Advisory Board Top Picks: Tom Davis and Nghia Truong

Tom Davis is a member of Advisory Board for Polymer Chemistry and the Monash–Warwick Professor of medical nanotechnology at Monash University, Australia. Prof. Davis’ research focuses on the application of polymer science and nanotechnology to therapeutic applications, and enhancing the fundamental understanding of how nanomaterials interact with biological systems.

Nghia Truong is a member of the RSC Advances Reviewer Panel and a research fellow at Monash University, Australia. His research focuses on engineering the size, shape, surface, core, and function of polymeric nanoparticles for applications in nanomedicine, using a variety of techniques including emulsion polymerization, self-assembly, polymerization-induced self-assembly, temperature-induced morphological transformation, and click chemistry.

You can find all Advisory Board’s Top Picks papers in our web collection.

Focus on nanoparticle shapes (Prof. Tom Davis, Monash University, Australia and Dr. Nghia Truong, Monash University, Australia).

Shape plays an important role in functional properties of nanoparticles, and as a result, their utility in many applications. Polymer chemists with powerful synthetic techniques have recently made significant contributions expanding our ability to make complex nano-shapes. In 2016, many excellent Polymer Chemistry publications have appeared describing the synthesis and assembly of polymers into tertiary structures.   Below we highlight some that have caught our eye.

1. Multicompartment morphologies self-assembled from fluorinated ABC triblock terpolymers: the effects of flexible and rigid hydrophobic moieties

Sen Li, Jinlin He, Mingzu Zhang, Hairong Wang and Peihong Ni

Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 1773–1781

Li et. al. self-assemble fluorinated triblock terpolymers into five types of reproducible shapes including sphere, tube, rod, hamburger, and flower. Interestingly, rod-like aggregates have a uniform zig-zag pattern. This work reveals the fact that flexibility or rigidity of hydrophobic segment and polymer concentration have a big influence on the shape of nanoparticles.

2. Disk-like micelles with cylindrical pores from amphiphilic polypeptide block copolymers

Xue Lin, Xiaohua He, Chaoqun Hu, Yuxiang Chen, Yiyong Mai and Shaoliang Lin

Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 2815–2820

A rare and complex shape such as a nanodisk with cylindrical pores has recently been achieved by self-assembly of the amphiphilic block copolypeptide poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PEG-b-PBLG) in solution. Spherical micelles and vesicles can also be prepared by tuning the ratio between the hydrophilic block and hydrophobic block in PEG-b-PBLG copolymers.

3. Salicylaldehyde-functionalized block copolymer nano-objects: one-pot synthesis via polymerization-induced self-assembly and their simultaneous cross-linking and fluorescence modification

Jianbing Huang, Hanjun Zhu, Hui Liang and Jiang Lu

Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 4761–4770

Beside traditional self-assembly, RAFT-mediated emulsion and dispersion polymerization is a very useful technique to simultaneously synthesise block copolymers and form nanoparticles with different shapes. Using this technique, Huang et. al. can crosslink and functionalise spheres, worms, and vesicles with salicylaldazine moieties. These moieties endow the nano-objects with strong orange fluorescence in water, organic solutions or solid state via an aggregation-induced emission mechanism.

4. Microwave-assisted synthesis of block copolymer nanoparticles via RAFT with polymerization-induced self-assembly in methanol

Elden T. Garrett, Yiwen Pei and Andrew B. Lowe

Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 297–301

Andrew Lowe and coworkers have reported the use of microwaves to further assist RAFT-mediated dispersion polymerization and the formation of nanoparticles with various shapes. The work shows the benefits of microwave-assisted syntheses of nanoparticles in alcoholic solvents.

5. Addition of water to an alcoholic RAFT PISA formulation leads to faster kinetics but limits the evolution of copolymer morphology

E. R. Jones, M. Semsarilar, P. Wyman, M. Boerakker and S. P. Armes

Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 851–859

Besides using a microwave, the addition of water into alcoholic solvents also increases the rate of RAFT-mediated dispersion polymerization. On the other hand, Armes and coworkers find that in the presence of water, only kinetically-trapped spheres are obtained. This work and other works using aqueous RAFT-mediated emulsion polymerizations create a currently unclear question about the mechanism of the in-situ formation of various nanoparticle shapes in water.

Review article

Theoretical simulations of nanostructures self-assembled from copolymer systems

Zhanwen Xu, Jiaping Lin, Qian Zhang, Liquan Wang and Xiaohui Tian

Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 3783–3811

Beside powerful synthetic techniques, theoretical simulations offer a useful approach for the understanding and prediction of the formation of polymeric nanostructures. The review by Xu et al. gives a nice overview of the simulation investigations of many self-assembled nanostructures. By tailoring the molecular architectures of block copolymers, nanoparticles with desired shapes can be achieved. Challenges and further developments for theoretical simulations are also discussed in this useful review.

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5th Zing Polymer Chemistry Conference

5th – 8th August 2016 in Dublin, Ireland

We are proud to announce the 5th Zing Polymer Chemistry Conference will take place in Dublin (Ireland).

The field of polymer chemistry has experienced a renaissance over the last few last years with the discovery of novel mechanisms to control polymer structure, molecular weight, and functionality. Moreover, the preparation of new polymeric materials with stimuli-responsive or dynamic characteristics have led to novel biomedical materials, polymers for electronic applications, and many other advanced materials. Indeed, polymer science is more exciting than ever before.

This conference will be held 5th – 8th August 2016 and will feature recent developments in the area of polymer synthesis and applied science and intends to gather researchers interested in the forefront polymer science and its future applications.

Several Editorial Board members of Polymer Chemistry will be attending:

- Eva M. Harth (Vanderbilt University): Conference Chair
- David M Haddleton (University of Warwick): Plenary speaker with the talk ‘Sulfur free RAFT in emulsion for multi-block copolymer synthesis
- Emily B. Pentzer (Case Western Reserve University): Invited speaker with the talk ‘Polymerization of Silyl Ketenes
- Masami Kamigaito (Nagoya University): Invited speaker with the talk ‘New Developments in Controlled Radical and Cationic Polymerizations

We look forward to welcoming you for the 5th Zing Polymer Chemistry Conference!

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JEPO 2016 Congress

19-23 September in France

The JEPO 2016 congress enables young researchers in polymer science to present and share their work with their peers (young and senior colleagues) in a privileged environment.

The 44th edition of the French Journées d’Etudes des Polymères will take place on the seaside at the VVF “Le Moulin de Praillane” at Piriac-sur-Mer from 19-23 September 2016

The congress in open to any contribution related to polymer science, ranging from synthesis and physico-chemical properties to applications, and from industrial and academic background.

The event will consist of seven invited conferences from renowned academic and industrial English and French scientists (45 min) and oral contributions from the congress participants (20 min). The language of the congress will be English.

Registration dates:

  • Early bird registration period: 1 February – 30 April 2016
  • Regular registration period: 4 April – 30 July 2016

Submission dates:

  • Abstract submission opens: 4 April 2016
  • Abstract submission deadline: 24 June 2016
  • Acceptance notification: 30 June 2016

Mark your calendar today and register now!


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Focus on: Polymers for detection

Highlights by Dr. Fiona Hatton (@fi_hat)

This month we focus on articles describing polymers designed for the detection of small organic molecules, published in Polymer Chemistry.

Here, polymers have been reported which, through incorporation of either functional groups or varying structural architecture, could be used to detect compounds including organic vapours, various anions and aromatic explosives. Detection of compounds is important in various applications, such as the detection of explosives in airports and border controls, doping in sports, contamination of water supplies and air pollution.


1. BODIPY based hyperbranched conjugated polymers for detecting organic vapors
Choong Ping Sen, Vanga Devendar Goud, Rekha Goswami Shrestha, Lok Kumar Shrestha, Katsuhiko Ariga Suresh Valiyaveettil
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 4213-4225; DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00847J

The authors describe the preparation of three soluble BODIPY containing hyperbranched polymers through Sonogashira coupling polymerisation. The sensing of organic solvents (toluene, benzene, acetone and methanol) was assessed using QCM, through preparing polymer films on the QCM crystal by solvent dropcasting. Varying masses adsorbed to the surface showed the different sensitivities of the hyperbranched polymers which showed a higher selectivity towards aromatic solvents.

2. Well-defined polymers containing a single mid-chain viologen group: synthesis, environment-sensitive fluorescence, and redox activity
Zhaoxu Wang, Nicolay V. Tsarevsky
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 4402-4410; DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00628K

Viologen containing polymers were prepared which exhibited strong fluorescence in solution. A di-functional ATRP initiator containing a viologen group was used to polymerise methyl methacrylate. The addition of salts with polarisable anions resulted in a reduction of the fluorescence, as did the presence of nitrobenzene, highlighting possible detection capabilities. In addition to this the polymers also showed  efficient catalysis of the oxidation of phenylhydrazine by air.

3. Fiber-optic detection of nitroaromatic explosives with solution-processable triazatruxene-based hyperbranched conjugated polymer nanoparticles
Yuxiang Xu, Xiaofu Wu, Yonghong Chen, Hao Hang, Hui Tong, Lixiang Wang
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 4542-4548; DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00930A

Two conjugated polymer nanoparticle systems, based on triazatruxene and fluorine units, were prepared by Pd-catalysed Suzuki coupling in mini-emulsion. Films were assessed for their vapour detection to TNT and DNT, and were also prepared on fibre optic tips and papers. Owing to the steric hindrance of spirobifluorene units in one of the systems, the sensitivity of detection of nitroaromatic vapours was increased in solid state and TNT was visually detectable using the coated paper.


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About the webwriterFiona Hatton

Dr. Fiona Hatton is a web writer for Polymer Chemistry. She is currently a postdoctoral researcher in the Armes group at the University of Sheffield, UK. Find her on Twitter: @fi_hat

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Paper of the month: Investigation into the photolytic stability of RAFT agents and the implications for photopolymerization reactions

Photolytic stability of RAFT agents under blue LED irradiation has been investigated with regard to photopolymerization reactions

McKenzie et al. report the stability of a wide range of RAFT agents during photopolymerization.

The use of external stimuli to mediate the polymerization process has recently received significant attention with light being one of the most popular stimuli mainly due to its natural abundance and the possibility for spatiotemporal control. Photopolymerizations involving reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) have been widely investigated and studied exhibiting impressive characteristics such as fast reaction rates, good spatiotemporal control, and high-end group fidelity.

However, a report on the stability of these RAFT agents has been clearly missing from the literature. Qiao and co-workers recently discovered an initiator-free photopolymerization where the RAFT agent is activated by a blue LED. Following this work, they have investigated the photolytic stability of a range of RAFT agents under blue light irradiation. Careful NMR studies regarding the initiation process and the induction period revealed that the photopolymerization reaction is strongly dependent on the structure of the employed trithiocarbonates (TTCs).

Degradation studies under polymerization relevant conditions showed that photolytic degradation of TTCs with more labile R-groups is observable within the reaction time scale up to 12% for a cyanosubstituted tertiary fragmenting group. On the contrary, when less stable (i.e. primary and secondary) R-group-derived radicals are employed, no degradation is detected.

Two main conclusions can be derived from these studies. Firstly, under identical photochemical conditions, the polymerization of acrylates will lead to higher end group fidelity polymers when compared to the polymerization of methacrylates. In addition, the induction period is dependent on the ability of the RAFT agent to fragment photolytically. As such, this work significantly contributes towards the understanding of the RAFT mechanism and side reactions during photopolymerization processes.

Tips/comments directly from the authors:

  1. The rate of photolysis, although demonstrated here under blue light irradiation (λmax ~ 460 nm) of constant intensity (ca. 1.5 mW/cm2), is likely strongly dependent on both the wavelength and intensity of the employed light source.
  2. Less stable (i.e. faster fragmenting) RAFT agents can be used with acrylate type monomers with minimal degradation due to conversion of the fragmenting species from tertiary to secondary during initiation.
  3. The rate of photopolymerization is also dependent on the initial RAFT agent concentration, and hence the targeted degree of polymerization.
  4. Trithiocarbonates are also more hydrolytically stable than many dithiobenzoates, so these photopolymerization reactions are also amenable to aqueous reaction conditions.



Read this exciting research for free until 31/08/2016 through a registered RSC account:

Investigation into the photolytic stability of RAFT agents and the implications for photopolymerization reactions
T. G. McKenzie, L. P. da M. Costa, Q. Fu, D. E. Dunstan and G. G. Qiao
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 4246-4253
DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00808A

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About the webwriterAthina Anastasaki

Dr. Athina Anastasaki is a web writer for Polymer Chemistry. She is currently an Elings fellow working alongside Professor Craig Hawker at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).

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Top 10 most-read Polymer Chemistry articles – Q2 2016

This month sees the following articles in Polymer Chemistry that are in the top 10 most accessed from April – June 2016:

Lignocellulosic biomass: a sustainable platform for the production of bio-based chemicals and polymers
Furkan H. Isikgor and C. Remzi Becer
Polym. Chem., 2015, 6, 4497-4559
DOI: 10.1039/C5PY00263J

Thiol-ene “click” reactions and recent applications in polymer and materials synthesis
Andrew B. Lowe
Polym. Chem., 2010, 1, 17-36
DOI: 10.1039/B9PY00216B

Thiol–ene “click” reactions and recent applications in polymer and materials synthesis: a first update
Andrew B. Lowe
Polym. Chem., 2014, 5, 4820-4870
DOI: 10.1039/C4PY00339J

Investigation into thiol-(meth)acrylate Michael addition reactions using amine and phosphine catalysts
Guang-Zhao Li, Rajan K. Randev, Alexander H. Soeriyadi, Gregory Rees, Cyrille Boyer, Zhen Tong, Thomas P. Davis, C. Remzi Becer and David M. Haddleton
Polym. Chem., 2010, 1, 1196-1204
DOI: 10.1039/C0PY00100G

Oxidant-induced dopamine polymerization for multifunctional coatings
Qiang Wei, Fulong Zhang, Jie Li, Beijia Li and Changsheng Zhao
Polym. Chem., 2010, 1, 1430-1433
DOI: 10.1039/C0PY00215A

Thermoresponsive polyelectrolytes derived from ionic liquids
Yuki Kohno, Shohei Saita, Yongjun Men, Jiayin Yuan and Hiroyuki Ohno
Polym. Chem., 2015, 6, 2163-2178
DOI: 10.1039/C4PY01665C

Bringing d-limonene to the scene of bio-based thermoset coatings via free-radical thiol–ene chemistry: macromonomer synthesis, UV-curing and thermo-mechanical characterization
Mauro Claudino, Jeanne-Marie Mathevet, Mats Jonsson and Mats Johansson
Polym. Chem., 2014, 5, 3245-3260
DOI: 10.1039/C3PY01302B

Effect of gold nanoparticle shapes for phototherapy and drug delivery
Nik N. M. Adnan, Y. Y. Cheng, Nur M. N. Ong, Tuan T. Kamaruddin, Eliza Rozlan, Timothy W. Schmidt, Hien T. T. Duong and Cyrille Boyer
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 2888-2903
DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00465B

Facile and efficient chemical functionalization of aliphatic polyesters by cross metathesis
Lucie Fournier, Carine Robert, Sylvie Pourchet, Alice Gonzalez, Lewis Williams, Joëlle Prunet and Christophe M. Thomas
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 3700-3704
DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00664G

Toughening of photo-curable polymer networks: a review
Samuel Clark Ligon-Auer, Martin Schwentenwein, Christian Gorsche, Jürgen Stampfl and Robert Liska
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 257-286
DOI: 10.1039/C5PY01631B

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.




Fancy submitting an article to Polymer Chemistry?
Then why not submit to us today!

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign up for the e-alerts or RSS feeds, and follow us on Twitter.

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Polymer Chemistry’s Impact Factor increases to 5.687

Polymer Chemistry is pleased to announce that its latest Impact Factor is 5.687.

Polymer Chemistry is the home for the most innovative and exciting polymer research, with an emphasis on the synthesis of polymers and their applications. Led by Editor-in-Chief David Haddleton, and our expert team of international Associate Editors and Editorial Board members, Polymer Chemistry has the highest immediacy index (1.408) of any primary research journal in the Polymer Science category.

Immediate impact: Our Immediacy Index has been consistently higher than those of our competitors since our launch.

High citation rate: We have a higher fraction of articles cited than our competitors, with 98% of papers receiving at least 1 citation.*

Rapid publication: We have an average time from receipt to publication of just 50 days, and less than 19 days from receipt to first decision.

Continued growth: For the 6th year in a row both our number of publications and our impact factor have increased.

We are extremely grateful to all our readers, authors and referees for their contribution to Polymer Chemistry’s continued success, and to our Editorial and Advisory Board members for their hard work and dedication.

Join the many leading scientists who have already chosen to publish in Polymer Chemistry and submit today!

Find out how other Royal Society of Chemistry journals were ranked in the latest Impact Factor release.

*As of 29 June 2016, based on citations to articles published in 2013 and 2014.

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Focus on: Aggregation Induced Emission in Polymers

Highlights by Dr. Fiona Hatton (@fi_hat)

Aggregation induced emission (AIE) is the phenomenon through which luminophores exhibit an enhanced luminescence in the aggregated state. To date, various types of luminogens have demonstrated AIE, including: hydrocarbon, heteroatom, cyano-substituted, hydrogen bonded, polymeric and organometallic based luminogens.

Here we take a look at three articles which focus on AIE in polymers that were published in Polymer Chemistry this month.

ToC

1. Aggregation-induced emission: the origin of lignin fluorescence
Yuyuan Xue, Xueqing Qiu, Ying Wu, Yong Qian, Mingsong Zhou, Yonghong Deng, Yuan Li
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 3502-3508; DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00244G

Lignin is commonly defined as a complex and irregular phenylpropanoid heteropolymer, with wide variability in structure, and its fluorescence has been well studied. The authors demonstrate that AIE is the cause of the blue lignin fluorescence commonly observed, due to clustering of carbonyl groups and restriction of intrmolecular rotation. This system aids the development of non-conventional chromophores originating from biomass.


2. Fabrication of a cross-linked supramolecular polymer on the basis of cucurbit[8]uril-based host–guest recognition with tunable AIE behaviors
Lili Wang, Zhe Sun, Miaomiao Ye, Yu Shao, Lei Fang, Xiaowei Liu
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 3669-3673; DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00500D

A supramolecular cross-linked polymer based on the ternary host-guest interaction between cucurbit[8]uril, 1,1-dimethyl-4,4-bipyridinium dication and an azobenzene derivative was prepared. The resulting material was photoresponsive due to the azobenzene derivative and the introduction of tetraphenylethylene gave the network AIE properties. This novel photoresponsive cucurbit[8]uril-based supramolecular polymer with AIE, enables further development of fluorescent cucurbituril-based materials.


3. Acid–base-controlled and dibenzylammonium-assisted aggregation induced emission enhancement of poly(tetraphenylethene) with an impressive blue shift
Lipeng He, Lijie Li, Xiaoning Liu, Jun Wang, Huanting Huang, Weifeng Bu
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 3722-3730; DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00275G

Suzuki cross-coupling polymerisation was used to prepare several poly(tetraphenylethylene) based polymers, grafted with dibenzo-24-crown-8 groups (DB24C8), connected at different positions (ortho, meta or para). The polymers exhibited AIE, which was highly dependant upon the substitution and could also be caused by complexation of the DB24C8 groups with dibenzyl ammonium chloride. These polymers show promising properties required for optoelectronic, chemical and biomedical sensors.

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About the webwriterFiona Hatton

Dr. Fiona Hatton is a web writer for Polymer Chemistry. She is currently a postdoctoral researcher in the Armes group at the University of Sheffield, UK. Find her on Twitter: @fi_hat

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Paper of the month: Bespoke cationic nano-objects via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerisation

Cationic diblock copolymer spheres synthesised via polymerisation-induced self-assembly

Williams et al. utilise addition-fragmentation chain transfer aqueous dispersion polymerisation for the synthesis of bespoke cationic nano-objects directly in water.

Polymerisation-induced self-assembly (PISA) via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerisation enables the direct and efficient formation of various diblock copolymer morphologies (e.g. spherical micelles, work-like micelles, vesicles etc.) in aqueous solution. Here the first block is selected to be water-soluble, while the growing second block is water-insoluble and hence drives in situ self-assembly. This versatile approach can be conducted at much higher copolymer concentrations than traditional block copolymer self-assembly based on post-polymerisation processing.

Now Williams and co-workers report the synthesis of a range of cationic diblock copolymer nano-objects utilising a judicious binary mixture of chain transfer agents, namely non-ionic poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMA) and cationic poly[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl trimethylammonium chloride] (PQDMA) and using poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PHPMA) as the hydrophobic core-forming block. Systematic variation of the PQDMA mol fraction and the mean degree of polymerisation of the core-forming PHPMA block enabled the formation of well-defined spheres, worms or vesicles that remain cationic over a wide pH range.

Interestingly, higher cationic character led to the formation of kinetically-trapped spheres; this is because more effective electrosteric stabilisation prevents sphere-sphere fusion. In addition, using 5 mol% PQDMA stabiliser enabled preparation of a 12.5% w/w cationic worm gel that exhibited a zeta potential of +20 mV and a storage modulus of 137 Pa, as demonstrated by variable temperature rheology studies. This worm gel proved to be thermoresponsive: it underwent reversible degelation on cooling from 25 °C to 5 °C. Finally, such cationic gels exhibited weak antimicrobial activity towards the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

Tips/comments directly from the authors:

  1. It is really important to map out a detailed phase diagram for the reliable and reproducible identification of pure copolymer phases. This is particularly true for the elusive worm phase, since this occupies relatively narrow phase space.
  2. Using pairs of stabiliser blocks is a powerful and versatile means of tuning the copolymer morphology. If a wholly cationic stabiliser is used, only spheres can be obtained. However, using a binary mixture of a non-ionic and a cationic stabiliser allows access to cationic spheres, worms or vesicles. This is because the non-ionic stabiliser dilutes the charge density within the coronal layer. If maximum cationic character is desired, then the ionic block should have a higher degree of polymerisation than the non-ionic block. This will enable it to protrude from the layer of non-ionic stabiliser chains and influence the electrophoretic footprint of the diblock copolymer nano-objects.
  3. When diluting thermoresponsive worm dispersions to the relatively low concentrations typically used for TEM or DLS analysis, it is important for dispersions to be stored at ambient temperature. This is because the thermoresponsive degelation behaviour becomes irreversible below a certain critical copolymer concentration. Thus storing highly dilute (< 1 %) dispersions in a refrigerator at 4-5 °C simply leads to kinetically-trapped spheres – worms are no longer reformed on returning to ambient temperature under these conditions.



Read this exciting research for free until 31/07/2016 through a registered RSC account:

Bespoke cationic nano-objects via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerisation
M. Williams, N. J. W. Penfold, J. R. Lovett, N. J. Warren, C. W. I. Douglas, N. Doroshenko, P. Verstraete, J. Smets and S. P. Armes
Polym. Chem., 2016, 7, 3864-3873
DOI: 10.1039/C6PY00696E

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About the webwriterAthina Anastasaki

Dr. Athina Anastasaki is a web writer for Polymer Chemistry. She is currently an Elings fellow working alongside Professor Craig Hawker at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).

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Warwick Polymer Conference 2016

11–14 July 2016 in Warwick, UK

Warwick Polymer Conference 2016 is the premier conference on polymer chemistry, which focus on the chemical synthesis and chemical properties of polymers.

Held 11–14 July 2016 in Warwick, UK, this year’s conference is the fourth in their series of international polymer chemistry meetings and the largest so far with almost 600 delegates. The program is designed for all to spend social time as well as scientific time.

Polymer Chemistry proudly sponsors this conference, which will feature a number of lectures by both established researchers from across the globe and early-career scientists who are making recent, novel contributions. Contributed oral and poster presentations will also add to the mix.

Mark your calendar today and register now!


Executive Editor, Polymer ChemistryMeet the team:

Dr Neil Hammond (Executive Editor of Polymer Chemistry) will be attending the event. He would love to hear about your research and meet with our readers, authors and referees. Please do get in touch with Neil if you would like to arrange a meeting in advance.

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