Nanoscale Emerging Investigators 2022

Nanoscale 2022 Emerging Investigators

A collection highlighting 2022’s rising stars of nanoscience and nanotechnology research

Nanoscale is proud to present our 2022 Emerging Investigators collection, recognising the rising stars of nanoscience and nanotechnology by gathering some of the very best work from researchers in the early stages of their independent careers. Each contributor was recommended by experts in their fields for carrying out work with the potential to influence future directions in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Congratulations to all the featured researchers on their important work so far!

Read the collection

Meet the scientists

We hope you enjoy reading these articles.

Best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery

Managing Editor, Nanoscale

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Professor Christian Klinke joins the Associate Editor team

Professor Christian Klinke joins the Associate Editor team

Welcome to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

 

Professor Christian Klinke

We are delighted to welcome Professor Christian Klinke, University of Rostock, Germany and Swansea University, UK, as a new Associate Editor working across Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances.

Christian Klinke studied physics at the University of Würzburg and the University of Karlsruhe, Germany, where he also obtained his diploma degree. In 2017 he joined the Chemistry Department of Swansea University, UK, as an associate professor and since 2019 he has also held a position of full professor at the University of Rostock, Germany.

His research concerns the colloidal synthesis of nanomaterials and the optoelectronic characterization of these materials.

 

 

Submit your latest research to Professor Klinke’s Editorial Office

 

Read some of his recent papers below.

Two-dimensional halide perovskites: synthesis, optoelectronic properties, stability, and applications
Sushant Ghimire and Christian Klinke
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NR02769G

Anisotropic circular photogalvanic effect in colloidal tin sulfide nanosheets
Mohammad Mehdi Ramin Moayed, Fu Li, Philip Beck, Jan-Christian Schober and Christian Klinke
Nanoscale, 2020, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR01189D

Photoexcitation of PbS nanosheets leads to highly mobile charge carriers and stable excitons
Jannika Lauth, Michele Failla, Eugen Klein, Christian Klinke, Sachin Kinge and Laurens D. A. Siebbeles
Nanoscale, 2019, DOI: 10.1039/C9NR07927K

Preparation of high-yield and ultra-pure Au25 nanoclusters: towards their implementation in real-world applications
Michael Galchenko, Raphael Schuster, Andres Black, Maria Riedner and Christian Klinke
Nanoscale, 2019, DOI: 10.1039/C8NR08200F

Please join us in welcoming Professor Klinke to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

Best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery Dr Jeremy Allen
Managing Editor, Nanoscale Executive Editor, Nanoscale Advances
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Professor Janet Macdonald joins the Associate Editor team

Professor Janet Macdonald joins the Associate Editor team

Welcome to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

 

Professor Janet Macdonald

We are delighted to welcome Professor Janet Macdonald, Vanderbilt University, USA, as a new Associate Editor working across Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances.

Janet Macdonald received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from McGill University, followed by a PhD from the University of Alberta in 2008. She joined the chemistry faculty at Vanderbilt University in 2011, where she is an associate professor of chemistry and a member of the Vanderbilt Institute for Nanoscale Science and Engineering.

Her research focuses on the phase selective synthesis of nanocrystalline materials, especially preparing non-natural phases of metal chalcogenides. Her group also studies fundamental charge transfer phenomena from semiconductor nanocrystals for solar-to-fuel technologies and photovoltaics, including specialized ligand synthesis to aid charge transfer.

 

Submit your latest research to Professor Macdonald’s Editorial Office

 

Read some of her recent papers below.

Alkyl selenol reactivity with common solvents and ligands: influences on phase control in nanocrystal synthesis
Eric A. Ho, Antony R. Peng and Janet E. Macdonald
Nanoscale, 2022, DOI: 10.1039/D1NR06282D

Synthesis of vulcanite (CuTe) and metastable Cu1.5Te nanocrystals using a dialkyl ditelluride precursor
Evan H. Robinson, Kaelyn M. Dwyer, Alexandra C. Koziel, Ahmed Y. Nuriye and Janet. E. Macdonald
Nanoscale, 2020, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR06910H

Photo-induced copper mediated copolymerization of activated-ester methacrylate polymers and their use as reactive precursors to prepare multi-dentate ligands for the water transfer of inorganic nanoparticles
Binh T. Mai, Markus J. Barthel, Aidin Lak, Tommaso Avellini, Ana Maria Panaite, Emille M. Rodrigues, Luca Goldoni and Teresa Pellegrino
Polym. Chem., 2020, DOI: 10.1039/D0PY00212G

Ligand cleavage enables formation of 1,2-ethanedithiol capped colloidal quantum dot solids
James Z. Fan, Andrew D. La Croix, Zhenyu Yang, Emma Howard, Rafael Quintero-Bermudez, Larissa Levina, Nicole M. Jenkinson, Nathan J. Spear, Yiying Li, Olivier Ouellette, Zheng-Hong Lu, Edward H. Sargent and Janet E. Macdonald
Nanoscale, 2019, DOI: 10.1039/C9NR02708D

 

Please join us in welcoming Professor Macdonald to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

Best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery Dr Jeremy Allen
Managing Editor, Nanoscale Executive Editor, Nanoscale Advances
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Call for papers: Themed collection on Supercapacitors

Guest Editors: Zhaojun Han, Ruopian (Sophie) Fang, Dewei Chu, Da-Wei Wang (all affiliated with University of New South Wales)
Advisory Guest Editor: Kostya Ostrikov

Supercapacitors are important electrochemical energy storage devices that can deliver high power, fast charge/discharge rate, long lifespan and safe operation. The last few decades have witnessed significant progress in supercapacitors for clean and sustainable energy applications. Depending on charge storage process, supercapacitors can be classified as electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) or pseudocapacitor. This themed collection will focus on all aspects of supercapacitors, including electrochemistry, electrode materials, electrolytes, performance evaluation, device design and fabrication, and applications. It will also cover the integration of supercapacitors with other energy harvesting or storage systems for broader energy applications. The scope includes:

 

  • New electrode materials for EDLC and pseudocapacitor
  • Charge storage mechanism investigation, theory, modelling and simulations
  • Electrolyte development
  • Performance evaluation such as energy density, power density, safety and cyclability
  • Applications of supercapacitors in areas such as electronics, transport, aerospace and stationary power stations
  • Integrated energy systems consisting of supercapacitors
  • Multifunctional energy storage devices
  • Other emerging properties or applications of supercapacitors.

 

You are welcome to submit either an original research article or a review-type article within the scope.

If you are interested in contributing to this collection please get in touch with the Editorial Office by email.

Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when you submit your manuscript to say that this is a submission for the themed collection. The Editorial Office and Guest Editors reserve the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection and inclusion of accepted articles in the collection is not guaranteed. All manuscripts will be subject to the journal’s usual peer review process. Accepted manuscripts will be added to the online collection as soon as they are online, and they will be published in a regular issue of Nanoscale Advances. Article Processing Charges (APCs) apply to all accepted articles in Nanoscale Advances and more information about APCs and waivers can be found here.

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Professor Teresa Pellegrino joins the Associate Editor team

Professor Teresa Pellegrino joins the Associate Editor team

Welcome to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

 

Professor Teresa Pellegrino

We are delighted to welcome Professor Teresa Pellegrino, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Italy, as a new Associate Editor working across Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances.

Teresa Pellegrino received her Master’s in Chemistry in 2000 and her PhD in Chemical Synthesis and Applied Enzymatic Chemistry in 2005 from the University of Bari, Italy. In 2014 she became a tenured Team Leader of the Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications Group at the Italian Institute of Technology, Genoa, Italy.

Her current research interests focus on the synthesis of inorganic nanocrystals with an emphasis on magnetic materials and organic-inorganic nanostructured materials for drug delivery, magnetic hyperthermia, photo-thermal treatment and radiotherapy.

 

Submit your latest research to Professor Pellegrino’s Editorial Office

 

Read some of her recent papers below.

Magnetic nanoparticles and clusters for magnetic hyperthermia: optimizing their heat performance and developing combinatorial therapies to tackle cancer
Helena Gavilán, Sahitya Kumar Avugadda, Tamara Fernández-Cabada, Nisarg Soni, Marco Cassani, Binh T. Mai, Roy Chantrell and Teresa Pellegrino
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1CS00427A

Di- and tri-component spinel ferrite nanocubes: synthesis and their comparative characterization for theranostic applications
Niccolò Silvestri, Helena Gavilán, Pablo Guardia, Rosaria Brescia, Soraia Fernandes, Anna Cristina S. Samia, Francisco J. Teran and Teresa Pellegrino
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NR01044A

Photo-induced copper mediated copolymerization of activated-ester methacrylate polymers and their use as reactive precursors to prepare multi-dentate ligands for the water transfer of inorganic nanoparticles
Binh T. Mai, Markus J. Barthel, Aidin Lak, Tommaso Avellini, Ana Maria Panaite, Emille M. Rodrigues, Luca Goldoni and Teresa Pellegrino
Polym. Chem., 2020, DOI: 10.1039/D0PY00212G

Novel synthesis of platinum complexes and their intracellular delivery to tumor cells by means of magnetic nanoparticles
Alessandra Quarta, Manuel Amorín, María José Aldegunde, Laura Blasi, Andrea Ragusa, Simone Nitti, Giammarino Pugliese, Giuseppe Gigli, Juan R. Granja and Teresa Pellegrino
Nanoscale, 2019, DOI: 10.1039/C9NR07015J

Dually responsive gold–iron oxide heterodimers: merging stimuli-responsive surface properties with intrinsic inorganic material features
Hamilton Kakwere, Maria Elena Materia, Alberto Curcio, Mirko Prato, Ayyappan Sathya, Simone Nitti and Teresa Pellegrino
Nanoscale, 2018, DOI: 10.1039/C7NR06726G

Unraveling viscosity effects on the hysteresis losses of magnetic nanocubes
D. Cabrera, A. Lak, T. Yoshida, M. E. Materia, D. Ortega, F. Ludwig, P. Guardia, A. Sathya, T. Pellegrino and F. J. Teran
Nanoscale, 2017, DOI: 10.1039/C7NR00810D

 

Please join us in welcoming Professor Pellegrino to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

Best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery Dr Jeremy Allen
Managing Editor, Nanoscale Executive Editor, Nanoscale Advances
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Themed collection: Flexible Nanomaterials

We are delighted to invite you to read a new themed collection on Flexible Nanomaterials: Microscopic Mechanisms and Macroscopic Applications

 

Read the collection

 

Guest edited by Yuan Cheng (Monash University, Australia), Zibiao Li (A*STAR, Singapore), Junfeng Gao (Dalian University of Technology, China), Hai-Dong Yu (Northwestern Polytechnical University, China) and Gang Zhang (A*STAR, Singapore). This themed collection is focussed on the fundamental physical and chemical properties of flexible materials, as well as controlled functionalization, in order to harness the materials’ fundamental properties and enhanced performance in applications in the fields of flexible electronics, rechargeable batteries, thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and soft robotics.

 

Articles in the collection are published in Nanoscale Advances and are freely available with gold open access. Read the Editorial article that introduces the collection:

Introduction to flexible nanomaterials: microscopic mechanisms and macroscopic applications

 

We hope you enjoy reading this collection. If you work on flexible nanomaterials and want to know more about publishing your next piece of work with Nanoscale Advances, please get in touch.

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Photoinduced Charge Transfer in a Bi2O2Se/CsPbBr3 Heterostructure

Photoinduced Charge Transfer in a Bi2O2Se/CsPbBr3 Heterostructure

An infographic highlighting photodetectors exploiting interfacial charge transfer in nanocrystal heterostructures

We would like to share an infographic highlighting the excellent work by P. K. Giri et al. on understanding the efficient charge transfer in few-layer Bi2O2Se/CsPbBr3 nanocrystal heterostructures! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Nanoscale article.

Understanding the interfacial charge transfer in the CVD grown Bi2O2Se/CsPbBr3 nanocrystal heterostructure and its exploitation in superior photodetection: experiment vs. theory
Md Tarik Hossain, Mandira Das, Joydip Ghosh, Subhradip Ghosh and P. K. Giri
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NR04470B

An infographic summarising the content of the article “Understanding the interfacial charge transfer in the CVD grown Bi2O2Se/CsPbBr3 nanocrystal heterostructure and its exploitation in superior photodetection: experiment vs. theory"

Meet the authors

Md Tarik Hossain Md Tarik Hossain

Md Tarik Hossain is presently a PhD research scholar at the department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam. He obtained his Master degree in Physics from University of Hyderabad and joined the PhD programme at Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati in 2018. His research interests are CVD growth and multifunctional applications of non-van der Walls 2D materials, including photophysics and optoelectronics.

Professor Pravat Giri Pravat K. Giri

Prof. P. K. Giri earned his PhD in Physics from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kanpur in 1998 followed by postdoctoral research in CNR IMM, Italy. In 1999, he joined IGCAR, Kalpakkam as a Scientist and later (2001) he moved to IIT Guwahati as a Faculty member in Physics. Presently he is a full Professor of Physics and Nanotechnology at IIT Guwahati. For his outstanding research contributions, he received several awards/ fellowships including ICTP TRIL fellowship (1998), DAE Young Scientist Award (2000), DAAD Exchange visit Fellowship (2010), JSPS Invitation Fellowship for log-term research in Japan (2012), Visiting research fellowship, University of Birmingham, UK (2018), MRSI medal (2020). He is a fellow of Institute of Physics, UK. He has published more 160 journal articles including 8 review articles in high profile international journals and holds one patent to his credit. Currently, his H-index is 41. He is one among the world’s top 2% scientists in Applied Physics and Nanoscience area (database published by Stanford University, USA). His research areas of interests are semiconductor nanostructures, 2D materials, nanobiosensors, optoelectronics, nanophotonics etc.

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Most Popular 2021 Nanoscale Articles

Most popular articles in 2021

 

We wanted to share with you some of the most popular articles published in Nanoscale last year, determined by their citations and page views.

Read the most popular Nanoscale articles here

All of the articles in the collection are free to access until the end of March 2022. Read some of the featured articles below.

Revisiting anodic alumina templates: from fabrication to applications
Alejandra Ruiz-Clavijo, Olga Caballero-Calero and Marisol Martín-González
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR07582E

2D metal–organic framework-based materials for electrocatalytic, photocatalytic and thermocatalytic applications
Yanpeng Xue, Gongchi Zhao, Ruiying Yang, Feng Chu, Juan Chen, Lei Wang and Xiubing Huang
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR09064F

Inorganic nanohybrids combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria hiding within human macrophages
Martin T. Matter, Meagan Doppegieter, Alexander Gogos, Kerda Keevend, Qun Ren and Inge K. Herrmann
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR08285F

Efficient single-photon pair generation by spontaneous parametric down-conversion in nonlinear plasmonic metasurfaces
Boyuan Jin, Dhananjay Mishra and Christos Argyropoulos
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NR05379E

Group-IV(A) Janus dichalcogenide monolayers and their interfaces straddle gigantic shear and in-plane piezoelectricity
Pradip Nandi, Ashima Rawat, Raihan Ahammed, Nityasagar Jena and Abir De Sarkar
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR07027K

 

We hope you enjoy reading these popular articles.

With best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery
Managing Editor, Nanoscale

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Generation of Chiroptically Active CsPbBr3 Nanoparticles

Generation of Chiroptically Active CsPbBr3 Nanoparticles

An infographic highlighting the post-synthetic ligand modification of perovskites to generate chiral nanoparticles

We would like to share an infographic highlighting the excellent work by David H. Waldeck et al. on a facile post-synthetic ligand modification strategy for making CsPbBr3 nanoparticles from achiral counterparts at room temperature! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Nanoscale article.

Using post-synthetic ligand modification to imprint chirality onto the electronic states of cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr3) perovskite nanoparticles
Gouranga H. Debnath, Zheni N. Georgieva, Brian P. Bloom, Susheng Tan and David H. Waldeck
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NR04274B

An infographic summarising the content of the article “Using post-synthetic ligand modification to imprint chirality onto the electronic states of cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr3) perovskite nanoparticles"

Meet the authors

Dr Gouranga Debnat Gouranga H. Debnat

Gouranga H. Debnath received his Ph.D. in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology from the Centre for Research in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CRNN) University of Calcutta in 2020, where he worked on the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of lanthanide doped semiconductor nanomaterials. He is currently a postdoctoral associate in Prof. David H. Waldeck’s group at the Department of Chemistry University of Pittsburgh, where he studies perovskite nanomaterials and the chiral induced spin selectivity (CISS) effect.

Professor David Waldeck David H. Waldeck

David H. Waldeck obtained a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Chicago in 1983 and was an IBM Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley from 1983 to 1985. In 1985 he began his independent career as an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh, where he now serves as Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Petersen Institute of NanoScience and Engineering. David’s research program uses methods of spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and microscopy to investigate primary processes in the condensed phase and in nanoscale assemblies. His research program uses experiment and theory in a synergistic manner to quantify the interesting phenomenology that is displayed by molecules and their assemblies. Currently they are working to elucidate the nature of long-range electron transfer and the chiral induced spin selectivity effect.

 

 

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New Highly Active Carbon-Black-Supported Platinum Nanocluster Catalysts

New Highly Active Carbon-Black-Supported Platinum Nanocluster Catalysts

An infographic highlighting a simple size-selective method for the synthesis of Pt nanocluster catalysts

We would like to share an infographic highlighting the excellent work by Yuichi Negishi et al. on a simple method for the size-selective synthesis of a series of ligand-protected platinum nanoclusters with superior oxygen reduction reactivity! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Nanoscale article.

Simple and high-yield preparation of carbon-black-supported ∼1 nm platinum nanoclusters and their oxygen reduction reactivity
Tokuhisa Kawawaki, Nobuyuki Shimizu, Kanako Funai, Yusuke Mitomi, Sakiat Hossain, Soichi Kikkawa, D. J. Osborn, Seiji Yamazoe, Gregory F. Metha and Yuichi Negishi
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NR04202E

An infographic summarising the content of the article “Simple and high-yield preparation of carbon-black-supported ∼1 nm platinum nanoclusters and their oxygen reduction reactivity"

Meet the authors

Professor Yuichi Negishi Yuichi Negishi

Yuichi Negishi is a Professor in the Department of Applied Chemistry at Tokyo University of Science. He received his Ph.D. degree in Chemistry in 2001 under the supervision of Prof. Atsushi Nakajima at Keio University. Before joining Tokyo University of Science in 2008, he was employed as an assistant professor at Keio University (with Associate Prof. Atsushi Nakajima) and at the Institute for Molecular Science (with Associate Prof. Tatsuya Tsukuda). As senior researcher, he has more than 190 publications to his credit (total citations are over 12,000 times) and is the head of his research laboratory at the university. His areas of research include physical chemistry, cluster chemistry, and nanomaterial chemistry. His notable achievements include The Chemical Society of Japan Award for Young Chemists (Japan Chemical Society, 2008), the Japan Society for Molecular Science Award for Young Scientists (Japan Society for Molecular Science, 2012), Yagami Prize (Keio University, 2017), Distinguished Award 2018 for Novel Materials and Their Synthesis (IUPAC etc., 2018) and International Investigator Awards of the Japan Society for Molecular Science (Japan Society for Molecular Science, 2020).

 

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