Enzyme mutagenesis sweetens prebiotics

Eleanor Hall writes about a hot ChemComm article for Chemistry World

Sugar lumpsEuropean scientists have developed an enzyme to cleanly and cheaply produce a healthier sugar with prebiotic properties.

Prebiotics – compounds that nourish the good bacteria in our gut – have become important synthetic targets due to their potential role in preventing diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. There are a limited number currently available for use in food, and most do not have the additional benefit of tasting sweet. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in ChemComm – it’s free to access until 30 March 2016:
Converting bulk sugars into prebiotics: semi-rational design of a transglucosylase with controlled selectivity
Tom Verhaeghe, Karel De Winter, Magali Berland, Rob De Vreese, Matthias D’hooghe, Bernard Offmann and Tom Desmet
Chem. Commun., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/C5CC09940D, Communication

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Solar cells firing on all cylinders

William Bergius writes about a hot ChemComm article for Chemistry World

Scientists in china have manufactured cylindrical dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSCs) capable of generating a stable electrical output at different times of the day. Compared to their traditional flat counterparts, if correctly positioned so that the sun moves around their axis, their output is far less dependent of the angle of the sun. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in ChemComm – it’s free to read* until 22nd March 2016:
Cylindrical dye-sensitized solar cells with high efficiency and stability over time and incident angle
Qunwei Tang, Lei Zhang, Benlin He, Liangmin Yu and Peizhi Yang
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC10105K, Communication

*Access is free through a registered RSC account

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Top 25 ChemComm articles October–December 2015

The 25 most-downloaded ChemComm articles in the fourth quarter of 2015 were as follows:

Design and synthesis of nitrogen-containing calcined polymer/carbon nanotube hybrids that act as a platinum-free oxygen reduction fuel cell catalyst
Tsuyohiko Fujigaya, Takeshi Uchinoumi, Kenji Kaneko and Naotoshi Nakashima
Chem. Commun., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1CC11303H, Communication

Improvement of oxygen reduction reaction and methanol tolerance characteristics for PdCo electrocatalysts by Au alloying and CO treatment
Yu-Chen Wei, Chen-Wei Liu and Kuan-Wen Wang
Chem. Commun., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1CC15110J, Communication

Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay of proteins based on in situ duple amplification of gold nanoparticle biolabel signals
Xiaoli Qin, Aigui Xu, Ling Liu, Wenfang Deng, Chao Chen, Yueming Tan, Yingchun Fu, Qingji Xie and Shouzhuo Yao
Chem. Commun., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C5CC01439E, Communication

Multifunctional catalysis by Pd-polyoxometalate: one-step conversion of acetone to methyl isobutyl ketone
Robert D. Hetterley, Elena F. Kozhevnikova and Ivan V. Kozhevnikov
Chem. Commun., 2006, DOI: 10.1039/B515325E, Communication

The surface chemistry of metal–organic frameworks
Christina V. McGuire and Ross S. Forgan
Chem. Commun., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C4CC04458D, Feature Article
From themed collection 2015 Emerging Investigators

Production of few-layer phosphorene by liquid exfoliation of black phosphorus
Jack R. Brent, Nicky Savjani, Edward A. Lewis, Sarah J. Haigh, David J. Lewis and Paul O’Brien
Chem. Commun., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C4CC05752J, Communication

π-Electron rich small molecule sensors for the recognition of nitroaromatics
Sankarasekaran Shanmugaraju and Partha Sarathi Mukherjee
Chem. Commun., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C5CC07513K, Feature Article

Nanostructured electrochromic smart windows: traditional materials and NIR-selective plasmonic nanocrystals
Evan L. Runnerstrom, Anna Llordés, Sebastien D. Lounis and Delia J. Milliron
Chem. Commun., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03109A, Feature Article

Yttrium alkyl complexes with a sterically demanding benzamidinate ligand: synthesis, structure and catalytic ethene polymerisation
Sergio Bambirra, Daan van Leusen, Auke Meetsma, Bart Hessen and Jan H. Teuben
Chem. Commun., 2003, DOI: 10.1039/B208502J, Communication

Graphene quantum dots: emergent nanolights for bioimaging, sensors, catalysis and photovoltaic devices
Jianhua Shen, Yihua Zhu, Xiaoling Yang and Chunzhong Li
Chem. Commun., 2012, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC00110A, Feature Article

Reduction of graphene oxide viaL-ascorbic acid
Jiali Zhang, Haijun Yang, Guangxia Shen, Ping Cheng, Jingyan Zhang and Shouwu Guo
Chem. Commun., 2010, DOI: 10.1039/B917705A, Communication

Aggregation-induced emission: phenomenon, mechanism and applications
Yuning Hong, Jacky W. Y. Lam and Ben Zhong Tang
Chem. Commun., 2009, DOI: 10.1039/B904665H, Feature Article

Key processes in ruthenium-catalysed olefin metathesis
David J. Nelson, Simone Manzini, César A. Urbina-Blanco and Steven P. Nolan
Chem. Commun., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C4CC02515F, Feature Article

Recent developments in transition metal carbides and nitrides as hydrogen evolution electrocatalysts
Wei-Fu Chen, James T. Muckerman and Etsuko Fujita
Chem. Commun., 2013, DOI: 10.1039/C3CC44076A, Feature Article
From themed collection Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution

A facile synthesis of UiO-66, UiO-67 and their derivatives
Michael J. Katz, Zachary J. Brown, Yamil J. Colón, Paul W. Siu, Karl A. Scheidt, Randall Q. Snurr, Joseph T. Hupp and Omar K. Farha
Chem. Commun., 2013, DOI: 10.1039/C3CC46105J, Communication

Layered double hydroxides toward electrochemical energy storage and conversion: design, synthesis and applications
Mingfei Shao, Ruikang Zhang, Zhenhua Li, Min Wei, David G. Evans and Xue Duan
Chem. Commun., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C5CC07296D, Feature Article

A superior catalyst with dual redox cycles for the selective reduction of NOx by ammonia
Zhiming Liu, Yang Yi, Junhua Li, Seong Ihl Woo, Baoyi Wang, Xingzhong Cao and Zhuoxin Li
Chem. Commun., 2013, DOI: 10.1039/C3CC43041C, Communication

Rapid synthesis of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) nanocrystals in an aqueous system
Yichang Pan, Yunyang Liu, Gaofeng Zeng, Lan Zhao and Zhiping Lai
Chem. Commun., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C0CC05002D, Communication

Aerobic oxidation catalysis with stable radicals
Qun Cao, Laura M. Dornan, Luke Rogan, N. Louise Hughes and Mark J. Muldoon
Chem. Commun., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C3CC47081D, Feature Article

Strongly green-photoluminescent graphene quantum dots for bioimaging applications
Shoujun Zhu, Junhu Zhang, Chunyan Qiao, Shijia Tang, Yunfeng Li, Wenjing Yuan, Bo Li, Lu Tian, Fang Liu, Rui Hu, Hainan Gao, Haotong Wei, Hao Zhang, Hongchen Sun and Bai Yang
Chem. Commun., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1CC11122A, Communication

Synthesis and catalytic properties of MIL-100(Fe), an iron(III) carboxylate with large pores
Patricia Horcajada, Suzy Surblé, Christian Serre, Do-Young Hong, You-Kyong Seo, Jong-San Chang, Jean-Marc Grenèche, Irene Margiolaki and Gérard Férey
Chem. Commun., 2007, DOI: 10.1039/B704325B, Communication

Nano-structured ternary niobium titanium nitrides as durable non-carbon supports for oxygen reduction reaction
Minghui Yang, Abigail Rose Van Wassen, Rohiverth Guarecuco, Héctor D. Abruña and Francis J. DiSalvo
Chem. Commun., 2013, DOI: 10.1039/C3CC45732J, Communication

Chemical synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles
Taeghwan Hyeon
Chem. Commun., 2003, DOI: 10.1039/B207789B, Feature Article

Yolk/shell nanoparticles: new platforms for nanoreactors, drug delivery and lithium-ion batteries
Jian Liu, Shi Zhang Qiao, Jun Song Chen, Xiong Wen (David) Lou, Xianran Xing and Gao Qing (Max) Lu
Chem. Commun., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1CC13658E, Feature Article

Exploration of the medical periodic table: towards new targets
Nicolas P. E. Barry and Peter J. Sadler
Chem. Commun., 2013, DOI: 10.1039/C3CC41143E, Feature Article
From themed collection Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry

 


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Véronique Gouverneur – our new ChemComm Chair

We warmly welcome Professor Véronique Gouverneur as the new Editorial Board Chair of ChemComm

ChemComm is delighted to announce Professor Véronique Gouverneur as its new Editorial Board Chair.

Professor Véronique Gouverneur (and friend!)

Véronique Gouverneur, who is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford, leads a dynamic research group and holds a tutorial fellowship in organic chemistry at Merton College Oxford. She has been internationally recognised for her outstanding and original work in fluorine chemistry, and has recently been awarded the Tetrahedron Chair for 2016. She was also the Blaise Pascal Chair from 2012 to 2014, and is currently holding a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award (2013-2018).

Her research aims to develop new approaches to address long-standing problems in the synthesis of fluorinated analogues of natural products, pharmaceutical drugs and molecular [18F] labelled probes for PET imaging.

Véronique takes on the role from Professor Richard R. Schrock, our previous Chair, to whom we remain extremely grateful for his vision and leadership for ChemComm, throughout a period of exceptional development and continued success for the journal. As he now passes the baton, we look forward to working with Véronique towards an even more exciting and dynamic future for ChemComm.

A very warm welcome to Véronique from all of us here at ChemComm!

Read some of Véronique’s recent publications in ChemComm and other Royal Society of Chemistry journals:

Synthesis and characterization of a novel N–F reagent derived from the ethano-Tröger’s base: 1JFN coupling constants as a signature for the N–F bond
Raul Pereira, Jamie Wolstenhulme, Graham Sandford, Timothy D. W. Claridge, Véronique Gouverneur and Ján Cvengroš
Chem. Commun., 2016,52, 1606-1609
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC08375C, Communication

Methylation followed by fluorination of the ethano-Tröger’s base affords a novel N–F reagent more reactive than Selectfluor bis(tetrafluoroborate). This study provides 1JFN coupling constants to characterize the N–F group.
Asymmetric 18F-fluorination for applications in positron emission tomography
Faye Buckingham and Véronique Gouverneur
Chem. Sci., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04229A, Minireview
OA iconOpen Access

Coordination diversity in hydrogen-bonded homoleptic fluoride–alcohol complexes modulates reactivity
Keary M. Engle, Lukas Pfeifer, George W. Pidgeon, Guy T. Giuffredi, Amber L. Thompson, Robert S. Paton, John M. Brown and Véronique Gouverneur
Chem. Sci., 2015,6, 5293-5302
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC01812A, Edge Article
OA iconOpen Access

A dual radiolabelling approach for tracking metal complexes: investigating the speciation of copper bis(thiosemicarbazonates) in vitro and in vivo
Rebekka Hueting, Veerle Kersemans, Matthew Tredwell, Bart Cornelissen, Martin Christlieb, Antony D. Gee, Jan Passchier, Sean C. Smart, Véronique Gouverneur, Ruth J. Muschel and Jonathan R. Dilworth
Metallomics, 2015,7, 795-804
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00330F, Paper

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A nitro boost for solid oxides

Hugh Cowley writes about a hot ChemComm article for Chemistry World

Scientists in Germany have made tetranitratoethane (C2H2N4O12), a solid oxidiser with one of the highest oxygen contents ever synthesised. This research is part of an international search for new oxidisers to replace toxic ammonium perchlorate (NH4ClO4). Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in ChemComm – it’s free to read until 29 February 2016:
Tetranitratoethane
Dennis Fischer, Thomas M. Klapötke and Jörg Stierstorfer
Chem. Commun., 2016,52, 916-918, DOI: 10.1039/C5CC09010E, Communication

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Ethanol to butanol conversion shows sustainable potential

Elisabeth Ratcliffe writes about a hot ChemComm article for Chemistry World

Scientists in the US have come up with a simple way to convert ethanol into 1-butanol, in what could be an important step forward for renewable energy.

Ethanol can be made by fermenting biomass. However, ethanol presents problems as a fuel, such as low energy density compared to petrol, corrosiveness towards engine technology and fuel pipelines, and since it reacts with water, it can separate out from fuel blends over time. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in ChemComm:
Upgrading ethanol to 1-butanol with a homogeneous air-stable ruthenium catalyst
K T Tseng et al, Chem. Commun., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c5cc09913g

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Hot and cold cells: sensitive thermometers for biomaterials

Iain Larmour is a guest web writer for ChemSci. He has researched a wide variety of topics during his years in the lab including nanostructured surfaces for water repellency and developing nanoparticle systems for bioanalysis by surface enhanced optical spectroscopies. He currently works in science management. In his spare time he enjoys reading, photography, art and inventing.

Lanthanide metal–organic frameworks (Ln-MOFs) have recently received increased interest due to their  interesting and useful luminescence characteristics, such as  large Stokes shifts, long luminescence lifetime and a wide emission range – all the way from ultraviolet to near-infrared.  Furthermore, the luminescence of these materials shows strong temperature dependence, which  makes them excellent candidates for the development of luminescent thermometers.  

Ln-MOF thermometers have recently been realised through the mixed lanthanide MOF approach, whereby two distinct lanthanide ions are incorporated into the MOF structure. There is an excellent linear correlation between the intensity ratio of the emissions from the two lanthanide ions and temperature. Such ratiometric luminescent thermometers have distinct advantages over conventional thermometers due to their fast response, high sensitivity and non-invasive operation.

Guodong Qian and team from Zhejiang University recently designed a novel mixed Ln-MOF thermometer with excellent sensitivity over the physiological temperature range (293-313K) by incorporating  Ytterbium and Neodymium into the MOF. With excitation and luminescence in the near infrared window, this thermometer is harmless to biological tissues and its resolution is high enough to measure the temperature differences in pathological cells.  These characteristics make this luminescent thermometer ideal for biological sensing.

Figure (a) from article C5CC07532G

Emission spectra of Nd0.577Yb0.423BDC-F4 in the range of 293–313 K excited at 808 nm; inset: temperature dependence of the normalized intensity of the corresponding transitions.

To find out how more about this thermometer, read the paper in ChemComm today!

A near infrared luminescent metal-organic framework for temperature sensing in the physiological range
Xiusheng Lian, Dian Zhao, Yuanjing Cui, Yu Yang and Guodong Qian
Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, Advanced Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC07532G

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Hot ChemComm articles for December

Take a look at this selection of recently published referee-recommended articles – all are free to read* until 23 January.

Highly sensitive and selective bioluminescence based ozone probes and their applications to detect ambient ozone
Younseok Nam, Beom Seok Kim and Injae Shin
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC08622A, Communication

C5CC08622A GA


Transient electrochemistry: beyond simply temporal resolution
X.-S. Zhou, B.-W. Mao, C. Amatore, R. G. Compton, J.-L. Marignier, M. Mostafavi, J.-F. Nierengarten and E. Maisonhaute
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC07953E, Feature Article

C5CC07953E GA


Robust molecular representations for modelling and design derived from atomic partial charges
A. R. Finkelmann, A. H. Göller and G. Schneider
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC07887C, Communication

C5CC07887C GA


A novel multi-stimuli responsive gelator based on D-gluconic acetal and its potential applications
Xidong Guan, Kaiqi Fan, Tongyang Gao, Anping Ma, Bao Zhang and Jian Song
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC08615A, Communication

C5CC08615A GA


Enzyme encapsulation in zeolitic imidazolate frameworks: a comparison between controlled co-precipitation and biomimetic mineralisation
Kang Liang, Campbell J. Coghlan, Stephen G. Bell, Christian Doonan and Paolo Falcaro
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC07577G, Communication

C5CC07577G GA


Spotting and designing promiscuous ligands for drug discovery
P. Schneider, M. Röthlisberger, D. Reker and G. Schneider
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC07506H, Communication

C5CC07506H GA

*Access is free through a registered RSC account

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Molecules, materials, medicines – the story of pharmaceutical cocrystals

Iain Larmour is a guest web writer for ChemSci. He has researched a wide variety of topics during his years in the lab including nanostructured surfaces for water repellency and developing nanoparticle systems for bioanalysis by surface enhanced optical spectroscopies. He currently works in science management. In his spare time he enjoys reading, photography, art and inventing.

Pharmaceutical cocrystals – cocrystals that contain a drug molecule - can improve the physicochemical performance of drugs, making the prescription you take on doctor’s orders more effective. The properties of any crystal are inherently dependent upon composition and crystal packing, so if you have control over these two things you have control over the physicochemical properties.

Following an explosion of interest and work in this area over the last decade, Michael Zaworotko and colleagues from the Department of Chemical and Environmental Sciences at the University of Limerick review the current state of the literature on pharmaceutical cocrystals.

They cover four areas: nomenclature, design using hydrogen-bonded supramolecular synthons, methods of discovery, and synthesis and development of pharmaceutical cocrystals as drug products. Usefully, they present seven recent case studies on the clinical improvements that can be observed.

The three stages of early drug discovery and development: identify a molecule that is biologically active; create a material suitable for use in a drug product; formulate the material into a medicine with excipients.

A review in 2004 asked the question “Do pharmaceutical co-crystals represent a new path to improved medicines?” Zaworotko and colleagues, having reviewed the last decade of literature, can answer in the affirmative. To find out why the answer to this question is “yes” read this review today!

To read the details, check out the ChemComm article in full:

Pharmaceutical cocrystals: along the path to improved medicines
Naga Duggirala, Miranda Perry, Örn Almarsson and Michael Zaworotko
Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, Advanced Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC08216A

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Journal lectureships 2016 – nominations open!

Nominations for the 2016 lectureships for ChemComm, Chem Soc Rev, and Chemical Science are open till Friday, 15 January 2016. Nominate now!

We are pleased to welcome nominations for the 2016 lectureships for ChemComm, Chem Soc Rev, and Chemical Science – the Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship general chemistry journals.

All nominations must be received by Friday, 15 January 2016.

Nominations are open for the following journal lectureships – only one entry needed per nominee, as each nomination will be considered for all three competitions as appropriate.

ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship
• Recognises emerging scientists in the early stages of their independent academic career
• Eligible nominees should have completed their PhD on or after the 15th September 2007, and should also have published as least one article in ChemComm during the course of their independent career

Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship
• Recognises emerging scientists who have made significant contributions to their research field
• Eligible nominees should have completed their PhD on or after the 15th September 2007

Chemical Science Lectureship
• Recognises sustained excellence in research by a mid-career scientist within the chemical sciences.
Previous recipients of this lectureship include Kevan Shokat (UC San Francisco; 2013), Gregory Fu (Caltech; 2014) and Yamuna Krishnan (University of Chicago; 2015).

Lectureship details
• Recipients of these lectureships will each be invited to present a lecture at three different locations over a 12-month period, with at least one of these events taking place at an international conference. Note: As part of this series of winners’ lectures, the Chemical Science Lectureship recipient will be invited to give a plenary lecture at a relevant ISACS (International Symposia on Advancing the Chemical Sciences) meeting.
• Each recipient will receive a contribution of £1500 towards travel and accommodation costs for their lectures, as well as a certificate.
• Recipients will be asked to contribute a review article for the specific journal awarding their lectureship.

How to nominate
Self-nomination is not permitted. Nominators must send the following to the editorial team via chemcomm-rsc@rsc.org by Friday, 15 January 2016. Each nomination will be considered for all appropriate lectureships.
• Recommendation letter, including the name, contact details and website URL of the nominee.
• A one-page CV for the nominee, including their date of birth, summary of education, career and key achievements, a list of up to five of their top independent publications, total numbers of publications and patents, and other indicators of esteem (and evidence of independence for nominees eligible for the emerging investigator lectureships).
• A copy of the candidate’s best publication to date (as judged by the nominator).
• Two supporting letters of recommendation from two independent referees. These should not be someone from the same institution or the candidate’s post doc or PhD supervisor.

The nominator and independent referees should comment on the candidate’s presenting skills.

Incomplete nominations or those not adhering to the above requirements will not be considered, and nominees will not be contacted regarding any missing or incorrect documents.

Selection procedure
• The editorial team will screen each nomination for eligibility and draw up a shortlist of candidates based on the nomination documents provided.
• Shortlisted candidates will be asked to provide a brief supporting statement summarising their key achievements, highlighting the impact of their work and justifying why they deserve the specific lectureship for which they have been entered.
• Recipients of each lectureship will then be selected and endorsed by a joint selection panel composed of members of each journal’s Editorial Board. Winners of the lectureships will be announced in spring 2016.

NB: Please note that members of the selection panel from the ChemComm, Chem Soc Rev and Chemical Science Editorial Boards are not eligible to nominate, provide references for or be nominated for these lectureships.

For any queries, please contact the editorial team at chemcomm-rsc@rsc.org.

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