Archive for the ‘Board News’ Category

New Editorial Board Member: Katye Altieri

We are very pleased to announce that Katye Alteri has joined the ESPI Editorial Board!

Katye Altieri is a Senior Lecturer in the Oceanography Department at the University of Cape Town. Katye has a B.Sc. in Chemistry (2004; College of New Jersey) and a Ph.D. in Oceanography (2009; Rutgers University). She was a NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellow for two years and then spent another two years as a Postdoctoral Research Associate, jointly appointed at Princeton University and Brown University. After her postdoctoral time, she pursued a Masters in Public Policy at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University (2014).

Katye received the Claude Leon Merit Award in 2017 and the Peter B. Wagner Award for Women in Atmospheric Sciences in 2008.

Her current research interests include: air pollution in coastal cities, the impact of human activities on surface ocean biogeochemistry, and studying the remote marine atmosphere of the Southern Ocean as a proxy to understand more about atmospheric chemistry and climate during the preindustrial.

Katye says “I am excited to join the Editorial Board of ESPI and I look forward to continuing the great tradition of high quality research and strong community that exists at ESPI.”

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New Editorial Board Member: Mingliang (Thomas) Fang

 

 

 

We are pleased to announce that Mingliang (Thomas) Fang has joined the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Editorial Board.

Mingliang (Thomas) Fang is currently an Assistant Professor in School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Prior to that, he studied his PhD degree majoring in environmental chemistry and toxicology at Duke University and received metabolomics training in The Scripps Research Institute. His previous research experience primarily includes applications of mass spectrometry methods to identify emerging organic contaminants, measure human exposure, and assess potential health effects. He is also interested in investigating emerging organic contaminants using in vivo and in vitro bioassays and omic technologies to conduct risk assessment and identify toxicity mechanisms.

 

 

Read his recent work in our sister journal, Environmental Science: Nano:
A high-throughput method to characterize the gut bacteria growth upon engineered nanomaterial treatment
Qin Yang, Tharushi Prabha Keerthisinghe, Tiffany Rou Jie Tan, Xiaoqiong Cao, Magdiel Inggrid Setyawati, Glen DeLoid, Kee Woei Ng, Say Chye Joachim Loo, Philip Demokritoucd and Mingliang Fang*
https://doi.org/10.1039/D0EN00568A

 

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New Editorial Board Member: Weihua Song

We are delighted to announce that Weihua Song has joined the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Editorial Board!

Weihua is currently a full professor of Department of Environmental Science and Engineering at Fudan University. He received a B.S. in Environmental Chemistry and M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Nanjing University in 1999 and 2002. He completed his Ph.D. with Professor Kevin E. O’Shea at Florida International University in 2006. He was a postdoctoral fellow, working with Prof. William J. Cooper at University of California, Irvine from 2007 to 2010. His research interests are in the area of Environmental Chemistry. Particularly, he focuses on the occurrence, transformation, and fate of emerging contaminants in aqueous environments.

Read his work in our sister journal, Environmental Science: Nano:
Effects of ozone and produced hydroxyl radicals on the transformation of graphene oxide in aqueous media
Tingting Du, Adeyemi S. Adeleye,  Tong Zhang, Nan Yang, Rongjie Hao, Yao Li,* Weihua Song and Wei Chen*
https://doi.org/10.1039/C9EN00361D

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New Editorial Board Member: Amila De Silva

We are delighted to announce that Amila De Silva has joined the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Editorial Board!

Amila De Silva is a research scientist in the Government of Canada in the Water Science Technology Directorate located in Burlington, Ontario. She received her PhD in environmental chemistry from the University of Toronto in 2008. Her expertise areas are fate, transport and disposition of organic contaminants in the environment. In addition to the discovery of new contaminants with advanced analytical chemistry, Amila uses a combination of field and lab experiments to discern their ecological risk based on persistence, bioaccumulation, toxicity and long range transport potential. Amila holds adjunct Professor appointments at the University of Toronto and Memorial University.

Read her work in the journal:
Emerging investigator series: a 14-year depositional ice record of perfluoroalkyl substances in the High Arctic
John J. MacInnis, Katherine French, Derek C. G. Muir, Christine Spencer, Alison Criscitiello, Amila O. De Silva* and Cora J. Young*
https://doi.org/10.1039/C6EM00593D

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New Editorial Board members for Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts

We are delighted to welcome three new members to the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Editorial Board.

Delphine Farmer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Colorado State University. Her work focuses on the development of new analytical techniques to study human influences on atmospheric chemistry and biosphere-atmosphere exchange of reactive trace gases and particles. Delphine received a Hermann Frasch Foundation Award in 2012 and an Arnold and Mabel Beckman Young Investigator Award in 2013
Lenny Winkel is Associate Professor (with tenure-track) of Inorganic Environmental Geochemistry at ETH Zurich and Eawag, the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology. Her current research is aimed at understanding the processes controlling the biogeochemical cycling and environmental distribution of trace elements, and the effects of climate and environmental changes on these processes, through modelling, field and laboratory studies. A further focal point is the development of novel analytical methods to quantitatively and qualitatively analyze trace elements in different environmental matrices.
Dr Guang-Guo Ying is the Director and Distinguished Professor of environmental chemistry and ecotoxicology in the Environmental Research Institute of South China Normal University. His research interests focus on environmental contamination assessment and remediation technology, including the fate and effects of contaminants in the environment. He is currently conducting research in emerging science areas such as antibiotics and AMR, endocrine disrupting chemicals, pharmaceuticals and personal care products in the environment, and environmental issues associated with wastewater and biosolidreuse as well as water quality improvement technology. He is interested in the development of chemical and biological tools for the risk assessment of chemicals in the environment.

Emerging Investigators Series:

In addition to joining the Editorial Board, Delphine, Lenny and Guang-Guo will be Editors for our ongoing Emerging Investigators Series. This Series aims to highlight the best research being conducted by early career scientists in the field of Environmental Chemistry.

Papers included in the Series will be extensively advertised, including a feature interview with the lead author on our blog, a mention in our table of contents alerts and on Twitter. The Series is ongoing, with articles being added to the online collection on publication, meaning there are no submission deadlines.

To be eligible for the Emerging Investigator Series you will need to have completed your PhD (or equivalent degree) within the last 10 years* and have an independent career. If you are interested in contributing to the Series please contact the Editorial Office (espi-rsc@rsc.org) and provide the following information:

  • Your up-to-date CV (no longer than 2 pages), which should include a summary of education and career, a list of relevant publications, any notable awards, honours or professional activities in the field, and a website URL if relevant;
  • A synopsis of the article intended to be submitted to the Series, including a tentative submission date. This can be an original research or review article. Please visit the journal website for more details on article types. Please note that articles submitted to the journal for the Series will undergo the usual peer-review process.

Read the articles included in the Series so far at – rsc.li/espi-emerging

Keep up to date with the latest papers added to this Series on our twitter feed (@EnvSciRSC) with the hashtags #EmergingInvestigators #ESPI

*Appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path

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New Advisory Board members for Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts

ESPI is delighted to welcome the following new members to our Advisory Board:

Richard Brown, National Physical Laboratory, UK. Professor Brown’s research focuses on trace chemical analysis to provide traceability for, and improve the accuracy of, measurements of pollutants in ambient air and other environmental matrices. He is also involved in research into complex data analysis and calibration techniques.
Tamara Galloway, University of Exeter, UK. Professor Galloway’s research focuses on marine pollution, the human health effects of pollutants and the sustainable development of novel materials and substances.
Colleen Hansel, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA. Professor Hansel’s research sits at the intersection of mineralogy, geochemistry, and microbiology with the goal of disentangling the reaction networks that mediate metal and mineral dynamics in natural systems. She is broadly interested in how Earth’s changing climate impacts key mineralization reactions essential for organismal health and functioning, including coral calcification, diatom silicification, and mineral-based metabolisms is researching the biotic and abiotic reaction networks that are involved in biogeochemical cycles and mineralization.
Hans Christian Bruun Hansen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Professor Hansen’s main research interest in solid-solution processes in soils and sediments governing pollutant fate and with applications in soil and water cleaning.
Kara Nelson, University of California, Berkeley, USA. Professor Nelson’s research focuses on the detection, removal, and inactivation of pathogens in water and sludge; water reuse; nutrient recovery; Drinking water and sanitation in developing countries.
Weihua Song, Fudan University, China. The goal of Professor Song’s research is to understand key chemical processes of current environmental problems. Specifically, the reactivity, transformation and fate of emerging contaminants in natural and engineered environments.
Elsie Sunderland, Harvard University, USA. Research in Professor Sutherland’s lab  focuses on how biogeochemical processes affect the fate, transport and food web bioaccumulation of trace metals and organic chemicals. Her group develops and applies models at a variety of scales ranging from ecosystems and ocean basins (e.g., the Gulf of Maine, the North Pacific and Arctic Oceans) to global applications to characterize how changes in climate and emissions affect human and ecological health.

Read some of the high-impact research published in ESPI by our new Advisory Board members below:

Predicting the frequency of extreme air quality events
Richard J. C. Brown and Peter M. Harris

Biological versus mineralogical chromium reduction: potential for reoxidation by manganese oxide
Elizabeth C. Butler, Lixia Chen, Colleen M. Hansel, Lee R. Krumholz, Andrew S. Elwood Madden and Ying Lan

Photo-transformation of pharmaceutically active compounds in the aqueous environment: a review
Shuwen Yan and Weihua Song

 

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New appointments to the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Advisory Board

  Alexandria Boehm is a Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Stanford. Her primary research areas are coastal water quality and sanitation with a focus on waterborne pathogens. Her work is focused on key problems in both, developed and developing countries with the overarching goal of designing and testing novel interventions and technologies for reducing the burden of waterborne disease.


   
  Philip Gschwend is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at MIT. His research focuses on environmental organic chemistry, including phase exchanges and transformation processes, modeling fates of organic pollutants, roles of colloids and black carbons and passive sampling for site evaluation.


  Andreas Kappler is professor for geomicrobiology at the University of Tübingen, Germany, and his main research is the biogeochemical cycle of iron and the consequences for the fate of pollutants and trace metals in modern environments as well as the consequences for rock formation on early Earth.
  Karen Kidd is based at the University of New Brunswick, Canada. Her research interests focus on fate and effects of contaminants in aquatic food webs.


   
  Linsey Marr is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech. She is interested in characterizing the emissions, fate, and transport of air pollutants in order to provide the scientific basis for improving air quality and health.


  Junji Cao is the Director of the Key Laboratory of Aerosol Chemistry and Physics and the Vice President of the Institute of Earth Environment at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. His work encompasses three main strands – carbonaceous aerosol chemistry, atmospheric chemistry and urban atmospheric pollution.

 

  Urs Baltensperger is the Head of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry at the Paul Scherrer Institute. His work focuses on aerosol science and technology.


  Beate Escher is the Head of the Department of Cell Toxicology at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research. Her research interests focus on mode-of-action based environmental risk assessment, including methods for initial hazard screening and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, disinfection by-products and persistent organic pollutants with an emphasis on mixtures.


  Derek Muir is a Senior Research Scientist and Section Head at the Environment and Climate Change Canada. His work aims to develop knowledge on the distribution, fate and bioaccumulation of priority substances in order to provide policy- and decision-makers with information to make sound decisions on assessment and management of chemicals.


  Jasquelin Peña is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Geoscience and Environment at the University of Lausanne. Her research is aimed at improving the environmental quality of soils and waters impacted by metal pollution.


  Kathrin Fenner is a Senior Scientist in the Department of Environmental Chemistry at Eawag. The goal of her research is to develop more accurate methods to assess persistence and risk from transformation product formation in regulatory risk assessment procedures. Her work focuses on three main strands – prediction of biodegradation pathways and rates, hazard and risk assessment of transformation products and improved tools for persistence assessment.


  David Waite is a Scientia Professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Dean of Research in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of New South Wales. His biogeochemical work aims to improve our understanding of natural aquatic systems and enables us to i) prevent environmental degradation and ii) develop appropriate solutions to challenges such as provision of water supply and improving human health.


 
Sachchida Nand (Sachi) Tripathi
is a Rajeeva and Sangeeta Lahri Chair Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering & Department of Earth Sciences at the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur. His research focuses on the chemical, microphysical and optical properties of aerosols.
  Stuart Harrad is a Professor of Environmental Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. His research addresses all aspects of the environmental sources, fate and behaviour of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). He has particular interests in human exposure to POPs with a focus on indoor pathways. He is also active in research that explores the environmental forensics utility of chirality.


  Jian-Ying Hu is a Professor of Urban and Environmental Science at the Peking University. Her work focuses on the occurrence and fate of environmental contaminants, toxicology mainly for endocrine disrupting chemicals and health/ecological risk assessment.

Also appointed but not pictured:

Ruben Kretzschmar is a Full Professor of Soil Chemistry and head of the Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, Department of Environmental Sciences at ETH Zurich. His current work focuses on the biogeochemistry of metals and metalloids in periodically flooded or water-saturated soils, such as contaminated river floodplains and irrigated rice paddies.

 

Also of interest: Read some of the high-impact research authored by our new Advisory Board members in Environmental Science: Processes & impacts using the links below:

Steroidal estrogen sources in a sewage-impacted coastal ocean
David R. Griffith, Melissa C. Kido Soule, Timothy I. Eglinton, Elizabeth B. Kujawinski and   Philip M. Gschwend
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2016, 18, 981-991
DOI: 10.1039/C6EM00127K

Sorption selectivity of birnessite particle edges: a d-PDF analysis of Cd(II) and Pb(II) sorption by δ-MnO2 and ferrihydrite
Case M. van Genuchten and Jasquelin Peña
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2016, 18, 1030-1041
DOI: 10.1039/C6EM00136J

Highly time resolved chemical characterization of submicron organic aerosols at a polluted urban location
Bharath Kumar, Abhishek Chakraborty, S. N. Tripathi and Deepika Bhattu
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2016, 18, 1285-1296
DOI: 10.1039/C6EM00392C

Emerging halogenated flame retardants and hexabromocyclododecanes in food samples from an e-waste processing area in Vietnam
Fang Tao, Hidenori Matsukami, Go Suzuki, Nguyen Minh Tue, Pham Hung Viet, Hidetaka Takigami and Stuart Harrad
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2016, 18, 361-370,
DOI: 10.1039/C5EM00593K

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Introducing our new Editorial Board Member – Marianne Glasius

We are delighted to introduce Marianne Glasius as a new Editorial Board Member for Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts. Marianne joins the team as an Editorial Board Member, and will start her role as Associate Editor from January 2017.


Marianne will be joining Liang-Hong Guo, Helen Hsu-Kim, Edward Kolodziej, Matthew MacLeod and Paul Tratnyek as Associate Editors handling submissions to the journal.

Marianne Glasius is Associate Professor at the Department of Chemistry at Aarhus University, Denmark (since 2006), where she is also affiliated with the Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center and the Arctic Research Centre. She received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from University of Southern Denmark in 2000. During her studies she stayed at the European Commissions Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy for a year. Dr. Glasius was a scientist and senior scientist at the National Environmental Research Institute, Denmark for six years. Recently, she visited University of California, Berkeley for one year, working with Prof. A.H. Goldstein at the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management.

The research of Dr. Glasius focuses on development and application of advanced chemical analyses for identification and characterization of organic compounds in complex matrices. The aim is to obtain understanding of processes whether these involve atmospheric aerosols affecting air pollution and climate, or development of bio-fuels of the future.



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Please join us in welcoming Marianne to Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts.

Interested in the latest news, research and events of the Environmental Science journals? Find us on Twitter:@EnvSciRSC

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Introducing our new Associate Editors

We are delighted to introduce Helen Hsu-Kim, Matthew MacLeod and Paul Tratnyek as three new Associate Editors for Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts.

Helen, Matt and Paul join Liang-Hong Guo and Ed Kolodziej as Associate Editors handling submissions to the journal – more details about their research interests are given below.


Helen Hsu-Kim
Duke University, USA

Heileen (Helen) Hsu-Kim is the Yoh Family Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering at Duke University. Her expertise areas include aquatic geochemistry, biogeochemistry of metal pollutants in the environment, and nanogeoscience.

Ongoing research activities in Dr. Hsu-Kim’s group include studies on mercury biogeochemistry and remediation, mineral-microbe interactions, the disposal implications and reuse opportunities for coal ash, and the environmental impacts of nanotechnology. Additional details of the Hsu-Kim research group can be found online here.

Please note that Professor Hsu-Kim will start handling submissions starting on June 2016.


Matthew MacLeod
Stockholm University, Sweden

Matthew MacLeod is Professor of Environmental Chemistry at the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry at Stockholm University. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from the University of Victoria (British Columbia, Canada), and a PhD in Environmental Chemistry from Trent University (Ontario, Canada).

He was a post-doctoral fellow at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California, USA, and a Research Group Leader at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zürich, Switzerland.

Since 2010 he has been a faculty member at Stockholm University, Sweden.  Prof. MacLeod’s research interests include the fate, exposure and effects of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), modeling chemical pollutants, and environmental impacts of micro- and macro-plastics.


Paul Tratnyek
Oregon Health & Science University, USA

Paul G. Tratnyek is currently Professor, and Associate Head, in the Division of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems (EBS) and Institute of Environmental Health (IEH), at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU).

He received his Ph.D. in Applied Chemistry from the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) in 1987; served as a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Laboratory in Athens, GA (ERD-Athens), during 1988; and as a Research Associate at the Swiss Federal Institute for Water Resources and Water Pollution Control (EAWAG) from 1989 to 1991.

His research concerns the physico-chemical processes that control the fate and effects of environmental substances, including minerals, metals (for remediation), organics (as contaminants), and nanoparticles (for remediation, as contaminants, and in biomedical applications).

Dr. Tratnyek is best known for his work on the degradation of groundwater contaminants with zero-valent metals, but his interests extend to all aspects of contaminant reduction and oxidation (redox) in all aquatic media. Some of his recent work emphasizes the fate/remediation of emerging contaminants (e.g., nanoparticles and 1,2,3-trichloropropane).

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The appointments of Helen, Matt, and Paul, illustrate the exciting future for Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, as outlined by Editor-in-Chief Professor Kris McNeill in his recent Editorial. We are delighted to welcome them to the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts team.

Interested in the latest news, research and events of the Environmental Science journals? Find us on Twitter: @EnvSciRSC

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New Editor-in-Chief for Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts

We are pleased to announce that Professor Kris McNeill (ETH Zürich) will be taking on the role of Editor-in-Chief for Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts from 2016. Professor McNeill has been an active member of the Editorial Board of Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts for several years.

His research focuses on environmental chemistry in aquatic systems, particularly regarding reaction mechanisms. Kris takes over from Professor Frank Wania, who finished his term as Chair of the Editorial Board at the end of 2015.

Read Kris’ most recent work in Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts below:

Aquatic photochemical kinetics of benzotriazole and structurally related compounds, Elisabeth M. L. Janssen, Emily Marron and Kristopher McNeill, Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2015, 17, 939–946, DOI:  10.1039/C5EM00045A

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