Shape-shifting hydrogel can heal itself

Written by Jamie Durrani for Chemistry World

A shape-memory hydrogel that also has self-healing properties has been developed by scientists in China. The new material can repair itself and return to its original shape even after being cut into segments.
Both self-healing and shape-memory polymers have many potential uses, including in aerospace, textiles and biomedicine. Now, a team lead by Tao Chen and Jiawei Zhang from the Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering has developed a material that combines both of these useful properties.

The hydrogel is produced by polymerising acrylamide in the presence of a boronic acid-grafted alginate and poly(vinyl alcohol). After immersion in calcium chloride solution, the polymer is strengthened by the reversible double network of boronic acid-diol ester bonds, and chelation of the alginate chains with the calcium cations.

Graphical Abstract

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Stretchable supramolecular hydrogels with triple shape memory effect
Xiaoxia Le, Wei Lu, Jing Zheng, Dingyi Tong, Ning Zhao, Chunxin Ma, He Xiao, Jiawei Zhang, Youju Huang and Tao Chen
Chem. Sci., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC02354A, Edge Article

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Chemical Science continues achieving with its latest Impact factor

Aiming higher for 2016 and beyond

Since Chemical Science was launched in 2010, we have been overwhelmed by the support of our global community. And with our latest Impact factor at 9.144, according to citation data released by Thomson Reuters in its 2015 Journal Citation Reports®, we are truly grateful to all of you – our authors, referees, readers, Associate Editors, and Editorial and Advisory Board members – for your enthusiastic support towards the journal’s success.C6SC90001A

In less than six years, Chemical Science has grown and developed into one of the world’s leading chemistry journals, maintaining a strong and sustained impact, even as we saw significant growth in the number of articles published in recent years.

And having gone open access in 2015, it continues to be free to read, as well as free for authors to publish in – all publication charges continue to be waived. Therefore through Chemical Science your high-quality work can be freely read, with absolutely no barriers, by your peers and by researchers around the world.

We want our momentum to keep on building

With increasing submissions, this does mean that now – more than ever – it is essential that we publish only the best of the best, nothing less than the most exceptional science. For us, it’s all about quality and excellence, recognition and visibility, as we aim higher for the rest of 2016 and beyond.

We aim for Chemical Science to be the global home for cutting-edge solutions to today’s most pressing challenges, communicated worldwide, without barriers – will you join us as we move closer to our vision?

Then submit only your top-quality work to Chemical Science, and be a key part of the solution.

Top cited Chemical Science articles:

Perspectives and Minireviews

Evaluating metal–organic frameworks for natural gas storage
Jarad A. Mason, Mike Veenstra and Jeffrey R. Long
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 32-51
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52633J, Perspective

Earth-abundant hydrogen evolution electrocatalysts
James R. McKone, Smaranda C. Marinescu, Bruce S. Brunschwig, Jay R. Winkler and Harry B. Gray
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 865-878
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC51711J, Minireview

Transition metal-catalyzed direct nucleophilic addition of C–H bonds to carbon–heteroatom double bonds
Xi-Sha Zhang, Kang Chen and Zhang-Jie Shi
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 2146-2159
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC53115E, Minireview

NKP-1339, the first ruthenium-based anticancer drug on the edge to clinical application
Robert Trondl, Petra Heffeter, Christian R. Kowol, Michael A. Jakupec, Walter Berger and Bernhard K. Keppler
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 2925-2932
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC53243G, Perspective

Edge articles

A dual emission fluorescent probe enables simultaneous detection of glutathione and cysteine/homocysteine
Xiao-Feng Yang, Qian Huang, Yaogang Zhong, Zheng Li, Hua Li, Mark Lowry, Jorge O. Escobedo and Robert M. Strongin
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 2177-2183
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00308J, Edge Article

Sandmeyer trifluoromethylthiolation of arenediazonium salts with sodium thiocyanate and Ruppert–Prakash reagent
Grégory Danoun, Bilguun Bayarmagnai, Matthias F. Gruenberg and Lukas J. Goossen
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 1312-1316
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC53076K, Edge Article

Photoredox activation and anion binding catalysis in the dual catalytic enantioselective synthesis of β-amino esters
Giulia Bergonzini, Corinna S. Schindler, Carl-Johan Wallentin, Eric N. Jacobsen and Corey R. J. Stephenson
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 112-116
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52265B, Edge Article

A pillar[5]arene/imidazolium [2]rotaxane: solvent- and thermo-driven molecular motions and supramolecular gel formation
Shengyi Dong, Jiayin Yuan and Feihe Huang
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 247-252
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52481G, Edge Article

Read more about the Royal Society of Chemistry’s journals 2015 impact factors

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year to articles published in the preceding two years, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2015 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2016).

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MOF 2016 Conference

11th-15th September at the Hilton Long Beach, California

The 5th International Conference on Metal-Organic Frameworks & Open Framework Compounds (MOF 2016) is the premier conference on open framework materials, which represent a fast-growing new field of chemistry.

Held 11th-15th September 2016 in beautiful Long Beach, California, this year’s conference will provide a comprehensive overview of the latest research encompassing Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs), Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs), and recent additions to the field of nanoporous materials, such as molecular cage compounds.

Chemical Science and CrystEngComm proudly sponsor this conference, which will feature a number of lectures by both established researchers from across the globe and early-career scientists who are making recent, novel contributions. Contributed oral and poster presentations and a commercial exhibition will also add to the mix.

Mark your calendar today and register now!

Photograph of Dr Jeanne Andres

Meet the team:

Dr Jeanne Andres (Deputy Editor of Chemical Science) will be attending the event. She would love to hear about your research and meet with our readers, authors and referees. Please do get in touch with Jeanne if you would like to arrange a meeting in advance.

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As easy as TT

Written by Heather Powell for Chemistry World

Scientists’ discovery that π electron repulsion is more important than previously thought might change our understanding of conjugation. The effect is behind peculiar irregularities in bond lengths and resonance energies of conjugated molecules that our textbooks cannot explain.

Conjugated molecules like 1,3-pentadiene have π electrons that are delocalised across several bonds. Conjugation lowers a molecule’s overall energy and makes it more stable. However, a few years ago, researchers from Long Island University, US, claimed that conjugation could actually destabilise some molecules. They calculated cyanogen (NC–CN) to be less stable than its non-conjugated analogue ethylenediamine (H2NCH2–CH2NH2). Many researchers have tried to disprove this, but so far, no one has been able to give a simple explanation for these apparently counterintuitive results.

Graphical Abstract

Read the full article in Chemistry World>>>


Yirong Mo, Huaiyu Zhang, Peifeng Su, Peter D. Jarowski and Wei Wu
Chem. Sci., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC00454G, Edge Article
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Top 25 most-downloaded Chemical Science articles January–March 2016

Take a look at the 25 most-downloaded Chemical Science articles from the first quarter of 2016 – many are open access.

Which conformations make stable crystal structures? Mapping crystalline molecular geometries to the conformational energy landscape
Hugh P. G. Thompson and Graeme M. Day
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 3173-3182, DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01132E, Edge Article
Open access

Pot economy and one-pot synthesis
Yujiro Hayashi
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 866-880, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02913A, Perspective
Open access

Macrocycles: lessons from the distant past, recent developments, and future directions
Andrei K. Yudin
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 30-49, DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03089C, Perspective
Open access

Evaluating metal–organic frameworks for natural gas storage
Jarad A. Mason, Mike Veenstra and Jeffrey R. Long
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 32-51, DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52633J, Perspective
Open access

Reversible photo-induced trap formation in mixed-halide hybrid perovskites for photovoltaics
Eric T. Hoke, Daniel J. Slotcavage, Emma R. Dohner, Andrea R. Bowring, Hemamala I. Karunadasa and Michael D. McGehee
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 613-617, DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03141E, Edge Article
Open access

The ligand unwrapping/rewrapping pathway that exchanges metals in S-acetylated, hexacoordinate N2S2O2 complexes
J. A. Denny, W. S. Foley, A. D. Todd and M. Y. Darensbourg
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 7079-7088, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02269J, Edge Article
Open access

Rethinking the term “pi-stacking”
Chelsea R. Martinez and Brent L. Iverson
Chem. Sci., 2012, 3, 2191-2201, DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20045G, Perspective
From themed collection Physical Chemistry

Structurally plastic peptide capsules for synthetic antimicrobial viruses
Valeria Castelletto, Emiliana de Santis, Hasan Alkassem, Baptiste Lamarre, James E. Noble, Santanu Ray, Angelo Bella, Jonathan R. Burns, Bart W. Hoogenboom and Maxim G. Ryadnov
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 1707-1711, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03260A, Edge Article
Open access

A versatile synthetic route for the preparation of titanium metal–organic frameworks
Lanfang Zou, Dawei Feng, Tian-Fu Liu, Ying-Pin Chen, Shuai Yuan, Kecheng Wang, Xuan Wang, Stephen Fordham and Hong-Cai Zhou
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 1063-1069, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03620H, Edge Article
Open access

Dual gold/photoredox-catalyzed C(sp)–H arylation of terminal alkynes with diazonium salts
Adrian Tlahuext-Aca, Matthew N. Hopkinson, Basudev Sahoo and Frank Glorius
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 89-93, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02583D, Edge Article
Open access

Sulfonyl fluorides as privileged warheads in chemical biology
Arjun Narayanan and Lyn H. Jones
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 2650-2659, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00408J, Perspective
Open access

Asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy density based on helical hierarchical porous NaxMnO2 and MoO2
Xue-Feng Lu, Zhi-Xiang Huang, Ye-Xiang Tong and Gao-Ren Li
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 510-517, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03326H, Edge Article
Open access

Vitrimers: permanent organic networks with glass-like fluidity
Wim Denissen, Johan M. Winne and Filip E. Du Prez
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 30-38, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02223A, Minireview
Open access

Metal–organic framework-based CoP/reduced graphene oxide: high-performance bifunctional electrocatalyst for overall water splitting
Long Jiao, Yu-Xiao Zhou and Hai-Long Jiang
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 1690-1695, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04425A, Edge Article
Open access

Aromatic hydrocarbon macrocycles for highly efficient organic light-emitting devices with single-layer architectures
Jing Yang Xue, Tomoo Izumi, Asami Yoshii, Koki Ikemoto, Takashi Koretsune, Ryosuke Akashi, Ryotaro Arita, Hideo Taka, Hiroshi Kita, Sota Sato and Hiroyuki Isobe
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 896-904, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03807C, Edge Article
Open access

Peptide-based synthetic vaccines
Mariusz Skwarczynski and Istvan Toth
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 842-854, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03892H, Minireview
Open access

Accurate calculation of the absolute free energy of binding for drug molecules
Matteo Aldeghi, Alexander Heifetz, Michael J. Bodkin, Stefan Knapp and Philip C. Biggin
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 207-218, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02678D, Edge Article
Open access

Thin metal nanostructures: synthesis, properties and applications
Zhanxi Fan, Xiao Huang, Chaoliang Tan and Hua Zhang
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 95-111, DOI: 10.1039/C4SC02571G, Minireview
Open access

Combination of Ru(II) complexes and light: new frontiers in cancer therapy
Cristina Mari, Vanessa Pierroz, Stefano Ferrari and Gilles Gasser
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 2660-2686, DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03759F, Perspective
Open access

Designing logical codon reassignment – Expanding the chemistry in biology
Anaëlle Dumas, Lukas Lercher, Christopher D. Spicer and Benjamin G. Davis
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 50-69, DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01534G, Minireview
Open access

Computational design of molecules for an all-quinone redox flow battery
Süleyman Er, Changwon Suh, Michael P. Marshak and Alán Aspuru-Guzik
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 885-893, DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03030C, Edge Article
Open access

Dialkylbiaryl phosphines in Pd-catalyzed amination: a user’s guide
David S. Surry and Stephen L. Buchwald
Chem. Sci., 2011, 2, 27-50, DOI: 10.1039/C0SC00331J, Perspective

An ultrasensitive near-infrared ratiometric fluorescent probe for imaging mitochondrial polarity in live cells and in vivo
Haibin Xiao, Ping Li, Wei Zhang and Bo Tang
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 1588-1593, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04099J, Edge Article
Open access

Visible light-mediated gold-catalysed carbon(sp2)–carbon(sp) cross-coupling
Suhong Kim, Jaime Rojas-Martin and F. Dean Toste
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 85-88, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03025K, Edge Article
Open access

Synthesis of high quality two-dimensional materials via chemical vapor deposition
Jingxue Yu, Jie Li, Wenfeng Zhang and Haixin Chang
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 6705-6716, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC01941A, Perspective
Open access


Chemical Science is the Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship journal, publishing research articles of exceptional significance and high-impact reviews from across the chemical sciences. It has been gold open access since January 2015. 

Submit your exceptional research to Chemical Science today!

Stay up to date with Chemical Science

Be among the first to hear about the newest articles being published – Sign-up to our journal news alert to receive information about most read articles, journal news, as well as calls for papers and invitations.

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Multiphase NMR of whole animal leaves shrimp unscathed

Richard Massey writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

An NMR technique that allows solid, gel and solution-state chemistry to be studied simultaneously has been applied to a living organism for the first time. By demonstrating the technique on live shrimp, the US-led team hope the method will eventually unpick chemical processes in larger biological systems.

© Science Source/Science Photo Library

Whilst solution-state NMR spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) routinely explore living systems, they only reveal information on fully solubilised molecules. If you want to study insoluble biological material such as membranes, muscle or bone, solution-phase NMR won’t work. Yet to combat diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, caused by soluble proteins crystallising into solid fibres, it’s essential more information is gained about the chemistry occurring across these interfaces. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in Chemical Science – it’s open access:
Comprehensive multiphase NMR applied to a living organism
Yalda Liaghati Mobarhan, Blythe Fortier-McGill, Ronald Soong, Werner E. Maas, Michael Fey, Martine Monette, Henry J. Stronks, Sebastian Schmidt, Hermann Heumann, Warren Norwood and André J. Simpson
Chem. Sci., 2016, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C6SC00329J, Edge Article

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ISACS21: Challenges in Nanoscience

Submit your poster abstract by 29 August 2016

ISACS21: Challenges in Nanoscience

We are delighted to announce the upcoming Challenges in Nanoscience (ISACS21) meeting, to be held on 10–12 November 2016 in Beijing, China.

The themes for Challenges in Nanoscience will be synthetic methodology, self-assembly, catalysis, energy and nano-biology/medicine. Confirmed speakers include:

  • Raffaella Buonsanti (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)
  • Xiong Wen (David) Lou (Nanyang Technological University)
  • Joachim Spatz (Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems)
  • Brian Trewyn (Colorado School of Mines)
  • Jianfang Wang (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
  • Yadong Yin (University of California Riverside)
  • Hua Zhang (Nanyang Technological University)
  • Xi Zhang (Tsinghua University)
  • and many more

———————–

Submit your oral abstract by 29 August and get involved

Registration now open: receive a discount by signing up before 19 September!

———————–

Check out these recent reviews and original research articles on related topics in Chemical Science. As of 2015 Chemical Science is fully Gold Open Access, and publication charges are waived until the end of 2018, so all articles published since then are free to read and free to publish:

Perspective

Bing Ni and Xun Wang
Chem. Sci., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC00432F
Open Access

Minireview

Zhanxi Fan, Xiao Huang, Chaoliang Tan and Hua Zhang
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 95-111
Open Access

Edge Articles

Zeng-Wen Hu, Liang Xu, Yuan Yang, Hong-Bin Yao, Hong-Wu Zhu, Bi-Cheng Hu and Shu-Hong Yu
Chem. Sci., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC00674D
Open Access

Ved Prakash, Sonali Saha, Kasturi Chakraborty and Yamuna Krishnan
Chem. Sci., 2016,7, 1946-1953
Open Access

Guangtong Wang, Bohan Tang, Yang Liu, Qingyu Gao, Zhiqiang Wang and Xi Zhang
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 1151-1155
Open Access

Peilei He, Biao Xu, Xiaobin Xu, Li Song and Xun Wang
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 1011-1015
Open Access

Wei Cheng, Felix Rechberger, Gabriele Ilari, Huan Ma, Wan-Ing Lin and Markus Niederberger
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 6908-6915
Open Access

Zhaorui Zhang, Zhenni Wang, Shengnan He, Chaoqi Wang, Mingshang Jin and Yadong Yin
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 5197-5203
Open Access

Xianjun Lang, Wei Hao, Wan Ru Leow, Shuzhou Li, Jincai Zhao and Xiaodong Chen
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 5000-5005
Open Access

Xiangrui Yang, Shichao Wu, Yang Li, Yu Huang, Jinyan Lin, Di Chang, Shefang Ye, Liya Xie, Yuan Jiang and Zhenqing Hou
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 1650-1654
Open Access

Xianjun Lang, Wan Ru Leow, Jincai Zhao and Xiaodong Chen
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 1075-1082
Open Access

We hope you can join us for Challenges in Nanoscience (ISACS21). Xun Wang and the rest of the Scientific Committee look forward to welcoming you and your colleagues to Beijing.

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Whipping oils into a frenzy

Samantha Ivell writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

Inspired by foams in everyday products such as food, researchers in the UK have developed a way to form extremely stable temperature-sensitive air-in-oil foams.

Air-in-oil foams are widely used in industry, and feature regularly in everyday life. A typical example is aerated chocolate, formed from molten cocoa butter. Not only does the light texture provide a pleasant sensation in the mouth, but introducing air into products allows companies to manufacture foods with a lower fat content for less money. Oil foaming is also responsible for the phenomenon that cuts off the pump when refuelling vehicles. Despite this familiarity with air-in-oil foams, information on the science behind them is still lacking. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in Chemical Science:
Whipped oil stabilised by surfactant crystals
Bernard P. Binks, Emma J. Garvey and Josélio Vieira 
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 2621-2632
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC00046K, Edge Article

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Chemical Science Lectureship 2015 – Yamuna Krishnan

We are delighted to announce the  winner of the 2015 Chemical Science Lectureship – Professor Yamuna Krishnan, University of Chicago.

Yamuna KrishnanYamuna is a Professor and Brain Research Foundation Fellow of Chemistry and the Grossman Institute of Neuroscience at the University of Chicago. She received her PhD from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore and pursued her postdoctoral studies as an 1851 Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge, UK, with Shankar Balasubramanian. She set up her group at the NCBS, Bangalore, in 2005 focusing on intelligent DNA-based molecular devices to interrogate cellular processes.

Selected honors include the Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Award in Chemical Sciences, the Wellcome Trust Senior Fellowship, the AVRA Young Scientist Award, Associateship of the Indian Academy of Sciences, the Innovative Young Biotechnologist Award, the INSA Young Scientist Medal, the YIM Boston Young Scientist Award and she recently featured on Cell’s 40 under 40.

The Chemical Science Lectureship recognises sustained excellence in research by a mid-career scientist within the chemical sciences.
Previous recipients of this lectureship include Kevan Shokat (UC San Francisco; 2013) and Gregory Fu (Caltech; 2014).

Yamuna will give her first Chemical Science Lectureship talk on “Synthetic DNA devices quantitate protein activity in living organisms” at this weeks’ ISACS19: Challenges in Organic Chemistry conference at University of California, Irvine.

Her second talk will be on  “DNA-based Fluorescent Reporters for Live Imaging”. We hope you can join her:

Monday 18 April 2016, 4:00 pm
Materials Research Laboratory, Room 2053
University of California, Santa Barbara

Check out Yamuna’s recent article in Chemical Science which is available Open Access:

Rational design of a quantitative, pH-insensitive, nucleic acid based fluorescent chloride reporter
Ved Prakash, Sonali Saha, Kasturi Chakraborty and Yamuna Krishnan
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 1946-1953
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04002G

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Hot Chemical Science articles for March

Here are some of the latest referee-recommended articles published in Chemical Science – all are open access and free to download:

Improvement of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the multicolor detection of biomarkers
Chao Li, Yucai Yang, Dan Wu, Tianqi Li, Yongmei Yin and Genxi Li
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04256A, Edge Article

C5SC04256A GA


Small molecule regulated dynamic structural changes of human G-quadruplexes
Manish Debnath, Shirsendu Ghosh, Deepanjan Panda, Irene Bessi, Harald Schwalbe, Kankan Bhattacharyya and Jyotirmayee Dash
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC00057F, Edge Article

C6SC00057F GA


Overall water splitting by Pt/g-C3N4 photocatalysts without using sacrificial agents
Guigang Zhang, Zhi-An Lan, Lihua Lin, Sen Lin and Xinchen Wang
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04572J, Edge Article

C5SC04572J GA


Highly selective catalytic trans-hydroboration of alkynes mediated by borenium cations and B(C6F5)3
John S. McGough, Samuel M. Butler, Ian A. Cade and Michael J. Ingleson
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04798F, Edge Article

C5SC04798F GA


Fatty acids’ double role in the prebiotic formation of a hydrophobic dipeptide
Sara Murillo-Sánchez, Damien Beaufils, Juan Manuel González Mañas, Robert Pascal and Kepa Ruiz-Mirazo
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04796J, Edge Article

C5SC04796J GA


Carbogenic nanodots derived from organo-templated zeolites with modulated full-color luminescence
Ying Mu, Ning Wang, Zaicheng Sun, Jing Wang, Jiyang Li and Jihong Yu
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC00085A, Edge Article

 C6SC00085A GA

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