Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Congratulations to the winners of the Society for Biomaterials Three Minute Thesis Award

In April 2022, the Society for Biomaterials held their annual meeting in Baltimore, USA. Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances sponsored this event along with companion journal Biomaterials Science.

We would like to congratulate the winners of the SFB Three Minute Thesis Award. Check out the award winners and learn about their research in our interviews below.

 

Kevin Grassie: 1st Prize

My PhD research is focused on a new approach for bone regenerative engineering that combines stem cell therapy and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation to enhance the repair of complex bone defects.  LIPUS serves as a non-invasive mechanical stimulus to deliver additional forces that may trigger more robust bone formation.  My work thus far aims to 1) develop a computational tool for quantifying 3D externally-applied forces on cells, and 2) use this tool to estimate the LIPUS-derived 3D acoustic radiation forces that hydrogel-encapsulated experience under different ultrasound and gel conditions. By uncovering how ultrasound influences cell behavior, we hope to develop and optimize new strategies that combine cell therapy and finely-tuned mechanical stimuli to improve bone regeneration.

1.  What inspired you to go into your area of specific research?
I have always been passionate about science and surrounded by critical-thinkers;my parents and other family members have studied and/or worked in technological or scientific industries.  I was taught at a young age to be curious about the world around us. Throughout high-school and during my undergraduate education at the University of Connecticut (UConn), I became eager to study a scientific field which sits at the intersection of my favorite disciplines: physics, mathematics, engineering, biology, and medicine. At the same time, my life-long athletic outlets in martial arts and acrobatic movements enhanced my curiosity in biomechanics and, through two injuries requiring surgery, gave me first-hand experience with clinical challenges in musculoskeletal health. Finally, in my undergraduate years at UConn, I took a tissue engineering class taught by Dr. Yusuf Khan (now my PhD advisor) that perfectly mixed all of my academic interests. These experiences all inspired me to pursue research in bone tissue/regenerative engineering, allowing me to integrate concepts from nearly every corner of science to find solutions to real-world, clinically-relevant problems.

2. What is one of the most rewarding things about your area of research?
One of the most rewarding aspects of my area of research is the collaborative and multidisciplinary nature of the work. I am very fortunate to be part of the Connecticut Convergence Institute for Translation in Regenerative Engineering at UConn Health, which offers a diverse group of faculty and students with wide-ranging expertise and technical skills.  The days are never dull and there is always a lot to learn, which is exciting to me.

3. What are your next steps for your research/career?
In my research, the next steps are to dig deeper into the mechanotransduction events and osteogenic responses in hydrogel-encapsulated cells exposed to different types of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation. As for my career after my PhD, I am still undecided but considering the many possibilities that await. My several years as a tutor for college mathematics and physics have given me a strong desire to teach in some capacity, regardless of my career path. However, my primary goal is to stay connected to cutting-edge biomedical research, whether that be through academia, industry-based research-and-development, or government agencies/institutes such as NASA. 

 

Gabriel Rodriguez- Rivera: 2nd Prize

My thesis is focused on developing an injectable hydrogel to terminate lethal arrhythmias in the ventricles without the pain induced by high-energy defibrillation shocks. Our initial work demonstrated that the proposed hydrogel electrode is conductive, hydrolytically stable, and compatible with the body, allowing us to reach areas of the heart that would not be reachable using commercial pacing leads.

1. What inspired you to go into your area of specific research?
Curiosity, possibilities, and opportunities. I worked in a biopharmaceutical company in Puerto Rico for seven years in the technology transfer of new products. Working at the interphase of development and commercialization sparked my interest in creating products that could impact the patient’s quality of life and using my tools as a chemical engineer to design and improve new biomaterials.

What is one of the most rewarding things about your area of research?
Being able to design a biomaterial that could eventually save and improve lives. Also, just seeing how we can use materials to induce a response in our bodies is incredible. Additionally, interacting with other scientists and clinicians with different areas of expertise helped me learn and grow.

What are your next steps for your research/career?
I am excited to continue understanding the fundamental properties of biomaterials for cardiovascular applications as a postdoc in Jason Burdick’s lab at the University of Colorado – Boulder.

 

Sarah Jones: 3rd Prize

I presented on my thesis project focused on developing a wrap to optimize the healing environment in large bone defects to reduce the risk of amputation or severe disability and improve patient outcomes. For wrap fabrication, I am co-electrospinning a durable synthetic polymer loaded with antibiotics along with extracellular matrix containing growth factors into a fibrous wrap. The wrap will be placed around a cement bone spacer used in a two-stage procedure to guide the membrane formation that is responsible for enveloping a bone graft and guiding bone formation. The synthetic fibers will improve barrier performance, preventing graft resorption, and will support sustained local antibiotic release to eradicate infection. Secondly, the matrix fibers will provide angiogenic and immunomodulatory cues to improve the membrane’s regenerative potential. Together this wrap aims to improve bone healing and overall quality of life for survivors of traumatic injury.

What inspired you to go into your area of specific research?
I have always been interested in pursuing a career to improve human health, specifically by developing new techniques or products. However, my interest in biomedical engineering started quite broad. I initially imagined working on prosthetics or robotic surgical systems. However, once attending classes at Texas A&M University, I became increasingly interested in biomaterials and their ability interact with the human body. I joined the Grunlan Research Group and really discovered and developed a passion for materials-guided tissue regeneration. This is the idea that the chemistry/structure of an implanted material can guide tissue regeneration and healing without exogenous biologics. This field spoke to me as a way to sustainably and reliably enhance human health. This passion led me to the Cosgriff-Hernandez Lab at The University of Texas at Austin, focusing on polymeric materials for tissue engineering, to pursue my PhD in biomedical engineering. I hope to continue to develop and refine my passion for biomaterials throughout my education and career.

What is one of the most rewarding things about your area of research?
I believe the wide application of my research area is extremely rewarding. We spend so much time developing this wrap for a specific procedure for traumatic bone injuries. However, the things we learn from this process can be applied to almost any area of the body. Discovering structure property relationships and cell material interactions can contribute to the overall body of knowledge in biomedical engineering. For example, nutrient supply and blood flow is a common hurdle faced in all areas of tissue engineering, and my project has the potential to reveal a new technique to improve vascularization in new tissue.

What are your next steps for your research/career?
After completing my doctorate, I plan to continue in the field of biomaterials for tissue engineering. I hope to join the medical device industry as a research engineer and continually work to design and develop new products to aid in tissue regeneration.

 

Please join us in congratulating all the winners of the SFB Three Minute Thesis Award!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Congratulations to the winners of the Society for Biomaterials Postdoctoral Research Award

In April 2022, the Society for Biomaterials held their annual meeting in Baltimore, USA. Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances sponsored this event along with companion journal Biomaterials Science.

We would like to congratulate the winners of the SFB Postdoctoral Research Award. Check out the award winners and learn about their research in our interview below.

 

Mykel Green: 1st Prize

The success of stem cell regenerative therapies has been crippled by low cell survival, poor retention in the target tissue, uncontrolled differentiation, and induction of host immune response. My work seeks to develop a PEG-based hydrogel carrier to address these concerns and improve engraftment efficiency by protecting the fragile blood-producing stem cells during direct delivery into the bone marrow and increasing cell retention through controlled cell release. Successful completion of this work and its subsequent studies will lead to an improved understanding of the pathophysiology of SCD and the development of my hydrogel system as a tool to target other bone marrow transplantation-reliant curative therapies.

1. What inspired you to go into your area of specific research?
While studying biology at Morehouse College, I fell in love with sickle cell disease. It’s a simple mutation, but the consequences are physiologically disastrous. Blood is nearly ubiquitous; therefore, all biomedical researchers can study it, but it is significantly under-resourced and under-studied relative to other conditions. I want to correct this injustice for patients with sickle cell and other health disparities.

2. What is one of the most rewarding things about your area of research?
I love creating polymers! Something about synthesis excites me, especially trying to develop a new protocol. It is akin to cooking from scratch; you always take great pride in the final product (except when results are unfavorable).

3. What are your next steps for your research/career?
In the immediate future, I hope to create a definitive body of research supporting my hydrogel carrier as a functional bone marrow transplantation modality in a non-diseased animal model. Eventually, I will begin testing in a sickle cell model and tailor the hydrogel to address its many challenges. I expect these studies to be a significant part of my early-stage investigator work, among many other related projects.

 

Teresa Rapp: 2nd Prize

Ruthenium Crosslinkers for Hydrogel Formation with Applications in Tissue Culture and Cell Delivery
My work focuses on the development of new molecular crosslinkers that respond to unique external stimuli, specifically light. This work discussed the synthesis and application of two new ruthenium-based hydrogel crosslinkers that can selectively respond to red (617 nm) and green (530 nm) light. Used in conjunction with an ortho-nitrobenzyl-based hydrogel crosslinker, I created a hydrogel system that softens in response to three unique, visible light inputs. I showed these hydrogels are cytocompatible, orthogonal, and can be used to study cellular fate in 3D.

1. What inspired you to go into your area of specific research?
A chemist by training, I was first inspired by the incredible potential to create new functional biomaterials by innovation in the chemistry space. This field has allowed me to pursue both my interest in basic science as I discover new molecules, and demonstrate their real world feasibility in a product that could transform the work of so many research groups across the world. I hope to continue to work at the forefront of biomaterial development throughout my academic career.

2. What is one of the most rewarding things about your area of research?
The depth of knowledge I get to pursue as I work in this area. I love my work in synthetic chemistry and materials development, and this area provides many opportunities for me to collaborate with bioengineers, biologists, clinicians, and many others; opportunities that allow me to learn about a vast range of natural sciences.

3. What are your next steps for your research/career?
I will be entering the tenure track faculty job market this year, looking to start my own research lab to explore the potential of these new photochemistries in the next generation of biomaterials.

 

Kimberly Nellenbach: 3rd Prize

I presented research focused on our lab’s novel hemostatic materials. We’ve developed Platelet-like Particles or PLPs that are capable of mimicking the ability of native platelets to form a platelet plug and stem bleeding during traumatic injury. My recent efforts have been focused on analyzing the in vivo safety and efficacy of these PLPs. In my research, it was determined that at an optimized dose, PLPs are able to significantly reduce blood loss across multiple models of traumatic injury without any deleterious off-target thrombotic effects.

1. What inspired you to go into your area of specific research?
Tissue engineering has been a long interest of mine because of family and friends who experienced tissue and organ damage due to injuries or chronic inflammatory illnesses.  I wanted to play an integral role in helping restore, maintain, or improve this damage.  I narrowed my focus of research on wound healing/hemostatic materials when I became part of the Advanced Wound Healing Lab at NCSU and wanted to contribute to moving this research forward.

2. What is one of the most rewarding things about your area of research?
One of the most rewarding aspects of developing hemostatic materials is that our lab is working towards filling a critical need, especially given the current nationwide blood shortage. 

3. What are your next steps for your research/career?
The next steps in my research career are to continue to explore ways to enhance wound healing and treat bleeding by investigating the efficacy of our lab’s platelet-like technology in different models of coagulopathies and impaired wound healing

 

We would also like to congratulate the following finalists for the SFB Postdoctoral Research Award:

Jason Guo

Ana Mora Boza

Jingjing Gao

 

Please join us in congratulating all the winners and the finalists of the SFB Postdoctoral Research Award 2022!

 

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Open call to submit your plastics research to these cross-journal themed collections on ‘Polymer Upcycling’ and ‘Plastic Conversion’

The Royal Society of Chemistry has announced an open call to submit your plastics research to our themed collections on ‘Polymer Upcycling’ and ‘Plastic Conversion’

The Royal Society of Chemistry is committed to sustainable plastics research and has published a policy statement regarding plastic waste. With increasing impact of plastic waste on the environment, it is necessary to research ways in which we can have a sustainable future for plastics.

Plastics research is interdisciplinary and involves a wide range of chemical scientists. As such, we invite you to contribute to our cross-journal themed collections by submitting your work to Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B, C, Polymer Chemistry or Catalysis Science & Technology.

 

Polymer Upcycling

Joint themed collection between Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C

 

 

In 2015 alone, the global waste generated by plastic packaging applications was 82.7 metric tons (Mt). Currently, waste management practices for the end-of-life plastics exploit landfilling, industrial energy recovery from municipal solid waste incineration, pyrolysis and recycling. Due to the ubiquity and necessity of plastics in our daily life, the elimination or reduction of plastics is not foreseeable in the near future and fundamentally new science is needed to describe and understand the polymers, interfaces, decomposition and upcycling of plastics. This Themed Collection aims to explore the latest developments in materials characterization, polymer design and synthesis, physical chemistry and molecular understanding of plastic decomposition and transformation that contribute to a broad knowledge base for upcycling waste plastics.

Submissions should fit within the scope of  Journal of Materials Chemistry A, Journal of Materials Chemistry B or Journal of Materials Chemistry C. We welcome high quality studies across all fields of materials chemistry in the form of full Papers, Communications and Review-type articles (Reviews, Highlights or Perspectives) and we invite authors to select the journal that best suits their submission.

 

For more information, visit our open calls page

 

Guest Edited by:

Blair Brettmann (Georgia Institute of Technology), Marco Fraga (Instituto Nacional De Technologia Brasil), Monika Gosecka (Polish Academy of Sciences) and Natalie Stingelin (Georgia Institute of Technology)

Submit your work to Journal of Materials Chemistry A, Journal of Materials Chemistry B or Journal of Materials Chemistry C now!

 

Plastic Conversion

Joint themed collection between Polymer Chemistry and Catalysis Science & Technology

 

 

 

 

Catalysts have been the main driver for the design of ever new polymers with highly diverse and specialized properties. In this themed issue, we aim to highlight research that makes use of catalysis to optimize the reverse. How can we get the most value out of plastic waste? In this quest, we especially welcome manuscripts that address the challenges unique to plastics. These include but are not limited to additive impurities; mixed polymer streams; how to contact the very viscous, high molecular weight polymer with the (micro-)porous catalyst or a cleavage agent and more broadly catalytic conversion of sustainable polymeric materials for a circular plastic economy. Unconventional approaches via photo-, electro- or mechano-catalytic approaches and combinations thereof are also very welcome. We highly encourage to place the work in the context of performance metrics of green chemistry.

Submissions should fit the scope of either Polymer Chemistry or Catalysis Science & Technology. We would suggest that articles focused on synthetic and polymer chemistry aspects would be best suited to Polymer Chemistry, whereas articles focused on catalytic and/or related methodological advances would be appropriate for Catalysis Science & Technology. The collaborative joint special issue recognizes that management of plastic wastes relies on research conducted at the intersection of polymer chemistry and catalysis. You may submit to whichever journal you feel is most relevant to your current research. Please note that your article may be offered a transfer to the alternate journal if deemed more appropriate by the handling editor.

 

For more information, visit our open calls page

 

Guest Edited by:

Professor Ina Vollmer (Utrecht University, Netherlands), Professor George Huber (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA), Professor Haritz Sardon (POLYMAT, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Spain) and Professor Zhibo Li (Qingdao University of Science and Technology, China)

Submit your work to Polymer Chemistry or Catalysis Science & Technology now!

 

If you would like to contribute to either of these themed collections, you can submit your article directly through the journal’s online submission service. Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when uploading your files to say that this is a contribution to the respective themed collection. The Editorial Office reserves the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection, and inclusion of accepted articles in the final themed collection is not guaranteed.

If you would like more information about the ‘Polymer Upcycling’ themed collection, please email Materials-rsc@rsc.org. For more information about the ‘Plastic Conversion’ themed collection, please email Polymers-rsc@rsc.org.

We look forward to receiving your submissions and showcasing this important research in our collections.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Congratulations to the poster award winners at E-MRS 2022!

We were delighted to sponsor Women in Renewable Energy (WiRE) at E-MRS 2022!

We would like to congratulate the following poster award winners at the 2022 WiRE E-MRS 2022.

The prize winners were sponsored by the Journal of Materials Chemistry A, C, and Materials Horizons

Meet the winners

Deimantė Vaitukaitytė, Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania

Deimante Vaitukaityte obtained Bachelor (2017) and Master’s (2019) degrees in Applied Chemistry from Kaunas University of Technology (Kaunas, Lithuania). She has been a PhD student since 2019 at the same university, with research focusing on the development of hole transporting materials for perovskite solar cells. She also works as a junior researcher in prof. Vytautas Getautis research group at Kaunas University of Technology.

We were delighted to present Deimantė an award for Best Poster at WiRE E-MRS 2022.

Shegufta Upama, IMDEA Materials Institute, Spain

Shegufta hails from Dhaka, Bangladesh. She completed her Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering with Honors from the University of Houston in Texas, USA. In August 2020, she started her Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University, where she joined Dr. Micah Green’s lab. A year later, she moved to Madrid, Spain, to continue her Ph.D. research in Dr. Juan José Vilatela’s group at IMDEA Materials Institute. Her research focuses on developing CNT fiber/inorganic hybrid materials and non-conventional heating methods for the rapid and targeted processing of materials.

We were delighted to present Shegufta an award for Best Question at WiRE E-MRS 2022.

Kenedy Tabah, Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology in Barcelona, Spain

Kenedy Tabah is a doctoral student at the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology in Barcelona, Spain. After obtaining a BSc in Chemistry from the University of Buea, Cameroon and an Erasmus Mundus master in Chemical Nanoengineering, he developed an ever-growing interest in nanotechnology for renewable energy. His current research comprises fabrication of Perovskite Solar Cells and analysis of their stability through Machine Learning.

We were delighted to present Kenedy an award for Best Poster at WiRE E-MRS 2022.

Francesca De Rossi, University of Rome, Italy

After her PhD degree in Telecommunications and Microelectronics Engineering on flexible dye solar cells, awarded by University of Rome ‘Tor Vergata’ in 2014, Dr De Rossi spent nearly 4 years abroad, working as a Technology Transfer Fellow at SPECIFIC Innovation and Knowledge Centre, Swansea University (UK). She was part of the PV team led by Prof T.M. Watson, focusing on the upscaling of printable perovskite solar cells, and lead of the stability activity within his group.

She is currently a fixed term researcher (RTD-A), funded by the EU H2020 project APOLO, led by Prof F. Brunetti, on smart designed, fully printed flexible perovskite solar cells (https://project-apolo.eu/).

We were delighted to present Francesca an award for Best Poster at WiRE E-MRS 2022.

 

Dr. Ludmila Cojocaru, University of Bordeaux, France

Ludmila Cojocaru received her PhD from the University of Bordeaux (France) for her work on the synthesis of semiconducting metal oxide nanoparticles and their application in liquid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Subsequently, she was awarded by the Japan Society for Promotion of Science (JSPS) as a first post-doc fellow in the framework of the Japanese-French Associate Laboratory for Next-generation Photovoltaic Cells (LIA Next-PV) (LiaNextPV) at the University of Tokyo, and then, continue working in a national (NEDO) Japanese project at the same University. During her almost five years of work in Japan, she developed the solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells and then moved to the perovskite solar cells. As a pioneer working in the field of perovskite solar cells since the earlier stage of their discovery, she concentrated her work on the fabrication of high-performance devices focusing on interface engineering of perovskite and provided a plausible reason for the origin of IV hysteresis. Later, she moved to the University of Freiburg (Germany) where she developed the evaporation process for perovskite and applied it in tandem configuration with silicon solar cells, working in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy (Germany). Now, she is a Junior Researcher at the University of Bordeaux in an Initiative of Excellence “Make Our Planet Great Again”. In this project, her objective is to integrate perovskite solar cells and supercapacitors connected through a common carbon extracted from biomass and fabricate sustainable energy conversion-storage devices able to keep continuous power in intermittent light.

We were delighted to present Ludmila an award for Best Poster at WiRE E-MRS 2022.

 

 

 

Fanny Baumann, Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology in Barcelona, Spain

Fanny Baumann got her Master in Science Engineering at Lund University with a specialty in Nanoscience Engineering and Nanomaterials in 2020 after an eventful academic journey combining studies with professional windsurfing. For her Master Thesis work she spent one semester at LSPM EPFL supervised by Anders Hagfeldt and Eva Unger, resulting in her also participating in the Perovskite Database project. She have been in the group of Monica Lira Cantú at NMPE ICN2 since September 2021 when she started my PhD position in Material science.

We were delighted to present Fanny an award for Best Poster at WiRE E-MRS 2022.

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Editor’s Choice Collection on solid-state ion conductors

We are delighted to announce a new Journal of Materials Chemistry A and Materials Advances Editor’s Choice Collection on solid-state ion conductors.

 The newly appointed Journal of Materials Chemistry A and Materials Advances Advisory Board member, Stephen Skinner (Imperial College London, UK) who has recently come to the end of his time as an Associate Editor, has gathered the journals’ most outstanding recent papers in solid-state ion conductors for this Editor’s Choice collection. In order to highlight developments in solid-state ion conductors, this online collection includes recent manuscripts from Journal of Materials Chemistry A and Materials Advances on the topic.

Papers published in Materials Advances are gold open access and freely accessible. Those published in Journal of Materials Chemistry A are free to access until 10 June 2022. You can read the full collection online.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

2022 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship

We invite you to nominate exceptional materials chemistry researchers for the prestigious 2022 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship. Do you know an outstanding emerging scientist who deserves recognition? Nominate them today for a chance to win this respected award!

Established in 2010, this international lectureship honours early-career scientists who have made significant contributions to the field of materials chemistry, with previous recipients including Serena Corr, Shaojun Guo, Christopher Bettinger, Henry Snaith and last year’s winner Maria Escudero-Escribano.

For more information and details on eligibility criteria and how to nominate a candidate, please visit the Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship webpage.

The deadline for nominations is 13 June 2022

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Journal of Materials Chemistry B themed issue on Bioinspired Surfaces Engineering for Biomaterials

We are delighted to present this Journal of Materials Chemistry B themed issue on Bioinspired Surfaces Engineering for Biomaterials, guest edited by Professor Jian Ji (Zhejiang University), Professor Kazuhiko Ishihara (The University of Tokyo), Professor Shaoyi Jiang (Cornell University), Professor M. Cristina L. Martins (Universidade do Porto) and Professor G. Julius Vancso (University of Twente).

Understanding the sophisticated functionalities offered by objects and processes found in nature will guide the design of materials with desirable properties to meet challenging applications. Zwitterionic and other materials, inspired by biological structures and functions at different levels (e.g. cell membrane, protein, tissues etc.) have shown great potential in diagnostic, drug delivery and tissue regeneration applications.

This themed issue of Journal of Materials Chemistry B is focused on recent rapid development in bioinspired biomaterials. It aims at covering the recent progress on zwitterionic materials specifically and other bioinspired biomaterials broadly, including properties, applications, and synthesis of bioinspired and zwitterionic materials related to biology and medicine, bioinspired surfaces/interfaces, fabrication and functionality of bioinspired nanoparticles, high-throughput methods and applications in nanomedicine, nanodiagnostics, medical devices, sensors, and scaffolds for tissue regeneration.

 

All of the articles in the issue are free to access until 8 May 2022. A selection of articles from the issue is provided below.

 Editorial

Introduction to bioinspired surfaces engineering for biomaterials

G. Julius Vancso, Jian Ji, Kazuhiko Ishihara, M. Cristina L. Martins and Shaoyi Jiang

J. Mater. Chem. B, 2022, 10, 2277-2279 DOI: 10.1039/D2TB90044K

 

 Reviews

Fundamentals and exploration of aggregation-induced emission molecules for amyloid protein aggregation

Yijing Tang, Dong Zhang, Yanxian Zhang, Yonglan Liu, Lirong Cai, Eleanor Plaster and Jie Zheng

J. Mater. Chem. B, 2022, 10, 2280-2295 DOI: 10.1039/D1TB01942B

 

Antimicrobial peptide-based materials: opportunities and challenges

Akhilesh Rai, Rafaela Ferrão, Paulo Palma, Tatiana Patricio, Paula Parreira, Elsa Anes, Chiara Tonda-Turo, M. Cristina L. Martins, Nuno Alves and Lino Ferreira

J. Mater. Chem. B, 2022, 10, 2384-2429 DOI: 10.1039/D1TB02617H

 

 Articles

Bioinspired NO release coating enhances endothelial cells and inhibits smooth muscle cells
Sheng-yu Chen, Jing Wang, Fan Jia, Zhi-da Shen, Wen-bin Zhang, You-xiang Wang, Ke-feng Ren, Guo-sheng Fu and Jian Ji
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2022, 10, 2454-2462 DOI: 10.1039/D1TB01828K

Molecular simulations of zwitterlation-induced conformation and dynamics variation of glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin
Qi Qiao, Lirong Cai and Qing Shao
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2022, 10, 2490-2496 DOI: 10.1039/D1TB02561A

A natural polysaccharide-based antibacterial functionalization strategy for liquid and air filtration membranes
Ruonan Wu, Mengkai Song, Dandan Sui, Shun Duan and Fu-Jian Xu
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2022, 10, 2471-2480 DOI: 10.1039/D1TB02273C

A biomimetic anti-biofouling coating in nanofluidic channels
Sumire Fukuda and Yan Xu
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2022, 10, 2481-2489 DOI: 10.1039/D1TB02627E

Zwitterionic choline phosphate conjugated folate-poly (ethylene glycol): a general decoration of erythrocyte membrane-coated nanoparticles for enhanced tumor-targeting drug delivery
Yuyue Zhang, Yuemin Wang, Qiangwei Xin, Mingjing Li, Peng Yu, Jun Luo, Xinyuan Xu, Xingyu Chen and Jianshu Li
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2022, 10, 2497-2503 DOI: 10.1039/D1TB02493K

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Open call: themed issue “New era in advanced functional materials emerging from molecular imprinting and related techniques”

Journal of Materials Chemistry B is delighted to announce a call for papers for its latest themed issue on “New era in advanced functional materials emerging from molecular imprinting and related techniques” to be published in 2022. Guest Edited by: Toshifumi Takeuchi (Kobe University, Japan), Karsten Haupt (Université de Technologie de Compiègne, France), and Guoping Chen (National Institute for Materials Science, Japan)

Recent developments in molecular imprinting and related technologies have attracted a great deal of attention in the field of materials science. Many scientists and engineers in academia and industry, in the analytical, biomedical, environmental and materials sciences are interested in molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). Unfortunately, the 11th International Conference on molecular imprinting (MIP2020), due to be held in Hiroshima (Japan), has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Even under such circumstances, work has continued to develop new MIPs.

Therefore, this themed issue of Journal of Materials Chemistry B aims to collect the latest information on MIP research, act as the most relevant venue for sharing new ideas and recent advances, and accelerate future developments in molecular imprinting and related techniques, in place of the MIP2020 conference.

The scope of this themed collection ranges from new concepts and principles to advanced preparation techniques and industrial applications, including design, synthesis and characterization, affinity separation, sensing, and biological applications.

This call for papers is open for the following article types:
• Communications
• Full papers

Submission Deadline: 7 February 2022

If you would like to contribute to this themed issue, you can submit your article directly through the journal’s online submission service at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jmchemb. Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when uploading your files to say that this is a contribution to the themed issue. The Editorial Office reserves the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection, and inclusion of accepted articles in the final themed issue is not guaranteed.

Submissions to the journal should contain chemistry in a materials context and should fit within the scope of Journal of Materials Chemistry B. Please see the journal’s website for more information on the journal’s scope, standards, article types and author guidelines.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Editor’s Choice collection: Spiro Compounds for Electronics

We are delighted to announce a new Journal of Materials Chemistry C Editor’s Choice Collection on spiro compounds for electronics.

Advisory Board member for Journal of Materials Chemistry C, Cyril Poriel (Université de Rennes and CNRS, France), has selected outstanding recent manuscripts on spiro compounds for electronics for this Editor’s choice collection. In order to highlight developments in spiro compounds, this collection features articles from Journal of Materials Chemistry C and Materials Advances

You can read the full collection online.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Journal of Materials Chemistry C call for papers: Materials for thermally activated delayed fluorescence and/or triplet fusion upconversion

Journal of Materials Chemistry C is delighted to announce a call for papers for its latest themed collection on “Materials for thermally activated delayed fluorescence and/or triplet fusion upconversion” to be published in early 2022. Guest Edited by: Eli Zysman-Colman (University of St Andrews), Malika Jeffries-EL (Boston University), and Nobuhiro Yanai (Kyushu University)

This issue aims to highlight the recent advances in the design of new materials that exhibit the thermally triggered phenomena of delayed fluorescence and/or the triplet-triplet annihilation-based photon upconversion. This includes topics on the theoretical and physical design of new materials and the opportunities created by exploiting the unique features of these molecular systems in the field of organic light-emitting diodes and sunlight-powered devices.

This call for papers is open for the following article types:
• Communications
• Full papers

Submission Deadline: 14th October 2021

If you would like to contribute to this themed issue, you can submit your article directly through the journal’s online submission service at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jmchemc. Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when uploading your files to say that this is a contribution to the themed issue. The Editorial Office reserves the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection, and inclusion of accepted articles in the final themed issue is not guaranteed.

Submissions to the journal should contain chemistry in a materials context and should fit within the scope of Journal of Materials Chemistry C. Please see the journal’s website for more information on the journal’s scope, standards, article types and author guidelines.

With best wishes,

Professor Eli Zysman-Colman
University of St Andrews, UK
Professor Malika Jeffries-EL
Boston University, USA
Journal of Materials Chemistry C Associate Editor
Professor Nobuhiro Yanai
Kyushu University, Japan
Lynn Murphy
Deputy Editor, Journal of Materials Chemistry C
Royal Society of Chemistry
Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)