Smaller, better chemosensing porous polymers

Researchers from the CSIR–National Chemical Laboratory have demonstrated that upon exfoliation of an imide-based covalent organic framework to its nanosheet counterpart, its ability to detect the presence of nitroaromatices is dramatically enhanced.

The exploitation of porous frameworks, both metal-organic and wholly organic in nature, for their ability to take up and store gases and small molecules, has been well reported over the past few decades. The modularity of these frameworks with respect to their size, flexibility and chemical functionality gives rise to their propensity to adsorb a myriad of chemicals; however, this process is not always selective and the chemical instability of these frameworks can cause difficulties in their extension towards real-life applications. A framework that a) is able to favourably and preferentially adsorb chemicals with high sensitivity, and b) exhibits chemical stability under a wide range of conditions, remains somewhat elusive and is thus a hot topic of investigation in many research groups.

Whilst the uptake and sensing properties of two-dimensional porous polymers have been well studied, the bulk nature of these materials often results in the decrease of their properties on account of the extensive aggregation of the polymer layers and resulting reduction of electrons available to interact with guest molecules. Rahul Banerjee and researchers from the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research – National Chemical Laboratory set out to address this limitation in the field of porous polymers through the Liquid Phase Exfoliation of an imide-based covalent organic framework to its covalent organic nanosheet (CON) analogue. Such a CON, which contains between five and fifteen layers of the material, has chemical and thermal stability equal to that of its bulk counterpart; however, its sensing ability down to 10–5 M towards 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) and other nitroaromatic explosive chemicals is far superior. Furthermore, this reversible detection upon uptake can be seen both spectroscopically in solution and visually in the solid state via the turning off and on of the CON luminescence respectively.

The ability to quickly and selectively detect chemicals is of paramount interest to researchers worldwide, particularly those chemicals that pose a threat to societal health and safety. The methodology involving covalent organic nanosheets developed in this research offers a new approach to and a first step towards increasing the selectivity and sensitivity of detection by porous frameworks for chemicals, in this case nitroaromatics like TNT.

Read this HOT ChemSci article in full – it’s open access and free to download:

Chemical sensing in two dimensional porous covalent organic nanosheets
Gobinda Das, Bishnu P. Biswal, Sharath Kandambeth, V. Venkatesh, Gagandeep Kaur, Matthew Addicoat, Thomas Heine, Sandeep Verma and Rahul Banerjee
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 3931–3939.
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00512D, Edge Article

About the Writer

Anthea Blackburn is a guest web writer for Chemical Science. Anthea is a recent graduate student hailing from New Zealand, who studied at Northwestern University in the US under the tutelage of Prof. Fraser Stoddart (a Scot), where she exploited supramolecular chemistry to develop multidimensional systems and study the emergent properties that arise in these superstructures. When time and money allow, she is ambitiously attempting to visit all 50 US states.

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Vy Dong’s organic love story

Chemical Science Associate editor Vy Dong recently gave a TEDx talk at UC Irvine. Check out her inspirational 15 minute lecture on YouTube: in it she tells how her family came to the US from Vietnam and why she chose a career in organic chemistry. She also compares organic chemistry to her favourite childhood toy, Lego, and talks about why she describes her students as ‘molecular architects’!

 

Submit your next high-quality manuscript to Vy Dong’s Chemical Science editorial office

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Insights on a high performing MOF

Victoria Richards highlights a recent Chemical Science Perspective article looking at HKUST-1

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received over a decade’s worth of attention from scientists worldwide. These porous materials can be constructed from almost an infinite combination of organic ligands and metal ions, which has spurred scientists to become creative in their designs, delivering materials with a wide range of useful applications.

In this recently published Chemical Science Perspective, Christopher Hendon and Aron Walsh (recently announced as the winner of the 2015 Chemical Society Reviews Emerging Investigator Lectureship) provide unique insight on the importance of the electronic, magnetic and physical properties of MOFs, focusing their attention on the body of evidence available on HKUST-1.

Many of the most successful MOFs contain arrays of copper paddle wheel motifs, and HKUST-1 is no exception. First reported by Williams in 19991, HKUST-1 remains one of the most high-performing materials of its kind and, thanks to it being high in demand, is one of few commercially available MOFs on the market.

With fresh analysis in hand, this report provides researchers with key design principles for the construction of MOFs with tailored chemical and electronic properties, potentially furthering the high-performance applications of these materials.

Read Walsh and Hendon’s Perspective in Chemical Science – it’s open access, and free to download:
Chemical principles underpinning the performance of the metal–organic framework HKUST-1
Christopher H. Hendon and Aron Walsh  
Chem. Sci., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC01489A, Perspective

1S. S. Chui, S. M. Lo, J. P. H. Charmant, A. G. Orpen and I. D. Williams, Science, 1999, 283, 1148

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ISACS16: Challenges in Chemical Biology in Zurich

Image of lecture hall

Professor Shankar Balasubramanian gives the opening talk at ISACS 16

From 15-18th June, the lecture theatre at ETH Zurich was almost full as delegates from 26 different countries gathered to hear the latest research in the field of Chemical Biology as we continued our series of International Symposia on Advancing the Chemical Sciences.

Across the 4 days of the conference we were treated to a diverse range of topics, from the very beginnings of life as we know it with John Sutherland to the latest diagnostic markers in various stages of clinical trials with Annette Beck-Sickinger, Yasuteru Urano and others. We also enjoyed various contributions on the latest synthetic developments to smooth the process of discoveries and heard about the latest natural product being identified and their potential applications.

Presentation of the Chemistry World poster prize at ISACS 16

Helma Wennemers (Scientific Committee Chair) and Heather Montgomery (Deputy Editor) present the Chemistry World poster prize to Oliver ThornSeshold

Eugenio Indrigo with his Chemical Science poster prize certificate

Eugenio Indrigo with his Chemical Science poster prize certificate

We were delighted to have an enthusiatic participation in our “flash” poster presentations (just three minutes each) and overall around 80 posters were displayed and discussed during the event.

The Chemical Science sponsored poster prize was won by Eugenio Indrigo (University of Edinburgh) for his poster on “Palladium mediated chemistry in living cells, while the Chemistry World poster prize (and associated mug!) was won by Oliver ThornSeshold (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich). Congratulations to them both!

Peng Chen is presented with the 2014 Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator lectureship

Peng Chen is presented with the 2014 Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator lectureship

The final talk of the meeting was the 2014 Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator lecture, given by Prof. Peng Chen (Peking University) entitled “Exogenous chemistry for intracellular protein manipulations” and was an impressive overview of the exciting work being done in his lab.

We look forward to announcing the next installment of the ISACS conference series on the theme of Challenges in Chemical Biology in the near future…

Can’t wait to get involved? Find out about the ISACS symposia still to come this year:

ISACS 17: Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy
8-11 September 2015, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Early bird registration deadline: 20 July 2015

ISACS 18: Challenges in Organic Materials and Supramolecular Chemistry
19-21 November 2015, Bangalore, India
Poster abstract deadline: 7 September 2015

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Chemical Science Impact Factor rises to 9.211

We are delighted to announce that Chemical Science’s latest Impact Factor has soared to an impressive 9.211 this year, according to the 2014 Journal Citation Reports®.

C5SC90001HThank you to all our authors, referees, Associate Editors, and Editorial and Advisory Board members for contributing to the journal’s continued impact and success – this achievement would not have been possible without your support and trust. Chemical Science remains dedicated to publishing research of exceptional significance from across the chemical sciences – for us, it’s all about giving our authors the visibility and recognition their research deserves.

Chemical Science became a gold open access journal in January 2015, giving the global community free access to high quality research while waiving all Article Processing Charges (APCs), keeping articles free to publish, for at least two years.  This unique combination of open access, top quality articles, a flexible format and world-class Associate Editors makes it clear why so many leading scientists choose to publish in Chemical Science.

We invite you to submit your exceptional research to Chemical Science today.

Take a look at our most highly cited articles listed below.

Perspectives

Ruthenium-catalyzed direct oxidative alkenylation of arenes through twofold C–H bond functionalization
Sergei I. Kozhushkov and Lutz Ackermann
Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 886-896
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC21524A, Perspective

Indole synthesis – something old, something new
Martyn Inman and Christopher J. Moody
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 29-41
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC21185H, Perspective

Minireviews

Intriguing aspects of lanthanide luminescence
Jean-Claude G. Bünzli and Svetlana V. Eliseeva
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 1939-1949
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC22126A, Minireview

Carbene-stabilized main group radicals and radical ions
Caleb D. Martin, Michele Soleilhavoup and Guy Bertrand
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 3020-3030
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC51174J, Minireview

Edge articles

Slow magnetization dynamics in a series of two-coordinate iron(II) complexes
Joseph M. Zadrozny, Mihail Atanasov, Aimee M. Bryan, Chun-Yi Lin, Brian D. Rekken, Philip P. Power, Frank Neese and Jeffrey R. Long
Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 125-138
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20801F, Edge Article

Metal-free oxidative tandem coupling of activated alkenes with carbonyl C(sp2)–H bonds and aryl C(sp2)–H bonds using TBHP
Ming-Bo Zhou, Ren-Jie Song, Xuan-Hui Ouyang, Yu Liu, Wen-Ting Wei, Guo-Bo Deng and Jin-Heng Li
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 2690-2694
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC50810B, Edge Article

Catalytic hydrotrifluoromethylation of styrenes and unactivated aliphatic alkenes via an organic photoredox system
Dale J. Wilger, Nathan J. Gesmundo and David A. Nicewicz
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 3160-3165
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC51209F, Edge Article

Read more Impact Factor highlights for the Royal Society of Chemistry’s leading journals, including Chemical Communications and Chemical Society Reviews.

Find out how other RSC journals are ranked in the latest Impact Factor release

Chemical Science is the world’s first high-quality gold open access chemistry journal (open access from January 2015). Set up a personal account on the publishing platform to download articles for free.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2014 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2015).

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Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy: poster deadline 29 June

Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy ISACS17 8-11 September 2015 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Poster abstract deadline 29 June 2015

The poster abstract deadline for Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy (ISACS17) is fast approaching. This meeting will cover a broad range of topics from solar fuels and molecular catalysis to biofuels and much more besides.

Don’t miss your chance to present your own research alongside some of the world’s leading experts in this important research area, including Daniel Nocera (Harvard University), Marc Fontecave (Collège de France), Karen Wilson (Aston University), Ernesto R. Gonzalez (University of São Paulo) and many more.

Submit your poster abstract today!

A provisional programme is now available on our website.Take advantage of our early bird discount and register now to secure your place at this exciting event. We look forward to welcoming you to Brazil.

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DNA inspires smart phospholipids

Carla Pegoraro writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

Researchers in China and Ireland have developed a simple way of building new stimuli-responsive phospholipids that can self-assemble into hollow spheres and trigger the release of anticancer drugs only when inside the cell lysosome.

Liposomes made from synthetic nucleoside phospholipids could benefit drug delivery

Liposomes are nanoscale three-dimensional hollow vesicles with a phospholipid-based outer shell. They are widely used as drug and gene delivery agents and have been approved for various clinical trials. Liposomes are easily internalised by cells and are sealed off from the rest of the cell by the endosome and later in the internalisation process by the lysosome. These compartments specifically isolate foreign objects from the cell and remove them. Controlled release from them can significantly enhance delivery of a therapeutic drug directly within the targeted cell. Since the internal lysosome environment is acidic, pH sensitive liposomes capable of braking up and releasing their cargo have been widely studied. Due to the covalent nature of most of the phospholipids used to prepare liposomes, the latter do not respond promptly to the acidic environment, limiting the fast release of their cargos, and require tedious covalent synthesis procedures. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


You can read the original journal article in Chemical Science – it’s open access and free to download:
Supramolecularly engineered phospholipids constructed by nucleobase molecular recognition: upgraded generation of phospholipids for drug delivery
Dali Wang, Chunlai Tu, Yue Su, Chuan Zhang, Udo Greiser, Xinyuan Zhu, Deyue Yan and Wenxin Wang 
Chem. Sci., 2015,6, 3775-3787
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC01188D, Edge Article

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Carsten Shultz joins Chemical Science as Associate Editor

In March this year Chemical Science was delighted to welcome Dr Carsten Schultz as an Associate Editor, further strengthening our Associate Editor team. He is now handling submissions in the area of Chemical Biology.

Biography
Dr Schultz received his PhD from the University of Bremen in 1989. He then spent some time as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, San Diego before returning to Germany to take up a position at the University of Bremen in 1997 for a few years. He has been a group leader at EMBL since 2001 and a Senior Scientist since 2008.

Research
Carsten leads the Schultz Group at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg. The lab is interested in better understanding complex intracellular signalling networks relevant in diabetes, cancer, lung inflammation and metabolic diseases. For this purpose the group develops probes useful for visualizing intracellular events such as enzyme activities, lipid metabolism or protein translocation in intact cells. The Schultz lab also constructs tools to manipulate cell components and their activities.

Carsten and Chemical Science:
Carsten says that ”in Chemical Science I like to see articles that describe chemistry of the highest quality.” He enjoys reading papers on novel synthetic methods, natural compound syntheses, and mechanistic studies, and says that what excites him most is “when chemistry is used to solve highly relevant problems in biology, pharmacology, physiology or medicine; similarly important are applications of chemistry to material sciences and physics.”

You can submit your high quality research in the area of Chemical Biology to Carsten Schultz’s Editorial Office.

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ZIF-8 disrupts ionic liquid deep freeze

Emma Stephen writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

Ionic liquid conductivity decreases at low temperature. To overcome this, a team of researchers from across Japan have combined an ionic liquid with a metal–organic framework (MOF) to produce an unusual material that retains its conductivity below –20°C. This low-temperature conductivity, together with the attractive ionic liquid properties of non-flammability and negligible volatility, could open up the potential for safe battery and capacitor materials for use in extremely cold conditions. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the full article in Chemical Science – it’s open access and free to download:
Low temperature ionic conductor: ionic liquid incorporated within a metal–organic framework
Kazuyuki Fujie, Kazuya Otsubo, Ryuichi Ikeda, Teppei Yamada and Hiroshi Kitagawa  
Chem. Sci., 2015, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC01398D, Edge Article

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Crystalline sponge method strikes again

Victoria Richards writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

Scientists from Japan report that their revolutionary crystallographic technique has determined the stereochemistries of molecules with axial and planar chiralities, where classical methods had failed.

A team led by Makoto Fujita from the University of Tokyo captured the chemistry community’s attention just a few years ago when they reported a crystallographic technique capable of analysing compounds without first needing to crystallise them. Read the full article in Chemistry World»

 


You can read the original journal article in Chemical Science – it’s open access and free to download:
Absolute structure determination of compounds with axial and planar chirality using the crystalline sponge method
Shota Yoshioka, Yasuhide Inokuma, Manabu Hoshino, Takashi Sato and Makoto Fujita  
Chem. Sci., 2015, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC01681A, Edge Article

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