Royal Society of Chemistry and ACS Publications commit to ORCID integration

On 28 November 2016, the Royal Society of Chemistry and the American Chemical Society Publications Division, ACS Publications, both signed the ORCID Open Letter committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

The official press release can be found here: http://rsc.li/orcid

In brief, this partnership with ORCID will resolve ambiguity in researcher identification caused by name changes, cultural differences in name presentation, and the inconsistent use of name abbreviations, thereby ensuring their contributions are appropriately recognized and credited.

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Frontiers in Chemical Sciences (FICS-2016)

8th to 10th December, IIT Guwahati, India


Frontiers in Chemical Science 2016

8 – 10 December 2016, IIT Guwahati, India

The FICS-2016 conference is a national biennial conference hosted by the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati on 8-10 December 2016 in Guwahati, India.

The conference is mainly aimed at motivating and promoting aspiring young scientists in the field of chemistry and allied sciences, by giving them an opportunity to present their work alongside the stalwarts in the field.

All branches of chemistry and sister sciences will be covered, from theoretical to experimental and applied chemistry, as well as modern science and technology. The scientific program includes plenary sessions, invited talks, and poster presentations.


Chemical Science, ChemComm and Chem Soc Rev proudly sponsor this event: 3 poster prizes will be awarded at the conference on behalf of each journal.

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Multi-talented polymer more versatile than sum of its parts

Written by Fiona Tscherny for Chemistry World

Researchers in China have designed multi-talented materials with mix-and-match functionalities, such as shape memory, self-healing or colour changes, which can be triggered by stimuli such as heat, light or voltage.

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry - The polymer can heal a scratch (top left) or hole (bottom left) within 10 seconds when exposed to light

Stimuli-responsive polymers adapt to environmental changes, making them useful for applications such as drug delivery systems that exploit differences in pH to direct medicines to the required organs or thermochromic coatings for windows reversibly tint the glass in response to temperature.
However, integrating responsivity to numerous stimuli in smart polymers ‘in particular when considering a simple and feasible synthetic route’, has been challenging, notes Patrick Théato, from the University of Hamburg, Germany, who wasn’t involved in this work.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Multi-stimuli responsive and multi-functional oligoaniline-modified vitrimers
Qiaomei Chen, Xiaowen Yu, Zhiqiang Pei, Yang Yang, Yen Wei and Yan Ji
Chem. Sci., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC02855A, Edge Article

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Chemical Science Symposium 2017

11 January 2017, Kolkata, India

We are delighted to announce that the Chemical Science Symposium 2017 will take place in Kolkata, India on 11 January 2017.

This event will be chaired by Chemical Science Editor-in-Chief Dan Nocera (Harvard University) and it will bring together exceptional researchers – all leading names in their field – to share scientific developments covering broad research areas of renewable energy, environment, materials and inorganic and organometallic catalysis.

The Chemical Science symposium will be a part of the Symposium on Advanced Biological Inorganic Chemistry (SABIC) organised by the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science (IACS) and the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), bringing together more than 600 scientists working in inorganic and bio-inorganic chemistry.

The venue will be The Stadel, Vivekananda Yuba Bharati Krirangan, Kolkata, India.

Find out more about this event.

Mark your calendar today and register now!

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Top 10 Reviewers for Chemical Science

Many thanks to our reviewers and community

In celebration of Peer Review Week, with the theme of Recognition for Review, we would like to highlight the top 10 reviewers for Chemical Science in 2016, as selected by the editor for their significant contribution to the journal.

Top 10 Reviewers for Chemical Science:
– Professor Takashi Hisatomi – University of Tokyo, Japan
– Professor Jun Kubota – Fukuoka University, Japan
– Dr Thomas Snaddon – Indiana University, USA
– Professor Dr Frank Würthner – Universität Würzburg, Germany
– Professor Kazuhiko Maeda – Tokyo Institute of Technology , Japan
– Professor Stefan Matile – University of Geneva, Switzerland
– Professor Dr Gilles Gasser – University of Zurich, Switzerland
– Professor Jonathan Nitschke – University of Cambridge, UK
– Professor Atsushi Fukuoka – Hokkaido University, Japan
– Professor Chunhai Fan – Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, CAS, China
– Professor Juyoung Yoon – Ewha Womans University, Republic of Korea

We would like to say a massive thank you to these reviewers as well as the Chemical Science board and all of the chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

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Top 10 most accessed Chemical Science articles from April – June 2016

From April – June 2016, our most downloaded Chemical Science articles were:

Evaluating metal–organic frameworks for natural gas storage
Jarad A. Mason, Mike Veenstra and Jeffrey R. Long
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 32-51
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52633J, Perspective

Rethinking the term “pi-stacking”
Chelsea R. Martinez and Brent L. Iverson
Chem. Sci., 2012, 3, 2191-2201
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20045G, Perspective

Macrocycles: lessons from the distant past, recent developments, and future directions
Andrei K. Yudin
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 30-49
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03089C, Perspective

Reversible photo-induced trap formation in mixed-halide hybrid perovskites for photovoltaics
Eric T. Hoke, Daniel J. Slotcavage, Emma R. Dohner, Andrea R. Bowring, Hemamala I. Karunadasa and Michael D. McGehee
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 613-617
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03141E, Edge Article

Metal–organic framework-based CoP/reduced graphene oxide: high-performance bifunctional electrocatalyst for overall water splitting
Long Jiao, Yu-Xiao Zhou and Hai-Long Jiang
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 1690-1695
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04425A, Edge Article

Sulfonyl fluorides as privileged warheads in chemical biology
Arjun Narayanan and Lyn H. Jones
Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 2650-2659
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC00408J, Perspective

Accurate calculation of the absolute free energy of binding for drug molecules
Matteo Aldeghi, Alexander Heifetz, Michael J. Bodkin, Stefan Knapp and Philip C. Biggin
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 207-218
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02678D, Edge Article

Pot economy and one-pot synthesis
Yujiro Hayashi
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 866-880
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02913A, Perspective

Vitrimers: permanent organic networks with glass-like fluidity
Wim Denissen, Johan M. Winne and Filip E. Du Prez
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 30-38
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02223A, Minireview

Topochemical molten salt synthesis for functional perovskite compounds
Lihong Li, Jinxia Deng, Jun Chen and Xianran Xing
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 855-865
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03521J, Perspective

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EMBO Chemical Biology meeting

31 August – 3 September 2016 at EMBL Heidelberg

The EMBO Chemical Biology meeting is one of the leading conferences in Chemical Biology in Germany and not only attracts national but also many international speakers and attendees on a biannual basis.

Taking place 31 August – 3 September 2016 at the new Advanced Training Centre at EMBL Heidelberg, the conference provides a great platform for researchers working in the field of Chemical Biology, from tool development to biological applications, and from computational drug design to synthetic chemistry.

Chemical Science and Chemical Communications are delighted to support this meeting, and there’s lots to look forward to again on this 6th edition of the symposium:

  • Frances H. Arnol – Keynote lecture on ‘Innovation by Evolution: Expanding the Enzyme Universe’
  • Edward Tate – Lecture on ‘Probing and Drugging Protein Lipidation’
  • Christopher Schofield – Lecture on ‘The Chemistry of Oxygen Sensing in Humans and Other Organisms’
  • Giulio Superti-Furga – Keynote lecture on ‘Solute Carriers, Metabolism and Drug Response: a Magic Triangle’
  • Jennifer Prescher – Lecture on ‘Expanding the imaging toolbox’

… and many more excellent speakers. Access the full scientific programme here.

Meet the team:

Dr May Copsey (Executive Editor of Chemical Science and Chemical Communications) will be attending the event. She looks forward to meeting many of you in Heidleberg, and would love to hear about your research and meet with our readers, authors and referees. Please do get in touch with May if you would like to arrange a meeting in advance.

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HPLC-free synthesis slashes protein production time

Written by William Bergius for Chemistry World

Chemists in Germany have devised a faster, cheaper and greener way to synthesise proteins which avoids the need to use high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC).

Being able to chemically synthesise proteins from scratch allows them to be modified with atom-by-atom precision, and in ways that are not possible in nature. For example, researchers can introduce non-natural amino acids into proteins or tag them with fluorescent markers.

Graphical Abstract

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


S. F. Loibl, Z. Harpaz, R. Zitterbart and O. Seitz
Chem. Sci., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC01883A, Edge Article

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Shape-shifting hydrogel can heal itself

Written by Jamie Durrani for Chemistry World

A shape-memory hydrogel that also has self-healing properties has been developed by scientists in China. The new material can repair itself and return to its original shape even after being cut into segments.
Both self-healing and shape-memory polymers have many potential uses, including in aerospace, textiles and biomedicine. Now, a team lead by Tao Chen and Jiawei Zhang from the Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering has developed a material that combines both of these useful properties.

The hydrogel is produced by polymerising acrylamide in the presence of a boronic acid-grafted alginate and poly(vinyl alcohol). After immersion in calcium chloride solution, the polymer is strengthened by the reversible double network of boronic acid-diol ester bonds, and chelation of the alginate chains with the calcium cations.

Graphical Abstract

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Stretchable supramolecular hydrogels with triple shape memory effect
Xiaoxia Le, Wei Lu, Jing Zheng, Dingyi Tong, Ning Zhao, Chunxin Ma, He Xiao, Jiawei Zhang, Youju Huang and Tao Chen
Chem. Sci., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC02354A, Edge Article

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Chemical Science continues achieving with its latest Impact factor

Aiming higher for 2016 and beyond

Since Chemical Science was launched in 2010, we have been overwhelmed by the support of our global community. And with our latest Impact factor at 9.144, according to citation data released by Thomson Reuters in its 2015 Journal Citation Reports®, we are truly grateful to all of you – our authors, referees, readers, Associate Editors, and Editorial and Advisory Board members – for your enthusiastic support towards the journal’s success.C6SC90001A

In less than six years, Chemical Science has grown and developed into one of the world’s leading chemistry journals, maintaining a strong and sustained impact, even as we saw significant growth in the number of articles published in recent years.

And having gone open access in 2015, it continues to be free to read, as well as free for authors to publish in – all publication charges continue to be waived. Therefore through Chemical Science your high-quality work can be freely read, with absolutely no barriers, by your peers and by researchers around the world.

We want our momentum to keep on building

With increasing submissions, this does mean that now – more than ever – it is essential that we publish only the best of the best, nothing less than the most exceptional science. For us, it’s all about quality and excellence, recognition and visibility, as we aim higher for the rest of 2016 and beyond.

We aim for Chemical Science to be the global home for cutting-edge solutions to today’s most pressing challenges, communicated worldwide, without barriers – will you join us as we move closer to our vision?

Then submit only your top-quality work to Chemical Science, and be a key part of the solution.

Top cited Chemical Science articles:

Perspectives and Minireviews

Evaluating metal–organic frameworks for natural gas storage
Jarad A. Mason, Mike Veenstra and Jeffrey R. Long
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 32-51
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52633J, Perspective

Earth-abundant hydrogen evolution electrocatalysts
James R. McKone, Smaranda C. Marinescu, Bruce S. Brunschwig, Jay R. Winkler and Harry B. Gray
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 865-878
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC51711J, Minireview

Transition metal-catalyzed direct nucleophilic addition of C–H bonds to carbon–heteroatom double bonds
Xi-Sha Zhang, Kang Chen and Zhang-Jie Shi
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 2146-2159
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC53115E, Minireview

NKP-1339, the first ruthenium-based anticancer drug on the edge to clinical application
Robert Trondl, Petra Heffeter, Christian R. Kowol, Michael A. Jakupec, Walter Berger and Bernhard K. Keppler
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 2925-2932
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC53243G, Perspective

Edge articles

A dual emission fluorescent probe enables simultaneous detection of glutathione and cysteine/homocysteine
Xiao-Feng Yang, Qian Huang, Yaogang Zhong, Zheng Li, Hua Li, Mark Lowry, Jorge O. Escobedo and Robert M. Strongin
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 2177-2183
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00308J, Edge Article

Sandmeyer trifluoromethylthiolation of arenediazonium salts with sodium thiocyanate and Ruppert–Prakash reagent
Grégory Danoun, Bilguun Bayarmagnai, Matthias F. Gruenberg and Lukas J. Goossen
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 1312-1316
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC53076K, Edge Article

Photoredox activation and anion binding catalysis in the dual catalytic enantioselective synthesis of β-amino esters
Giulia Bergonzini, Corinna S. Schindler, Carl-Johan Wallentin, Eric N. Jacobsen and Corey R. J. Stephenson
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 112-116
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52265B, Edge Article

A pillar[5]arene/imidazolium [2]rotaxane: solvent- and thermo-driven molecular motions and supramolecular gel formation
Shengyi Dong, Jiayin Yuan and Feihe Huang
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 247-252
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52481G, Edge Article

Read more about the Royal Society of Chemistry’s journals 2015 impact factors

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year to articles published in the preceding two years, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2015 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2016).

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