Author Archive

Special collection in memoriam of Prof. Susan Odom

This special collection across Materials Advances, Journal of Materials Chemistry A and Journal of Materials Chemistry C is in memoriam of Prof. Susan A. Odom, who sadly passed away on April 18, 2021.

 

Read the collection

 

Susan’s fundamental understanding of electro-chemical devices, coupled with her deep appreciation for materials chemistry, allowed her to push new boundaries. Amongst these were the development of new redox flow batteries, the design of lithium-ion batteries with redox active organic molecules, and the advancement of novel materials screening methods.

This special collection covers the topics that have been at the core of the scientific activity of Susan. As a chemist, she had a tremendous impact on the broad fields of organic electronics and electrochemical energy storage contributing research on the development of stable electro-active materials, the design of new electrodes and electrolytes for electro-chemical devices, the establishment of understanding of electron transfer reactions and, generally, the synthesis of new conjugated organic materials.

Guest edited by Veronica Augustyn, Kelsey B. Hatzell, Malika Jeffries-El, Jodie Lutkenhaus, and Natalie Stingelin.

 

All of the articles in the collection are free to access until 30th November, 2022. Articles in Materials Advances will always be free to access. A small selection of articles from the issue is provided below.

 

Introduction to the special collection in memoriam of Susan A. Odom (16 November 1980–18 April 2021)
Veronica Augustyn, Kelsey B. Hatzell, Malika Jeffries-EL, Jodie L. Lutkenhaus and Natalie Stingelin
Mater. Adv., 2022, Advance Article DOI: 10.1039/D2MA90085H

 

On the challenges of materials and electrochemical characterization of concentrated electrolytes for redox flow batteries
Alexis M. Fenton, Jr, Rahul Kant Jha, Bertrand J. Neyhouse, Aman Preet Kaur, Daniel A. Dailey, Susan A. Odom and Fikile R. Brushett
J. Mater. Chem. A, 2022, 10, 17988-17999 DOI: 10.1039/D2TA00690A

 

Functionalized anthrathienothiophenes: synthesis, properties, and integration into OFETs
Garrett Fregoso, Gehan S. Rupasinghe, Maryam Shahi, Karl Thorley, Sean Parkin, Alexandra F. Paterson and John Anthony
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2022, Advance Article DOI: 10.1039/D2TC02977D

 

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New Collection: Advances in Materials Characterisation

We are delighted to share with you a new collection of articles highlighting some of the most popular recent articles published in Materials Advances on the characterisation of materials. Containing both reviews and original research, the collection includes work on new characterisation methods as well as applications to a variety of systems from MOFs to nanomaterials.

Read the collection

Below is a snapshot of some of the papers in the collection. We hope you enjoy reading these gold open access articles, which are all free to access.

 

Review

The emergence of mass spectrometry for characterizing nanomaterials: atomically precise nanoclusters and beyond
Clothilde Comby-Zerbino, Xavier Dagany, Fabien Chirot, Philippe Dugourd and Rodolphe Antoine
Mater. Adv., 2021, 2, 4896-4913
DOI: 10.1039/D1MA00261A

Communication

The surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering of dye molecules adsorbed on two-dimensional titanium carbide Ti3C2Tx (MXene) film
Satheeshkumar Elumalai,  John R. Lombardi and Masahiro Yoshimura
Mater. Adv., 2020, 1, 146-152
DOI: 10.1039/D0MA00091D

Paper

Effect of conductivity, viscosity, and density of water-in-salt electrolytes on the electrochemical behavior of supercapacitors: molecular dynamics simulations and in situ characterization studies
Débora A. C. da Silva, Manuel J. Pinzón C., Andresa Messias, Eudes E. Fileti, Aline Pascon, Débora V. Franco, Leonardo Morais Da Silva and Hudson G. Zanin
Mater. Adv., 2022, 3, 611-623
DOI: 10.1039/D1MA00890K

 

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Open Call: Bioinspired Artificial Synapses and Neurons Based on Memristors

We are delighted to announce a new themed collection on bioinspired artificial synapses and neurons based on memristors, to be published in Materials Advances, a gold open access journal from the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Guest Edited by Niloufar Raeis-Hosseini, Ruomeng Huang, and Sujaya Kumar Vishwanath.

Brain-inspired artificial synapses compute beyond the bottlenecks of von Neumann architectures by adapting highly sustainable information processing. Fabrication of artificial synapses in a physical device with the functionality of the biological neural network is an attractive research area. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) analog circuits emulate the synaptic performance of hardware-based neural networks. Since the hardware implementation of neuromorphic computation systems based on CMOS consumes much more energy than a natural system, numerous devices have been studied to realize an effective neuromorphic computing system. Among the proposed devices, memristors have emerged as the most efficient candidates to emulate biological synapses with high learning speed.

Memristors are two-terminal nanoelectronic devices with low power consumption, sustainable scaling, cost-effectiveness, and superior computing efficacy. They process information and compromise various fundamental operations that surpass typically integrated circuit technology. The temporal switching recommends that memristors are capable of acting as a physical system that imitates the synaptic memory function more precisely than the CMOS system.

This themed collection aims to highlight the recent developments, opportunities, and challenges in memristors and their applications in neuromorphic devices. We will outline the recent advances in neuromorphic nanodevices based on memristors by focusing on their fabrication and characterization methods. We will emphasize emerging bioinspired memristive devices and their improved performance by device structure and applied pulses engineering. We will also present outlooks of nanoelectronic devices and nanomaterials such as 2D materials, hybrid perovskites, and natural polymers.

We welcome contributions on memristors and artificial synapses in the form of research articles, communications, and reviews in the following categories.

Novel nanomanufacturing and processing methods of memristors:

  • Fabrication and characterization of memristors, memtransistors, and memcapacitors
  • Novel top-down and bottom-up approaches for nanofabrication of memristors
  • Specified electrical and structural characterization techniques
  • Novel approaches to realize flexible or rigid electronic synapses
  • Novel nanomaterials and device structures to increase memristive device reliability and performance

 Novel Memristive Materials:

  • 2D materials such as graphene, phosphorene, and transition metal dichalcogenides
  • Renewable materials, including biodegradables and biocompatible materials
  • Organic and bio-electronic materials
  • Heterogenous structures with organic-inorganic hybrid materials
  • Flexible memristive materials

Emerging memristive devices and architectures:

  • Biomemristors
  • Optoelectronic memristors
  • Ferroelectric memristive systems
  • Spintronic memristors
  • Assimilation of nanomaterials in neuromorphic computing systems based on memristors

Memristive devices enabled neuromorphic computing applications:

  • Artificial synapses and neurons
  • Artificial synapses by renewable materials
  • Photonic and optoelectronic synapses
  • Artificial neural networks
  • Convolutional neural networks
  • Recurrent neural networks such as reservoir computing
  • Logic-in-memory system
  • Neuromorphic and bio-inspired circuits and systems
  • Explanation of operational principle of artificial synapses via modeling

Keywords: memristor, nanoelectronics, neuromorphic computing, artificial synapse, brain-inspired nanodevice

 

Submit before 28 February 2023

 

All submitted papers will go through the standard peer review process of Materials Advances and should meet the journal’s standard requirements as well as fit into the general scope of materials science.

Manuscripts can be submitted here https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ma

Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when you submit your manuscript to say that this is a submission for the themed collection. The Editorial Office and Guest Editors reserve the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection and inclusion of accepted articles in the collection is not guaranteed. Accepted manuscripts will be added to the collection as soon as they are online, and they will be published in a regular issue of Materials Advances.

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Repair and re-use of the outer casing for a Lithium-ion battery cell

An infographic describing a new method to repair and recycle a Li-ion battery pouch

Benign solvents for recycling and re-use of a multi-layer battery pouch
Jean E. Marshall, Bethany Middleton, Dominika Gastol, Roberto Sommerville, Con R. McElroy, Emma Kendrick and Vannessa Goodship
Mater. Adv., 2022, 3, 4973-4981, DOI: 10.1039/D2MA00239F

Meet the authors

Dr. Jean Marshall gained her Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 2008, for investigating surface-initiated polymer chemistry. Her subsequent research work includes postdoctoral work on stimulus-responsive polymeric materials, as well as industrial experience in novel polymers for ink formulations. Since joining the Warwick Manufacturing Group (University of Warwick) in 2019, she has worked on several projects, covering diverse areas including tailored polymers for use in Lithium-ion batteries, polymeric materials as part of a circular economy, and recycling of battery components.
Dominika Gastol joined University of Birmingham in 2019 and has been involved in recycling of Li-ion batteries from EV since then. Her research activities cover development of material recycling streams combined with remanufacturing, automated methods of electrode deposition and advanced microscopic characterisation.
Rob gained a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the university of Birmingham in 2017, where he worked on producing synthetic zeolites from fly ash. Rob worked at the University of Warwick for a year on Lithium-ion battery recycling under Professor Emma Kendrick, before returning to Birmingham to join the ReLiB project in 2018. Rob Sommerville is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with a focus on reutilisation of waste and the circular economy of Lithium Ion Batteries. He is currently a Faraday Institution Research Fellow working on the ReLiB (Recycling and Reuse of Lithium Ion Batteries) project funded by the Faraday Institution, looking at physical separation techniques in the recycling of lithium-ion batteries.
Dr Rob McElroy gained his Ph.D in 2007 at Keele University working on the production of composite materials from copolymers incorporating renewable resources. In 2009 he joined Prof. Pietro Tundo’s Carbonate Chemistry Group at Ca Foscari University of Venice looking into applications of dialkyl carbonates. He joined the Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York as a PDRA in 2011 and has worked on a variety of projects including extraction and separation in supercritical CO2, greening of pharmaceutical chemistry, production of bio-derived polymers, production of bio-derived surfactants, running an industry facing club focusing on circular economy related research called RenewChem, development of new green solvents and solvent applications. His current role is looking at green solvents in electrode formulation and as deputy director of the Circa Renewable Chemistry Institute.
Following 14 years working in industry as a plastic engineer, Dr. Vannessa Goodship joined WMG, University of Warwick in 1997. She gained a PhD in 2002 on multi-material injection moulding and has continued working across multiple sectors on polymer related topics at the academic and industry interface.
Prof Emma Kendrick is Professor of Energy Materials, lead of the Energy Materials Group (EMG) in the School of Metallurgy and Materials and co-director of the Centre for Energy Storage (BCES) at the University of Birmingham (UoB). Her research focus is upon sustainable energy storage technologies, the objective to understand the science and engineering principles which underpin manufacturing and lifetime. Before UoB, she spent two years as Reader in WMG, University of Warwick, and before academia, she led innovations in the battery industry. Latterly as Chief Technologist in Energy Storage at SHARP Laboratories of Europe Ltd (SLE) and prior to that for two highly innovative lithium-ion battery SMEs, Fife Batteries Ltd and Surion Energy Ltd. She completed her PhD in Ceramics at Ceram Research and Keele University, MSc in New Materials at University of Aberdeen, and BSC in chemistry from the University of Manchester.

An interview with Dr. Jean Marshall:

a) What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

I am currently gaining a lot of new knowledge about how lithium-ion batteries work and how complex they are as chemical systems. The electrochemistry of batteries is not necessarily an obvious area for a polymer chemist, but batteries are enormously complicated and there is a lot of scope for experimenting with novel materials in this area. The most difficult challenge here is deciding which research question to tackle first!

 

b) How do you feel about Materials Advances as a place to publish research on this topic?

Materials Advances is an excellent ‘home’ for our work. Open access publishing is great for us as academics and publishing with an RSC journal lends articles good credibility.

 

c) Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

Some researchers prefer to have laser-focus on one niche subject, and that’s definitely the approach that’s encouraged for gaining a PhD. However, in my ‘postdoctoral life’ I’ve definitely found that the most productive projects are really collaborative. So, my advice is to collaborate with as many people as possible, and make sure that they aren’t all in your direct field of research. The more people you talk to, the more you can bounce ideas around, and you’ll find yourself with far more new avenues to explore.

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Call for Papers: Advanced Functional Materials and Manufacturing Processes

Guest Editors: Jessica O. Winter (The Ohio State University), Jawwad Darr (University College London), John Wang (National University Singapore)

Advanced Functional Materials (AFMs): especially nanomaterials, play an important role in catalysis, optoelectronic and quantum materials, biomaterials, and energy harvesting, storage, and conversion materials. AFMs can be designed, synthesized, (or modelled) to possess different (nano)particle/cluster attributes, such as bulk and/or defect structures and surface properties. AFMs can be further consolidated into larger hierarchical arrangements, using additive manufacturing or electrospinning for example, with nano-/micro-structure or surface characteristics that impart new functionality.

Materials Processes: Research involving discovering and translating AFMs from the bench to commercial products can be challenging. Discovery synthesis approaches for new AFMs require materials to be made faster and consistently, so that properties can be compared within compositional space. Thereafter, during scale up, replicating properties can pose a number of challenges. Scale-up can result in inhomogeneous mixing and uneven mass and heat gradients that influence material function. Structure-property relationships can strongly depend on manufacturing method (e.g., thermodynamic vs. kinetic limitations). Consequently, there is a need to better understand the relationship between materials synthesis and consolidation parameters at different scales in order to maintain desired functional properties.

This themed issue aims to explore the latest developments in advanced inorganic functional materials (synthesis, modelling and simulation), novel manufacturing processes including scale up approaches, and property evaluation and optimization. Suggested contributions that address, but are not restricted to, the following topics are welcome:

Advanced Materials

  • Ceramics, metal oxides, nanoparticles, metal organic frameworks, zeolites
  • Combinatorial, structure-property relationships, theory and simulation
  • Catalysts, quantum materials, biomaterials, and energy materials

Materials Processes

  • Batch vs. flow, green synthesis/manufacturing, process control and optimization
  • Hydrothermal/solvothermal, flame, plasma, electrospinning, precipitation methods, etc.
  • Process intensification / scale up
  • Controlled heat treatments/sintering
  • Additive manufacturing/3D printing

If you are interested in contributing to this collection please get in touch with the Editorial Office by email.

Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when you submit your manuscript to say that this is a submission for the themed collection. The Editorial Office and Guest Editors reserve the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection and inclusion of accepted articles in the collection is not guaranteed. All manuscripts will be subject to the journal’s usual peer review process. Accepted manuscripts will be added to the collection as soon as they are online, and they will be published in a regular issue of Materials Advances.

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Low processing temperature for phosphate glass composites

An infographic highlighting a new hydrated phosphate glass composite

Novel optical amorphous phosphate materials with a low melting temperature
Simon Kaser, Théo Guérineau, Clément Strutynski, Reda Zaki, Marc Dussauze, Etienne Durand, Sandra H. Messaddeq, Sylvain Danto, Younès Messaddeq and Thierry Cardinal
Mater. Adv., 2022, 3, 4600-4607, DOI: 10.1039/D1MA00995H

Meet the authors

Simon Kaser obtained a Materials Engineer degree in 2018 from INP-ENSIACET (Toulouse, France). He has been a PhD student since 2018, between Université de Bordeaux (Bordeaux, France) & Université Laval (Québec, Canada), with research focusing on 3D printing of phosphate glasses by Fused Deposition Modeling and the development of low-Tg phosphate glasses for this purpose.

(a) What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

I like the fact that my research focuses on relatively unexplored but rapidly expanding fields, such as glass 3D-printing. Not having much information on the subject from the literature and not knowing what is worth pursuing or not can be frustrating, but the satisfaction that comes from finally finding results makes all these efforts worthwhile.

 

b. Why did you choose Materials Advances as a place to publish research on this topic?

It feels important to me that any research work is available to the broadest audience, which is possible thanks to Open Access journals such as Materials Advances.

 

c. Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

Do not be afraid to ask for help from senior researchers, their expertise and experience can only be beneficial to your own work.

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2D C2h group III monochalcogenides with direct bandgaps and highly anisotropic carrier mobilities

An infographic highlighting the prediction of 2D group III monochalcogenides  for future high efficiency solar cells and optoelectronics

Prediction of new phase 2D C2h group III monochalcogenides with direct bandgaps and highly anisotropic carrier mobilities
Tuo Hu, Congsheng Xu, Ao Zhang and Peiyuan Yu
Mater. Adv., 2022, 3, 2213-2221, DOI: 10.1039/D1MA01068A

Meet the authors

Tuo Hu was a visiting student in Prof. Peiyuan Yu’s group at the Department of Chemistry at Southern University of Science and Technology from 2020 to 2021 where he worked on polymorphism of 2D semiconductors via DFT computation. He is currently a fourth-year undergraduate at University of California, Los Angeles majoring in Chemistry and Materials Science.
Congsheng Xu received his master’s degree from Xiangtan University where his research focused on electronic properties of multilayer GeSe and its heterojunctions. Currently, he is a doctoral student in Prof. Peiyuan Yu’s research group at Southern University of Science and Technology. His main research direction is prediction of molecular structures and calculation of electronic properties of two-dimensional materials by machine learning.
Ao Zhang received his Ph.D. in physics from Hunan Normal University in 2021. He is currently a postdoctoral at the Department of Physics in Southern University of Science and Technology. His research interests are on novel physical properties induced by spin-orbit coupling, topological semimetals, and multiferroic materials.
Peiyuan Yu obtained his Ph.D. in chemistry from University of California, Los Angeles in 2017 and was a postdoctoral fellow at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory from 2017 to 2019. He began his independent career as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) in 2019. Peiyuan’s research program uses computational chemistry to study a wide range of phenomena in chemistry and materials science, with a focus in understanding the reaction mechanisms and origins of selectivity of organic reactions.

(a) What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

In this work, we are most excited to discover that some novel polymorphs of two-dimensional materials give rise to very interesting and exotic electronic properties. For example, the new C2h polymorph of 2D group III monochalcogenides features a direct bandgap which has not been found in other known single-layer phases. However, conventional computational methods to predict or design novel polymorphs are often limited by large computational costs. Therefore, we investigated the use of deep learning methods based on generative adversarial neural networks to quickly and comprehensively discover different phases of two-dimensional materials. This project requires knowledge and specialties from diverse disciplines such as computational chemistry, materials science, and physics. Besides, the rapid development of new computational techniques constantly motivates us to try to apply new technologies, which is quite challenging and intriguing.

 

(b) How do you feel about Materials Advances as a place to publish research on this topic?

Materials Advances is designated for interdisciplinary research and insights in the field of materials research, and our work is a combination of computer science and materials science, so I think it is a perfect match for this work to be published on Materials Advances. The professional editorial team and expert reviewers made the publishing process highly efficient.

 

(c) Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

For undergraduate students who are interested in scientific research, I would like to encourage them to actively participate and collaborate with graduate students and postdocs in research projects as early as possible and don’t be shy to share their hypotheses or insights.

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Call for papers: Themed collection on Materials Informatics

Guest Editors: Chris Pickard (University of Cambridge, UK), Jörg Behler (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Germany), and Krishna Rajan (University at Buffalo, USA)

In this themed collection, we invite contributions in materials informatics. Manuscripts are encouraged in topics ranging from novel computational and experimental methods to state-of-the-art applications.

The discipline of Materials Informatics has emerged from a fusion of increasing availability of materials data, high throughput experimental and computational methods, first principles and other advanced materials models, and machine learning. It has been fuelled by the dramatic growth in available computational power, and its ubiquity.

If you are interested in contributing to this collection please get in touch with the Editorial Office by email.

Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when you submit your manuscript to say that this is a submission for the themed collection. The Editorial Office and Guest Editors reserve the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection and inclusion of accepted articles in the collection is not guaranteed. All manuscripts will be subject to the journal’s usual peer review process. Accepted manuscripts will be added to the online collection as soon as they are online, and they will be published in a regular issue of Materials Advances.

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Call for papers: Themed collection on Biomass Materials

Guest Editors: Meisha Shofner (Georgia Institute of Technology) and Andy Tennyson (Clemson University)

In this themed collection, we will collect primary research and review articles from across the area of biomass materials. Manuscripts are encouraged from a broad range of topics related to biomass materials including synthesis/processing, biological-synthetic interfaces, characterization, properties, degradation and end-of-life, lifecycle/economic analysis, and application studies.

Biomass was used by humans to formulate some of the earliest polymers, and contemporary environmental concerns have served as the impetus for the researchers and industry to return to biomass as precursors for engineered materials. Biomass materials are now poised to re-emerge as materials of construction across a range of applications that currently employ synthetic plastics and materials. In adapting biological compounds and materials for use in synthetic systems, the desired biological compound or material of interest is almost always found in extremely complex mixtures of structurally- and functionally-diverse molecules and macromolecules which are impossible to separate. Furthermore, completely removing all water from many biological compounds and materials causes them to lose the desired structure, property, or function of interest. To address these challenges and facilitate this shift in materials usage, interdisciplinary research spanning fundamental understanding of synthesis and properties to translational studies for targeted applications is needed.

If you are interested in contributing to this collection please get in touch with the Editorial Office by email.

Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when you submit your manuscript to say that this is a submission for the themed collection. The Editorial Office and Guest Editors reserve the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection and inclusion of accepted articles in the collection is not guaranteed. All manuscripts will be subject to the journal’s usual peer review process. Accepted manuscripts will be added to the online collection as soon as they are online, and they will be published in a regular issue of Materials Advances.

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Themed collection: Chiral Nanomaterials

We invite you to read a new themed collection in Materials Advances on chiral nanomaterials.

We are pleased to inform you that this new themed issue has now been published online.

Read the collection

Guest Edited by Nicholas A. Kotov (University of Michigan, USA), Luis M. Liz-Marzán (CIC biomaGUNE, Spain), and Qiangbin Wang (SINANO, China).

Chiral nanostructures is one of the most rapidly developing research fields encompassing chemistry, physics, and biology. The rise to academic prominence of chiral nanostructures was fuelled by their giant optical activity and the fundamental structural parallels between biotic and abiotic structures with mirror asymmetry. This themed collection provides a snapshot of concepts being developed by a diverse spectrum of scientists around the world working in chiral nanostructures from metals, semiconductors and ceramics. Many fundamental discoveries in this area are expected that are likely to encompass multiscale chirality transfer, chiral surfaces, biological signalling, and circularly polarized emitters. Technological applications being pursued along the way of fundamental studies include biosensing, healthcare, chiral photonics, and sustainable catalysis.

Articles in the collection are published in Materials Advances and they are all freely accessible with open access. A small selection of articles from the collection are provided below.

(more…)

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