Molecular beacon homes in on protein structures

Written by Aurora Walshe for Chemistry World

Graphical AbstractTwo separate groups of scientists have developed methods to uncover proteins’ 3D structure inside living animal cells for the first time.

It is vital to know the structure of a protein to understand its chemical and biological functions. Scientists usually need to purify and crystallise a protein to determine its 3D structure by x-ray crystallography. Not only is this process difficult and lengthy, it can also misrepresent the protein’s structure, as the measuring conditions are vastly different from the conditions inside a living cell.

Now, a researcher team led by Xun-Cheng Su from Nankai University in Tianjin, China,Conggang Li at Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Thomas Huber from the Australian National University, has analysed a protein’s structure using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy inside living frog cells.1 The researchers tagged the protein with a beacon, a paramagnetic lanthanide tag, which binds to a cysteine residue on the outside of the protein. ‘The measured effects from the beacons tagged onto the protein give away the positions of the atoms in the protein, in a similar way that a set of satellites can be used to locate the exact position of a GPS receiver,’ Su explains.

Read the full article on Chemistry World >>>


Bin-Bin Pan, Feng Yang, Yansheng Ye, Qiong Wu, Conggang Li, Thomas Huber and Xun-Cheng Su
Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 10237-10240
DOI: 10.1039/C6CC05490K, Communication
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Transition metal material captures inert neon

Written by Charles Quigg for Chemistry World

Graphical AbstractA team of scientists has discovered the first interactions between neon and a transition metal. Their discovery opens up the possibility of new methods to capture the inert gas, as well as other unreactive elements such as helium.

Although it’s found in advertising and eye-catching signage, neon is also incorporated into lasers used in the photolithographic printing of semiconductors. Neon is abundant in the universe, but its inert nature means that it escapes the Earth’s atmosphere. The noble gas is also hard to isolate. Current methods involve liquefying air and distilling the gas in a liquid form – an expensive and inefficient approach.

A team led by Peter Wood at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, UK, has discovered that, under particular conditions, the inert gas interacts with a transition metal. Not only is this the first interaction ever observed, but it may kick-start new approaches in capturing unreactive noble gases.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Peter A. Wood, Amy A. Sarjeant, Andrey A. Yakovenko, Suzanna C. Ward and Colin R. Groom
Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 10048-10051
DOI: 10.1039/C6CC04808K, Communication
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Amine behind mask hides its reactivity

Written by Andrea McGhee for Chemistry World

Graphical AbstractChemists mask amines’ unwanted reactivity with carbon dioxide and overcome limitations of amide formation

Chemists at Imperial College London, UK, have overcome limitations that afflict a specific class of amidation reactions, used to produce a range of compounds from drugs to valuable materials. Their simple trick was to add carbon dioxide, which masks the reagent’s reactivity, making sure it only reacts when they want it to.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Robert W. M. Davidson and Matthew J. Fuchter
Chem. Commun., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6CC04639H, Communication
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Top 10 most accessed ChemComm articles from April – June 2016

From April – June 2016, our most downloaded ChemComm articles were:

Chemical generation and modification of peptides containing multiple dehydroalanines
Philip M. Morrison, Patrick J. Foley, Stuart L. Warriner and Michael E. Webb
Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 13470-13473
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC05469A, Communication

The surface chemistry of metal–organic frameworks
Christina V. McGuire and Ross S. Forgan
Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 5199-5217
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC04458D, Feature Article

Reduction of graphene oxide viaL-ascorbic acid
Jiali Zhang, Haijun Yang, Guangxia Shen, Ping Cheng, Jingyan Zhang and Shouwu Guo
Chem. Commun., 2010, 46, 1112-1114
DOI: 10.1039/B917705A, Communication

Rapid synthesis of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) nanocrystals in an aqueous system
Yichang Pan, Yunyang Liu, Gaofeng Zeng, Lan Zhao and Zhiping Lai
Chem. Commun., 2011, 47, 2071-2073
DOI: 10.1039/C0CC05002D, Communication

Graphene quantum dots: emergent nanolights for bioimaging, sensors, catalysis and photovoltaic devices
Jianhua Shen, Yihua Zhu, Xiaoling Yang and Chunzhong Li
Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 3686-3699
DOI: 10.1039/C2CC00110A, Feature Article

Nanostructured electrochromic smart windows: traditional materials and NIR-selective plasmonic nanocrystals
Evan L. Runnerstrom, Anna Llordés, Sebastien D. Lounis and Delia J. Milliron
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 10555-10572
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03109A, Feature Article

A facile synthesis of UiO-66, UiO-67 and their derivatives
Michael J. Katz, Zachary J. Brown, Yamil J. Colón, Paul W. Siu, Karl A. Scheidt, Randall Q. Snurr, Joseph T. Hupp and Omar K. Farha
Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 9449-9451
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC46105J, Communication

Production of few-layer phosphorene by liquid exfoliation of black phosphorus
Jack R. Brent, Nicky Savjani, Edward A. Lewis, Sarah J. Haigh, David J. Lewis and Paul O’Brien
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 13338-13341
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC05752J, Communication

Key processes in ruthenium-catalysed olefin metathesis
David J. Nelson, Simone Manzini, César A. Urbina-Blanco and Steven P. Nolan
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 10355-10375
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC02515F, Feature Article

Aggregation-induced emission: phenomenon, mechanism and applications
Yuning Hong, Jacky W. Y. Lam and Ben Zhong Tang
Chem. Commun., 2009, 4332-4353
DOI: 10.1039/B904665H, Feature Article

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Fullerenes: past, present and future

Celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminsterfullerene

Special issue by Royal Society Publishing

Royal Society Publishing has recently published a special issue of Philosophical Transactions A entitled “Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminsterfullerene“.

The discovery of C60 and the subsequent evolution of fullerene physics and chemistry can be seen as the culmination of a series of parallel research strands pursued by Harry Kroto through numerous collaborations with colleagues and co-workers.

This themed issue originates from the 2-day symposium held on 15–16 July 2015, organized by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) and the Royal Society. The majority of the reviews and reports of original research were provided by scientists who gave presentations at the July 2015 meeting and the other contributions were produced by friends and co-workers of Harry.

This issue is free to access until the end of September:

Introduction:

Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminsterfullerene
Anthony J. Stace, Paul O’Brien

Dedication:

Professor Sir Harry Kroto (1939–2016)
Dave Garner

Articles:

Pathway to the identification of C60+ in diffuse interstellar clouds
John P. Maier, Ewen K. Campbell

Fullerene ion chemistry: a journey of discovery and achievement
Diethard K. Böhme

Super-atom molecular orbital excited states of fullerenes
J. Olof Johansson, Elvira Bohl, Eleanor E. B. Campbell

Another big discovery—metallofullerenes
Hisanori Shinohara

Fullerene and nanotube growth: new insights using first principles and molecular dynamics
Rodolfo Cruz-Silva, Takumi Araki, Takuya Hayashi, Humberto Terrones, Mauricio Terrones, Morinobu Endo

Unconventional high-Tc superconductivity in fullerides
Yasuhiro Takabayashi, Kosmas Prassides

The influence hydrogen atom addition has on charge switching during motion of the metal atom in endohedral Ca@C60H4 isomers
G. Raggi, E. Besley, A. J. Stace

– Ab initio infrared vibrational modes for neutral and charged small fullerenes (C20, C24, C26, C28, C30 and C60)
Jean-Joseph Adjizian, Alexis Vlandas, Jeremy Rio, Jean-Christophe Charlier, Chris P. Ewels

The Stone–Wales transformation: from fullerenes to graphite, from radiation damage to heat capacity
M. I. Heggie, G. L. Haffenden, C. D. Latham, T. Trevethan

Two-dimensional inorganic analogues of graphene: transition metal dichalcogenides
Manoj K. Jana, C. N. R. Rao

We hope you enjoy reading this collection.

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Pink paper probe exposes formaldehyde

Written by Kathryn Gempf for Chemistry World

A new test, developed by investigators in China, exposes formaldehyde quickly and colourfully wherever it may be.

Formaldehyde is a carcinogenic pollutant produced mainly by industrial activity. It also occurs naturally in plants and animals, albeit only in small quantities. The simple aldehyde can be harmful in larger concentrations, but detecting it requires specialised equipment or applying harsh acids or bases.

Graphical Abstract

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Longwei He, Xueling Yang, Mingguang Ren, Xiuqi Kong, Yong Liu and Weiying Lin
Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 9582-9585
DOI: 10.1039/C6CC04254F, Communication
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2016 ChemComm Emerging Investigators issue – now published

We are delighted to announce the publication of the 2016 ChemComm Emerging Investigators issue.

Now on its sixth year, this annual special issue showcases internationally recognised, up-and-coming scientists who are making outstanding contributions to their respective fields.

This year’s issue includes a selection of Feature articles and Communications, as well as a Profile of this year’s contributors, with interesting photos to spotlight our authors at work or at play – look out for a cool plasma ball, white-water rafting, a cute canine friend, and loads of lovely shots in the great outdoors!

You can also take a look at our previous Emerging Investigator issues in 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015.


Read our Emerging Investigators 2016 collection today

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ChemComm – top 3 most cited journal in general chemistry

We’re hot, we’re fast, and we’re the third most cited

Researchers around the world cited ChemComm articles 175,661 times last year, making us the third most cited general chemistry journal, according to the latest citation data released by Thomson Reuters in its 2015 Journal Citation Reports®.

With our Impact Factor riding high at 6.567 and our Immediacy Index at its highest-ever at 1.713, not only are your findings published rapidly in ChemComm, they’re also read and cited quickly by more and more researchers across all chemical science disciplines around the world – proof that we continue to publish urgent, high quality work on the very hottest topics.

A massive thank you to everyone – our authors, referees, readers, Associate Editors, and Editorial and Advisory Board members – for contributing to the journal’s continued success.
C6CC90001A

With more than 175,000 cites under our belt, we can’t help but think this an apt and fitting way of celebrating our 175 years in the service of the chemical science community as the oldest chemical society in the world.

Submit your next urgent Communication to ChemComm, and quickly see the impact of your work across the breadth of the chemical sciences.

Top cited ChemComm articles:

Feature articles

C–H nitrogenation and oxygenation by ruthenium catalysis
Vedhagiri S. Thirunavukkarasu, Sergei I. Kozhushkov and Lutz Ackermann
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 29-39
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC47028H, Feature Article

Intriguing mechanistic labyrinths in gold(I) catalysis
Carla Obradors and Antonio M. Echavarren
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 16-28
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC45518A, Feature Article

Engineering ultrasmall water-soluble gold and silver nanoclusters for biomedical applications
Zhentao Luo, Kaiyuan Zheng and Jianping Xie
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 5143-5155
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC47512C, Feature Article
From themed collection 2014 Emerging Investigators

Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and graphene composite structures for energy and catalytic applications
Won Jun Lee, Uday Narayan Maiti, Ju Min Lee, Joonwon Lim, Tae Hee Han and Sang Ouk Kim
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 6818-6830
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC00146J, Feature Article

Pillararene-based supramolecular polymers: from molecular recognition to polymeric aggregates
Chunju Li
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 12420-12433
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03170A, Feature Article
From themed collection Polymer Self-Assembly

Single-molecule magnet engineering: building-block approaches
Kasper S. Pedersen, Jesper Bendix and Rodolphe Clérac
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 4396-4415
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC00339J, Feature Article

Communications

Bay-linked perylene bisimides as promising non-fullerene acceptors for organic solar cells
Wei Jiang, Long Ye, Xiangguang Li, Chengyi Xiao, Fang Tan, Wenchao Zhao, Jianhui Hou and Zhaohui Wang
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 1024-1026
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC47204C, Communication

A p-type Ti(IV)-based metal–organic framework with visible-light photo-response
Junkuo Gao, Jianwei Miao, Pei-Zhou Li, Wen Yuan Teng, Ling Yang, Yanli Zhao, Bin Liu and Qichun Zhang
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 3786-3788
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC49440C, Communication

An achievement of over 12 percent efficiency in an organic dye-sensitized solar cell
Kenji Kakiage, Yohei Aoyama, Toru Yano, Takahiro Otsuka, Toru Kyomen, Masafumi Unno and Minoru Hanaya
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 6379-6381
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC02192D, Communication

Metal-free nitro-carbocyclization of activated alkenes: a direct approach to synthesize oxindoles by cascade C–N and C–C bond formation
Tao Shen, Yizhi Yuan and Ning Jiao
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 554-556
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC47336H, Communication

Revealing the metal-like behavior of iodine: an iodide-catalysed radical oxidative alkenylation
Shan Tang, Yong Wu, Wenqing Liao, Ruopeng Bai, Chao Liu and Aiwen Lei
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 4496-4499
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC00644E, Communication

From assembled metal–organic framework nanoparticles to hierarchically porous carbon for electrochemical energy storage
Arlin Jose Amali, Jian-Ke Sun and Qiang Xu
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 1519-1522
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC48112C, Communication

Read more about the Royal Society of Chemistry’s journals 2015 impact factors

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. The journal Immediacy Index indicates how quickly articles in a journal are cited, and is calculated by dividing the number of citations to articles published in a given year by the number of articles published in that year. Data based on 2015 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2016).

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Congratulations to the Poster Prize winners at the 13th International Conference on the Chemistry of Selenium and Tellurium

Graphical Abstract

The Royal Society of Chemistry were delighted to sponsor Chemical Communications and Metallomics Poster Prizes at  the 13th International Conference on the Chemistry of Selenium and Tellurium which was held at Nagaragawa Convention Center at Gifu in Japan between 23rd & 27th May 2016.

Many congratulations to our Poster Prize winners!

Graphical Abstract

Yuuki Maekawa from Gifu University
Diastereoselective Synthesis of Chiral Phosphonoselenoates Having a Binaphthyl Group

Chemical Communications Poster Prize winner


Graphical Abstract

Masato Sakabe from Tokyo Metropolitan University
Synthesis and Structure of Hexacoordinated Chalcogenonium Salts Bearing 2-Phenylpyridine Ligands

Chemical Communications Poster Prize winner


Graphical Abstract

Kouta Sugiura from Nagoya University
Tunable Photoluminescence of ZnTe-AgInTe2 Solid Solution Nanocrystals in Near-Infrared Light Wavelength Region

Chemical Communications Poster Prize winner


Graphical Abstract

Atsuki Shimizu
Identification of Selenium Delivery System for Selenophosphate Synthetase in Bacteria

Metallomics Poster Prize winner

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Light and heat flip compound between phases

Written by Tom Wilson for Chemistry World

Scientists from Japan can now transform an ionic liquid to a solid coordination polymer using UV light, and then reverse the switch using heat.

Tomoyuki Mochida and co-workers from Kobe University, Japan, synthesised a ruthenium-containing ionic liquid, which transforms to a yellow solid coordination polymer when irradiated with UV light. Applying heat reverses the process.

Graphical Abstract

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>

Yusuke Funasako, Shotaro Mori and Tomoyuki Mochida
Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 6277-6279
DOI: 10.1039/C6CC02807A, Communication
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