Archive for the ‘JMCs 10th Anniversary’ Category

Journal of Materials Chemistry B 10th anniversary survey – the results are in

To celebrate 10 years of Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C we asked you to contribute your thoughts and perspectives about the development of materials chemistry and the future of the field!

We asked 3 questions to Journals of Materials Chemistry B authors, reviewers, and readers. Below we discuss our findings and share some of the common trends amongst the Journal of Materials Chemistry B community responses.

Question 1:

What development in materials chemistry for biological and medicinal applications do you see as having the biggest impact over the last 10 years?

Clearly research in the development and application of hydrogels has contributed a great deal to advances in biological and medical materials over the past decade, however as you can see from our responses, this was not the only development recognised in our survey. A great deal of responses credited the development of nanomaterials to be impactful on our recent growth in biological and medicinal materials. Therapy and diagnostics, specifically for cancer treatment and detection was widely mentioned in the responses and is a common theme throughout the survey.

 

The letter 'B' filled with multicoloured words from survey responces. Hydrogels, Cancer, Targeted, Biomaterials, Nanomaterials, Therapy, Organoids.

 

 

 

 

The letter 'B' filled with multicoloured words from survey responses. Materials, Nanomaterials, Personalised, Therapy, Electronics, Medicine, Targeted, Cancer, Precision. Question 2:

Where do you see the direction of materials chemistry research for biological and medicinal applications heading in the next 10 years?

Again we had a wide array of responses to this question and similar themes to above emerge from the responses. Targeted and personalised therapies seem to be at the forefront and we anticipate this will be a major field moving forward. Alongside this, we have further mention of nanomaterials – indeed they hold a great deal of potential for the biomedical materials field, and we hope to see future developments in this topic. The materials field for biological applications certainly has an exciting future ahead of it!

Question 3:

What topic would you like to see more of in Journal of Materials Chemistry B?

The resounding theme for this response was the call for more articles dedicated to specialised biomaterials. There were lots of suggestions for a large variety of materials – polymeric and collagen-based, porous, nano, and bioelectric materials. Sensing devices was also a popular response, as was imaging technology.

The letter 'B' filled with multicoloured words from survey responses. Biomaterials, Materials, Nanomaterials, Imaging, Hydrogels, Devices, Sensing, Microfluidic, Polymeric, Regenerative.

So how did your contribution compare to the rest of the community? We appreciate all of your responses and it has certainly shed some light on our communities’ perspectives in regard to the materials chemistry field – past, present and future.

Discover the results for the Journal of Materials Chemistry A survey and Journal of Materials Chemistry C survey.

Don’t forget to check out all of our special Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C 10-year anniversary celebrations, including our 10-year Anniversary Community spotlight blog, the #myfirstJMC collections showcasing our first-time corresponding authors, monthly 10th anniversary cover art round-ups and a special anniversary editorial by Editors-in-Chief Anders Hagfeldt, Jeroen Cornelissen and Natalie Stingelin.

Follow us on Twitter (@JMaterChem), WeChat and sign up to our mailings to keep up to date with our latest anniversary activities. We are excited to celebrate our anniversary year and we are grateful to our community for all their support!

 

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Journal of Materials Chemistry A 10th anniversary survey – the results are in

To celebrate 10 years of Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C we asked you to contribute your thoughts and perspectives about the development of materials chemistry and the future of the field!

We asked 3 questions to Journals of Materials Chemistry A authors, reviewers, and readers. Below we discuss our findings and share some of the common trends amongst the Journal of Materials Chemistry A community responses.

 

Question 1:

What development in materials chemistry for energy and sustainability do you see as having the biggest impact over the last 10 years?

The past decade has demonstrated our ability to discover and synthesise new materials. Some of the greatest advances you mentioned were development of 2D materials and nanomaterials in particular. Many responses included the development and application of photo- and electro-catalysts. Unsurprisingly, batteries was also a very popular response, although it seems we still have work to do in that regard!

The letter 'A' filled with words from survey responses in different colours. Hydrogen, Cells, Materials, Synthesis, Green, Energy, Solar, Efficient, Nanomaterials.
The letter 'A' filled with words from responses to the survey in different colours. Energy, Solar, Materials, Hydrogen, Battery, Storage, Porous, Lithium, MOFs. Question 2:

Where do you see the direction of materials chemistry research in the area of energy and sustainability heading in the next 10 years?

The most common responses for future research and direction in energy and sustainability were for hydrogen generation (green hydrogen) and use. New materials for advancing sustainable energy storage and conversion dominated a large proportion of responses, this included frequent mentions of solar cell advances and development.

Question 3:

What topic would you like to see more of in Journal of Materials Chemistry A?

Energy, Energy, Energy! Yes we always want to see more about how we can move towards more efficient, more cost effective and more sustainable forms of energy generation, conversion and storage. We also want to see more drive towards development of renewable energy sources and particularly through the use of novel materials. But it looks like energy won’t be our only focus – many of you also want to see more from the field of sensing and catalysis, so watch this space!

The letter 'A' filled with words from survey responses in different colours. Energy, Storage, Sensing, Catalysts, Renewable, Hydrogen, Specialist, Materials, Conversion.

So how did your contribution compare to the rest of the community? We appreciate all of your responses and it has certainly shed some light on our communities’ perspectives in regard to the materials chemistry field – past, present and future.

Discover the results for the Journal of Materials Chemistry B survey and Journal of Materials Chemistry C survey.

Don’t forget to check out all of our special Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C 10-year anniversary celebrations, including our 10-year Anniversary Community spotlight blog, the #myfirstJMC collections showcasing our first-time corresponding authors, monthly 10th anniversary cover art round-ups and a special anniversary editorial by Editors-in-Chief Anders Hagfeldt, Jeroen Cornelissen and Natalie Stingelin.

Follow us on Twitter (@JMaterChem), WeChat and sign up to our mailings to keep up to date with our latest anniversary activities.

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Journal of Materials Chemistry 10-year Anniversary Survey.

To celebrate 10 years of Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C we asked you to contribute your thoughts and perspectives about the development of materials chemistry and the future of the field!

We asked 3 questions to our authors, reviewers, and readers across the 3 journals:

  • What development in materials chemistry do you see as having the biggest impact over the last 10 years?
  • Where do you see the direction of materials chemistry research heading in the next 10 years?
  • What topic would you like to see more of in the journal?

Click on the links below to see the individual journal highlights.

Letter 'A' filled with answers from the survey. Energy, Conversion, Specialist, Catalysts, Hydrogen, Renewable, Materials, Storage.

JMCA Survey results

Letter 'B' filled with answers from the survey. Cancer, Therapy, Targeted, Nanomaterials, Biomaterials, Diagnosis, Treatment, Hydrogels.

JMCB Survey results

Letter 'C' filled with answers from the survey. Sustainability, Sensing, Green, Organic, Optical, Energy, Solar, Harvesting, Bioelectronics, Metamaterials.

JMCC Survey results

All the answers were pooled and formed into a word cloud to represent the past, present and future of the Journal of Materials Chemistry family.

Letters 'J' 'M' 'C' filled with materials chemistry related words in different colours.

 

So how did your contribution compare to the rest of the community? We appreciate all of your responses and it has certainly shed some light on our communities’ perspectives in regard to the materials chemistry field – past, present and future.

Don’t forget to check out all of our special Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C 10-year anniversary celebrations, including our 10-year Anniversary Community spotlight blog, the #myfirstJMC collections showcasing our first-time corresponding authors, monthly 10th anniversary cover art round-ups and a special anniversary editorial by Editors-in-Chief Anders Hagfeldt, Jeroen Cornelissen and Natalie Stingelin.

Follow us on Twitter (@JMaterChem), WeChat and sign up to our mailings to keep up to date with our latest anniversary activities. We are excited to celebrate our anniversary year and we are grateful to our community for all their support!

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Journal of Materials Chemistry C 10th anniversary survey – the results are in

To celebrate 10 years of Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C, we asked you to contribute your thoughts and perspectives about the development of materials chemistry and the future of the field!

We asked 3 questions to Journals of Materials Chemistry C authors, reviewers, and readers. Below we discuss our findings and share some of the common trends amongst the Journal of Materials Chemistry C community responses.

Question 1:

What development in materials chemistry for optical, magnetic and electronic applications do you see as having the biggest impact over the last 10 years?

Responses to this question seemed to be divided across a few key topics – materials related to solar energy conversion and perovskites were common, as were hybrid and organic materials. As you would expect, there were also many responses related to devices such as optoelectronic devices and electroluminescent devices.

 

 

The letter 'C' filled with words from survey responses. Cells, Solar, Materials, Devices, Applications, Perovskite, Hybrid, Halide, Optical, Organic, Electroluminescence.

 

 

 

The letter 'C' filled with words from survey responses in different colours. Energy, Sensing, Organic, Materials, Optimisation, Sustainability, Bioelectronics, Green. Question 2:

Where do you see the direction of materials chemistry research for optical, magnetic and electronic applications heading in the next 10 years?

Responses to this question certainly focussed towards energy research, specifically optimisation of energy harvesting and storage using sustainable sources. New devices and electronics were predicted to be the root of these developments alongside the development and application of organic materials in bioelectronics and technology.

Question 3:

What topic would you like to see more of in Journal of Materials Chemistry C?

Responses to this question illuminates our broad and diverse community, with requests for more research based on devices, sensing and optics (which just so happens to be our specialty!) You would also like to see more on electroluminescent materials, as well as solar energy research and sustainable energy sources. By far my favourite word which appeared in our responses was ‘exploration’. That is truly something to look forward to!

The letter 'C' filled with words from survey responses. Devices, Materials, Soft, Sensing, Optical, Energy, Chemical, Quantum, Molecular, Energy, Electrochemical, Optoelectronic, Photonic, Sustainability, Novel.

So how did your contribution compare to the rest of the community? We appreciate all of your responses and it has certainly shed some light on our communities’ perspectives in regard to the materials chemistry field – past, present and future.

Discover the results for the Journal of Materials Chemistry A survey and Journal of Materials Chemistry B survey.

Don’t forget to check out all of our special Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C 10-year anniversary celebrations, including our 10-year Anniversary Community spotlight blog, the #myfirstJMC collections showcasing our first-time corresponding authors, monthly 10th anniversary cover art round-ups and a special anniversary editorial by Editors-in-Chief Anders Hagfeldt, Jeroen Cornelissen and Natalie Stingelin.

Follow us on Twitter (@JMaterChem), WeChat and sign up to our mailings to keep up to date with our latest anniversary activities.

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Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C 10th Anniversary Community Spotlight: Dedicated Authors

This year we are pleased to celebrate 10 years since Journal of Materials Chemistry was split into three respective journals: Journal of Materials Chemistry AB and C, each focusing on a different aspect of materials chemistry. We are grateful to our fantastic community of authors, reviewers, Board members and readers and wanted to showcase just some of them in a series of ‘Community Spotlight’ blog articles.

Next in our ‘Community Spotlight’ series, we feature some of our authors who have supported us by publishing in Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B or C regularly over the last ten years. We have asked them what they like most about publishing with the journal and how their research has evolved over the years. Check out their interview responses below.

 

Prof. Ghim Wei Ho

Prof. Ghim Wei Ho is currently the Vice Dean of Student Life and a full professor of the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the National University of Singapore (NUS). She leads the Sustainable Smart Solar System research group working on fundamental and applied research on nanosystems with emerging low-dimensional nanomaterials, interfacial interactions, and hybridized functionalities for energy, environment, electronics, and healthcare. She has co-authored more than 200 papers in international refereed journals. She was an elected Scholar at Selwyn College, University of Cambridge, and is a Cambridge Commonwealth Society Fellow since 2006. She is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC). In 2014, she was awarded the L’OREAL UNESCO for Women in Science Fellowship. In 2015, she was the honoree winner of the JCI’s Ten Outstanding Young Persons (TOYP) Award in the Science and/or Technological Development category. In 2016, she was honored as the Science & Technology winner for the Great Women of Our Time and the ASEAN-US Science Prize for women. She is serving as an Associate Editor of Journal of Materials Chemistry A and Materials Advances, as well as Editorial Advisory Boards of Advanced Sustainable Systems, ChemPlusChem, Advanced Materials Technologies, and ChemNanoMat.

What do you like most about Journal of Materials Chemistry A as a place to publish your latest materials chemistry research?

What I appreciate most about Journal of Materials Chemistry A as a platform for publishing my latest materials chemistry research is the journal’s commitment to showcasing high-quality, cutting-edge research. The rigorous peer-review process and the esteemed editorial board ensure that the published works maintain a high standard, which adds value to the research community. Additionally, the wide readership and accessibility of the journal facilitate the dissemination of knowledge and allow for fruitful collaborations.

How has your research evolved from your first Journal of Materials Chemistry A article to your most recent publication in the journal?

The evolution of my research from my first Journal of Materials Chemistry A article to my most recent publication in the journal is evident in the breadth and depth of the topics explored. My first publication focused on the development of a cost-effective optical technique for real-time monitoring of nucleation and growth dynamics in Ga:ZnO films. This work demonstrated the potential for controlled, low-cost aqueous routes to produce high-quality transparent conductor films. Fast forward to my latest publication, which is a review of the recent advances in atmospheric water harvesting and moisture-enabled energy generation technologies. This demonstrates the progression in my research interests, moving from materials synthesis and characterization to broader applications in sustainability and energy conversion. Throughout this journey, the Journal of Materials Chemistry A has provided an excellent platform for sharing my research with the scientific community.

 

Prof. Guoping Chen

Guoping Chen was an Associate Editor for Journal of Materials Chemistry B for 9 years until last June. He is a Group Leader at National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) and a Professor at University of Tsukuba, Japan. He received his Ph.D. from Kyoto University in 1997 majoring in polymer biomaterials and did postdoctoral research until 2000. He joined the Tissue Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology as a Researcher in 2000 and a Senior Researcher in 2003. He moved to the Biomaterials Center, NIMS as a Senior Researcher in 2004 and was promoted to Group Leader in 2007. He served as a Principal Investigator and Unit Director of the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, NIMS from 2011 to 2017. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC, 2015), the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE, 2017) and the International Union of Societies for Biomaterials Science and Engineering (FBSE, 2020). His research focuses on biomaterials, scaffolds, biomimetic matrices, micro-patterning, surface modification, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and nanomedicine.

What do you like most about Journal of Materials Chemistry B as a place to publish your latest materials chemistry research?

I think Journal of Materials Chemistry B is one of the most prestigious journals in the field of materials chemistry. It bridges a broad scope in materials chemistry from fundamental research to biological and medical applications. Its high quality, reputation and broad readership provide an excellent opportunity to rapidly share and disseminate the latest research findings in the community.

What made you decide to keep publishing your work with the journal over the past years?

In addition to the high quality, the fast turn-around time and good service are very attractive. There are many channels for authors to communicate and discuss their manuscripts with the editors.

 How has your research evolved from your first Journal of Materials Chemistry B article to your most recent publication in the journal?

Significant progress has been made in our research since our first Journal of Materials Chemistry B article that is related to bioactive scaffolds was published in 2014. Reading the high-quality articles in this journal allows us to follow the innovative knowledge and latest development in materials chemistry. We have been incorporating some novel ideas and methods in our research to synthesize bioadaptive materials with more biomimetic structures and higher functions.

 

Prof. Antonio Facchetti

Prof. Antonio Facchetti is a Research Professor at Northwestern University and a Guest Professor at Linkoping University. He is also a co-founder and currently the Chief Technology Officer of Flexterra Corporation. He has published more than 560 research articles, 15 book chapters, and holds more than 120 patents. In 2010 he was selected among the “TOP 100 MATERIALS SCIENTISTS OF THE PAST DECADE (2000-2010)” by Thomson Reuters and has been recognized as a Highly Cited Scientist since 2015. He received the ACS Award for Creative Invention, the Giulio Natta Gold Medal of the Italian Chemical Society, the team IDTechEx Printed Electronics Europe Award, the corporate Flextech Award. He is a Fellow of the European Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Inventors, MRS, AAAS, PMSE, Kavli, and RSC. Facchetti is an Associate Editor of Journal of Materials Chemistry C. Prof. Facchetti’s research interests include synthesis of organic and metal oxide semiconductor, conductor and dielectric materials, electronic and mixed ionic-electronic conductors, molecular doping, transistors, circuits, organic SERS devices, sensors, batteries, and photovoltaics.

What made you decide to keep publishing your work with Journal of Materials Chemistry C over the past years?

Since my research spans from new synthetic methodologies to engineering of devices based on novel materials, JMCC is ideal to disseminate very novel results to a broad audience comprising scientists from academia, national labs and industrial research laboratories.

How has your research evolved from your first Journal of Materials Chemistry C article to your most recent publication in the journal?

I have been interested in developing materials for opto-electronics for my entire career. However, while my initial work had more emphasis in the molecular design and synthetic aspects of electro-optic and electron transporting semiconductors now I am more focussed on combining new materials for different device functions particularly where photonic and electronic signals are coupled and ionic-electronic conductors for bioelectronics.

 

Prof. Jean’ne Shreeve

Jean’ne M. Shreeve is a Montana native and received a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry at the University of Washington, Seattle.  She has been at the University of Idaho since 1961 where she served as chemistry department head and vice president for research and graduate studies.  In 2011, Shreeve was named a University Distinguished Professor.  Her research interests include the design, syntheses, characterization, and reactions of energetic materials, fluorine-containing compounds, and energetic  ionic liquids published in more than 725 papers in refereed journals.

What do you like most about Journal of Materials Chemistry A as a place to publish your latest materials chemistry research?

Having grown up with various Royal Society of Chemistry journals, we expected that this new venture, Journal of Materials Chemistry, would be high class. We were not disappointed nor surprised when the manuscript quality and pressure demanded division into three journals with one – Journal of Materials Chemistry A having a main focus on the materials for energy, including materials for energy storage and conversion, conservation of scarce natural resources and sustainability and green processes.  This enables attraction of the very best science resulting in a surging publication pressure leading to an almost sky rocketing Impact Factor value.  The Journal of Materials Chemistry A has led the way as the progress and direction of these fields have been modified with changing sophistication and interest of the science.

What made you decide to keep publishing your work with the journal over the past years?

Being published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A acknowledges that the work being done in our lab is at the very top of the field and that it will share pages in every issue only with the very best. This will tend to draw attention to our chemistry while simultaneously keep us up to date as we peruse the contents of each issue.

 

Prof. Neil Robertson

Neil Robertson is an Associate Editor of Journal of Materials Chemistry C. He graduated from the University of Edinburgh and worked in FU Berlin, University of Wales and Imperial College London before returning to University of Edinburgh. He leads research on molecular materials and nanomaterials for solar photovoltaics, photocatalytic water treatment and electrical energy storage. His team won the Kerr Macgregor Award for solar innovation in 2021. He is Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (UK). He has previously served as Elected Member of RSC Dalton Council and RSC Materials Chemistry Division Council and is currently Dean International Partnerships for Science and Engineering at the University of Edinburgh.

 

What do you like most about Journal of Materials Chemistry A as a place to publish your latest materials chemistry research?

I have always found that the J. Mater. Chem. journal family, and RSC journals more generally, are run for the benefit of the chemistry community, with high editorial standards and a commitment to strive towards diversity and inclusion.

 What made you decide to keep publishing your work with the journal over the past years?

The quality and constructive approach of referees has provided very valuable feedback on manuscripts and has greatly helped to improve the final published papers. I’m always very grateful to referees for their expert input and advice.

 

Prof. Cheol Seong Hwang

Cheol Seong Hwang received an MSc degree in 1989 and a Ph.D. in 1993 in the department of inorganic materials science and engineering, both from Seoul National University-Seoul, South Korea. In 1993 he joined the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, MD USA, as a postdoctoral research fellow. Then, he joined Samsung Electronics as a senior researcher in 1994 and contributed to semiconductor memory device fields by researching high-k dielectrics, including (Ba,Sr)TiO3. Since 1998, he has been a professor in the materials science and engineering department at Seoul National University. He has authored or co-authored more than 686 papers in international peer-reviewed scientific journals, cited ~40,000 times (H-index 93), and has given over 100 invited presentations at international conferences. He also holds 183 (89 approved, 94 under review) international/domestic patents. His research interests include high-k gate oxide, DRAM capacitors, new memory devices including RRAM/PRAM, ferroelectric materials and devices, negative capacitance effect, and thin-film transistors. He is also working actively in neuromorphic computing devices/materials. He is a member of the Korean Academy of Science and Technology, the National Academy of Engineering of Korea, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK.

What made you decide to keep publishing your work with the Journal of Materials Chemistry C over the past years?

The journal’s review process has always been plausibly accurate and timely. In addition, the reviewer selections have been encouraging, and their comments were generally helpful in improving the quality of the submission. Besides, many other journals, mainly from commercial publishers, went to commercialize their products. As a result, the review process has been degraded, although their journal’s impact factors have been increased. Journal of Materials Chemistry C has not been strived in this way, rendering it a notable venue for sincere scientific work in the field.

Which of your Journal of Materials Chemistry C publications would you say you are most proud of and why?

Jeon et al., Enhanced Pseudo-Atomic Layer Deposition of Antimony Telluride Thin Films by Co-injecting NH3 Gas with Both Precursors (DOI: 10.1039/d3tc00007a). The reviewers have very favourably reviewed this work, and, as a result, the paper has been selected as the cover paper of the 10th-anniversary issue of the journal.

 

Thank you to all of our loyal and regular authors for their support of the Journal of Materials Chemistry family of journals over the years.

We hope you enjoyed finding out more about some of our authors. Keep an eye out for our next ‘Community Spotlight’!

If you missed any of our previous ‘Community Spotlight’ blog posts, check them out here.

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Journal of Materials Chemistry 10th Anniversary Cover Showcase – April

This year, as you may know, Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B, and C are celebrating their 10th anniversary! To join in the celebrations, we’ve asked authors to find creative ways to add a ’10’ to the cover artwork and are excited to show you the results in our monthly cover showcase.

To join in the celebration, you can view the #JMCs10Years hashtag on Twitter and follow the posts for the year so far.

Here are this month’s covers:

 

Citrated cellulose nanocrystals from post-consumer cotton textiles

 

 

A highly permeable porous organic cage composite membrane for gas separation

 

 

High-throughput transient photoluminescence spectrometer for deep learning of thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials

 

Photo-response modulation of organic transistors for multi-level light sensing using active layer microstructure control

 

Recent advances in interfacial solar vapor generation: clean water production and beyond

 

 

 

 

Ultrathin electrochemical layer tailoring of lithiophilic materials with 3D hierarchical configuration for lithium metal batteries: Sn/Cu6Sn5@Cu2+1O nanowires on Cu foam

 

 

Improved alkaline water electrolysis system for green energy: sulfonamide antibiotic-assisted anodic oxidation integrated with hydrogen generation

 

 

Brain-like optoelectronic artificial synapses with ultralow energy consumption based on MXene floating-gates for emotion recognition

 

 

 

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Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C 10th Anniversary Community Spotlight: Advisory board

This year we are pleased to celebrate 10 years since Journal of Materials Chemistry was split into three respective journals: Journal of Materials Chemistry AB and C, each focusing on a different aspect of materials chemistry. We are grateful to our fantastic community of authors, reviewers, Board members and readers and wanted to showcase just some of them in a series of ‘Community Spotlight’ blog articles.

In the second of our ‘Community Spotlight’ series, we feature some more of the Advisory Board members who have supported Journal of Materials Chemistry Aor over the years and have asked them what they like most about being on the journal’s Advisory Boards and about their recent Journal of Materials Chemistry publications. Check out their interview responses below.

 

Prof. Magda Titirici

 

Prof. Magda Titirici is a Chair of Sustainable Energy Materials in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London. Her research interests are related to the development of sustainable materials for energy storage and conversion in particular batteries beyond Li ion as well as sustainable electrocatalytic processes for oxygen reduction free of critical metal or biomass oxidation with H2 production. She has served as an Associate Editor for Journal of Materials Chemistry A between 2013-2022. She has published over 300 papers in this area among which > 15 are in J Mater Chem A. She remains currently in the J Mater Chem A advisory board and continues to engage with the materials chemistry community in her role of the President of the RSC Materials Chemistry Community.

What do you like most about being on the Advisory Board for Journal of Materials Chemistry A?

I like being at the forefront of materials chemistry research by being involved in reviewing topical papers, setting new strategies for the journal, suggesting special issues, and indirectly interacting with different scientific topics, especially following on from my previous role as an Associate Editor for J Mater Chem A. I believe that the J Mater Chem family works with the materials chemistry community for the materials chemistry community, and you always feel included as scientist no matter where you work in the world.

What do you think of Journal of Materials Chemistry A as a place to publish impactful materials chemistry research?

J Mater Chem A is indeed the ideal place to publish research in materials chemistry related to green materials, energy and other environmental applications in order to maximise impact and visibility of research. This is due to the journal’s great scientific reputation and the professionalism of to its editorial team. J Mater Chem was one of the first journal I have published in at the very start of my academic career. It has been instrumental for my academic career especially during my early days.

Where do you see the materials chemistry field in the next 10 years?

I believe that theory driven materials discovery using high throughput automatic robots optimised by AI to balance cost performance and sustainability will increase significantly. This is where I see the future of materials chemistry.

 

Prof. Markus Niederberger

Markus Niederberger is an Advisory Board member for Journal of Materials Chemistry A. He is a Professor of Multifunctional Materials in the Department of Materials at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. He received his diploma in Chemistry and his doctoral degree from ETH Zurich. After a postdoctoral stay at the University of California Santa Barbara he was a group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces. His group is active in diverse research areas ranging from nanoparticle synthesis to aerogels for gas-phase photocatalysis, flexible, transparent and degradable batteries, polymers for corrosion protection and luminescent materials.

What do you like most about being on the Advisory Board for Journal of Materials Chemistry A?
As an Advisory Board member I often act as adjudicative referee for manuscripts with conflicting reports. I like doing this because it is very instructive for me. I learn about the different views and opinions of experts on certain topics and I have to weigh them carefully so that I can make a sound and fair recommendation.

Where do you see the materials chemistry field in the next 10 years?
It is clear that sustainability will become a focus. However, I also believe that the aspect of rapid implementation of research results in industry and technology will continue to gain in importance, which will strongly influence research and publication activities.

 

Prof. Ross Forgan

 

Prof Ross Forgan is an Advisory Board member for Journal of Materials Chemistry B and is a Professor of Supramolecular and Materials Chemistry at the University of Glasgow. His research into the application of metal-organic frameworks in biomimetic catalysis and nanoscale drug delivery is underpinned by fundamental studies into molecular recognition and self-assembly processes inside nanoporous materials. He graduated with a PhD in supramolecular inorganic chemistry, under the supervision of Prof Peter Tasker, from the University of Edinburgh in 2008. A three year postdoctoral position (2008-2011) with Nobel Laureate Prof Sir J Fraser Stoddart at Northwestern University, USA, saw him research organic interlocked molecules, chemical topology and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). He returned to Scotland in 2011 as a senior research fellow in Prof Lee Cronin’s group at the University of Glasgow, investigating hybrid materials and applications of 3D-printing. After 11 months, he was awarded a Royal Society University Research Fellowship (2012-2021) to begin his independent academic career, with subsequent promotions to Reader in 2016 and Professor in 2019.

What do you like most about being on the Advisory Board for Journal of Materials Chemistry B?

Having an overview of the wide range of exciting materials research that is being published, building links with others in the field through things like special issues (I am co-editing a special issue for JMC B in 2023), and supporting the younger members of the community through initiatives such as the JMC lectureship.

Could you provide a brief summary of your most recent Journal of Materials Chemistry B publication?

Our most recent publication was a review article on the application of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as nanoscale imaging agents led by Dr Fatma Demir Duman. The review covers a wide range of potential imaging applications to which MOFs can be applied, focussing on structure-activity relationships and highlighted the great potential for MOFs to act as multifunctional vectors in nanomedicine.

 

 

Prof. Marta Mas-Torrent

 

Prof. Marta Mas-Torrent is an Advisory Board member for Journal of Materials Chemistry C. She received her PhD in 2002 working at the Institut de Ciència de Materials (ICMAB-CSIC) in Barcelona (Spain) and at The Royal Institution of Great Britain in London (UK). Afterwards, she carried out postdoctoral research at Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft (The Netherlands). Since June 2007 she obtained a research position at ICMAB-CSIC. In 2012 she was awarded with an ERC Starting Grant project and one year later an ERC-PoC project. She has also participated in many other European and national projects as well as in two industrial related projects. She is co-author of around 190 publications and co-inventor of 7 patents. Prof. Mas-Torrent received the 2013 Oliver Kahn International Award for her contributions in the field of materials science and the Prize of Young Researcher 2006 of the Spanish Royal Society of Chemistry (RSEQ). Currently she is leading an interdisciplinary research group focused on the design and preparation of new functional molecular materials for their application in organic electronic devices.

Her interests range from fundamental studies in order to better understand materials properties to a more applied perspective aiming at developing proof-of-principle devices. Particularly, she is interested in structure-property correlation studies, surface self-assembly, processing of organic semiconductors, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), electrolyte-gated organic field effect transistors (EGOFETs), charge transport and sensors.

What do you think of Journal of Materials Chemistry C as a place to publish impactful materials chemistry research?

The J. Mater. Chem. C is a widely read journal among the materials science community and holds a strong and long history. The journal is suitable to publish novel materials, fundamental studies of appealing materials as well as advanced applications. In particular, related to my research field of molecular electronics, I always found here very inspiring works.

Could you provide a brief summary of your most recent Journal of Materials Chemistry C publication?

In my last publication, we report the fabrication of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) that respond to UV radiation. The OFETs have been prepared using as active layer a blend of an organic semiconductor with different insulating polymers. We show that the nature of the binding polymer has a significant impact on the device performance and photoresponse due to the tuning of the charge traps. Therefore, this work demonstrates that the use of a binding polymer is a useful tool to optimise the OFET electrical characteristics as well as its photoresponsivity.

 

Prof. Yanlin Song

 

Yanlin Song is on the Advisory Board for Journal of Materials Chemistry C and is a professor and director of Key Laboratory of Green Pringting at Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ICCAS). He received his Ph.D. degree from the Department of Chemistry at Peking University in 1996. Then he conducted research as a postdoctoral follow at Tsinghua University from 1996 to 1998. He has been working at ICCAS since 1998. His research interests include nano-materials and green-printing technology, printed electrics and photonics, fabrication and applications of nanostructured devices. He has published more than 400 papers and 15 books and chapters, with a H-index of 95, and has been granted more than 130 patents from China, USA, European Union , Japan and Korea, etc.

Where do you see the materials chemistry field in the next 10 years?

In the next 10 years, the design and preparation of new molecules and materials will be influenced greatly by Artificial Intelligence, such as DNA Synthesis and Materials Genome, and the disciplinary crossing and integration of Chemistry, Materials and Bioscience will be more and more important and popular.

 Could you provide a brief summary of your most recent Journal of Materials Chemistry C publication?

Recently, we have published a review article with the title “Interface engineering of perovskite nanocrystals: challenges and opportunities for biological imaging and detection”. Perovskite nanocrystals (PNCs) have attracted much attention due to their unique optical properties, including high photoluminescence quantum yield, narrow emission and tunable wavelength. This perspective focuses on the recent progress of these promising materials as fluorescent probes for biological diagnosis. Efforts on the interface engineering are presented on how to construct water-resistant and biocompatible PNC probes. Their applications in biological diagnosis are discussed with a focus on cell and tumor imaging, biomolecular detection, and fluorescence immunoassay. With the high tolerance of defect, precisely tunable emission, and strong light absorption coefficient, the physical and optical properties of PNCs are superior to traditional fluorescent dyes. Finally, this perspective discusses the challenges and opportunities for the application of PNCs as fluorescent labeling probes in biological fields.

 

We hope you enjoyed finding out more about some more of our Advisory Board members. Keep an eye out for our next ‘Community Spotlight’!

If you missed the first of our ‘Community Spotlight’ blog posts, check it out here.

 

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Journal of Materials Chemistry 10th Anniversary Cover Showcase – March

This year, as you may know, Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B, and C are celebrating their 10th anniversary! To join in the celebrations, we’ve asked authors to find creative ways to add a ’10’ to the cover artwork and are excited to show you the results in our monthly cover showcase.

To join in the celebration, you can view the #JMCs10Years hashtag on Twitter and follow the posts for the year so far.

Here are this month’s covers:

 

Ultrafine-fiber thermistors for microscale biomonitoring

 

 

A switchable system between magnetic and natural circularly polarised luminescence via J-aggregation using photosynthetic antenna model compounds

Post-imprinting modification: electrochemical and scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of a semi-covalently surface imprinted polymer

 

Lithium–sulfur cells with a sulfide solid electrolyte/polysulfide cathode interface

 

Chitosan based dielectrics for use in single walled carbon nanotube-based thin film transistors

 

 

A binder-driven cathode–electrolyte interphase via a displacement reaction for high voltage Na3V2(PO4)2F3 cathodes in sodium-ion batteries

 

Surface modified materials for active capture of enzymes

 

 

 

Orthogonal light-triggered multiple effects based on photochromic nanoparticles for DNA cleavage and beyond

 

 

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Journal of Materials Chemistry Anniversary Cover Showcase – Feb

This year, as you may know, Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B, and C are celebrating their 10th anniversary! To join in the celebrations, we’ve asked authors to find creative ways to add a ’10’ to the cover artwork and are excited to show you the results in our monthly cover showcase.

To join in the celebration, you can view the #JMCs10Years hashtag on Twitter and follow the posts for the year so far.

Here are this month’s covers:

 

Tuning CPL by helical pitch modulation in helically flexible small organic multichromophores

 

Facile dimerization strategy for producing narrowband green multi-resonance delayed fluorescence emitters

 

Enhancing energy storage performance in Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3-based lead-free relaxor ferroelectric ceramics along a stepwise optimization route

A charge-free and membrane-free hybrid capacitive mixing system for salinity gradient energy harvesting

 

Improving the intrinsic conductivity of δ-MnO2 by indium doping for high-performance neutral aqueous sodium-ion supercapacitors with commercial-level mass-loading

 

Polymorph- and molecular alignment-dependent lasing behaviors of a cyano-substituted thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer

 

 

Solvent-free temperature gradient melt formation of efficient visible-to-UV photon upconversion organic films with subsolar threshold and over 100 h photostability in air

 

 

Thermally stable and strongly emitted CPL in Eu(d-facam)3 hybrid solids with an alkylammonium salt

 

 

 

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Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C 10th Anniversary Community Spotlight: Advisory Board

This year we are pleased to celebrate 10 years since Journal of Materials Chemistry was split into three respective journals: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C, each focusing on a different aspect of materials chemistry. We are grateful to our fantastic community of authors, reviewers, Board members and readers and wanted to showcase just some of them in a series of ‘Community Spotlight’ blog articles.

In this blog post, we feature some of the Advisory Board members who have supported Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B or C over the years and have asked them what they like most about being on the journal’s Advisory Boards. Check out their interview responses below.

 

Prof. Hiroshi Imahori

Hiroshi Imahori is an Advisory Board member for Journal of Materials Chemistry A. He received his Doctor of Science from Kyoto University in 1990. After post-doctoral training at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, he was Assistant and Associate Professors at Osaka University. Since 2002, he has been a Professor at Kyoto University. His current interests involve solar energy conversion and organic functional materials. For his work, he has been awarded the Japanese Photochemistry Association Prize (2004), Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Prize (2006), the Chemical Society of Japan Award for Creative Work (2006), the Osaka Science Prize (2007), Fellow of the Electrochemical Society (2016), and the Chemical Society of Japan Award (2022).

What do you like most about being on the Advisory Board for Journal of Materials Chemistry A?

HI: I have the privilege to access the academic network of JMCA and enjoy working together with people involved closely in JMCA.

What do you think of Journal of Materials Chemistry A as a place to publish impactful materials chemistry research?

HI: I believe JMCA is one of the prestigious platforms for promoting recent results in energy-related science and technology.

 

Prof. Sahika Inal

Sahika Inal is an Advisory Board member for Journal of Materials Chemistry B and is the recipient of the 2022 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship. She is an Associate Professor of Bioengineering with co-affiliations in Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering programs at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). Her expertise is in polymer science and bioelectronic devices, particularly in the photophysics of conjugated polymers, characterization of polymer films, and the design of biosensors and actuators. Since 2016, the Inal lab at KAUST exploits the functionalities of organic electronic materials, investigates ionic/electronic charge transport, and designs electronic devices that record/stimulate biological signals.

What do you like most about being on the Advisory Board for Journal of Materials Chemistry B?

SI: RSC, in general, is a publisher that works for and alongside scientists. JMC B editorial team has been very open to the advisory board’s suggestions, and they want the journal to be a home for good science and a community with members that support each other. So, I feel that my voice is valued and all decisions taken are for the good of the community.

What do you think of Journal of Materials Chemistry B as a place to publish impactful materials chemistry research?

SI: I have been reading papers in JMC B since I was in graduate school and some have affected the direction of research we took in my group. I have been writing and reviewing for JMC B and I can certainly say that the peer review process is thoughtful and done in a way to make the science in that paper more complete. The editors in JMC B work to help authors make their work better. Even when I got a paper rejected, the reviewer’s comments were helpful in resubmitting it.

Could you provide a brief summary of your most recent Journal of Materials Chemistry B publication?

SI: I wrote an editorial piece on the recent work about conducting gels developed for wearable electronics. Mechanically compliant and electronic materials are at the core of devices that can electronically interface soft biological tissues. I summarized some of the work that was published in this area in the past year in JMC B and aimed to highlight the novelties and opportunities presented by each research idea. It is very interesting to read all these papers, see a common thread, and witness how each, even maybe small, development shown in each paper is now contributing to our common knowledge about this special class of materials. In a decade from now on, this collective knowledge in this class of materials will either generate a new materials type or will directly form the basis of wearable sensors, sensor-integrated prosthetics, and robotics technologies.

 

Prof. Christian Müller

Christian Müller is an Advisory Board member for Journal of Materials Chemistry C and is a professor in Polymer Science at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. He is a Wallenberg Scholar and received an ERC Consolidator Grant in 2022. Prior to Chalmers he completed postdoctoral stays at ICMAB-CSIC in Barcelona and Linköping University. He holds a Dr.Sc. in Materials Science from ETH Zürich (2008) and a M.Sci. in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (2004). His research interests include the use of organic semiconductors and polymer blends in the fields of wearable electronics and energy technology.

What do you like most about being on the Advisory Board for Journal of Materials Chemistry C?

CM: I have the opportunity to aid the community work of the RSC, especially the support of young faculty.

Where do you see the materials chemistry field in the next 10 years?

CM: I anticipate that sustainability will be the central theme.

In your opinion, how could members of the community be more involved with the journal?

CM: Involvement could be through the proposal of focus issues and perspective style manuscripts that highlight important trends in materials chemistry.

 

Dr Jun Fu

Dr. Jun Fu received his B.Sc. at Wuhan University and Ph.D. at the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). After working in Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research and Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Jun took a full professor position in Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, CAS. In 2019, he moved to Sun Yat-sen University in 2019. His research focuses on the synthesis and engineering of biomimetic and bio-functional polymers for applications as medical implants, wearable flexible electronics, and soft actuators. Jun joined the Advisory Board of Journal of Materials Chemistry B since 2017.

Twitter: @ProfFuSYSU_MSE

What do you like most about being on the Advisory Board for Journal of Materials Chemistry B?

JF: It has been an amazing experience. I am excited to discuss with peer Board Members on the development of this esteemed journal. I have learned a lot from my peers and the Editors. I also enjoy recommending young scientists to this journal for its awards and special issue collections. It greatly helps promote the young scientists and spread the outreach of this journal.

Where do you see the materials chemistry field in the next 10 years?

JF: Materials chemistry provides very powerful toolkits to confront these challenges in the fields of healthcare, resources, energy, environment, and sustainability, among others. People are endowing great efforts in the development of smart biomedical devices, flexible electronics, soft robotics, tissue engineering scaffolds, and 3D/4D bioprinting, for example, to promote breakthrough and practical applications in the next 10 years. I believe innovations in these fields will highly benefit our welfare.

Could you provide a brief summary of your most recent Journal of Materials Chemistry B publication?

JF: Journal of Materials Chemistry B is always one of our first choices to publish our articles. To date, I have published 20 papers in Journal of Materials Chemistry B. In 2021, we published a review article “Tissue adhesive hydrogel bioelectronics” in Journal of Materials Chemistry B. In this publication, we reviewed recent progress on strategies to prepare tissue adhesive hydrogels and representative adhesion mechanisms for conductive hydrogels to adhere on biotissues. We are delighted that this review article is well recognized by readers and receives good citations.

 

We hope you enjoyed finding out more about some of our Advisory Board members. Keep an eye out for our next Community Spotlight blog post!

 

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