Author Archive

Green Chemistry Emerging Investigators Series – Daily Rodríguez-Padrón

Green Chemistry is proud to present the Green Chemistry Emerging Investigators Series, showcasing work being conducted by Emerging Investigators. This collection aims to highlight the excellent research being carried out by researchers in the early stages of their independent career from across the breadth of green chemistry. For more information about this series, click here

The most recent contribution to this series, a Paper entitled Orthogonal assisted tandem reactions for the upgrading of bio-based aromatic alcohols using chitin derived mono and bimetallic catalysts (Green Chem., 2024,26, 5221-5238, DOI: 10.1039/D3GC04848A), presents a tandem protocol for the valorisation of renewable alcohols derived from lignocellulosic biomass. The process involves an oxidation step followed by a reductive amination steps. By utilizing custom-made catalytic materials synthesized from renewable biopolymers derived from fishery waste, various aldehydes with potential applications as flavoring molecules were obtained, as well as secondary and tertiary amines that could serve as sustainable intermediates in the pharmaceutical industry. The authors explored the use of mechanochemistry for oxidizing solid alcohols.

Read our interview with the corresponding author below.

How would you set this article in a wider context?

While our primary focus lies in heterogeneous catalysis, this work carries significant implications for the broader context of sustainable chemistry and green technology. Specifically, it has the potential to impact industries involved in synthesizing flavouring molecules and pharmaceutical intermediates. Furthermore, our research aligns with ongoing efforts in biomass valorisation and waste management and reduction. From utilizing lignocellulosic waste via biomass-derived platform molecules as feedstocks to harnessing fishery waste as a renewable carbon and nitrogen source for catalytic material synthesis, our approach spans diverse avenues. Ultimately, this research contributes to global initiatives aimed at promoting sustainability and reducing the carbon footprint of the chemical industry.

 What is the motivation behind this work?

Our main motivation is to offer potential solutions to address the requirements of the European Green Deal. Firstly, we aim to provide more eco-friendly alternatives by reducing or even eliminating the use of hazardous solvents through mechanochemistry. Secondly, we strive to develop safer chemical and technological solutions by utilizing renewable feedstocks and reducing dependency on fossil carbon. This includes employing renewable precursors derived from lignocellulosic waste or fishery waste for synthesizing chemicals and catalytic materials, respectively, thereby contributing to waste reduction.

What aspects of this work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about it?

One aspect of this work that excites me the most is that we were able to conduct the oxidation reaction using air as the oxidizing agent, without pressurizing the autoclave reactors. This offers clear advantages for both safety and cost-efficiency of the protocol, potentially facilitating its scalability. Additionally, I’m thrilled about being able to perform the oxidation reaction under continuous-flow mechanochemical conditions in a twin-screw extruder, in this case using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizing agent, but under solvent-free conditions. This provides another sustainable alternative for oxidizing solid benzyl-type alcohols. On the other hand, one of the most challenging aspects has been controlling the selectivity of the reductive amination step towards the desired products, an area we are continuously working on improving.

 

 

What is the next step? What work is planned?

This work has indeed sparked numerous new avenues for our ongoing research, particularly concerning the reductive amination of carbonyl-containing products and the potential applications in mechanochemistry. The use of green reducing agents for reduction and reductive amination reactions in mechanochemistry remains largely unexplored in the literature, posing a significant challenge. Nevertheless, we are highly motivated by some promising preliminary results in this area, although there is still much work to be done. It’s an exciting journey ahead!

Please describe your journey to becoming an independent researcher

My journey, as a Latin-American woman, to becoming an independent researcher has been filled with challenges, but it has been incredibly rewarding. From earning my bachelor’s degree in chemistry in Havana to completing my Ph.D. in Spain, and undertaking research stays in various universities across Europe, each experience has shaped me as a scientist and as a person. While relocating from my home country to Spain to pursue my Master’s and PhD degrees was one of the most challenging decisions I’ve made, it proved pivotal in shaping my academic trajectory.

Currently, I hold a post-doctoral position as a Marie-Curie Fellow at Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Italy, under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Cofund Grant Agreement No. 945361. Throughout my career, I have undertaken research stays at various institutions, including Università degli Studi Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria and Università degli Studi di Messina in Italy, as well as PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech CNRS, in France. Additionally, I have gained valuable experience through research stays at Deasyl SA in Switzerland and KelAda Pharmachem Ltd. in Dublin, Ireland.

My research interests have been deeply rooted in the realm of materials science for different applications, with a strong emphasis on sustainability. My core objectives are to spearhead a transformative shift in the synthesis of materials. To tackle these goals, my approach centres on mechanochemistry and sustainable precursors to develop green and scalable protocols for tailoring nanomaterials with improved performance. In this line, I am dedicated to the use of wastes as a strategy to design new materials while enabling waste management and aligning with the circular economy.

Apart from the scientific challenges I eagerly embrace on a daily basis, one of the most daunting aspects I have faced has been navigating bureaucracy, especially coming from a Latin American country like Cuba. Yet, amidst these obstacles, I’ve been fortunate, especially to have crossed paths with remarkable individuals, mentors, and colleagues throughout my journey in every place I’ve been.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

If I could offer one piece of advice to fellow early-career scientists, it would be to embrace interdisciplinary collaborations. The most groundbreaking solutions often emerge from crossing disciplinary boundaries and exploring new perspectives. I am truly fortunate to have collaborated with outstanding scientists who have enriched my scientific knowledge and experience. Their expertise and insights have significantly contributed to my growth and development as a researcher.

Moreover, at this stage of my career, I’m increasingly engaged with students, something I find deeply fulfilling. For example, in the case of this contribution, collaborating with Francesco Zorzetto, who was once my student and is now my colleague, was truly an amazing experience. I can confidently say that I learned a great deal from him while working on this project. One key lesson that I consistently share with my students is that encountering negative results is normal: it’s part of the life of a researcher. What matters is perseverance, seeking alternatives, and returning to the laboratory the next day with renewed enthusiasm. Because perseverance and passion for what we do always yield rewards in the end.

Why did you choose to publish in Green Chemistry?

Choosing to publish in Green Chemistry was a no-brainer for me. It’s a prestigious journal known for its commitment to environmentally friendly chemical processes, which aligns perfectly with my research focus on sustainability.

Meet the author

Daily Rodríguez-Padrón is a Marie-Curie Post-Doctoral researcher at Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Italy (Marie Sklodowska-Curie Cofund Grant Agreement No. 945361). She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Havana, Cuba, in 2013, and completed her Ph.D. in the Department of Organic Chemistry at the University of Cordoba, Spain, in 2020. In April 2020, she joined KelAda Pharmachem Ltd (Dublin, Ireland) as a visiting postdoctoral researcher, contributing to the Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action (MSCA) RISE project titled GreenX4Drug. Dr Rodríguez-Padrón has undertaken research stays in esteemed universities, including the Universita degli Studi Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria and the Università degli Studi di Messina in Italy, as well as the PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech CNRS, in France. She serves on the Editorial Board of Sustainable Chemistry and has been invited as a Guest Editor for various journals, including Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Topics in Current Chemistry, and Nanomaterials. Dr Rodríguez-Padrón has been laureated with the Dan David Prize 2019 in the field of Combatting Climate Change from Tel-Aviv University in Israel and the Green Talent Award 2020 from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Her research primarily focuses on mechanochemistry, biomass valorisation, heterogeneous catalysis, and sustainability.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Green Chemistry 25th anniversary celebration symposium: Biorefinery for a low-carbon society

On April 21,2024 the Green Chemistry 25th anniversary celebration symposium: Biorefinery for a low-carbon society, co-sponsored by the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, was held at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics. This conference was held on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of Green Chemistry. It aimed to discuss the latest progress in converting biomass into renewable energy, chemicals and materials, and to contribute to the construction of a low-carbon society.

The opening ceremony was hosted by Prof. Tao Zhang (Director of the State Key Laboratory of Catalysis Fundamentals of the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics and Green Chemistry’s Editorial Board Member), Prof.  Zhongmin Liu (Director of the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics), and Dr Guanqun Song (Regional Publisher at the Royal Society of Chemistry). Dr. Michael Rowan (Green Chemistry’s Executive Editor) also extended his welcoming to this event via video, and thanked the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics for its support and contribution to this symposium. After the opening ceremony, Prof. Tao Zhang awarded the Green Chemistry Excellence certificate to the speakers.

This symposium focused on the field of biorefinery and invited more than 50 experts in related fields to participate. A total of 19 talks and 1 free discussion were held. The talks covered key topics in the conversion of biomass into renewable energy, chemicals and materials, exploring the application and innovation of chemical catalysis, biocatalysis and other emerging strategies in biorefineries. Each talk demonstrated the in-depth thinking and innovative results of the researchers, highlighted the active exploration and efforts of the speakers in promoting green chemistry and sustainable development, and also attracted active questions from the participating experts. The event provided a platform for communication and cooperation, promoting in-depth dialogue and scientific discussion between the attendees.

This seminar marks a milestone celebrating Green Chemistry’s 25th Anniversary. It not only explored the latest progress in converting biomass into renewable energy, chemicals and materials, but also deepened its understanding of its mission to build a low-carbon society.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Green Chemistry Emerging Investigators Series – Xiao-Jun Ji

Green Chemistry is proud to present the Green Chemistry Emerging Investigators Series, showcasing work being conducted by Emerging Investigators. This collection aims to highlight the excellent research being carried out by researchers in the early stages of their independent career from across the breadth of green chemistry.  For more information about this series, click here

The most recent contribution to this series, a Paper entitled Constructing a green oleaginous yeast cell factory for sustainable production of the plant-derived diterpenoid sclareol (DOI: 10.1039/D3GC04949C), presents a green, sustainable and efficient microbial synthesis of plant-derived sclareol through the construction of an oleaginous yeast cell factory. Sclareol is an important starting material for the synthesis of ambroxan, and it relies heavily on traditional plant extraction. At present, ambroxan is widely used to replace the ambergris extracted from the endangered sperm whales.

Read our interview with the corresponding author below.

How would you set this article in a wider context?

The sclareol chassis strain here constructed paves the way towards a sustainable, large-scale fermentation-based manufacturing of other diterpenoid compounds. The findings of this study not only demonstrate the significant potential of microbial synthesis as an alternative pathway for generating structurally complex chemicals but also establish a model for the sustainable industrial production of other valuable terpenoids.

What is the motivation behind this work?

Ambergris is a waxy substance secreted from sperm whales and has a long history of use in perfume. Sclareol is an important synthetic raw material for ambergris substitute ambroxan. However, the major sources of sclareol still rely heavily on traditional plant extraction and the low concentration of sclareol in the plant as part of a complex mixture, requires laborious and costly purification processes. Alternatively, the rapid development of synthetic biology has enabled microorganisms to emerge as potential alternatives to conventional methods for sclareol production. Therefore, we choose the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica as the ideal platform for sustainable production of plant-derived sclareol.

What aspects of this work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about it?

With the elaborate design of the sclareol biosynthesis pathway and tight regulation of cell metabolism, we finally achieved highest titer of microbial sclareol, this was the most excited aspects of the entire work. The most challenging is how to well control the synthesis of unwanted byproducts caused by metabolic imbalance. We first engineered plant enzymes to improve their catalytic activity in Yarrowia lipolytica, then constructed scaffold-free multienzyme complexes with the peptide pair RIDD and RIAD to significantly alleviate the metabolic imbalance and decrease the synthesis of byproducts.

What is the next step? What work is planned?

We would like to conduct a follow-up research with further optimization of metabolic network, such as extending cytosolic acetyl-CoA pool by regulating the lipid metabolism, engineering secretion systems through specific transporter identification, and enhancing the supply cofactor NADPH. In addition, we will further achieve the production of other high-value terpenoid compounds in the oleaginous yeast chassis.

Please describe your journey to becoming an independent researcher

My academic career began after I graduated from the undergraduate program and continued my graduate studies at Nanjing Tech University, China. The transformation from a novice in scientific research to an independent researcher was due to the guidance of three supervisors. The first supervisor is Prof. He Huang, who directed my doctoral thesis at the Jiangsu Provincial Innovation Center for Industrial Biotechnology. As one of the first batch graduate students of Prof. He Huang, I received his meticulous guidance step by step, from specific experimental operations to control of the developing trends of the entire bioindustry. Thanks to his helpful cultivation, my doctoral thesis won the National Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Nomination Award of China. The second supervisor is Prof. Pingkai Ouyang, who directed my postdoctoral research at the National Research Center for Biotechnology. It was Prof. Pingkai Ouyang who taught me to dig deep into the details and try to be unique in scientific research. The third supervisor is Prof. Jens Nielsen, who was my supervisor when I was conducting visiting research at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. It was Prof. Jens Nielsen who made me understand the convenience of focusing on a certain microorganism to carry out scientific research and the importance for creating my own academic label. During my visiting researches in his laboratory, I gained a lot of experience in yeast synthetic biology, and further strengthened my training as a biochemical engineer and broadened my interdisciplinary research experiences. These educational and collaborative experiences taught me how to run and effectively manage a laboratory, how to design research projects, and ultimately trained me to become an independent researcher specializing in “synthetic biology driven biomanufacturing”.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

I want to share with you George Bernard Shaw’s famous quote about sharing apple: If you have an apple and I have an apple, and we exchange apples, we both still only have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea, and we exchange ideas, we each now have two ideas.

Why did you choose to publish in Green Chemistry?

Green Chemistry is a top-tier, highly respected journal with a broad readership all over the world. This journal provides a unique forum for the publication of innovative research on the development of alternative green and sustainable technologies. Our present article is highly compatible with this scope. Therefore, we have an idea of publishing our work in this prestigious journal.

Meet the author

Prof. Xiao-Jun Ji received his BSc and PhD from Nanjing Tech University in 2005 and 2009, and conducted the visiting research in the Systems and Synthetic Biology lab headed by Professor Jens Nielsen at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, during 2016 and 2017. He has received many awards such as the Fok Ying-Tung Foundation Young Scholars Award (2014), the National Technological Invention Award of China (2018), the Excellent Young Scholars of National Natural Science Foundation of China (2019), the Newton Advanced Fellowships of the Royal Society (2020), etc. His recent research focuses on bio-manufacturing of pharmaceutical and nutritional chemicals using the non-conventional yeast through metabolic engineering and the emerging synthetic biology tools.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Introducing Luigi Vaccaro: Our new Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce that Luigi Vaccaro (University of Perugia, Italy) has been appointed as a new Associate Editor in Green Chemistry

Luigi is a Full Professor at the University of Perugia, where he leads the Green S.O.C. group, http://greensoc.chm.unipg.it. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC), and before joining Green Chemistry, he was an Associate Editor for RSC Advances (2015-2024). His recognitions include the Europa Medal from the Society of Chemical Industry – London (2001), the ADP Award from Merck’s Chemistry Council for “Creative work in organic chemistry” (2006 and 2007), the G. Ciamician Medal of the Società Chimica Italiana (2007), the Lady Davis (2018) Visiting Professorship, the Pino Medal from the Organic and Industrial Divisions of the Italian Chemical Society (2023). His research is aimed at developing different aspects of chemistry to define sustainable and optimized chemical processes, combining the use of safer organic solvents, heterogeneous catalysis, and continuous-flow technology.I am honoured for this new role as an Associate Editor of Green Chemistry. Catalysis, circularity, waste-minimisation, and innovative technologies are just a few shades of the complex greater picture that green chemistry represents. I am sure that research contributions in these areas that quantitatively prove advances in terms of sustainability have and will always find a home in this journal.” – Luigi Vaccaro
Read some of Luigi’s Open Access papers in Green Chemistry: 

Read more of Luigi’s Royal Society of Chemistry publications here

Please join us in welcoming Luigi!

“We are really grateful for Luigi’s hard work and support of RSC Advances during the past 9 years, and wish him all the best in his new role with Green Chemistry” – Laura Fisher, Executive Editor, RSC Advances

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Introducing our new Green Chemistry Editorial Board member: Charlotte Williams

We are delighted to announce that Charlotte Williams (University of Oxford, United Kingdom) has been appointed as new Editorial Board Member in Green Chemistry.

Charlotte K. Williams OBE FRS is a professor of Inorganic Chemistry and Associate Head of Department (Research) in Oxford Chemistry. She is also an EPSRC Established Career Research Fellow. She heads-up a research group investigating polymerization catalysis and polymer chemistry with a particular focus on improving polymer sustainability. Her work involves close collaboration with scientists and engineers in both academic and industrial laboratories.

In 2011, Charlotte founded econic technologies which sells catalysts and processes facilitating carbon dioxide utilization (http://econic-technologies.com/). From 2003-2016, Charlotte was an academic in the Chemistry department at Imperial College London, serving as Head of Inorganic Chemistry teaching and Head of Materials Chemistry. Earlier in her career, she was a postdoctoral researcher at Cambridge University (2002-2003), working with Andrew Holmes and Richard Friend (Organometallic polymers for electronics), and at the University of Minnesota (2001-2002) working with Bill Tolman and Marc Hillmyer (zinc catalysts for lactide polymerization). She obtained her BSc and PhD from Imperial College London, the latter supervised by Vernon Gibson and Nick Long on ethene polymerization catalysis.

Her work has been recognised by prizes and awards including the Royal Society Leverhulme Medal (2022), the RSC Tilden Medal (2021) an OBE from Queen Elizabeth II for Services to Chemistry (2020), Macro Group UK Medal (2019), The Dechema Otto Roelen Medal (2018), The UK Catalysis Hub Sir John Meurig Thomas Medal (2017), the Royal Society of Chemistry Corday Morgan Medal (2016) and the Women in Science and Engineering Tech-Start Up Award (2015).

Please join us in welcoming Charlotte!

Celebrate the 15th Anniversary of companion journal Polymer Chemistry in a special collection here

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Introducing our new Green Chemistry Editorial Board member: Jean-Paul Lange

We are delighted to announce that Jean-Paul Lange (University of Twente and Shell Projects & Technology, The Netherlands) has been appointed as new Editorial Board Member in Green Chemistry.

Jean-Paul is the senior Principal Science Expert at Shell Projects & Technology in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where he has been exploring novel catalytic processes for producing fuels and chemicals from natural gas and oil and, for more than twenty years also from biomass and plastic wastes. His research embraces heterogeneous catalysis, chemical engineering, conceptual process design, manufacturing economics and technology strategy. Jean-Paul is also a Professor in Chemical Biorefining at the University of Twente, the Netherlands, where he is investigating thermo-chemical and -catalytic routes to convert biomass to fuels and chemicals and to recycle plastic wastes. Before joining Shell, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Lehigh University in Bethlehem (Pennsylvania, USA), got his PhD at the Fritz-Haber Institute (Max Planck Society) in Berlin (Germany) and graduated from the University of Namur (Belgium). He has co-authored more than 120 patent series, 80 scientific publications, and 10 book chapters and is co-editor of one scientific book. He also contributes to public science through various advisory boards in the Netherlands, Europe for the CEFIC and the European Commission.

Green Chemistry is sterile if not applied. It prefers simplicity over sophistication, resilience over sensitivity”. – Jean-Paul Lange

Please join us in welcoming Jean-Paul!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Introducing new Green Chemistry Editorial Board member: Serenella Sala

We are delighted to announce that Serenella Sala (European Commission – Joint Research Centre, Italy) has been appointed as a new Board Member in Green Chemistry.

Serenella is the Head of Unit of the Land Resources and Supply Chain Assessments Unit within the Sustainable Resource Directorate at the European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC). Environmental scientist by background, with a PhD in applied ecology, her research activities support European policies and focus on assessing sustainability by applying methodologies and models for sustainable development, integrated environmental assessment, life cycle assessment, risk assessment. The focus is on the eco-innovation of process and products as well as resource efficiency. She joined the JRC in 2010. Between 2001 and 2010, Serenella was the coordinator of the Research Unit on Sustainable Development (GRISS) at the Department of Environmental Science at University of Milano Bicocca, where she worked as a scientific project leader for several environmental projects supporting sustainability assessment in both the private and public sector. She actively promoted public and private partnership on eco-innovation and resource efficiency and contributed to harmonisation of methods and models for life cycle impact assessment at international level.

Let’s learn from nature how to develop our production and consumption systems in a sustainable way”. – Serenella Sala

Please join us in welcoming Serenella!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Call for Papers: Exploring the Frontiers: Unveiling New Horizons in Carbon Efficient Biomass Utilization

Green Chemistry is delighted to announce a call for papers for its latest themed collection on Exploring the Frontiers: Unveiling New Horizons in Carbon Efficient Biomass Utilization themed collection of Green Chemistry, Guest Edited by Zhi-Hua Liu (Tianjin University), Bing-Zhi Li (Tianjin University), Joshua Yuan (Washington University in St. Louis), James Clark (University of York), Vânia Zuin Zeidler (Leuphana Universitat Luneburg), Lieve Laurens (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Arthur Ragauskas (The University of Tennessee Knoxville), Joao Coutinho (CICECO-Universidade de Aveiro) and Buxing Han (Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences).  Open for submissions until October 31, 2024.

Lignocellulosic biomass, which is the most plentiful source of renewable energy, serves as a vital storehouse of energy within chemical bonds formed during photosynthetic CO2 reduction. The utilization of this abundant natural resource has a transformative role in the advancement of sustainable development and human civilization. Biomass conversion employs environmentally friendly techniques to convert renewable bioresources into valuable products such as biofuels, chemicals, and materials. Biomass utilization contributes significantly to the transition towards bio-economy, green chemistry, and carbon neutrality.

About this Themed Collection

This themed collection intends to showcase cutting-edge research, advancements, and innovations in carbon efficient biomass utilization, with a particular focus on uncovering new possibilities and opportunities in this field. It also aims to showcase innovative biotechnical solutions that can effectively transform biomass for a wide range of applications, while also addressing the current challenges and prospects in the field of carbon efficient biomass utilization. We believe that this themed collection will be of great interest to researchers in various fields such as green chemistry, synthetic biology, artificial intelligence, enzyme engineering, lignin valorization, biorefineries, sustainability, and environmental studies, among others.

Preferred topics include but are not limited to:

  • Biomass fractionation technologies: Exploration of emerging deconstruction and fractionation approaches to enhance the accessibility and convertibility of the biomass.
  • Enzymatic and microbial conversion: Prospecting novel enzymes and microorganisms for efficient bioconversion of carbohydrates and lignin into value-added biofuels, biochemicals, and biomaterials.
  • Synthetic biology approaches: Highlighting the application of synthetic biology principles to design microbial cell factory for improved biomass conversion; designing biosensors to regulate metabolic networks and enhance microbial cell factory performance.
  • Biocatalysis and enzyme engineering: Showcasing advancements in biocatalysis and enzyme engineering to enhance their efficiency, specificity, and stability in carbohydrates and lignin conversion.
  • Artificial intelligence (AI) technology: Exploiting cutting-edge AI and machine learning techniques for screening, mining, engineering, and de novo design of vital ligninolytic enzymes and other important enzymes in biomass and lignin valorization.
  • Design and evaluation of sustainable and carbon efficient biomass utilization: Exploring innovative approaches and routes to enhance the sustainability and carbon efficiency of biomass and lignin valorization; developing a synthesis solution for producing biodegradable and sustainable materials from biomass utilization; promoting a circular carbon economy and striving towards carbon neutrality in biomass utilization.
  • Other innovative technical strategies for carbon efficient biomass utilization.

This call for papers is open for the following article types:

  • Communications
  • Full papers
  • Reviews

How to Submit

If you would like to contribute to this themed collection, you can submit your article directly through the journal’s online submission service at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/gc before the deadline (October 31, 2024). Please answer the themed collection question in the submission form when uploading your files to say that this is a contribution to the themed collection and add a “Note to the Editor” that this is from the Open Call.

About the Journal

Green Chemistry provides a unique forum for the publication of innovative research on the development of alternative green and sustainable technologies. The journal publishes original and significant cutting-edge research that is likely to be of wide general appeal. Recently we have produced a YouTube video explaining the green advance requirement for Green Chemistry, which can be found here (alternative link here). A more detailed video summarising some of the benchmarking metrics to satisfy this requirement can be found here (alternative link here). We hope these are helpful to you during the writing process. For more information on the journal, please visit the journal homepage and see this editorial.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Green Chemistry Emerging Investigators Series – Jun Xiang

Green Chemistry is proud to present the Green Chemistry Emerging Investigators Series, showcasing work being conducted by Emerging Investigators. This collection aims to highlight the excellent research being carried out by researchers in the early stages of their independent career from across the breadth of green chemistry.  For more information about this series, click here

The most recent contribution to this series, a communication article entitled A facile, general, and modular synthetic approach to biomass-based diols (DOI: 10.1039/D3GC03296E), introduces a novel method for synthesizing structurally diverse biomass-based diols (BDOs) in a facile and general manner. By providing access to BDOs without the need for catalysts and using mild reaction conditions, this method aims to advance the development of sustainable materials and promote the transition from petroleum-based to biomass-based chemicals.

The motivation behind this work was to develop a more efficient and sustainable method for biomass-based diols. The ultimate goal is to foster the advancement of sustainable materials, thus promoting a more eco-friendly and sustainable future.

Read our interview with the corresponding author below.

What aspects of this work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about it?

I’m excited about the establishment of a powerful approach towards the production of diols derived from biomass. This approach enables us to synthesize diols with analogous structures, thereby expediting our discovery of key performance-affecting factors and facilitating the fabrication of high-performance biomass-based materials.

The challenging aspect lies in pushing this technology from the lab side into the market and achieving the goal of replacing petroleum-based materials on a large scale.

What is the next step? What work is planned?

Our research group is deeply concerned with the efficiency and safety of material preparation, as well as the recyclability of as-prepared materials. In our future research efforts, we plan to design and synthesize biomass-based diols possessing unique functionalities, endowing their derived materials with exceptional durability and recyclability, and thus reducing the adverse impact on the environment.

Please describe your journey to becoming an independent researcher.

My scholarly journey commenced as a postgraduate student at the State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering at Sichuan University (SCU), Sichuan Province, China. It was during my doctoral studies at the University of Sherbrooke (UdeS) in Quebec, Canada, under the supervision of Prof. Yue Zhao, that I honed my expertise and skills. At UdeS, I engaged in pioneering work involving the design, synthesis, and biomedical applications of advanced functional materials derived from photo-responsive polymers. Seeking to further strengthen my training as a chemist and broaden my interdisciplinary research experiences, I embarked on a research endeavour within the laboratory of Prof. Haojun Fan at SCU, where I was acquainted with the realm of biomass-based polymeric materials and their environmentally sustainable manufacturing processes. These educational and collaborative experiences taught me how research labs work, how projects are conducted and how the lab is managed, and ultimately trained me to work as an independent researcher specializing in “biomass-based energy and materials”.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

“Choosing an important problem.”

Why did you choose to publish in Green Chemistry?

Green Chemistry is a top-tier, highly respected journal in Chemistry with a broad readership and followers all over the world. This journal encourages the design and synthesis of safer chemicals, the use of renewable resources, and the minimization of waste and pollution. Our current article aligns perfectly with the scope of this journal; hence it has inspired me to publish our work in this prestigious journal.

Meet the author

Jun Xiang is an Associate Professor in the College of Biomass Science and Engineering at Sichuan University. He currently works on developing more efficient and eco-friendly methods to accelerate the substitution of petroleum-based chemicals with biomass feedstocks. Dr Xiang earned his MSE from Sichuan University in 2013 and later completed a PhD in chemistry at the University of Sherbrooke in 2018, supported by the merit scholarship program provided by FRQNT. His professional journey commenced in December 2018. Starting in 2022, he became a committee member at ACS South western China Chapter and leads the subject of biomass-based energy and materials.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Celebrate the 25th anniversary of Green Chemistry! Read our newly published issue 1, 2024.

It’s Green Chemistry 25th anniversary!

Over the past 25 years, Green Chemistry has provided a unique forum for the publication of innovative research on the development of alternative sustainable technologies. The journal publishes original and significant cutting-edge research that is likely to be of wide general appeal. For more information on the journal, please visit the journal homepage.

The journal retains an expert Editorial Board led by our Chair Javier Pérez-Ramírez and manuscripts submitted are professionally handled by our Publishing Editors or by our dedicated Associate Editors Aiwen Lei, Elsje Alessandra Quadrelli, Magdalena Titirici and Keiichi Tomishige. We also have an exceptional Advisory Board to support our journal.

What is happening?

What’s next for Green Chemistry?

In celebration of our 25th anniversary, Green Chemistry is committed to remaining at the frontiers of this ever-evolving interdisciplinary field, bringing together collaborative, insightful, and impactful research working to advance the field of green and sustainable chemistry. We are looking forward to hearing from you!

Stay tuned for more news!

We invite you to keep an eye out for the upcoming exciting news and celebrations for our 25th anniversary!

Follow the latest news on the Green Chemistry blog, on Twitter/X @green_rsc and our new LinkedIn Sustainable Chemistry Showcase.

From all of the Green Chemistry team, we thank you for your continued interest in and support of the journal!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)