Paper of the month: Synthesis of star thermoresponsive amphiphilic block copolymer nano-assemblies and the effect of topology on their thermoresponse

Cao et al. report the synthesis of star thermoresponsive amphimphilic block copolymer assemblies.

c8py01617h

Thermoresponsive polymers can be used in a wide range of applications ranging from drug delivery to bioengineering owing to their unique capability of undergoing a soluble-to-insoluble transition in response to an external thermal stimulus. Amphiphilic block copolymers that contain a thermoresponsive block can self-assemble into core-corona nanoassemblies where the core consists of the hydrophobic block and the corona is formed by the thermoresponsive block. Zhang, Han and co-workers were interested in studying the dependence of a thermoresponsive phase transition on the topology structure. To achieve this, reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion polymerization was employed to synthesize well-defined multi-arm star block copolymer nanoassemblies via polymerization-induced self-assembly. The block copolymer was designed to have the first part consisting of the thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and the second block being the hydrophobic polystyrene (PS). By carefully modifying the number of arms (n=1, 2, 3 and 4), the degree of polymerization of the hydrophobic block and the polymerization conditions, (PNIPAM-b-PS) nanoassemblies with similar degree of polymerization and chain density, albeit different topology structure, were obtained. A range of characterization techniques were subsequently employed to comparatively study the responsiveness of these materials including turbidity analysis, dynamic light scattering, variable-temperature 1H NMR and rheological analysis. The authors found that the topology of the tethered PNIPAM chains had a significant influence on their thermoresponsive phase transition which decreased upon increasing the number of arms. This can be attributed to the inter-and intra-particle chain entanglement in the synthesized star nanoassemblies. It can thus be concluded that the topology of the thermoresponsive polymers can significantly affect their thermoresponsive and should be taken into account when designing the synthesis of such materials.

 

This paper is FREE to read and download until 27th February!

 

Synthesis of star thermoresponsive amphiphilic block copolymer nano-assemblies and the effect of topology on their thermoresponse, Polym. Chem., 2019, 10, 403-411, DOI: 10.1039/C8PY01617H

 

About the  Webwriter

Professor Athina AnastasakiDr. Athina Anastasaki is an Editorial Board Member and a Web Writer for Polymer Chemistry. Since January 2019, she joined the Materials Department of ETH Zurich as an Assistant Professor to establish her independent research group.

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

European Biopolymer Summit 2019

The 6th Edition of ACI’s European Biopolymer Summit will be taking place on 13th – 14th February 2019 in Ghent, Belgium.

The two day event specially designed to bring together senior executives, key industry experts, researchers and bioplastic manufacturers, to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of bioenvironmental polymer engineering, most recent innovations, trends and concern as well as solutions adopted in the sector.

Key topics include:

  • Evaluating Current Environmental Projects And Regulations Within The Biopolymer Industry
  • Assessing The Feedstock’s Landscape For The Biopolymers’ Production
  • Focusing On Biopolymers in The Circular Economy
  • Elaborating On The Application Of Biopolymers From Peoples’ And Planet’s Perspective
  • Introducing New Technologies In Processing New Bio-Based Materials
  • Brand Owners Perspective On The Use And Application Of Biopolymers
  • Focusing On The Basic Understanding Of Biodegradability
  • Assessing The Biobased New Content
  • Analysing The Impact Of Biobased Plastics On The CO2 Reduction
  • Changing Consumer Preference Towards Eco-Friendly Packaging
  • Assessing The End-Of-Life Of Materials, Through The Life Cycle Assessment

A £255 discount is available for all participants until January 31st. Register now

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Paper of the month: Synthesis of sheet-coil-helix and coil-sheet-helix triblock copolymers by combining ROMP with palladium-mediated isocyanide polymerization

Pomarico et al. report the synthesis of sheet-coil-helix and coil-sheet-helix triblock copolymers.

c8py01361f

Natural proteins are comprised of distinct secondary structure elements such as sheets, helices and coils. It is the combination of these diverse topologies that allow proteins to fulfil their functions. Owing to the properties of these structures, synthetic analogues of these materials are also of great interest to the polymer chemistry community. However, a covalent system where sheet, helix, and coil blocks are combined in a linear system has not been yet realized. Towards this direction, Weck, Elacqua and co-workers developed a new methodology to covalently link three distinct structures together with high fidelity without compromising the control over sequence. This was achieved by combining sequential ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of sheet- and coil-forming monomers with palladium-mediated isocyanide polymerization of covalent coil-sheet-helix (ABC) and sheetcoil helix (BAC) domains. After polymerizing the initial sheet of coil-forming monomer through ROMP, the second monomer is introduced and subsequently polymerized yielding to a diblock comprised of sheet and coil structures. ROMP is then terminated by a special transfer agent that contains an isocyanide polymerization initiator. The telechelic diblock copolymers containing both coil-sheet and sheet-coil blocks, can serve as macroinitiators for the polymerization of a P-helix forming monomer. As such, this combination of sequential copolymerization and macroinitiation enables three different polymer chains to be linked covalently. Importantly, throughout the triblock copolymer synthesis, all individual blocks retained their secondary structures as evidenced by circular dicroism and fluorescence spectroscopies. The authors are confident that this work can be extended to the formation of a diverse array of tri- and multiblock copolymers enabling a range of new applications.

Tips/comments directly from the authors:

1. When synthesizing a topologically-diverse block copolymer, oftentimes it is necessary to use different polymerization techniques. If so, prudent selection and design of polymer backbone is key. First, select the class(es) of monomers you intend to employ. This will inform the type of polymerization method required, and subsequently, the initiator to be designed.

2. Ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) is a widely-used controllable polymerization method that allows for one to not only control molecular weight, but also is amenable to an iterative or tandem ROMP, which is desirable for sequence-controlled block copolymers

3. Performing 31P NMR spectroscopy after each step of block copolymer synthesis, especially before the final step to create the helical block, is crucial. It ensures that only one palladium species is present throughout.

4. Isocyanide polymerization mediated by palladium(II) is a robust technique; there is high functional group tolerance when synthesizing the initiator, which allows for the engineering of multipurpose catalysts like the one featured in this manuscript.

5. Topologically-diverse polymer backbones, such as sheets, helices, and coils, garner much interest from a biomimetic standpoint in the synthetic community. Judicious choice of polymer backbones, as well as block lengths, can inform characterization techniques, such as circular dichroism, fluorescence, and X-ray scattering to gain insights into topology.

6. We are available for any questions and to troubleshoot any issues you may have – please contact mw125@nyu.edu or eze31@psu.edu.

 

Synthesis of sheet-coil-helix and coil-sheet-helix triblock copolymers by combining ROMP with palladium-mediated isocyanide polymerization, Polym. Chem., 2018, 9, 5655-5659, DOI: 10.1039/C8PY01361F

 

About the webwriter

Dr Athina AnastasakiDr. Athina Anastasaki is a Web Writer for Polymer Chemistry. She is currently an Assistant Professor at ETH Materials Department.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

6th World Elastomer Summit 2019

Join the 6th World Elastomer Summit 2019, taking place in Lyon, France on the 27th & 28th of March 2019 and hear case studies from their expert speakers on Traditional Elastomer Production during its dedicated session

6th World Elastomer Summit

Key Topics Will Include:

– Elastomers Market Dynamics
– Enhancing Sustainability & Circular Economy in the Elastomer Industry
– Natural & Bio-based Rubbers
– Current Regulation Shaping the Industry
– Traditional Elastomers Production
– Adopting a Holistic Approach to Recycled Elastomers
– Elastomer Production Technologies
– A Deeper Look Into Thermoplastic Elastomers
– Maximising Tyre Design & Production
– The Future of the Automotive Industry
– Other & Non-Traditional Applications for Elastomers

Please see more details on the conference website and download the conference agenda

For more information & registration, contact Rafael Krupa on +48 61 646 7040 or email: rafael@acieu.net

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Paper of the month: Choosing the ideal photoinitiator for free radical photopolymerizations: predictions based on simulations using established data

Eibel et al. report a tool that can predict the initiator efficiency in free radical photopolymerizations.

C8PY01195H

A major requirement to synthesize polymeric materials via photopolymerizations is the efficiency of the photoinitiator. This is because the amount of initiated polymer chain is crucial for the outcome of the radical polymerization. Many factors have been reported to influence this efficiency including the UV-Vis absorption properties, the irradiation wavelengths, the dissociation quantum yields and the reactivity of primary radicals towards monomers. To enable “on demand” access to a wide range of photoinitiators performance, Gescheidt and co-workers developed a tool for predicting the initiator efficiency of various type 1 (α-cleavage) photoinitiators. To achieve this, a systematic analysis of the photoinitiator performance revealed the interplay of absorption properties, dissociation quantum yields, light intensities, irradiation wavelengths and kinetics.  It is important to note that important side reactions such as oxygen quenching have also been taken into account. The author’s simulations demonstrate that under ideal conditions any photoinitiator will function in an almost perfect way. However, the oxygen quenching mechanism combined with the subtleness of the photo-physical properties of the photoinitiator differentiates a well-suited photoinitiator from a less useful one. The authors conclude that a balanced combination of the intrinsic photoinitiator characteristics (i.e. absorption spectrum of initiator, quantum yields of dissociation, rate constants for primary radicals towards monomers), the major side reactions such as oxygen quenching, and the emission properties of the utilized light source (i.e. irradiation wavelengths, light intensity) is crucial to achieve the optimal initiation performance. As the authors nicely note in their conclusion, such a tool is not only useful for experienced researchers but it can also serve as an educational guide. The corresponding kinetic scheme is freely available on the author’s website and can be adjusted by any user.

 

Tips/comments directly from the authors:

1. A single property is not sufficient to reasonably classify a photoinitiator. A subtly interplay between absorbance, quantum yield, kinetics and the character of the light source is what matters.

2. The choice of a suitable photoinitiator strongly depends on the desired application (e.g. bulk polymerization or coatings). Here, the number of initiating radicals directs the efficiency of the polymerization and its robustness vs. oxygen inhibition.

3. The optical density of the formulation combined with the wavelength of irradiation control the thickness of the cured layer. It is crucial to be aware of the exact properties of the used light source (emission bands, intensity), since this drastically influences the amount of generated radicals and the initiation rate.

4. The Simulations rely on experimental parameters, which are straightforwardly determined (e.g. rate constants (Polym. Chem., 2018, 9, 38–47) and quantum yields (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2018, 17, 660–669)) and provide an overall picture of a complex process such as the initiation of a photo-induced polymerization.

5. We are happy to answer any questions or remarks concerning our initiation model – please contact g.gescheidt-demner@tugraz.at.

 

FREE to read until 24th December

 

Choosing the ideal photoinitiator for free radical photopolymerizations: predictions based on simulations using established data, Polym. Chem., 2018, 9, 5107-5115, DOI: 10.1039/C8PY01195H

 

About the web writer

Dr Athina AnastasakiDr. Athina Anastasaki is a Web Writer for Polymer Chemistry. She is currently a Global Marie Curie Fellow working alongside Professor Craig Hawker at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). In January 2019, she will join the ETH Materials Department as an Assistant Professor to establish her independent group.

 

 

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Paper of the month: Thermoresponsive hybrid double-crosslinked networks using magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as crossing points

Blin et al. report thermoresponsive double-crosslinked networks exploiting the Diels-Alder reaction.

Double-network hydrogels (DN gels) consist of two interpenetrating networks that are bound together by covalent and reversible interactions and can resist high deformation by reorganizing their structure. Magnetic hybrid hydrogels in particular have attracted considerable attention owing to the possibility of triggering the properties of the hydrogels with an external magnetic field. Fontaine, Montembault and co-workers further contributed to this field by developing a novel class of thermoresponsive hybrid double-crosslinked polymer networks materials that can rearrange and rebuild upon triggering a Diels-Alder (DA) reaction. Central to this approach is the use of iron oxide nanoparticles as the nano-crosslinkers and difuran-functionalized poly(ethylene oxide) as the diene partner for the thermoreversible DA reaction. The thermoreversibility of the network was confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and rheological studies showing a fast gel/liquid state transition upon heating the sample. Importantly, the rheological properties of 3D networks with and without iron oxide nanoparticles were compared. The studies conclude that the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the network ensured that a gel-like structure was maintained after the retro DA reaction. These characteristics were attributed to the establishment of a secondary network through covalently integrated iron oxide nanoparticles. The unique combination of the Diels-Alder reaction with iron oxide nanoparticles to generate new reversible reticulated networks can pave the way for further applications mediated by magnetic hyperthermia stimuli.

c8py01006d

Tips/comments directly from the authors:

1. The strategy used for the synthesis of difuran-functionalized diphosphonic acid terminated poly(ethylene oxide) by a combination of Kabachnik-Fields reaction and “click” copper-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is a versatile method and poly(ethylene oxide) backbone can be replaced by a wide range of polymers that may bring new properties.

2. The formation of a 3D network via the Diels-Alder (DA) reaction with a trismaleimide is thermoreversible, with a faster retro-DA (rDA) reaction rate compared to the DA reaction, leading to an easier destruction of the 3D network than its formation.

3. The presence of phosphonic acid groups is needed to allow the crosslinking through interactions with the iron oxide nanoparticles and the formation of the 3D double-crosslinked network.

4. The 3D network is preserved even after the rDA reaction, demonstrating that the iron oxide nanoparticles serve as crossing points through strong bidendate Fe-O-P bonds. Furthermore, a gel-like structure is maintained at least in the limit of the percolation threshold.

5. The viscoelastic properties of the double-crosslinked gels demonstrates that the double-crosslinking leads to stiffer gels.

 

Read the full article for FREE until 26th November!

Thermoresponsive hybrid double-crosslinked networks using magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as crossing points, Polym. Chem., 2018, 9, 4642-4650, DOI: 10.1039/C8PY01006D

 

About the web writer

Dr Athina AnastasakiDr. Athina Anastasaki is a Web Writer for Polymer Chemistry. She is currently a Global Marie Curie Fellow working alongside Professor Craig Hawker at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). In January 2019, she will join the ETH Materials Department as an Assistant Professor to establish her independent group.

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Polymer Chemistry 2019 Lectureship now open for nominations!

Do you know an early-career researcher who deserves recognition for their contribution to the polymer chemistry field?

Now is your chance to put them forward for the accolade they deserve!

Polymer Chemistry is pleased to announce that nominations are now being accepted for its 2019 Lectureship. This annual award was established in 2015 to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the polymer chemistry field.

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture at an international meeting in 2019, where they will also be presented with the award. The Polymer Chemistry Editorial Office will provide financial support to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs.

The recipient will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased free of charge on the front cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Professor Cyrille Boyer

Left to right: Professor Cyrille Boyer with Dr Athina Anastasaki, Professor Emily Pentzer (Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor) and Dr Markus Muellner

Previous winners

2018 – Cyrille Boyer, University of New South Wales, Australia

2017 – Julien Nicolas, Université Paris Sud, France

2016 – Feihe Huang, Zhejiang University, China

2015 – Richard Hoogenboom, Ghent University, Belgium

Eligibility

To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates should meet the following criteria:

  • Be an independent researcher, having completed PhD and postdoctoral studies
  • Be actively pursuing research within the polymer chemistry field, and have made a significant contribution to the field
  • Be at an early stage of their independent career (this should be within 15 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break, for example for childcare leave, or followed an alternative study path)

Selection

  • Eligible nominated candidates will be notified of their nomination, and will be asked to provide 3 recent articles that they feel represent their current research.
  • All eligible nominated candidates will be assessed by a shortlisting panel, made up of members of the Polymer Chemistry Advisory Board and a previous lectureship winner.
  • The shortlisting panel will consider the articles provided by the candidates as well as their CVs and letters of nomination.
  • Shortlisted candidates will be further assessed by the Polymer Chemistry Editorial Board, and a winner will be selected based on an anonymous poll.
  • Selection is not based simply on quantitative measures. Consideration will be given to all information provided in the letter of recommendation and candidate CV, including research achievements and originality, contributions to the polymer chemistry community, innovation, collaborations and teamwork, publication history, and engagement with Polymer Chemistry.

Nominations

  • Nominations must be made via email to polymers-rsc@rsc.org, and should include a short CV and a brief letter of nomination
  • Self-nomination is not permitted
  • Nominators do not need to be senior researchers, and we encourage nominations from people at all career levels
  • As part of the Royal Society of Chemistry, we believe we have a responsibility to promote inclusivity and accessibility in order to improve diversity. Where possible, we encourage each nominator to consider nominating candidates of all genders, races, and backgrounds.
  • Candidates outside of the stated eligibility criteria may still be considered
  • Nomination letters should be up to 1 page in length. They should particularly highlight contributions that the nominee has made to the field as an independent researcher, and any career breaks or alternative career paths that should be taken into consideration by the judging panel. Nomination of one candidate by multiple people in the same letter is accepted.

 

Nominations should be submitted no later than 15th December 2018.

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Paper of the month: A user’s guide to the thiol-thioester exchange in organic media: scope, limitations, and applications in material science

Worrell et al. report a useful guide to the thiol-thioester exchange in organic media.

The thiol-thioester exchange is a common reaction in dynamic covalent chemistry. This reaction has been extensively optimized in aqueous media facilitating the widespread use in biochemistry and other bio-related applications. However, the utility of this reaction in material and polymer science is currently underexplored. This is possibly due to the fact that most polymer/material systems require organic media for their respective synthesis. To overcome this barrier and extend the scope and applications of thiol-thioester exchange, Bowman and co-workers explored this dynamic exchange in both small molecule and polymer analogues in a wide range of organic solvents. The effect of the pKa of the thiol and base employed, the electronic character of the thioester, the polarity of the solvent, the effect of the temperature and the nucleophilicity of the catalyst were thoroughly investigated. By judiciously choosing and optimizing all these parameters, the authors were able to tune the thiol-thioester exchange in both small molecules and subsequently network polymers to reduce applied stresses or change shape of the materials following polymerization. All these findings were thoroughly reported and explained by crafting an impressive “user’s guide” that can be useful for a large number of practitioners within the polymer/material community. The authors anticipate that the extremely robust, tuneable and responsive exchange reaction will further enable polymer/material scientists to develop new smart materials and will pave the way for further applications.

thiol-thioester exchange

 

Tips/comments directly from the authors:  

1. When comparing a panel of various thioesters exchanging with various thiols, the authors have found that thermodynamically the acyl group of a thioester prefers to rest on thiols of the highest pKa and will exchange rapidly to achieve this minima.

2. Base catalysts of a higher pKa form more thiolate and therefore promote the thiol-thioester exchange more rapidly in both small molecule systems and in crosslinked polymers, all things held the same. Base catalysts, if employed in larger concentrations, were, however, found to significantly retard the free radical thiol-ene reaction to produce crosslinked polymers. This can be overcome by optimizing the concentration of radical initiator (-photo, -thermal, or –redox) with respect to base.

3. Nucleophilic catalysts of a higher N-value (see Herbert Mayr’s work for more details on the calculation of this parameter) were found to promote the thiol-thioester exchange more rapidly in both small molecule systems and in crosslinked polymers, all things held the same. Unlike basic catalysts, nucleophilic catalysts did not show similar retardation in the free radical thiol-ene reaction to produce crosslinked polymers.

4. Due to polar intermediates formed during the thiol-thioester exchange reaction, polar solvents/matrices most effectively promote this dynamic exchange, especially with weaker bases.

5. Due to the low energetic barrier for the thiol-thioester exchange reaction, temperature does not have a great affect on the outcome of the exchange, however, it does improve the kinetics.

6. If the readers have any unanswered questions regarding this reaction, schemes for placing it into a polymer matrix, or other general queries, please direct them to brady.worrell@gmail.com and we’ll get to the bottom of it.

 

Read the full article for FREE until 30th October

 

A user’s guide to the thiol-thioester exchange in organic media: scope, limitations, and applications in material science, Polym. Chem., 2018, 9, 4523-4534, DOI: 10.1039/C8PY01031E

 

About the web writer

AthinaDr. Athina Anastasaki is a Web Writer for Polymer Chemistry. She is currently a Global Marie Curie Fellow working alongside Professor Craig Hawker at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). In January 2019, she will join the ETH Materials Department as an Assistant Professor to establish her independent group.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Welcome to our new Associate Editors

We are delighted to announce Professor Filip Du Prez (Ghent University) and Professor Holger Frey (Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz) as new Associate Editors for Polymer Chemistry!

Filip graduatProfoessor Filip Du Prezed from his postgraduate studies in macromolecular chemistry from Ghent (Belgium) and Lehigh (USA) University in 1996, after which he carried out postdoctoral research at the University of Montpellier and at Ghent University (UGent). In 1999, he ultimately became research leader of the Polymer Chemistry Research group (PCR) within the Centre of Macromolecular Chemistry (CMaC) at Ghent University, where he now leads a research group of 25 researchers and the UGent valorization consortium Chemtech as full professor.

Filip’s current research focuses on the development of new polymer structures, the exploration of powerful polymer functionalization methods and the design of polymer materials for high-value applications. His team uses a highly interdisciplinary approach to develop in some cases industrially applicable polymer materials. The main research themes of his research are on 1) polymer functionalization to absolute control, 2) dynamic and self-healing polymeric materials such as vitrimers and 3) increasing the functionality of renewable polymers.

Read some of his recent Polymer Chemistry articles below!

Polycycloacetals via polytransacetalization of diglycerol bisacetonide
Andrea Hufendiek,  Sophie Lingier,  Pieter Espeel,  Stefaan De Wildeman  and  Filip E. Du Prez
Polym. Chem., 2018, Advance Article

ADMET and TAD chemistry: a sustainable alliance
L. Vlaminck,  K. De Bruycker,  O. Türünç  and  F. E. Du Prez 
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 5655-5663

Polydimethylsiloxane quenchable vitrimers

Polym. Chem., 2017, 8, 6590-6593

 

Professor Holger Frey

Holger Frey is a chaired Professor at the Institute of Organic Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and the author of 350 peer-reviewed original publications and reviews in different areas of current Polymer Science. He has been an Editorial Board member for Polymer Chemistry since June 2017 and has now moved role to become an Associate Editor.

His scope of interests is broad and comprises ionic polymerization techniques in general, hyperbranched materials (polyethers, polyesters, polycarbonates), silicon-based polymers, multifunctional poly(ethylene glycol)s, block copolymers and polymer nanostructures for drug transport. The current research interest of his group is centered on new functional polymers prepared via oxyanionic ring-opening polymerization, new approaches utilizing CO2 as a monomer, and non-conventional approaches in carbanionic polymer synthesis to generate gradient and multiblock structures, for instance as dispersants or for thermoplastic elastomers.

 Read some of his recent articles below!

“Clickable PEG” via anionic copolymerization of ethylene oxide and glycidyl propargyl ether
Jana Herzberger,  Daniel Leibig,  Jens Langhanki,  Christian Moers,  Till Opatz  and  Holger Frey
Polym. Chem., 2017, 8, 1882-1887

Tunable dynamic hydrophobic attachment of guest molecules in amphiphilic core–shell polymers
Jörg Reichenwallner,  Anja Thomas,  Lutz Nuhn,  Tobias Johann,  Annette Meister,  Holger Frey  and  Dariush Hinderberger
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 5783-5798

Water-soluble and redox-responsive hyperbranched polyether copolymers based on ferrocenyl glycidyl ether
Arda Alkan,  Rebecca Klein,  Sergii I. Shylin,  Ulrike Kemmer-Jonas,  Holger Frey  and  Frederik R. Wurm
Polym. Chem., 2015, 6, 7112-7118

 


As Polymer Chemistry Associate Editors, Filip and Holger will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to their Editorial Office?

 

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Welcome to our new Associate Editor Professor Zi-Chen Li

We are delighted to welcome Professor Zi-Chen Li (Peking University) to his role as a new Associate Editor for Polymer Chemistry!

Professor Zi-Chen Li

Zi-Chen Li received his B.A. degree from Shandong University in 1987 and his M.Sci. degree from the Institute of Chemistry, CAS, in 1990. In 1995, he completed his PhD in Polymer Chemistry under the direction of Professor Fu-Mian Li at Peking University (PKU).   During his doctoral studies, he stayed at Waseda University, Japan, for one year as an exchanging student. After a two-year (1995-1996) postdoctoral research stint at PKU and Waseda University, he became a faculty member at PKU in 1997, and was promoted to professor in 2002.

His primary research interests currently include new polymerization methods, stimuli-responsive polymers and their biomedical applications, controlled degradation of polymers and recycling of monomers.

To learn about his research read some of his Polymer Chemistry articles below!

 

Synthesis of a ROS-responsive analogue of poly(ε-caprolactone) by the living ring-opening polymerization of 1,4-oxathiepan-7-one
Linggao Li,  Qiyuan Wang,  Ruiliang Lyu,  Li Yu,  Shan Su,  Fu-Sheng Du  and  Zi-Chen Li
Polym. Chem., 2018, Advance Article

ROS-responsive poly(ε-caprolactone) with pendent thioether and selenide motifs
Li Yu,  Mei Zhang,  Fu-Sheng Du  and  Zi-Chen Li
Polym. Chem., 2018, 9, 3762-3773

Oxidation and temperature dual responsive polymers based on phenylboronic acid and N-isopropylacrylamide motifs
Mei Zhang,  Cheng-Cheng Song,  Ran Ji,  Zeng-Ying Qiao,  Chao Yang,  Fang-Yi Qiu,  De-Hai Liang,  Fu-Sheng Du  and  Zi-Chen Li
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 1494-1504

 

As a Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor, Zi-Chen will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to his Editorial Office?

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)