Hot Articles: Pt-based dye-sensitized solar cells, self-rolling carbon microtubes, and preparing high-quality graphene

Graphical abstract: D–π–M–π–A structured platinum acetylide sensitizer for dye-sensitized solar cells

D–π–M–π–A structured platinum acetylide sensitizer for dye-sensitized solar cells: A platinum acetylide sensitizer for use in dye-sensitized solar cells has been developed by scientists at East China Normal University. The team used the sensitizer to create a device with a solar to electricity conversion efficiency of 3.28%, which they claim is higher than most solar cells using platinum complexes as dye sensitizers. Future work will focus on expanding the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the Pt-complexes, extend electron lifetime and further improve the optical properties of devices by molecular structure design. (J. Mater. Chem., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1JM10942A, Advance Article)

Graphical abstract: Low-temperature rapid synthesis of high-quality pristine or boron-doped graphene via Wurtz-type reductive coupling reactionLow-temperature rapid synthesis of high-quality pristine or boron-doped graphene via Wurtz-type reductive coupling reaction: A rapid and low-temperature method to prepared high-quality graphene has been developed by Chinese scientists. The method doesn’t require any transition metal catalysts and it can be adapted to prepare boron-doped graphene by adding BBr3. The team claim the method provides a cost-effective route to prepare high-quality pristine or doped graphene for mass production. (J. Mater. Chem., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1JM11184A, Advance Article)

Graphical abstract: Fabrication of carbon microtubes from thin films of supramolecular assemblies via self-rolling approachFabrication of carbon microtubes from thin films of supramolecular assemblies via self-rolling approach: A novel self-rolling approach to create carbon and carbon/metal hybrid microtubes could lead to programmable fabrication of spirals, springs and rings say German scientists. The team that developed this approach claim that it could be extended to fabricate a range of carbon/metal hybrid microtubes with control of the inner and outer diameters. These microtubes are expected to have potential applications in areas such as microfluidic devices, catalysis, sensing devices, and waveguiding. (J. Mater. Chem., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1JM11258A, Advance Article)

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