Author Archive

HOT ChemComm articles for March

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 4th May 2018

An umpolung of Lewis acidity/basicity at nitrogen by deprotonation of a cyclic (amino)(aryl)nitrenium cation
Jiliang Zhou, Liu Leo Liu, Levy L. Cao and Douglas W. Stephan
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC01331D, Communication

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Aqueous immiscible layered double hydroxides: synthesis, characterisation and molecular dynamics simulation
Kanittika Ruengkajorn, Valentina Erastova, Jean-Charles Buffet, H. Chris Greenwell and Dermot O’Hare
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC00528A, Communication

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Ultrasmall Ru2P nanoparticles on graphene: a highly efficient hydrogen evolution reaction electrocatalyst in both acidic and alkaline media
Tingting Liu, Shuo Wang, Qiuju Zhang, Liang Chen, Weihua Hu and Chang Ming Li
Chem. Commun., 2018,54, 3343-3346
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC01166D, Communication

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Catalytically active nanorotor reversibly self-assembled by chemical signaling within an eight-component network
Abir Goswami, Susnata Pramanik and Michael Schmittel
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC01496E, Communication

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Impact of partial interpenetration in a hybrid ultramicroporous material on C2H2/C2H4 separation performance
Daniel O’Nolan, David G. Madden, Amrit Kumar, Kai-Jie Chen, Tony Pham, Katherine A. Forrest, Ewa Patyk-Kazmierczak, Qing-Yuan Yang, Claire A. Murray, Chiu C. Tang, Brian Space and Michael J. Zaworotko
Chem. Commun., 2018,54, 3488-3491
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC01627E, Communication

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On the nature of organic and inorganic centers that bifurcate electrons, coupling exergonic and endergonic oxidation-reduction reactions
John W. Peters, David N. Beratan, Gerrit J. Schut and Michael W. W. Adams
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC01530A, Feature Article

 

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Outstanding Reviewers for Chemical Communications in 2017

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Chemical Communications in 2017, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Koji Hirano, Osaka University, ORCID: 0000-0001-9752-1985
Professor Marcel Hollenstein, Institut Pasteur, ORCID: 0000-0003-0263-9206
Professor Yu Sherry Jiang, Harvard Medical School
Professor Joohoon Kim, Kyung Hee University, ORCID: 0000-0003-1481-2440
Dr Matthew Lloyd, University of Bath, ORCID: 0000-0002-4821-4361
Professor Arpad Molnar, University of Szeged, ORCID: 0000-0001-9191-450X
Professor David Nelson, University of Strathclyde, ORCID: 0000-0002-9461-5182
Professor Kyungsoo Oh, Chung-Ang University, ORCID: 0000-0002-4566-6573
Professor Carlos del Pozo, University of Valencia, ORCID: 0000-0002-0947-5999
Professor Jin Xie, Nanjing University, ORCID: 0000-0003-2600-6139

We would also like to thank the Chemical Communications Board and the general chemical sciences community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

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HOT ChemComm articles for February

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 6th April 2018.

Challenges and advances in the computational modeling of biological phosphate hydrolysis
Dušan Petrović, Klaudia Szeler and Shina Caroline Lynn Kamerlin
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC09504J, Feature Article

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Copper-catalyzed three-component cyclization of amidines, styrenes, and fluoroalkyl halides for the synthesis of modular fluoroalkylated pyrimidines
Xue-Qiang Chu, Bu-Qing Cheng, Yao-Wei Zhang, Danhua Ge, Zhi-Liang Shen and Teck-Peng Loh
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC09571F, Communication

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Encoding matter with regiospecific 12C/13C isotopic labels
James J. La Clair
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC00080H, Communication

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Unravelling Lawesson’s reagent: the structure of monomeric (4-methoxyphenyl)phosphine disulfide
Artur Mardyukov, Dominik Niedek and Peter R. Schreiner
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC00034D, Communication

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Enhanced hydrogen spillover to fullerene at ambient temperature
Hirotomo Nishihara, Tomoya Simura and Takashi Kyotani
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC00265G, Communication

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Spatially resolved coding of λ-orthogonal hydrogels by laser lithography
Rhiannon R. Batchelor, Eva Blasco, Kilian N. R. Wuest, Hongxu Lu, Martin Wegener, Christopher Barner-Kowollik and Martina H. Stenzel
Chem. Commun., 2018,54, 2436-2439
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC09619D, Communication

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Nucleus infiltrated by peptide gene switch

Researchers in India have taken a step towards selective gene regulation by making a peptide-based artificial transcription factor that can upregulate a luciferase reporter gene in mammalian cells.1

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry
Top: Schematic representation of the artificial transcription factor. DBD = DNA binding domain, NLS = nuclear localisation signal, AD = activationdomain, CPP = cell penetrating peptide. Bottom: The main DNA recognition motif is a pair of symmetry related helices inserted into the major groove of the target DNA.

Transcription factors are proteins that bind to specific DNA sequences and control gene expression by converting DNA to RNA. Since transcription factors are important for turning genes on or off, the researchers hope that artificial transcription factors could treat diseases by rebalancing perturbations in cellular pathways. Lead researcher, Siddhartha Roy, from the Bose Institute in Kolkata, says their work ‘is part of a continuing effort to develop small peptides that are deliverable inside the cell and can regulate – either inhibit or activate – the expression of specific genes.’

Read the full story by Fiona Tscherny on Chemistry World.

References

1 K Roy et al, Chem. Commun., 2018, DOI: 10.1039/c7cc09279b

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HOT ChemComm articles for January

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 5th March 2018.

Kinetic Stabilisation of a Molecular Strontium Hydride Complex using an Extremely Bulky Amidinate Ligand
Caspar N. de Bruin-Dickason, Thomas Sutcliffe, Carlos Alvarez Lamsfus, Glen B. Deacon, Laurent Maron and Cameron Jones
Chem. Commun., 2018,54, 786-789
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC09362D, Communication

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The antibacterial activity of polyoxometalates: Structures, antibiotic effects and future perspectives
Aleksandar Bijelic, Manuel Aureliano and Annette Rompel
Chem. Commun., 2018,54, 1153-1169
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC07549A, Feature Article

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Controlled Preparation of Amphiphilic Triblock-Copolyether in a Metal- and Solvent-Free Approach for Tailored Structure-Directing Agents
Alexander Balint, Marius Papendick, Manuel Clauss, Carsten Müller, Frank Giesselmann and Stefan Naumann
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC09031E, Communication

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Alkene functionalization for the stereospecific synthesis of substituted aziridines by visible-light photoredox catalysis
Wan-Lei Yu, Jian-Qiang Chen, Yun-Long Wei, Zhu-Yin Wang and Peng-Fei Xu
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC09151F, Communication

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Microwave-induced covalent functionalization of few-layer graphene with arynes under solvent-free conditions
M. V. Sulleiro, S. Quiroga, D. Peña, D. Pérez, E. Guitián, A. Criado and M. Prato
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC08676H, Communication

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Barbiturate end-capped non-fullerene acceptors for organic solar cells: tuning acceptor energetics to suppress geminate recombination losses
Ching-Hong Tan, Jeffrey Gorman, Andrew Wadsworth, Sarah Holliday, Selvam Subramaniyan, Samson A. Jenekhe, Derya Baran, Iain McCulloch and James R. Durrant
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CC09123K, Communication

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Photoredox sugar synthesis plausible on early Earth

Scientists in the US have carried out experiments confirming that ultraviolet light could have driven the synthesis of simple prebiotically important sugars under conditions found on early Earth.1


Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry
UV light photooxidises cyanocuprates, producing aqueous electrons, which are key for putting into motion a reaction network capable of producing glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde

Back in 2012, Dougal Ritson and John Sutherland,2 at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK, synthesised sugars from cyanocuprates using ultraviolet light – findings that supported the RNA world hypothesis for the origin of life. Now Zoe Todd and Dimitar Sasselov from the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics, and their colleagues have performed similar experiments, but at lower, and more representative, wavelengths than those previously considered.

Read the full story by Lynn Murphy on Chemistry World.

References

1 Zoe Todd et al, Chem. Commun., 2018, DOI: 10.1039/c7cc07748c (This article is open access.)

2 D Ritson and J Sutherland, Nat. Chem., 2012, 4, 895 (DOI: 10.1038/nchem.1467)

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Tech red unmasked

Tech red, an enigmatic technetium compound that has resisted characterisation for half a century, has been identified using chemical detective-work and computer modelling. The molecule’s unusual chemistry may explain why it has proven so difficult to unmask.1


Source: © Bradley Childs
Tech red forms a red, oily liquid upon condensation

Nuclear chemists have been running into a volatile red oxide of technetium – Tc, a radioactive metal – since at least the 1960s.2 ‘Everybody seems to have accidentally made this a couple of times,’ notes Keith Lawler, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), US. Although the telltale hue makes tech red easy to spot, it has gone unidentified over the intervening decades. Tech red refuses to form crystals, so can’t studied by crystallographic methods, while technetium’s radioactivity is an inherent barrier to researching its compounds. ‘There are only a handful of laboratories who can work with large amounts of technetium, and even fewer who have access to anything other than simple characterisation techniques,’ explains John McCloy, who investigates radioactive materials at Washington State University, US.

Read the full story by Alexander Whiteside on Chemistry World.

 

1 K V Lawler et al, Chem Commun., 2018, DOI: 10.1039/c7cc09191e (This article is free to access until 7 March 2018.)

2 C Rulfs, R Pacer and R Hirsch, J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem., 1967, 29, 681 (DOI: 10.1016/0022-1902(67)80323-3 )

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Molecular box treats chemists to a strained surprise

Introducing pillar[4]pyridinium – the first of a new family of macrocycles

Pillar[4]pyridinium
Source: Grzegorz Sobczak Oksana Danylyuk and Volodymyr Sashuk

Scientists in Poland have made the most compact multiply charged macrocycle to date. Pillar[4]pyridinium is a cyclic tetramer consisting of four pyridyl units with methylene bridges between their nitrogens and para carbons. The quadruply charged molecule has a very symmetrical and incredibly strained structure. It represents a new class of cationic macrocycles, the pillar[n]pyridiniums.

Read the full story by Jennifer Newton on Chemistry World.

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Suzuki–Miyaura–hydrogenation targets 3D drugs

Scientists in the UK have unveiled a way to make pharmaceutical molecules with increased 3D characteristics. The single pot Suzuki–Miyaura–hydrogenation reaction results in sp2–sp3 linked pharmaceutically relevant molecules.

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry
A single pot Suzuki–Miyaura-hydrogenation can be used to furnish lead and fragment-like products in good to excellent yields

The number of tetrahedral carbon atoms, or how 3D a molecule is, is one factor that determines the success of a molecule in clinical drug trials. Molecules with a high sp3 fraction are in demand, however current methods to make them suffer drawbacks. The Suzuki–Miyaura reaction is common for the cross-coupling of sp2–sp3 systems, but alkyl boron or alkyl halides are prone to β-elimination and other side reactions, producing mixtures of products.

Read the full story by Suzanne Howson on Chemistry World.

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Tactile alternative to colour changes

Many instrument-free analytical methods, such as pH test strips and home pregnancy tests, indicate their results with a colour change. Now scientists in the US have devised a system that outputs a signal you can feel as well as see.

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry
Visual and tactile detection of ATP – gel shapes indicate a positive result.

Read the full story by Jennifer Newton on Chemistry World.

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