Archive for the ‘Themed Collections’ Category

Chemistry of water

We are delighted to share with you a series of collections of recent books, themed issues and articles on the topic of water.  These four collections – one per month – demonstrate different aspects of water: its chemistry, its wide use in reactions and as a solvent, its relationship with energy and sustainability, as well as with human health and the environment.

Image (c) Shutterstock

Here, in our first collection, we have assembled some of the groundbreaking research and transformative reviews related to the fundamental chemistry of water – including its interfacial behaviour and thermodynamics – from across our journals.

“This collection showcases highly topical and significant papers we have recently published on the underlying, essential chemistry of water, ” says Dr Robert Eagling, Managing Editor for Chemical Science, Chemical Communications, and Chemical Society Reviews.  “Authored by some of the leading scientists in the field, we hope that these articles will be of broad interest and of great use to all researchers – those who have spent years actively investigating the chemistry of water, as well as university or graduate students who may have just entered into this exciting field of research.”

“This year, as the IPCC prepares to release the final contributions to their Fifth Assessment Report on climate change, it is timely to consider the role of chemistry in addressing global challenges, such as food, water, raw materials and energy,” remarks Professor Lesley Yellowlees, President of the Royal Society of Chemistry.  “This collection from our journals shares the latest research from scientists around the world, aiming to tackle these challenges. Featuring original research and commentary by leaders in the field, we hope that you will find this high-quality collection engaging, inspirational and informative.”

You can read all of these articles for free until 23 March 2014!  We truly hope you enjoy this collection.

Did you know that the RSC has put together a webpage on Water, which brings together information on activities for scientists, policymakers, educators and young people? Take a look today…

Related themed issuesGA?id=C1CP22168J

These themed issues may be of interest – have a look…

PCCP 2011 themed issue on ice and water

PCCP 2012 themed issue on the interfaces of ionic liquids

PCCP 2012 themed issue on hydrogen bonding in electronically excited states


Reviews and Perspectives

Chemistry in solution: recent techniques and applications using soft X-ray spectroscopy
Kathrin M. Lange, Alexander Kothe and Emad F. Aziz
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012,14, 5331-5338
DOI: 10.1039/C2CP24028A, Perspective

Pressure amorphized ices – an atomistic perspective
John S. Tse and Dennis D. Klug
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012,14, 8255-8263GA?id=C2CP43235H
DOI: 10.1039/C2CP40201G, Perspective

Deeply-cooled water under strong confinement: neutron scattering investigations and the liquid–liquid critical point hypothesis
Christopher E. Bertrand, Yang Zhang and Sow-Hsin Chen
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013,15, 721-745
DOI: 10.1039/C2CP43235H, Perspective

On the nature and signatures of the solvated electron in water
B. Abel, U. Buck, A. L. Sobolewski and W. Domcke
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012,14, 22-34
DOI: 10.1039/C1CP21803D, Perspective

Oil–water interfacial self-assembly: a novel strategy for nanofilm and nanodevice fabrication
Linfeng Hu, Min Chen, Xiaosheng Fang and Limin Wu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012,41, 1350-1362GA?id=C0SM00558D
DOI: 10.1039/C1CS15189D, Critical Review

Very small bubbles at surfaces—the nanobubble puzzle
Vincent Stuart James Craig
Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 40-48
DOI: 10.1039/C0SM00558D, Tutorial Review


Original research articles

GA?id=C2SC20399EExperimental and quantum chemical characterization of the water oxidation cycle catalysed by [RuII(damp)(bpy)(H2O)]2+
Laura Vigara, Mehmed Z. Ertem, Nora Planas, Fernando Bozoglian, Nils Leidel, Holger Dau, Michael Haumann, Laura Gagliardi, Christopher J. Cramer and Antoni Llobet
Chem. Sci., 2012,3, 2576-2586
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20399E, Edge Article
From themed collection Physical Chemistry

Inhibition of ice nucleation by slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS)
Peter W. Wilson, Weizhe Lu, Haojun Xu, Philseok Kim, Michael J. Kreder, Jack Alvarenga and Joanna Aizenberg
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013,15, 581-585
DOI: 10.1039/C2CP43586A, Paper

GA?id=C3SC52287CAbsolute Redox Potential of Liquid Water: A First-Principles Theory
Michael Lucking, Yiyang Sun, Damien West and Shengbai Zhang
Chem. Sci., 2013, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52287C, Edge Article

Water-hydroxyl phases on an open metal surface: breaking the ice rules
Matthew Forster, Rasmita Raval, Javier Carrasco, Angelos Michaelides and Andrew Hodgson
Chem. Sci., 2012,3, 93-102
DOI: 10.1039/C1SC00355K, Edge Article
From themed collection Physical Chemistry

GA?id=C0SC00604AStructural trends of ionized water networks: Infrared spectroscopy of water cluster radical cations (H2O)n+ (n = 3–11)
Kenta Mizuse, Jer-Lai Kuo and Asuka Fujii
Chem. Sci., 2011,2, 868-876
DOI: 10.1039/C0SC00604A, Edge Article

Cold crystallisation behaviour of water molecules in ionic liquids as a screening method to evaluate biocompatibility of the hydrated ionic liquids
Kyoko Fujita, Yohsuke Nikawa and Hiroyuki Ohno
Chem. Commun., 2013,49, 3257-3259
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC39033K, Communication

Dual stimuli-responsive phase transition of an ionic liquid/water mixture
Yuki Kohno, Hiroki Arai and Hiroyuki Ohno
Chem. Commun., 2011,47, 4772-4774
DOI: 10.1039/C1CC10613A, Communication

Water droplet bouncing—a definition for superhydrophobic surfaces
Colin R. Crick and Ivan P. Parkin
Chem. Commun., 2011,47, 12059-12061
DOI: 10.1039/C1CC14749H, Communication

GA?id=C1CC14749H

Cubic Dipole Lattice of Water Molecules Trapped inside Carbon Cages
Shinobu Aoyagi, Norihisa Hoshino, Tomoyuki Akutagawa, Yuki Sado, Ryo Kitaura, Hisanori Shinohara, Kunihisa Sugimoto, Rui Zhang and Yasujiro Murata
Chem. Commun., 2013, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC46683C, Communication

Electrocatalytic oxidation of water observed on a nano-gold/palladium electrode
Yosuke Nakayama and Munetaka Oyama
Chem. Commun., 2013,49, 5228-5230
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC42149J, Communication

Me2–NHC based robust Ir catalyst for efficient water oxidation
Dennis G. H. Hetterscheid and Joost N. H. Reek
Chem. Commun., 2011,47, 2712-2714
DOI: 10.1039/C0CC05108J, Communication

GA?id=C1SM05096FNanoscale condensation of water on self-assembled monolayers
Michael James, Tamim A. Darwish, Simone Ciampi, Sven O. Sylvester, Zhaoming Zhang, Albert Ng, J. Justin Gooding and Tracey L. Hanley
Soft Matter, 2011,7, 5309-5318
DOI: 10.1039/C1SM05096F, Paper

Droplet emission induced by ultrafast spreading on a superhydrophilic surface
Ruize Sun, Hao Bai, Jie Ju and Lei Jiang
Soft Matter, 2013,9, 9285-9289
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM51409A, Communication

Dynamics of water confined to reverse AOT micelles
Tinka Luise Spehr, Bernhard Frick, Michaela Zamponi and Bernd Stühn
Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 5745-5755
DOI: 10.1039/C1SM05204G, Paper

GA?id=C1JA10242GDirect chemical analysis of frozen ice cores by UV-laser ablation ICPMS
Wolfgang Müller, J. Michael G. Shelley and Sune Olander Rasmussen
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2011, 26, 2391-2395
DOI: 10.1039/C1JA10242G

Determination of Fe2+ and Fe3+ species by FIA-CRC-ICP-MS in Antarctic ice samples
Andrea Spolaor, Paul Vallelonga, Jacopo Gabrieli, Giulio Cozzi, Claude Boutron and Carlo Barbante
J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2012, 27, 310-317
DOI: 10.1039/C1JA10276A

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Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): ChemComm web-themed issue

We would like to celebrate with our authors and the community our web themed collection entitled “Metal-organic frameworks” recently published in ChemComm.

The issue was Guest Edited by Neil Champness (University of Nottingham, UK), Christian Serre (University of Versailles, France) and Seth Cohen (University of California, San Diego, USA), and contains an impressive collection of articles, including:

Feature Articles:

MOFs for CO2 capture and separation from flue gas mixtures: the effect of multifunctional sites on their adsorption capacity and selectivity
Zhijuan Zhang, Yonggang Zhao, Qihan Gong, Zhong Li and Jing Li
Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 653-661, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC35561B

Commercial metal–organic frameworks as heterogeneous catalysts
Amarajothi Dhakshinamoorthy, Mercedes Alvaro and Hermenegildo Garcia
Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 11275-11288, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC34329K

Communications:

Understanding excess uptake maxima for hydrogen adsorption isotherms in frameworks with rht topology
David Fairen-Jimenez, Yamil J. Colón, Omar K. Farha, Youn-Sang Bae, Joseph T. Hupp and Randall Q. Snurr
Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 10496-10498, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC35711A

Targeted functionalisation of a hierarchically-structured porous coordination polymer crystal enhances its entire function
Kenji Hirai, Shuhei Furukawa, Mio Kondo, Mikhail Meilikhov, Yoko Sakata, Osami Sakata and Susumu Kitagawa
Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 6472-6474, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC31421E

Take a look at the excellent work published in this themed collection: http://rsc.li/cc-mofs

We encourage you to share the link to this collection with your colleagues.

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Chem Sci, ChemComm and Chem Soc Rev poster prizes awarded at J400 chemonostics symposium

Congratulations to our Chemical Science, ChemComm and Chem Soc Rev poster prize winners at Chemonostics: Chemical receptors in the development of simple diagnostic devices, a one-day symposium held in Bath, UK on 28 November 2013.  The event, organised by Professor Tony James from the University of Bath, was held to celebrate 400 years of Japan-British relations.  Our Editor Dr Robert Eagling was on hand to award the prizes.

J400 at Bath - Chemonostics

(Left to right) Giles Prentice, Rama Byravan, Robert Eagling, Xiaolong Sun

The RSC poster prizes were awarded to:

Giles Prentice (Bath) – Chem Soc Rev poster prize
Rama Byravan (Birmingham) – Chemical Science poster prize
Xiaolong Sun (Bath) – ChemComm poster prize

Once again, our warmest congratulations to all our winners!

Read J400: our cross-journal online collection celebrating the 400th anniversary of Japan-British relations

You may also be interested in our web collection dedicated to Professor Seiji Shinkai on the occasion of his 70th birthday

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HOT molecular spintronics on ChemComm: Sizzling teasers for our upcoming web collection

HOT articles from the ChemComm Molecular Spintronics web collection

We are delighted to present these HOT articles – all part of our soon-to-launch Molecular Spintronics web theme, guest edited by ChemComm Associate Editor Daniel Gamelin (University of Washington), together with Martin Kirk (University of New Mexico) and David Shultz (North Carolina State University).

While waiting for the full collection, why not read some of its Comms below?  They’re HOT, referee-recommended, and FREE for a limited time!

Coherent manipulation of spin qubits based on polyoxometalates: the case of the single ion magnet [GdW30P5O110]14−
José J. Baldoví, Salvador Cardona-Serra, Juan M. Clemente-Juan, Eugenio Coronado, Alejandro Gaita-Ariño and Helena Prima-García
Chem. Commun., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC44838J, Communication

Free to access until 29th September 2013


Controlling the orientation of spin-correlated radical pairs by covalent linkage to nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide membranes
Hsiao-Fan Chen, Daniel M. Gardner, Raanan Carmieli and Michael R. Wasielewski
Chem. Commun., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC45129A, Communication

Free to access until 29th September 2013


Electronic communication through molecular bridges
Carmen Herrmann and Jan Elmisz
Chem. Commun., 2013, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC45125A, Communication

Free to access until 29th September 2013


Can heterometallic 1-dimensional chains support current rectification?
John E McGrady, Daniel DeBrincat and Oliver Keers
Chem. Commun., 2013, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC45063E, Communication

Free to access until 29th September 2013

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Mechanochemistry: ChemComm web theme and Faraday Discussion 170 abstracts deadline 12 August

ChemComm Mechanochemistry web collection

We are delighted to present our ChemComm web themed issue on Mechanochemistry: fundamentals and applications in synthesis, guest edited by Stuart James (Queen’s University Belfast, UK) and Tomislav Friščić (McGill University, Canada).  Check out this special online collection now!

C3CC90136J

Faraday Discussion 170 on Mechanochemistry– deadline for oral abstracts 12 August 2013

We also invite you to submit your oral abstract for Faraday Discussion 170– Mechanochemistry: From Functional Solids to Single Molecules by Monday, 12 August 2013.  Stuart and Tomislav co-chair the FD170 Scientific Committee; they are joined by Jon Steed, James Mack, Elena Boldyreva and Carsten Bolm.

FD170banner

Submit your abstract now and register to secure your place at this exciting event!

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ChemComm papers in 2013 Cancer Nanotechnology collection– free until 28 July

We are pleased to present a web collection of articles from publications across the RSC journal portfolio demonstrating the use of (nano)technology in the diagnosis, imaging and treatment of cancer.

This web collection will be free to access until the 28th July, so register for an RSC Publishing personal account and read this cutting edge research for free this week!

Here are some ChemComm articles in this special cancer nanotechnology collection:

Targeting carbon nanotubes against cancer
Chiara Fabbro, Hanene Ali-Boucetta, Tatiana Da Ros, Kostas Kostarelos, Alberto Bianco and Maurizio Prato
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 3911-3926
DOI: 10.1039/C2CC17995D

Highly sensitive electrochemiluminescent cytosensing using carbon nanodot@Ag hybrid material and graphene for dual signal amplification
Li Wu, Jiasi Wang, Jinsong Ren, Wen Li and Xiaogang Qu
Chem. Commun., 2013,49, 5675-5677
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC42637H

A multifunctional nanoprobe based on Au–Fe3O4 nanoparticles for multimodal and ultrasensitive detection of cancer cells
Jian Liu, Wei Zhang, Haoli Zhang, Zhengyin Yang, Tianrong Li, Baodui Wang, Xing Huo, Rui Wang and Haotai Chen
Chem. Commun., 2013,49, 4938-4940
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC41984C

Micellar nanoparticle formation via electrostatic interactions for delivering multinuclear platinum(II) drugs
Haihua Xiao, Jared F. Stefanick, Xiaoyu Jia, Xiabin Jing, Tanyel Kiziltepe, Yu Zhang and Basar Bilgicer
Chem. Commun., 2013,49, 4809-4811
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC39119A

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Announcing the ChemComm Emerging Investigators issue 2014

Following the overwhelming postive response from the community to the 2011, 2012 and 2013 ChemComm Emerging Investigators issues, we are delighted to announce the forthcoming 2014 Emerging Investigators issue.

If you are interested in submitting to the issue please contact the ChemComm Editorial Office in the first instance. Please note that authors must not have featured in a previous ChemComm Emerging Investigators issue. The deadline for submission is 1 October 2013.

This annual issue is dedicated to profiling the very best research from scientists in the early stages of their independent careers from across the chemical sciences. We hope to feature principal investigators whose work has the potential to influence future directions in science or result in new and exciting developments.

Browse the 2013 Emerging Investigators issue

Find out more about the ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship – awarded annually to exceptional scientists in the early-stage of their independent career

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ChemComm Emerging Investigators Issue 2013

Front coverWe are delighted to announce the publication of the 2013 ChemComm Emerging Investigators issue.

This is the third edition of this themed collection and we have been overwhelmed by the community’s positive response. I encourage you to take a look at the exceptional communications and feature reviews in this issue, as well as our previous issues in 2011 and 2012.

The issue contains over 90 Communications as well as a selection of Feature review articles, take a look at the whole collection today.

We invite you to submit your next communication article to ChemComm.

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Viewpoints on groundbreaking ChemComms– celebrating our first baker’s dozen!

N2 coordination
Michael D. Fryzuk
Chem. Commun., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC42001A

C3CC42001A


The supramolecular approach for the syntheses of porphyrin complex species
Alessandro D’Urso, Maria Elena Fragalà and Roberto Purrello
Chem. Commun., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC41777H

C3CC41777H


The making of iLiquids – the chemist’s equivalent of the iPhone
Zhaofu Fei and Paul J. Dyson
Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 2594-2596
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC38671F

C3CC38671F

Click here to read more Viewpoints for free!

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If you like it, then you should put two rings on it

Microring resonators are pretty amazing things, offering label-free biosensing by coupling with light and then circulating the photons inside the cavity of the ring, enhancing the interaction between the light and the analytes.

However, I like to think of traditional microring resonators as tents: difficult to construct. They require a submicrometer gap between the input waveguide and the resonator ring structure to allow the coupling of light and before you can even get to that stage, you need to make the microring resonator, which requires a series of complex fabrication steps (FIG 1a).  In this Communication, which is part of ChemComm‘s Microfluidics themed web collection, Professor Jonathan Cooper and his colleagues at Glasgow University and at the International Islamic University Malaysia’s CTS Department have made (what I think of as) the double pop-up tent equivalent– or as they call it, the dual disk resonator (DDR). Made from SU8, an epoxy-based polymer used in microfluidics chips, it can be patterned in a single lithographic step. Not only that, but the DDR uses a gapless design and two rings, increasing the sensitivity of the device (FIG 1b).

FIG 1: The hard way or the easy way (a) the traditional microring resonator with submicrometer gap (b) gapless dual disk resonator

Once they had constructed the DDR, the team characterised the optical sensitivity of the device using sucrose solutions to vary the refractive index of the sample above the waveguide. They then went on to show that the sensor could be used to evaluate the dynamics of antibody interactions on surfaces, exploring avidin-biotin-based immobilisations; sharp resonance shifts confirmed the assembly and disassembly of constructs.

The simpler fabrication shows great promise, as the authors suggest that the sensitivity of the device could be greatly improved by coupling more disks to it– in which case Beyoncé might soon be singing ‘if you like it, then you should put a chain on it.’

Read this ‘HOT’ ChemComm article today:

Polymer dual ring resonators for label-free optical biosensing using microfluidics

Muhammad H. M. Salleh, Andrew Glidle, Marc Sorel, Julien Reboud and Jonathan M. Cooper

Chem. Commun., 2013, Advance Article

DOI: 10.1039/C3CC38228A

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