Organic synthons yield hyperbranched crop

Jennifer Newton writes about a hot ChemComm article for Chemistry World

Resembling a bundle of cereal stalks, this atomic force microscopy (AFM) image depicts the first ionic organic nanocrystals to have a sheaf-like structure. Ursula Mazur, of Washington State University, US, and colleagues grew the π-conjugated molecules from two electroactive porphyrin synthons: tetra(4-aminophenyl)porphyrin and tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin. These building blocks assembled themselves into branched structures – the higher the reaction temperature the longer and more numerous their branches.


Read the full article in Chemistry World»

Read the original journal article in ChemComm:
Hyperbranched Crystalline Nanostructure Produced from Ionic π-Conjugated Molecules
Ursula Mazur , K W Hipps, Jeremy R. Eskelsen and Kara J Phillips Chem. Commun., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC09288K, Communication

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Top 25 ChemComm articles for July–September 2014

We are delighted to share with you the top 25 most downloaded articles in Chemical Communications (ChemComm) from July–September 2014.

Alzheimer’s disease amyloid beta converting left-handed Z-DNA back to right-handed B-form
Jie Geng, Chuanqi Zhao, Jinsong Ren and Xiaogang Qu
DOI: 10.1039/C0CC02049D, Communication

Fabricating graphene supercapacitors: highlighting the impact of surfactants and moieties
Dale A. C. Brownson and Craig E. Banks
DOI: 10.1039/C1CC11276G, Communication
From themed collection Emerging Investigators 2012

Two-dimensional layered composite photocatalysts
Jingxiang Low, Shaowen Cao, Jiaguo Yu and Swelm Wageh
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC02553A, Feature Article

Highly plasmon-enhanced upconversion emissions from Au@β-NaYF4:Yb,Tm hybrid nanostructures
Ning Liu, Weiping Qin, Guanshi Qin, Tao Jiang and Dan Zhao
DOI: 10.1039/C1CC11179E, Communication

A hydrophobic hole transporting oligothiophene for planar perovskite solar cells with improved stability
Lingling Zheng, Yao-Hsien Chung, Yingzhuang Ma, Lipei Zhang, Lixin Xiao, Zhijian Chen, Shufeng Wang, Bo Qu and Qihuang Gong
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC04680C, Communication

A rapid synthesis of high aspect ratio copper nanowires for high-performance transparent conducting films
Shengrong Ye, Aaron R. Rathmell, Ian E. Stewart, Yoon-Cheol Ha, Adria R. Wilson, Zuofeng Chen and Benjamin J. Wiley
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC48561G, Communication

Star-shaped hole transporting materials with a triazine unit for efficient perovskite solar cells
Kwangseok Do, Hyeju Choi, Kimin Lim, Hyunjun Jo, Jin Woo Cho, Mohammad K. Nazeeruddin and Jaejung Ko
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC04550E, Communication

Incorporation of iron hydrogenase active sites into a highly stable metal–organic framework for photocatalytic hydrogen generation
Koroush Sasan, Qipu Lin, ChengYu Mao and Pingyun Feng
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03946G, Communication

Electrochemical activation of carbon dioxide in ionic liquid: synthesis of cyclic carbonates at mild reaction conditions
Hongzhou Yang, Yanlong Gu, Youquan Deng and Feng Shi
DOI: 10.1039/B108451H, Communication

A quick, simple, robust method to measure the acidity of ionic liquids
John Gräsvik, Jason P. Hallett, Trang Quynh To and Tom Welton
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC02816C, Communication

Modulating DNA-templated silver nanoclusters for fluorescence turn-on detection of thiol compounds
Zhengzhen Huang, Fang Pu, Youhui Lin, Jinsong Ren and Xiaogang Qu
DOI: 10.1039/C0CC05651K, Communication

CH3NH3PbI(3−x)(BF4)x: molecular ion substituted hybrid perovskite
Satyawan Nagane, Umesh Bansode, Onkar Game, Shraddha Chhatre and Satishchandra Ogale
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC04537H, Communication

Fluorescent probes for hydrogen sulfide detection and bioimaging
Fabiao Yu, Xiaoyue Han and Lingxin Chen
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03312D, Feature Article

Synthesis of 1,2-amino alcohols via catalytic C–H amidation of sp3 methyl C–H bonds

Taek Kang, Heejeong Kim, Jeung Gon Kim and Sukbok Chang
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC05655H, Communication

Synthesis and characterization of multi-helical DNA–silica fibers
Yuanyuan Cao, Junjie Xie, Ben Liu, Lu Han and Shunai Che
DOI: 10.1039/C2CC37470F, Communication

Recent advances in the catalytic asymmetric 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azomethine ylides
Javier Adrio and Juan C. Carretero
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC04381B, Feature Article

Wet chemical synthesis of silver nanorods and nanowires of controllable aspect ratio
Nikhil R. Jana, Latha Gearheart and Catherine J. Murphy
DOI: 10.1039/B100521I, Communication

A metal free domino synthesis of 3-aroylindoles via two sp3 C–H activation
Anupal Gogoi, Anju Modi, Srimanta Guin, Saroj Kumar Rout, Debapratim Das and Bhisma K. Patel
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC04407J, Communication

Self-assembly of supramolecularly engineered polymers and their biomedical applications
Dali Wang, Gangsheng Tong, Ruijiao Dong, Yongfeng Zhou, Jian Shen and Xinyuan Zhu
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03155E, Feature Article
From themed collection Polymer Self-Assembly

Nitrogen-centered radical-mediated C–H imidation of arenes and heteroarenes via visible light induced photocatalysis
Hyejin Kim, Taehoon Kim, Dong Gil Lee, Sang Weon Roh and Chulbom Lee
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03905J, Communication

Visible light-promoted metal-free sp3-C–H fluorination
Ji-Bao Xia, Chen Zhu and Chuo Chen
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC05650G, Communication

Cu-Catalyzed Suzuki–Miyaura reactions of primary and secondary benzyl halides with arylboronates
Yan-Yan Sun, Jun Yi, Xi Lu, Zhen-Qi Zhang, Bin Xiao and Yao Fu
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC05376A, Communication

Nanostructured electrochromic smart windows: traditional materials and NIR-selective plasmonic nanocrystals

Evan L. Runnerstrom, Anna Llordés, Sebastien D. Lounis and Delia J. Milliron
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03109A, Feature Article

Are Zr6-based MOFs water stable? Linker hydrolysis vs. capillary-force-driven channel collapse
Joseph E. Mondloch, Michael J. Katz, Nora Planas, David Semrouni, Laura Gagliardi, Joseph T. Hupp and Omar K. Farha
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC02401J, Communication

Graphene quantum dots: emergent nanolights for bioimaging, sensors, catalysis and photovoltaic devices
Jianhua Shen, Yihua Zhu, Xiaoling Yang and Chunzhong Li
DOI: 10.1039/C2CC00110A, Feature Article


ChemComm is the home of urgent high quality communications from across the chemical sciences. With a world renowned reputation for quality and fast times to publication (average of 40 days), ChemComm is the ideal place to publish your research.

Submit your urgent research to ChemComm today!

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σ meets π for a hole lot of bonding

Jason Woolford writes about a hot ChemComm article for Chemistry World

Researchers in India have provided experimental verification that a co-operative σ-hole and π-hole are responsible for holding the molecules of an isothiocyanate based peptide together in its crystal lattice, showcasing the importance of weak, but highly directional interactions in structure–activity relationships.

Understanding weak intermolecular interactions, like hydrogen bonding, π-stacking and ion– π -interactions, is vital to probing the relationship between structure and properties for pharmaceutically important molecules such as highly reactive organic isothiocyanates, which display anti-carcinogenic activity.


Read the full article in Chemistry World»

Read the original journal article in ChemComm – it’s free to download until 21st January 2015:

Observation of a reversible isomorphous phase transition and an interplay of “σ-holes” and “π-holes” in Fmoc-Leu-ψ[CH2-NCS]
Rumpa Pal, Govindappa Nagendra, M. Samarasimhareddy, Vommina V. Sureshbabu and Tayur N. Guru Row
Chem. Commun., 2015,51, 933-936
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08751H, Communication

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Novel optical trapping of aerosolised inhaler particles

Webwriter Kate Montgomery writes for us about a recent hot article in ChemComm

The inhaler, or pressurised metered-dose inhaler (pMDI), is a well-known medical device commonly used to help people all over the world with conditions such as asthma. However little is known about the form and phase of particles ejected from the inhaler on their route from the inhaler to the lung. It is important to understand the way that the solid particles behave once they are discharged from an inhaler as the size of a particle affects where it is delivered in the respiratory tract, ultimately determining the efficacy of the treatment.

Experimental setup used to trap and study particles discharged from a Salamon® inhaler.

In a collaboration between the University of Cambridge, Imperial College London, the University of Birmingham and the Central Laser Facility in Oxford, Tong et al. have used an optical trap to stably suspend individual particles discharged from a Salamon® inhaler for the first time. After stably trapping the particles the authors were able to determine the phase of the particles by comparing them to both a solid crystalline sample and nebulised aqueous droplets of the drug used in the Salamon® inhaler (salbutamol sulphate). Particles were also trapped and studied after being passed through a humidity chamber designed to mimic the lungs.

When first dispensed from the inhaler the particles had analogous properties to the solid crystalline sample of the drug. As the particles were exposed to a higher humidity they became more spherical as they absorbed water from the environment around them. Particles trapped at a relative humidity >92% had properties very similar to that of nebulised aqueous droplets of the drug. This change in morphology of the particles was confirmed by a combination of Raman spectroscopy and brightfield images.

Tong et al. have been able to show that once released into the body the crystalline particles take up    water, causing the particles to increase in size and sphericity. This information will be of great aid in understanding and improving the efficiency of aerosol-based inhalation products.

To download the full article for free for a limited time* click the link below:

Rapid interrogation of the physical and chemical characteristics of salbutamol sulphate aerosol from a pressurised metered-dose inhaler (pMDI)
H.-J. Tong, C. Fitzgerald, P. J. Gallimore, M. Kalberer, M. K. Kuimova, P. C. Seville, A. D. Ward and F. D. Pope
DOI: 10.1039/c4cc05803h

*Access is through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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Boron and beryllium finally shake hands

Jennifer Newton writes about a hot ChemComm article for Chemistry World

The first non-cluster bond between boron and beryllium has been reported by scientists in Germany.

10 years ago, few reactions existed where boron behaved as an nucleophile. That all changed with the advent of lithium diazaborolide in 2006, and boron has been partnering up with myriad main-group, transition metal and lanthanide elements ever since. However, despite beryllium sitting right next to boron in the periodic table, a classical two-centre/two-electron bond had never been reported between the two neighbours, until now.


Read the full article in Chemistry World»

Read the original journal article in ChemComm - it’s free to access until 6th January 2015:
Beryllium bis(diazaborolyl): old neighbors finally shake hands
T. Arnold, H. Braunschweig, W. C. Ewing, T. Kramer, J. Mies and J. K. Schuster  
Chem. Commun., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08519A, Communication

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Hot ChemComm articles for November

Here is a selection of the latest referee-recommended articles in ChemComm:

Diffusion of vaporous guests into a seemingly non-porous organic crystal
Simon A. Herbert, Agnieszka Janiak, Praveen K. Thallapally, Jerry L. Atwood and Leonard J. Barbour  
Chem. Commun., 2014,50, 15509-15512
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC07366E, Communication


Azobenzene-based chloride transporters with light-controllable activities
Ye Rin Choi, Gyu Chan Kim, Hae-Geun Jeon, Jinhong Park, Wan Namkung and Kyu-Sung Jeong  
Chem. Commun., 2014,50, 15305-15308
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC07560A, Communication


Fluorescent polymers from non-fluorescent photoreactive monomers
Jan O. Mueller, Dominik Voll, Friedrich G. Schmidt, Guillaume Delaittre and Christopher Barner-Kowollik  
Chem. Commun., 2014,50, 15681-15684
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC07792J, Communication


Is it possible to achieve a complete desaturation of cycloalkanes promoted by o-benzyne?
Francisco Cervantes-Navarro, Abel de Cózar, Fernando P. Cossío, María A. Fernández-Herrera, Gabriel Merino and Israel Fernández  
Chem. Commun., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC07311H, Communication


Thiol-modified gold nanoparticles for the inhibition of Mycobacterium smegmatis
Jennifer C. Gifford, Jamee Bresee, Carly Jo Carter, Guankui Wang, Roberta J. Melander, Christian Melander and Daniel L. Feldheim  
Chem. Commun., 2014,50, 15860-15863
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC06236A, Communication


Redox-responsive organometallic hydrogels for in situ metal nanoparticle synthesis
B. Zoetebier, M. A. Hempenius and G. J. Vancso  
Chem. Commun., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC06988A, Communication

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Aptamers and gold nanoparticles whisked up to spot influenza

Carla Pegoraro writes about a hot ChemComm article for Chemistry World

Researchers in the UK have developed a new visual bioassay that can detect flu viruses by making them heavier.

Early diagnosis is fundamental to slowing viral outbreaks. The latest (since 2003) outbreak of avian flu from Asia resulted in millions of chickens being culled and, according to the World Health Organization, the death of 393 people. Many laboratory-based tests, such as viral culture assays and the polymer chain reaction (PCR), are incredibly sensitive and accurate. However, they are costly, time consuming and require specialist training, so are unsuitable for transition to the field. It is therefore vital to introduce simple, quick and cheap field tests to control the spread of diseases and guide preventative measures, especially in countries like Vietnam where livestock is still a backyard affair.

Gold nanoparticles are conjugated with aptamers. Binding to the virus forms a gold nanoshell on the viral envelope

 Read the full article in Chemistry World»

Read the original journal article in ChemComm:
Aptamer-based biosensors for the rapid visual detection of flu viruses
T. T. Le, B. Adamiak, D. J. Benton, C. J. Johnson, S. Sharma, R. Fenton, J. W. McCauley, M. Iqbal and A. E. G. Cass  
Chem. Commun., 2014,50, 15533-15536
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC07888H, Communication

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Capturing C60 in a Crystalline Copolymer Chain

Since its structural realisation in 1985, C60 has garnered much attention in the chemical world for not only its spherical shape, but also its stability, electronic properties and the ability to do chemistry on its surface.

One such avenue that has proven popular in recent times is the incorporation of C60 into one-, two- and three-dimensional arrays, either covalently or non-covalently, in attempts to control the distribution of the molecules in the solid- or solution-phase.  One problem that arises in the synthesis of these extended frameworks, however, is that there often a large amount of disorder and void space in the structure, so it can be difficult to ascertain with much degree of certainty how these C60 molecules are oriented. This uncertainty can consequentially result in the properties and behaviours of the new materials remaining unidentified.

Now, researchers from the University of California, DavisMarilyn Olmstead and Alan Balch – have shown that coordination chemistry can be used to not only generate polymers that covalently link molecules of functionalised C60 in such a manner that can they can be studied crystallographically, but also that these polymers can be used to capture free C60 and C70.

Initially, polymers of C60 were synthesised through the mono-functionalisation of C60 with a piperazyl group, which, on account of its two tertiary amines, can coordinate in a linear fashion with transition metal ions, in this case rhodium(II) acetate. Upon the combination of these two components, a linear one-dimensional polymer was formed, in which it could be seen crystallographically that the C60 moieties were positioned on alternating sides of the polymer chain. These polymer chains were further found to extend into two dimensions through the interdigitation of neighbouring chains in a zipper-like fashion. C60-Rh(II) polymers can capture free C60

Perhaps more interestingly is that when these polymer chains were synthesised in the presence of either C60 or C70, free molecules of C60 or C70 were seen to occupy the void spaces between the C60 molecules of the polymer. Additionally, if a mixture of C60 and C70 was present in the polymer synthesis, it was observed that only C60 was captured by the polymer, most likely as a result of a better geometric match between the polymer and the spherical C60 in preference to the more elongated shape of C70.

This work elegantly demonstrates the generation of not only a self-assembling C60-containing polymer that can be characterised structurally in the solid state, but of one  that can entrap free molecules of C60 selectively over molecules of C70. Based on the properties of free C60 and transition metal complexes, the electronic and chromophoric properties of such a crystalline system could also be expected to offer some noteworthy results.

Read this HOT ChemComm article in full!

Zipping up fullerenes into polymers using rhodium(II) acetate dimer and N(CH2CH2)2NC60 as building blocks
Amineh Aghabali, Marilyn M. Olmstead and Alan L. Balch
Chem. Commun., 2014, Advance Article.
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC06995A

Biography

Anthea Blackburn is a guest web writer for Chemical Communications. Anthea is a graduate student hailing from New Zealand, studying at Northwestern University in the US under the tutelage of Prof. Fraser Stoddart (a Scot), where she is exploiting supramolecular chemistry to develop multidimensional systems and study the emergent properties that arise in these superstructures. When time and money allow, she is ambitiously attempting to visit all 50 US states before graduation.

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ChemComm Associate Editor Jonathan Sessler to receive the 2014 MSMLG Award

ChemComm warmly congratulates Associate Editor Jonathan Sessler, who will receive the 2014 MSMLG Award at the 4th International Conference on Molecular Sensors and Molecular Logic Gates (MSMLG2014), to be held in Shanghai, China, from 9-12th November.

Professor Jonathan Sessler
Professor Sessler, of the University of Texas at Austin, is to be recognized for his seminal contributions to colorimetric anion, cation, and neutral substrate sensors, as well as for his work on calixpyrrole-based self-assembly and molecular logic device design.

Professor Seiji Shinkai
The MSMLG Award will also be presented to Professor Seiji ShinkaiChemComm sends sincere congratulations! Professor Shinkai, of Kyushu University, Japan, designed the first molecular machines and played an integral part in the development of various functional calixarenes.  We invite you to check out our recent cross-journal collection of articles – including a good number from ChemComm – especially published in celebration of Seiji Shinkai’s 70th Birthday.

MSMLG2014
The International Conference on Molecular Sensors and Molecular Logic Gates is a biennial conference organized by the East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST). Over 350 delegates from 25 countries are expected to attend. They will discuss innovative research and development in the fields of molecular sensors and molecular logic gates, molecular recognition and supramolecular self-assembly, and related research areas.

The Royal Society of Chemistry is a proud supporter of MSMLG 2014, sponsoring two poster prizes, the winners of which will each receive a hardbound copy of ‘Molecular Logic-based Computation’ from the RSC Books list.

For more information on the conference and to see the line-up of speakers, visit http://www.msmlg2014.org/.

Look out for ChemComm’s upcoming themed collection on Molecular Logic Gates and Information Processing in early 2015!

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Bubble power: Driving self-propelled machines with acetylene bubbles

Iain Larmour is a guest web writer for ChemSci. He has researched a wide variety of topics during his years in the lab including nanostructured surfaces for water repellency and developing nanoparticle systems for bioanalysis by surface enhanced optical spectroscopies. He currently works in science management. In his spare time he enjoys reading, photography, art and inventing.

Self-propelled micro/nanomachines were once the thing of science-fiction, but as so often is the case, fiction has become reality in recent years. Such devices could in the future find uses in environmental remediation and biomedical applications. Researchers around the world have been making progress on designing these machines, and it is a novel fuel-free autonomous self-propelled motor which is the focus of this Chemical Communication by Martin Pumera and team from the School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Nanyang Technological University.

Rather than focus on oxygen bubble propulsion, which often requires the use of high levels of toxic hydrogen peroxide, they have developed an acetylene bubble based motor. To achieve this they utilised the reaction of water and calcium carbide, which produces acetylene and calcium hydroxide. This approach makes use of the water that will be found in the most common application environments, but does not require reactive metals such as magnesium and aluminium. The work expands the scope of bubble-propulsion beyond hydrogen and oxygen and gives designers of micro/nanomachines greater power unit choices in their designs.

Acetylene bubble powered motor in water.

The most important part of the research reported in this Communication is the optimisation of an encapsulation layer around the calcium carbide to control the reaction. However, to find out what this layer is made of and how to prepare it you will have to read the article today.

To read the details, check out the Chem Comm article in full:

Acetylene bubble-powered autonomous capsules: towards in situ fuel
James Guo Sheng Moo, Hong Wang and Martin Pumera
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC07218A
   

    

    

    

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