fluorescent imaging is one of the most useful techniques in modern day medicine, as it provides us with a method of visualizing the inside of a body to allow for diagnosis and treatment of disease. Typically, an organic fluorophore is attached to a biomolecule that, upon introduction to the body, is able to interact with a specific type of molecule in the body, such as a cancerous cell or a molecule that carries out a particular and important function. More recently, in addition to the use of biomolecules, fluorescent labeling has turned to the polymer world for applications in targeted drug delivery or cell patterning to name but a few examples. Fluorescence becomes important in these applications, as the introduction of non-biological molecules to the body requires a method of locating them to track and monitor their activity.

There are a number of methods of introducing organic fluorophores to polymers, for example, polymerization of fluorescently labeled monomer units, end-group attachment, or post-synthetic modification, all of which offer advantages and disadvantages. The one factor that all of these approaches have in common however, is that one needs to beware of how the attachment of fluorophores, which are typically large, will change the chemistry of the polymer. It would therefore be advantageous if small, yet fluorescent, groups could be attached to polymers without otherwise changing their properties.

It is this interest in synthesising fluorescent polymers using small molecules that Mathew Robin and Rachel O’Reilly from the University of Warwick sought to tackle. They were able to demonstrate that the introduction of dithiomaleimide functional groups, which have a large Stokes shift (250 nm) and bright emission, to acrylate or methacrylate polymers did not change the properties of the polymer itself. Perhaps even more interestingly is that it was demonstrated that the functional groups could be introduced both pre-synthetically and post-synthetically. In this way, polymer fluorescence could be both turned on in a profluorescent polymer that contained a reactive dibromomaleimide monomer unit, as well as reversibly turned off through a dithiol exchange reaction to a non-fluorescent dithiomaleimide monomer unit.

The development of a relatively simple system whose fluorescence can be reversible turned on and off is an exciting step forward in developing polymers, especially since the end groups of this functionalised polymer allows for its further incorporation into more complex polymeric systems. These polymers could have applications in not only the biomedical uses discussed, but also in a numerous other applications such as organic electronic devices, sensing materials and polymer materials like nanoparticles and hydrogels.

Read this HOT Chemical Science Edge article in full for free*!

Fluorescent and chemico-fluorescent responsive polymers from dithiomaleimide and dibromomaleimide functional monomers

Mathew P. Robin and Rachel K. O’Reilly
Chem. Sci.20145, 2717.
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00753K, Edge Article

About the Writer

Anthea Blackburn is a guest web writer for Chemical Science. Anthea is a graduate student hailing from New Zealand, studying at Northwestern University in the US under the tutelage of Prof. Fraser Stoddart (a Scot), where she is exploiting supramolecular chemistry to develop multidimensional systems and study the emergent properties that arise in these superstructures. When time and money allow, she is ambitiously attempting to visit all 50 US states before graduation.

*Access is free untill 08.08.14 through a registered RSC account – click here to register

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Small Molecule Mimics of Transport Proteins

Philip Gale, Chair of our sister Journal ChemSocRev, et al report the first use of thiosquaramides as anion receptors and pH-switchable anion transporters.

Many diseases are caused by faulty anion transport across cell membranes, such as faulty chloride transport leading to cystic fibrosis. Therefore, in recent years interest has grown in developing small molecule mimics of transport proteins that can be used to restore or disrupt the chemical processes within cells and thus cure or kill a range of diseases.

Researchers from the University of Southampton and the University of Sydney have produced a series of thiosquaramides which investigate pH dependent chloride transport properties. It was observed that the anion transport ability of the thiosquaramides was completely turned on below a pH of 7.2 but fully switched off at a pH value of 7.2 or higher. The developed thiosquaramides can promote chloride efflux mainly via a chloride/nitrate antiport process.

One of the thiosquaramide derivative with bound chloride anion

This paper provides one of the few examples of truly controllable and switchable anion transport by small synthetic molecules. Thiosquaramides form interesting targets for developing future biologically active anion transporters –  read the paper today to find out how to make them!

To read the details, check out the Chem Sci article in full for free:

Nathalie Busschaert, Robert B. P. Elmes, Dawid D. Czech, Xin Wu, Isabelle L. Kirby, Evan M. Peck, Kevin D. Hendzel, Scott K. Shaw, Bun Chan, Bradley D. Smith, Katrina A. Jolliffe and Philip A. Gale
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01629G
About the Webwriter
Iain Larmour is a guest web writer for ChemSci. He has researched a wide variety of topics during his years in the lab including nanostructured surfaces for water repellency and developing nanoparticle systems for bioanalysis by surface enhanced optical spectroscopies. He currently works in science management. In his spare time he enjoys reading, photography, art and inventing.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Hot Chemical Science articles for June

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 21st July:

A full-adder based on reconfigurable DNA-hairpin inputs and DNAzyme computing modules
Ron Orbach, Fuan Wang, Oleg Lioubashevski, R. D. Levine, Francoise Remacle and Itamar Willner  
Chem. Sci., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00914B, Edge Article


Millisecond lifetime imaging with europium complex using a commercial confocal microscope under one or two-photon excitations
Olivier Maury, Alexandre Haefele, Simon Pascal, Chantal Andraud, Alexei Grichine, Alain DUPERRAY and Richard MICHEL  
Chem. Sci., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00473F, Edge Article

 


Supramolecular chemistry with ureido-benzoic acids
E W Meijer, Anja R. A. Palmans, Wilco Appel, Bas FM de Waal, Marko Nieuwenhuizen and Martin Lutz  
Chem. Sci., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00871E, Edge Article


Synthesis and Chemoselective Ligations of MIDA Acylboronates with O-Me Hydroxylamines
Hidetoshi Noda and Jeffrey W Bode  
Chem. Sci., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00971A, Edge Article

  

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Artificial ion channels that work on a feedback loop

written by Cally Haynes, a Publishing Editor at the Royal Society of Chemistry

In nature, many cellular processes are controlled by structures that are only assembled when they are needed, in response to a chemical energy input. The structure (and hence the action of the structure) is maintained so long as the chemical energy input, or ‘fuel’ for the process is present. For example, microtubules can ‘grow’ or ‘shrink’ depending on the presence of guanosine triphosphate (GTP), and hence GTP serves as a ‘fuel’ for the function of the microtubules.

Inspired by this principle, Tom Fyles and his team from University of Victoria, Canada have used thiol–thioester exchange chemistry to assemble a metastable ion channel that disassembles over time in the absence of a chemical fuel.

In the scheme below, thiol 4 is not an active ion channel, but the addition of thioester 5 causes the formation of 3 by thiol-thioester exchange. 3 forms an active ion channel, but is metastable and therefore over time it disassembles into 4 + 6 which stops the ion transport. Adding more 5 (the fuel) will temporarily regenerate the ion transport as more C is formed.

While this system functions exactly as planned, its design was not without complications, says Fyles: “One setback was that these compounds do not work in vesicles so we had to develop reaction monitoring techniques using the bilayer clamp experiment.  That gives us exquisite sensitivity, but also allows us to detect very minor amounts of impurities.  So another setback was the observation that an oxidation impurity was vastly more active than the compounds we wanted to see.  This problem was easy enough to solve, but it took some time to recognize what was going on.”

This work also opens up exciting new avenues of investigation for the future for Fyles and his team. “The more general insight is that this system depends entirely on kinetic factors.  As chemists we are used to thinking about rates in terms of the reaction order and uniform reactant concentrations in the bulk.  Our system additionally shows the importance of local concentrations as opposed to the bulk concentration.  This introduces additional kinetic components related to diffusion.  The functioning of our system recorded using the bilayer clamp is largely controlled by diffusion processes, rather than the reaction kinetics we control in the design of the system.  This suggests that we might be able to make other systems that deliberately exploit non-uniform concentrations – yet another feature we can see in nature. Stay tuned.”

To download the full article for free*, click the link below:

Dissipative Assembly of a Membrane Transport System
A. K. Dambenieks, P. H. Q. Vu and T. M. Fyles
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01258E

*Access is free untill the 17.07.14 through a registered RSC account – click here to register

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)