Small Molecules and Monodisperse Oligomers for Organic Electronics themed issue

front coverThis thematic issue aims to highlight recent advances in organic electronic materials based on small molecules and monodisperse oligomers, including their synthesis, properties, applications or production and is guest edited by Guillermo Bazan and Martin Bryce.

The full Journal of Materials Chemistry C themed issue can be read here.

A small selection of articles from the issue are below:

Editorial
Themed issue on small molecules and monodisperse oligomers for organic electronics
Guillermo Bazan and Martin R. Bryce
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 3675-3676
DOI: 10.1039/C6TC90050J

Review Article
Organophosphorus derivatives for electronic devices
D. Joly, P.-A. Bouit and M. Hissler
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 3686-3698
DOI: 10.1039/C6TC00590J

Communication
Integration of aggregation-induced emission and delayed fluorescence into electronic donor–acceptor conjugates
Shifeng Gan, Wenwen Luo, Bairong He, Long Chen, Han Nie, Rongrong Hu, Anjun Qin, Zujin Zhao and Ben Zhong Tang
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 3705-3708
DOI: 10.1039/C5TC03588K

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Dissolving bone to ease pain

Written by Kirsty Muirhead for Chemistry World

Researchers in the UK are developing a chemical method to remove or prevent abnormal bone growths in the soft tissue of amputees. They hope the technique will limit additional surgery for seriously injured soldiers.

These 3D models show heterotopic ossification samples before (A) and after (B) treatment with hexametaphosphate

Heterotopic ossification, where a massive inflammatory response causes bone to form within soft tissues, is common in amputees and prevalent amongst combat-injured military personnel. Current treatments targeting the biological pathways involved are limited and surgery is often required to remove the bony growths and ease pain. Now, scientists at the University of Birmingham, including PhD researcher Neil Eisenstein who is also a trauma surgeon in the British Army, are investigating a chemical demineralisation approach using hexametaphosphate as a non-surgical treatment for this debilitating condition.

The full story can be read in Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below and is free to access until 23rd June 2016:

Enzymatically regulated demineralisation of pathological bone using sodium hexametaphosphate
Neil Eisenstein, Richard Williams, Sophie Cox, Sarah Stapley and Liam Grover*
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6TB00461J

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Emerging Investigators themed issues JMC A, B & C – now online!

front cover

Take a look at the Journal of Materials Chemistry A themed issue highlighting 2016’s rising stars of materials chemistry research. This Emerging Investigators themed issue gathers the very best work from materials chemists in the early stages of their independent career, with a special focus on novel design strategies for new functional materials.

Each contributor was recommended by our prestigious Editorial Board as carrying out work with the potential to influence future directions in materials chemistry. Congratulations to all of those who feature on their important work so far in the field of materials for energy and sustainability.

Read through a few papers which have been selected from the issue below. The full issue can be read here.

Read more »

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Smart bandages you press for antibacterial action

Written by Jason Woolford for Chemistry World

Researchers in China have developed capsules for use in bandages that can store antibacterials and control their activity, aiding in the fight against antimicrobial resistance.

The smart bandage contains silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) packaged in carbon below a layer of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Pressing the bandage causes the layers to interact, releasing the antibacterial silver particles

Bacterial strains resilient towards multiple drugs are an increasingly common and dangerous part of the 21st century. With repercussions global in scale, innovative devices are needed that deliver antibacterial agents precisely and instantly so bacteria cannot adapt.

The full story can be read in Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below and is free to access until the 31st May 2016.:

The first visually observable three-mode antibiotic switch and its relative 3D printing assisted applications
Miaoxing Liu, Fang Fang, Xiangwei Song, Fen Yu, Fengshun Li, Xiaotong Shi, Chaowen Xue, Tingtao Chen and Xiaolei Wang*
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2016, 4, 2544-2547
DOI: 10.1039/C6TB00576D

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2016 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship – Nominations are now open!

Now in its 7th year, we are looking for nominations from you for the next Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship recipient.

We are pleased to announce that the 2016 lectureship is now open for nominations. This annual lectureship honours a younger scientist who has made a significant contribution to the field of materials chemistry.

Professor Chengtie Wu, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, China, was chosen as the winner of the 2015 lectureship by the Journal of Materials Chemistry Executive Editorial Board, and will present his lecture at TERMIS-AP 2016 in Taipei, Taiwan from 3rd to 6th September

Qualification
To be eligible for the Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship, the candidate should be in the earlier stages of their scientific career, typically within 10 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, and will have made a significant contribution to the field.

Description
The recipient of the award will be asked to present a Journal of Materials Chemistry lecture, at a conference decided upon by the recipient and the Editorial Office. The Journal of Materials Chemistry Editorial Office will provide the sum of £1,000 to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs, and will present the winner with the award at this lecture. The award recipient will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased on the back cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Selection
The recipient of the lectureship will be selected and endorsed by the Journal of Materials Chemistry’s prestigious Executive Editorial Board.

Nominations
Those wishing to make a nomination should send details of the nominee including a brief C.V. (no longer than 2 pages) together with a letter supporting the nomination (no longer than 2 pages), to the Journal of Materials Chemistry Editorial Office by 1st June 2016. Please note that self-nomination is permitted, and you may re-nominate previous candidates.

Send a nomination here today: materials-rsc@rsc.org

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Winners at the 26th IUPAC International Symposium on Photochemistry

Congratulations to all the poster prize winners at the 26th IUPAC International Symposium on Photochemistry which took place in Osaka, Japan from the 3rd - 8th April 2016. The symposium was well attended with more than 600 worldwide delegates attending. Journal of Materials Chemistry A and Journal of Materials Chemistry C were two of the RSC journals providing awards for the best Young Researcher Oral Presentation, Student Oral Presentation and Student Poster.

The scientific program for the conference set out to cover all of the major disciplines of contemporary photochemistry-related science including physics, biology, medicine, materials science, engineering, and technology. A range of scientific events composed by plenary lectures, invited talks, oral presentations, and poster sessions. One of the main aims was to generate new research ideas, by providing a unique opportunity for scientific interaction and exchange of ideas among participants.

The conference chairperson Professor Tetsuro Majima was on hand to present the prizes to the winners pictured below. Further information can be found on the website along with a full list of all the winners.

Professor Tetsuro Majima with the poster prize winners

Professor Tetsuro Majima with the poster prize winners

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Molecular Imaging 2016

conference logo

The Molecular Imaging: From Design to Clinical Practicalities one day symposium will take place on the 15th July 2016 at the University Hospital of Coventry and Warwickshire.

The symposium will be in association with the University of Warwick and aims to bring together researchers with clinical/medical associations and clinicians to present their latest work in the design and application of imaging probes and the visual arts for medicine.

The symposium will directly follow and be independent of the Warwick Polymer Conference 2016 and 75-100 academic and clinical delegates are expected to attend.

Journal of Materials B and Materials Horizons will be providing poster prize awards with the remaining funding being provided by the Institute of Advanced Study (University of Warwick) and Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology.

Further information can be found on the website.

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International Conference on Hybrid and Organic Photovoltaics

The International Conference on Hybrid and Organic Photovoltaics (HOPV16) will be held in Swansea, UK from the 28th June – 1st July 2016.

HOPV is a unique forum for the presentation and discussion of the advances in hybrid and organic photovoltaics. Professors James Durrant, Henry Snaith and David Worsley, will be chairs of this 8th HOPV conference. The format will follow previous HOPV meetings and last three days, with plenary sessions for keynote and invited talks, as well as contributed talks by participant scientists and unlimited poster presentation. There will also be a satellite workshop on the 28th June.

Journal of Materials Chemistry A is a proud supporter and will be providing a poster prize which will be presented by Professor Neil Robertson (Associate Editor, Journal of Materials Chemistry C).

Topics covered by the conference will be:

  • Material synthesis and processing
  • Device architecture and optimisation
  • Functional and structural characterisation
  • Material and device modelling
  • Material and device stability
  • Scale up and commercial development
  • Related applications, including carrier multiplication, tandem devices and solar to fuels

Further information can be found on the website.

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Professor Chengtie Wu wins the 2015 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship

Many congratulations to Professor Chengtie Wu (Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, China) for winning the 2015 Journal of Materials Chemistry Lectureship.

Chengtie Wu is currently a Professor at the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics of Chinese Academy of Sciences. He obtained his bachelors degree at the Dalian Polytechnic University in China by studying Materials Science and Engineering from 1996 to 2000. His main focus of study was on the surface properties of biochips. He then studied bioactive ceramics for bone tissue repair for his doctorate at the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences where he is currently based. Below is his recently published article on bone tumour cells.

3D-printed bioceramic scaffolds with a Fe3O4/graphene oxide nanocomposite interface for hyperthermia therapy of bone tumor cells
Yongliang Zhang, Dong Zhai, Mengchi Xu, Qingqiang Yao, Jiang Chang and Chengtie Wu*
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6TB00390G

graphical abstract

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Colour-changing polymer adapts camouflage to vegetation and desert

Written by Harriet Brewerton for Chemistry World

Scientists are closer to producing outfits for the armed forces that change colour to match surroundings when soldiers move from a forest to a desert.

Clothing that adapts quickly to camouflage troops in different places would protect them against visual detection. Sunglasses, anti-glare mirrors and electronic display devices all use conducting polymers to change colour. Now, Wei Huang and Hong Meng at Nanjing Tech University, and their team in China, have designed an organic polymer that is green in the reduced state but oxidises and turns a sandy-brown when a low voltage is applied.

The full article can be read in Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below and is open access.:

Side-chain engineering of green color electrochromic polymer materials: toward adaptive camouflage application
Hongtao Yu, Shan Shao, Lijia Yan, Hong Meng,* Yaowu He, Chao Yao, Panpan Xu, Xiaotao Zhang, Wenping Hu and Wei Huang*
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 2269-2273
DOI: 10.1039/C6TC00197A

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