Archive for the ‘Lectureship’ Category

2022 Soft Matter Lectureship – Open for nominations

Do you know an early-career researcher who deserves recognition for their contribution to the soft matter field?

 

Soft Matter is pleased to announce that nominations are now being accepted for its 2022 Lectureship award and will close on 31 December 2021. This annual award was established in 2009 to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the soft matter field.

 

Soft Matter Lectureship - open for nominations

 

Eligibility

To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates should meet the following criteria:

  • Be an independent researcher, PhD students postdoctoral research associates are not eligible
  • Be actively pursuing research within the soft matter field, and have made a significant contribution to the field
  • Be at an early stage of their independent career (this should typically be within 12 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break, work in systems where their time period to independence may vary or who followed an alternative study path)

 

How to nominate

Nominations must be made via email to softmatter-rsc@rsc.org, and include the following:

  • The name, affiliation and contact details of the nominee, nominator and referee
  • An up-to-date CV of the nominee (1-3 A4 page maximum length)
  • A letter of recommendation from the nominator (500 words maximum length)
  • A supporting letter of recommendation from a referee (500 words maximum length). This could be from the nominee’s postdoc, PhD supervisor or academic mentor for instance
  • The nominator must confirm that to the best of their knowledge, their nominee’s professional standing is as such that there is no confirmed or potential impediment to them receiving the Lectureship

Please note:

  • Self-nomination is not permitted
  • The nominee must be aware that he/she has been nominated for this lectureship
  • Previous winners and current Soft Matter Editorial Board members are not eligible
  • As part of the Royal Society of Chemistry, we have a responsibility to promote inclusivity and accessibility in order to improve diversity. Where possible, we encourage each nominator to consider nominating candidates of all genders, races, and backgrounds. Please see the RSC’s approach to Inclusion and Diversity.

 

Selection

  • All eligible nominated candidates will be assessed by a judging panel made up of the Soft Matter Editorial Board, any Editorial Board members with a conflict of interest will be ineligible for the judging panel.
  • The judging panel will consider the following core criteria:
    • Excellence in research, as evidenced in reference to originality and impact
    • Quality of publications, patents or software
    • Innovation
    • Professional standing
    • Independence
    • Collaborations and teamwork
    • Evidence of promising potential
    • Other indicators of esteem indicated by the nominator
  • In any instance where multiple nominees are judged to be equally meritorious in relation to these core criteria, the judging panel will use information provided on the nominee’s broader contribution to the chemistry community as an additional criterion. Examples of this could include: involvement with RSC community activities, teaching or demonstrating, effective mentorship, service on boards, committees or panels, leadership in the scientific community, peer reviewing, promotion of diversity and inclusion, advocacy for chemistry, public engagement and outreach.

 

Previous winners

2021 – Silvia Marchesan, University of Trieste, Italy

2020 – Valeria Garbin, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands

2019 – Timothy J White, University of Colorado, USA

2018 – Susan Perkin, University of Oxford, UK

2017 – Daeyeon Lee, University of Pennsylvania, USA

2016 – Damien Baigl, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France

2015 – Lucio Isa, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

2014 – Eric Dufresne, Yale University, USA

2013 – Eric Furst, University of Delaware, USA

2012 – Patrick Doyle, MIT, USA

2011 – Michael J. Solomon, University of Michigan, USA

2010 – Bartosz Grzybowski, UNIST, Republic of Korea

2009 – Emanuela Zaccarelli, University of Rome, Italy

 

Nominations deadline: 31 December 2021

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2021 Soft Matter Lectureship awarded to Silvia Marchesan

It is with great pleasure that we announce Prof Silvia Marchesan (University of Trieste) as the recipient of the 2021 Soft Matter lectureship.

This award, now in its thirteenth year, honours an early-career researcher who has made significant contribution to the soft matter field. The recipient is selected by the Soft Matter Editorial Board from a list of candidates nominated by the community.

Promotional slide displaying the winner of the 2021 Soft Matter lectureship - Silvia Marchesan (university of Trieste)

Silvia completed her PhD in Chemistry at The University of Edinburgh in 2008 and did her postdoc research at the University of Helsinki (Finland), then at Monash University in a joint position with Australia’s national science agency (CSIRO). In 2013 she returned to Italy and secured a tenure-track academic position in 2015 at the University of Trieste, where she started to work on nanostructured materials as PI thanks to a starting grant by the Italian Ministry of Education and Research. In 2018 she became associate professor and obtained the national Habilitation as full professor in organic chemistry. She was featured amongst the 11 Rising Stars profiles in the natural sciences by Nature Index in 2018 for her multidisciplinary research that spans across chemistry, biophysics, nanotechnology and materials science.

Silvia leads the SuperStructures group and can be found on Twitter @MarchesanLab. She is interested in the control over the self-organization of molecules into superstructures that span over a sizescale that goes well beyond that of the single components. Her group’s main activities focus on the use of both D- and L- amino acids to form short heterochiral peptides that self-organize into different architectures. Their favourite systems are in water and they can be in the form of biomaterials (hydrogels), or nanostructures, for biological applications and they also also enjoy working on carbon nanomaterials (CNT, graphene, nanohorns, etc.) that they covalently functionalize to exert control over their properties, in this case both for energy or biological applications.

 

Read Silvia’s latest article in Soft Matter Supramolecular hydrogels from unprotected dipeptides: a comparative study on stereoisomers and structural isomers” which was in our peptide soft materials collection for FREE until 1 August. Also check out articles from our previous lectureship winners in our lectureship lectureship winners collection.

 

How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

In my first article as corresponding author, it was all about data interpretation, yet many questions were left unaswered. Over the years, the transition has been towards understanding the exact reasons behind unexpected observations, and identifying design rules for self-assembling minimalistic systems that gel and exert various functions (e.g. catalysis, drug delivery, amyloid fibril inhibition, etc.). On the journey, I have encountered great scientists, some of which have become collaborators from different disciplines that complement our skills and with whom we engage in stimulating discussions and learn something new every day!

 

What excites you most about your area of research and what has been the most exciting moment of your career so far?

What I love about our research on soft matter is that, especially in the case of supramolecular hydrogels, we can monitor the “dance” of molecules as they interact across size scales, using diverse techniques at the molecular, nano-, micro-, up to the macroscale, and we can actually see by eye the net outcome of the assembly process. It is stupefying to visually observe changes in a vial and understand the process that brings molecules together into a nanostructured, yet macroscopic, material.

The most exciting moment came after a long series of grant rejections, as I started to think of plan B, outside of academia, and wrapped up the scientific passion project that was keeping me awake at night, in what I thought was going to be the last proposal. I couldn’t believe my eyes when I discovered that it got funded with a starting package from the Italian Ministry of Research (MIUR). That was a game-changer and I remember standing in awe in front of the lab door with the name “Superstructures Lab”, thinking that finally I could realise the science that, until then, I could only dream of.

 

In your opinion, what are the most important questions to be asked/answered in your field of research?

I think there’s still a knowledge gap at the mesoscale. We understand well how to design and control molecules and nanostructures on one hand, and macroscopic materials on the other. However, sometimes a link goes missing in the middle, and geometrical errors accumulate in the process of structure amplification until it stops at the microscale, or it fails before then. I think that understanding and controlling how this happens, and how multiple components can exert orthogonal functions in complex systems, will open the way to a qualitative leap in the field. We are working very hard to uncover general design rules to go all the way from simple molecules to supramolecular materials, and peptides’ diversity renders the task an exciting challenge.

 

How do you feel about Soft Matter as a place to publish research on this topic?

Our work is at the interface of chemistry, biophysics, nanotechnology, and materials science. Most journals focus on one discipline or another, while Soft Matter readers are the perfect audience for mutlidisciplinary research of this type. The RSC publishing platform is very simple to use, and we experienced short peer-review times and constructive feedback that ultimately allowed us to grow as scientists and it enhanced the quality of our work.

 

In which upcoming conferences or events (online or in person) may our readers meet you?

In 2021, I’ll be at the “Design and Function of Stimuli Responsive Nanocomposites” Symposium at UCD, at the ACS Fall Meeting, the EMBO Workshop on Designing Functional Biomolecular Assemblies, and I’ll close the year in Caparica (Portugal) with the Conference on Translational Chemistry (IC3TC).

 

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with early career scientists?

Find an inspiring environment and mentor to help you find your path, do the science that makes you dream of it, engage with the community at large, professional and local (schools, public). The more you practise discussing science the clearer and better your ideas become.

 

How do you spend your spare time?

I wish I had spare time! I love rock concerts, art exhibitions, and going for hikes in dramatic landscapes. I am very fortunate that Italy on this front has lots to offer, and Trieste in particular, as it is a gem nested between the Alps and the Mediterranean, with the bonus of a synchrotron in between! Scientists are always welcome to visit us!

 

We would like to thank everybody who nominated a candidate for the 2021 Soft Matter Lectureship. The Editorial Board had a very difficult task in choosing a winner from the many excellent and worthy candidates.

 

Please join us in congratulating Silvia on winning this award!

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Open for Nominations: 2021 Soft Matter Lectureship

Do you know an early-career researcher who deserves recognition for their contribution to the soft matter field?

Now is your chance to put them forward for the accolade they deserve!

Soft Matter is pleased to announce that nominations are now being accepted for its 2021 Lectureship award. This annual award was established in 2009 to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the soft matter field.

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture at an international conference in 2021, where they will also be presented with the award. The Soft Matter Editorial Office will provide £1000 financial support to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs.

The recipient will also be asked to contribute a research article to the journal and will have their work showcased free of charge on the front cover of the issue in which their article is published. The article would be subject to the normal peer review standards of the journal.

Previous winners

2020 – Valeria Garbin, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands

2019 – Timothy J White, University of Colorado, USA

2018 – Susan Perkin, University of Oxford, UK

2017 – Daeyeon Lee, University of Pennsylvania, USA

2016 – Damien Baigl, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France

2015 – Lucio Isa, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

2014 – Eric Dufresne, Yale University, USA

2013 – Eric Furst, University of Delaware, USA

2012 – Patrick Doyle, MIT, USA

2011 – Michael J. Solomon, University of Michigan, USA

2010 – Bartosz Grzybowski, UNIST, Republic of Korea

2009 – Emanuela Zaccarelli, University of Rome, Italy

Eligibility

To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates should meet the following criteria:

  • Be an independent researcher, having completed PhD and postdoctoral studies
  • Be actively pursuing research within the soft matter field, and have made a significant contribution to the field
  • Be at an early stage of their independent career (this should be within 12 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed an alternative study path)

Although the Soft Matter Lectureship doesn’t explicitly reward support of or contributions to the journal, candidates with a history of publishing or reviewing for the journal would be more likely to be considered favourably.

Selection

  • All eligible nominated candidates will be assessed by a shortlisting panel, made up of members of the Soft Matter Advisory Board and a previous lectureship winner.
  • The shortlisting panel will consider the nomination form and letter of recommendation, as well as the three recent research articles highlighted in the nomination form for consideration.
  • Shortlisted candidates will be further assessed by the Soft Matter Editorial Board, and a winner will be selected based on an anonymous poll.
  • Selection is not based simply on quantitative measures. Consideration will be given to all information provided in the letter of recommendation and nomination form, including research achievements and originality, contributions to the soft matter community, innovation, collaborations and teamwork, publication history, and engagement with Soft Matter.

Nominations

Nominations must be made via email to softmatter-rsc@rsc.org, and include the following:

  • A brief letter of recommendation (1 page maximum length)
  • A complete nomination form (includes list of the candidate’s relevant publications or recent work, 3 research articles to be considered during the shortlisting process, candidate’s scientific CV, and full contact details)

Please note:

  • Nominations from students and self-nomination is not permitted.
  • The nominee must be aware that he/she has been nominated for this lectureship.
  • As part of the Royal Society of Chemistry, we have a responsibility to promote inclusivity and accessibility in order to improve diversity. Where possible, we encourage each nominator to consider nominating candidates of all genders, races, and backgrounds. Please see the RSC’s approach to Inclusion and Diversity.
  • Candidates outside of the stated eligibility criteria may still be considered.

 

Nominations deadline: 30th November 2020

 

Download nomination form here

 

 

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2020 Soft Matter Lectureship awarded to Valeria Garbin

It is with great pleasure that we announce Dr Valeria Garbin (Delft University of Technology, Netherlands) as the recipient of the 2020 Soft Matter Lectureship.

Valeria GarbinValeria Garbin studied Physics at the University of Padua and received her PhD from the University of Trieste in Italy. She was a Rubicon fellowship in the Physics of Fluids group at the University of Twente, and a postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania, before starting her research group at Imperial College London in 2012. She joined the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Delft University of Technology in 2019.

Her current research focuses on soft materials under flow and deformation, particularly the extreme deformation conditions of cavitation, which are central to biomedical ultrasound and bioprocessing; and of processing flows used to create advanced materials and formulated products.

Valeria has been awarded an ERC Starting Grant, was the 2018 recipient of the McBain medal (RSC/SCI), and has been featured in “100 Women of Chemistry” by the RSC.

Learn more about Valeria’s research by reading her papers in Soft Matter:

Polymer nanocomposite capsules formed by droplet extraction: spontaneous stratification and tailored dissolution
Christiana E. Udoh, Valeria Garbin and João T. Cabral
Soft Matter, 2019, 15, 5287-5295

High-frequency linear rheology of hydrogels probed by ultrasound-driven microbubble dynamics
Akaki Jamburidze, Marco De Corato, Axel Huerre, Angelo Pommella and Valeria Garbin
Soft Matter, 2017, 13, 3946-3953

Shape oscillations of particle-coated bubbles and directional particle expulsion
Vincent Poulichet, Axel Huerre and Valeria Garbin
Soft Matter, 2017, 13, 125-133

Surface waves on a soft viscoelastic layer produced by an oscillating microbubble
Marc Tinguely, Matthew G. Hennessy, Angelo Pommella, Omar K. Matar and Valeria Garbin
Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 4247-4256

Near field capillary repulsion
Lu Yao, Lorenzo Botto, Marcello Cavallaro, Jr, Blake J. Bleier, Valeria Garbin and Kathleen J. Stebe
Soft Matter, 2013, 9, 779-786

These articles are free to read until 31 March 2020.

Thank you to everyone who nominated a candidate for the Lectureship; we received many excellent nominations, and the Editorial Board had a difficult task in choosing between some outstanding candidates.

Please join us in congratulating Valeria on winning this award!

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Nominations now open for the 2020 Soft Matter Lectureship

Do you know an early-career researcher who deserves recognition for their contribution to the soft matter field?

Now is your chance to put them forward for the accolade they deserve!

Soft Matter is pleased to announce that nominations are now being accepted for the 2020 Soft Matter Lectureship award. This annual award was established in 2009 to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the soft matter field.

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture at an international conference in 2020, where they will also be presented with the award. The Soft Matter Editorial Office will provide financial support to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs.

The recipient will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased free of charge on the front cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Tim White receiving his award from Dimitris Vlassopoulos and Laura Fisher

Prof Tim White receiving his Soft Matter Lectureship award from Professor Dimitris Vlassopoulos (left) and Laura Fisher (right)

 

Previous winners

2019 – Timothy J White, University of Colorado, USA

2018 – Susan Perkin, University of Oxford, UK

2017 – Daeyeon Lee, University of Pennsylvania, USA

2016 – Damien Baigl, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France

2015 – Lucio Isa, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

2014 – Eric Dufresne, Yale Univeristy, USA

2013 – Eric Furst, University of Delaware, USA

2012 – Patrick Doyle, MIT, USA

2011 – Michael J. Solomon, University of Michigan, USA

2010 – Bartosz Grzybowski, UNIST, Republic of Korea

2009 – Emanuela Zaccarelli, University of Rome, Italy

Eligibility

To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates should meet the following criteria:

  • Be an independent researcher, having completed PhD and postdoctoral studies
  • Be actively pursuing research within the soft matter field, and have made a significant contribution to the field
  • Be at an early stage of their independent career (this should be within 12 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed an alternative study path)

Although the Soft Matter Lectureship doesn’t explicitly reward support of or contributions to the journal, candidates with no history of either publishing in or refereeing for the journal would typically not be considered.

Selection

  • Eligible nominated candidates will be notified of their nomination, and will be asked to provide 3 recent articles that they feel represent their current research.
  • All eligible nominated candidates will be assessed by a shortlisting panel, made up of members of the Soft Matter Advisory Board and a previous lectureship winner.
  • The shortlisting panel will consider the articles provided by the candidates as well as their CVs and letters of nomination.
  • Shortlisted candidates will be further assessed by the Soft Matter Editorial Board, and a winner will be selected based on an anonymous poll.
  • Selection is not based simply on quantitative measures. Consideration will be given to all information provided in the letter of recommendation and candidate CV, including research achievements and originality, contributions to the soft matter community, innovation, collaborations and teamwork, publication history, and engagement with Soft Matter.

Nominations

  • Nominations must be made via email to softmatter-rsc@rsc.org, and should include a short CV (3 page maximum length) and a brief letter of nomination (1 page maximum length)
  • Self-nomination is not permitted.
  • Nominators do not need to be senior researchers, and we encourage nominations from people at all career levels.
  • As part of the Royal Society of Chemistry, we believe we have a responsibility to promote inclusivity and accessibility in order to improve diversity. Where possible, we encourage each nominator to consider nominating candidates of all genders, races, and backgrounds.
  • Candidates outside of the stated eligibility criteria may still be considered.

Nominations should be submitted no later than 30th November 2019.

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2019 Lectureship awarded to Tim White at ISMC

Professor Tim White gave the 2019 Soft Matter Lecture and was presented with his Award at the International Soft Matter Conference in Edinburgh, which took place from the 3rd – 7th June. Professor White’s lecture was on ‘Pixelated Polymers: Programming Function into Liquid Crystalline Polymer Networks and Elastomers’.

 

Tim White receiving his award from Dimitris Vlassopoulos and Laura Fisher

Prof Tim White receiving his Soft Matter Lectureship award from Associate Editor Professor Dimitris Vlassopoulos (left) and Deputy Editor Laura Fisher (right) (©Paul Maguire)

 

Professor Tim White presenting his lecture at the ISMC

Professor Tim White presenting his lecture at the ISMC (©Paul Maguire)

 

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2019 Soft Matter Lectureship Awarded to Professor Tim White

It is with great pleasure that we announce Prof. Tim White (University of Colorado Boulder, USA) as the recipient of the 2019 Soft Matter Lectureship.

Professor Tim WhiteTim White completed his PhD at the University of Iowa.  Thereafter he went on to become a Senior Research Engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory in the US.  In July, Tim was appointed as the Gallogly Professor of Engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder where he has founded the Responsive and Programmable Materials Group.

His current research activities are broadly focused on harnessing stimuli response in liquid crystalline materials to realize shape transformation or optical reconfiguration.

Tim will give his lecture and receive his certificate at the International Soft Matter Conference in Edinburgh in June.

 

To learn more about Tim’s research read some of his Soft Matter papers below

Polymer stabilization of cholesteric liquid crystals in the oblique helicoidal state
Mariacristina Rumi,  Timothy J. Bunning  and  Timothy J. White
Soft Matter, 2018,14, 8883-8894

Blue-shifting tuning of the selective reflection of polymer stabilized cholesteric liquid crystals
Kyung Min Lee,  Vincent P. Tondiglia,  Nicholas P. Godman,  Claire M. Middleton  and  Timothy J. White
Soft Matter, 2017,13, 5842-5848

Voxel resolution in the directed self-assembly of liquid crystal polymer networks and elastomers
Benjamin A. Kowalski,  Vincent P. Tondiglia,  Tyler Guin  and  Timothy J. White
Soft Matter, 2017,13, 4335-4340

Photosensitivity of reflection notch tuning and broadening in polymer stabilized cholesteric liquid crystals
Kyung Min Lee,  Vincent P. Tondiglia  and  Timothy J. White
Soft Matter, 2016,12, 1256-1261

 

Thank you to everyone who nominated a candidate for the Lectureship; we received many excellent nominations, and the Editorial Board had a difficult task in choosing between some outstanding candidates.

Please join us in congratulating Tim on his award!

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2018 Soft Matter Lectureship awarded to Susan Perkin at STMG 2019

Professor Susan Perkin (University of Oxford, UK) was presented the Soft Matter 2018 Lectureship award  at the Annual Meeting of the Statistical Mechanics & Thermodynamics Group by Dr Neil Hammond, Executive Editor for Soft Matter.

Susan Perkin awarded Soft Matter Prize

Professor Perkin (left) with Executive Editor Dr Hammond (right)

The meeting, which was held in Manchester on the 9th – 11th January, aimed to bring together experimental and modelling/theory groups to discuss industrial and academic challenges related to electrolytes solutions.

Please join us in congratulating Susan on winning this award!

 

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Nominations for the 2019 Soft Matter Lectureship are now open!

Do you know an early-career researcher who deserves recognition for their contribution to the soft matter field?

Now is your chance to put them forward for the accolade they deserve!

Soft Matter is pleased to announce that nominations are now being accepted for its 2019 Lectureship award. This annual award was established in 2009 to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the soft matter field.

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture in 2019, where they will also be presented with the award. The Soft Matter Editorial Office will provide financial support to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs.

The recipient will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased free of charge on the front cover of the issue in which their article is published.

 

Susan Perkin awarded Soft Matter Prize

Professor Perkin (left) being presented with the award by Dr Hammond, Executive Editor (right)

Previous winners

2018 – Susan Perkin, University of Oxford, UK

2017 – Daeyeon Lee, University of Pennsylvania, USA

2016 – Damien Baigl, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France

2015 – Lucio Isa, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

2014 – Eric Dufresne, Yale Univeristy, USA

2013 – Eric Furst, University of Delaware, USA

2012 – Patrick Doyle, MIT, USA

2011 – Michael J. Solomon, University of Michigan, USA

2010 – Bartosz Grzybowski, UNIST, Republic of Korea

2009 – Emanuela Zaccarelli, University of Rome, Italy

 

Eligibility

To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates should meet the following criteria:

  • Be an independent researcher, having completed PhD and postdoctoral studies
  • Be actively pursuing research within the soft matter field, and have made a significant contribution to the field
  • Be at an early stage of their independent career (this should be within 12 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed an alternative study path)

Although the Soft Matter Lectureship doesn’t explicitly reward support of or contributions to the journal, candidates with no history of either publishing in or refereeing for the journal would typically not be considered.

Selection

  • Eligible nominated candidates will be notified of their nomination, and will be asked to provide 3 recent articles that they feel represent their current research.
  • All eligible nominated candidates will be assessed by a shortlisting panel, made up of members of the Soft Matter Advisory Board and a previous lectureship winner.
  • The shortlisting panel will consider the articles provided by the candidates as well as their CVs and letters of nomination.
  • Shortlisted candidates will be further assessed by the Soft Matter Editorial Board, and a winner will be selected based on an anonymous poll.
  • Selection is not based simply on quantitative measures. Consideration will be given to all information provided in the letter of recommendation and candidate CV, including research achievements and originality, contributions to the soft matter community, innovation, collaborations and teamwork, publication history, and engagement with Soft Matter.

Nominations

  • Nominations must be made via email to softmatter-rsc@rsc.org, and should include a short CV and a brief letter of nomination.
  • Self-nomination is not permitted.
  • Nominators do not need to be senior researchers, and we encourage nominations from people at all career levels.
  • As part of the Royal Society of Chemistry, we believe we have a responsibility to promote inclusivity and accessibility in order to improve diversity. Where possible, we encourage each nominator to consider nominating candidates of all genders, races, and backgrounds.
  • Candidates outside of the stated eligibility criteria may still be considered.
  • Nomination letters should be up to 1 page in length. They should particularly highlight contributions that the nominee has made to the field as an independent researcher, and any career breaks or alternative career paths that should be taken into consideration by the judging panel. Nomination of one candidate by multiple people in the same letter is accepted.

Nominations should be submitted no later than 15th December 2018.

 

 

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2018 Soft Matter Lectureship Awarded to Susan Perkin

It is with great pleasure that we announce Prof. Susan Perkin (University of Oxford, UK) as the recipient of the 2018 Soft Matter Lectureship.

Susan Perkin graduated with a First in Chemistry from St. John’s College, Oxford (with a St. John’s College Academic Scholarship), then received her DPhil in 2006 studying with Jacob Klein. She moved to UCL in London in 2007 where she set up a laboratory and research group to work on ionic liquids and liquid interfaces. In 2012 she returned to the Faculty of Chemistry at Oxford and she is currently an Associate Professor of Physical Chemistry and Fellow of Trinity College, University of Oxford.

Her current interests include electrostatics in concentrated electrolytes and ionic liquids, molecular mechanisms of friction and lubrication, field effects on confined liquids, graphene surface forces, and controlling surface properties through the design of switchable thin films.

In the past few years Susan has been awarded a Starting Grant from the ERC, the Harrison-Meldola Memorial Prize from the Royal Society of Chemistry, and a Philip Leverhulme Prize from The Leverhulme Trust.

 

To learn more about Susan’s research read some of her publications in our sister journals:

Underscreening in concentrated electrolytes
Alpha A. Lee,  Carla S. Perez-Martinez,  Alexander M. Smith  and  Susan Perkin
Faraday Discuss., 2017, 119, 239-259

Ionic liquids in confined geometries
Susan Perkin
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012,14, 5052-5062

Long range electrostatic forces in ionic liquids
Matthew A. Gebbie,  Alexander M. Smith,  Howard A. Dobbs,  Alpha A. Lee,  Gregory G. Warr,  Xavier Banquy,  Markus Valtiner,  Mark W. Rutland,  Jacob N. Israelachvili,  Susan Perkin  and  Rob Atkin
Chem. Commun., 2017,53, 1214-1224

Thank you to everyone who nominated a candidate for the Lectureship; we received many excellent nominations, and the Editorial Board had a difficult task in choosing between some outstanding candidates.

Please join us in congratulating Susan on her award!

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