Author Archive

Call for Papers: Epitaxial Growth of Nanostructures and their Properties

Guest Editors: Jin Zou, University of Queensland, Australia

To obtain nanomaterials with desired properties, various advanced fabrication techniques have been widely developed and frequently employed. Among them, as a key discipline of the bottom-up approach, epitaxial growth allows the grown nanostructures to have well defied orientation relationships, crystallographic directions/planes, crystal structures/phases, and facets/interfaces with their underlying substrates. Such unique features are often essential for securing their unique and high-efficient applications. In the recent decades, epitaxial growth has been widely employed to grow various advanced nanostructures, including semiconductor nanostructures (such as quantum dots, semiconductor nanowires and quantum wells), 2D nanostructures (including ultra-thin nanosheets), and hierarchical nanostructured metal-organic frameworks (MOF-on-MOF). In this theme, we intend to collect a set of manuscripts on the development of these three groups of epitaxial nanostructures, in which their outstanding properties are obtained due to the epitaxy.

 

We are delighted to consider original research articles within the scope.

 

If you are interested in contributing to this collection please get in touch with the Editorial Office by email.

 

Please note that article processing charges apply to all articles submitted to Nanoscale Advances if, following peer-review, they are accepted for publication. Details of the APC and discounted rates can be found here. Corresponding authors who are not already members of the Royal Society of Chemistry are entitled to one year’s Affiliate membership as part of their APC. Find out more about our member benefits.

 

The Editorial Office and Guest Editors reserve the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection and inclusion of accepted articles in the collection is not guaranteed. All manuscripts will be subject to the journal’s usual peer review process. Accepted manuscripts will be added to the collection as soon as they are online, and they will be published in a regular issue of Nanoscale Advances.

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Call for papers: Themed collection on Supercapacitors

Guest Editors: Zhaojun Han, Ruopian (Sophie) Fang, Dewei Chu, Da-Wei Wang (all affiliated with University of New South Wales)
Advisory Guest Editor: Kostya Ostrikov

Supercapacitors are important electrochemical energy storage devices that can deliver high power, fast charge/discharge rate, long lifespan and safe operation. The last few decades have witnessed significant progress in supercapacitors for clean and sustainable energy applications. Depending on charge storage process, supercapacitors can be classified as electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) or pseudocapacitor. This themed collection will focus on all aspects of supercapacitors, including electrochemistry, electrode materials, electrolytes, performance evaluation, device design and fabrication, and applications. It will also cover the integration of supercapacitors with other energy harvesting or storage systems for broader energy applications. The scope includes:

 

  • New electrode materials for EDLC and pseudocapacitor
  • Charge storage mechanism investigation, theory, modelling and simulations
  • Electrolyte development
  • Performance evaluation such as energy density, power density, safety and cyclability
  • Applications of supercapacitors in areas such as electronics, transport, aerospace and stationary power stations
  • Integrated energy systems consisting of supercapacitors
  • Multifunctional energy storage devices
  • Other emerging properties or applications of supercapacitors.

 

You are welcome to submit either an original research article or a review-type article within the scope.

If you are interested in contributing to this collection please get in touch with the Editorial Office by email.

Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when you submit your manuscript to say that this is a submission for the themed collection. The Editorial Office and Guest Editors reserve the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection and inclusion of accepted articles in the collection is not guaranteed. All manuscripts will be subject to the journal’s usual peer review process. Accepted manuscripts will be added to the online collection as soon as they are online, and they will be published in a regular issue of Nanoscale Advances. Article Processing Charges (APCs) apply to all accepted articles in Nanoscale Advances and more information about APCs and waivers can be found here.

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Themed collection: Flexible Nanomaterials

We are delighted to invite you to read a new themed collection on Flexible Nanomaterials: Microscopic Mechanisms and Macroscopic Applications

 

Read the collection

 

Guest edited by Yuan Cheng (Monash University, Australia), Zibiao Li (A*STAR, Singapore), Junfeng Gao (Dalian University of Technology, China), Hai-Dong Yu (Northwestern Polytechnical University, China) and Gang Zhang (A*STAR, Singapore). This themed collection is focussed on the fundamental physical and chemical properties of flexible materials, as well as controlled functionalization, in order to harness the materials’ fundamental properties and enhanced performance in applications in the fields of flexible electronics, rechargeable batteries, thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and soft robotics.

 

Articles in the collection are published in Nanoscale Advances and are freely available with gold open access. Read the Editorial article that introduces the collection:

Introduction to flexible nanomaterials: microscopic mechanisms and macroscopic applications

 

We hope you enjoy reading this collection. If you work on flexible nanomaterials and want to know more about publishing your next piece of work with Nanoscale Advances, please get in touch.

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RSC Chemical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Network Annual Symposium

In mid-January 2022, the RSC Chemical Nanoscience & Nanotechnology Network were delighted to welcome attendees to the annual symposium!

This annual flagship event of the RSC CNN Special Interest Group covers recent developments in fundamentals and applications of novel materials, with the aim to provide a forum of nanoscience and nanotechnology researchers to engage and exchange information, discuss challenges and build networks. Held in a hybrid format, more than 70 delegates attended in person at Burlington House in London, and many attendees dialed in to attend virtually.

 

 

 

 

 

Congratulations to the prize winners!

Congratulations to poster prize winner Ian Machado!

Congratulations to poster prize first runner-up Jennifer Gracie

Congratulations to poster prize runner-up Chengao Yue

 

An exciting new initiative from the RSC CNN interest group is coming in March 2022: a virtual Journal Club! If you’re on Twitter, follow @RSC__CNN to keep up to date.

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Call for Papers: Design and Function of Materials Nanoarchitectonics

Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances invite you to contribute to our new themed collection on the design and function of materials nanoarchitectonics.

Nanoarchitectonics refers to the creation of functional materials using nanoscale component units, encompassing fields such as nanostructured materials synthesis, supramolecular assembly, nanoscale structural fabrications, and materials hybridizations.

Find out more about nanoarchitectonics in this recent Focus article by Guest Editor Katsuhiko Ariga.

The Guest Editor team welcome submissions utilizing both theoretical and experimental methods. You are welcome to submit to either journal, and all published articles will be collated into a single online collection for promotion.

Find out more about Nanoscale here: www.rsc.li/nanoscale

Find out more about Nanoscale Advances* here: www.rsc.li/nanoscale-advances

 

Submit any time before 1st April 2022

 

Submit to Nanoscale

Submit to Nanoscale Advances

 

Please make sure you mention on the submission form that your contribution is intended for the nanoarchitectonics themed collection.

We welcome contributions of original research as a Communication or Full Paper. All submissions will be subject to initial assessment and rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of the journals.

 

 

*Nanoscale Advances is an international gold open access journal (impact factor 4.5), publishing research across the breadth of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Please note that article processing charges apply to all articles submitted to Nanoscale Advances if, following peer-review, they are accepted for publication. Details of the APC and discounted rates can be found here. Corresponding authors who are not already members of the Royal Society of Chemistry are entitled to one year’s Affiliate membership as part of their APC. Find out more about our member benefits. 

 

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Dr Dong Qin joins the Associate Editor team

Dr Dong Qin joins the Associate Editor team

Welcome to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

 

 

We are delighted to welcome Dr Dong Qin, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, as a new Associate Editor working across Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances.

 

 

 

 

What attracted you to pursue a career in nanoscience and how did you get to where you are now?

After my PhD study on the fundamental work of gas phase spectroscopy, I was very fortunate to have an opportunity to work on soft lithography as a postdoctoral fellow with Professor George M. Whitesides at Harvard University back in 1997. I am in debt to George who brought me to this fascinating world of nanoscale science where I enjoyed the research in the field of nanostructures and nanomaterials with a solid training as a physical chemist. I had been doing independent work in building the research infrastructure for nanoscale science and engineering from 1997-2011, during which I witness the progress of the field. When I finally returned back to academia in 2012, I decided to start my own research in the field of nanoscale nanomaterials, metal nanocrystals, with my keen focus on the optical properties for the development of in situ methodology to characterize the catalytically significant interface by fingerprinting spectroscopy. It has been a rewarding journey at Georgia Tech as I renowned my passion in both nanoscale science and spectroscopy.

 

What is the most exciting research paper that you have read recently?

Single atom catalysis! Questions remain on the ability to probe single atom and we are part of the efforts to address this challenge at the moment.

 

What is your biggest passion outside of science?

Free-lance writing!

 

What career would you have chosen if you had not taken this career path?

 An educator – I have enormous passion in teaching! Students in my classes will not only learn knowledge but also my positive attitude toward life in broad.

 

Why should young people study chemistry?

Chemistry introduces the smallest building blocks, atoms, which are essential in building structure-property relationship of materials in our daily life!

 

Please join us in welcoming Dr Qin to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

Best wishes,

Dr Charlotte Marshall                          Dr Ania Rulka

Managing Editor, Nanoscale                  Executive Editor, Nanoscale Advances

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Nanoscale journal family articles featured in the Chemistry World ‘Holy Grails’ series

Nanoscale journal family articles featured in the Chemistry World ‘Holy Grails’ series

Chemistry World has been exploring the ‘holy grails’ of chemistry, set out almost a quarter of a century ago in Accounts of Chemical Research, as part of a special issue.

For each ‘holy grail’ researchers working in the fields today have offered their insights into where these areas of research have gone since the publication of the original articles in 1995.

Ten relevant publications are highlighted as further reading for each ‘holy grail’, and we wanted to share with you the papers highlighted from the Nanoscale family of journals.  Also, don’t forget to click through to each Chemistry World ‘holy grail’ article to read more about the progress of each topic over the last 25 years.

 

Manipulation of matter at the atomic level

X Zeng et al, Nanoscale tailoring of supramolecular crystals via an oriented external electric field, Nanoscale, 2020,12, 15072 (DOI: 10.1039/d0nr01946a)

R J P Román et al, Tunneling-current-induced local excitonic luminescence in p-doped WSe2 monolayers, Nanoscale, 2020,12, 13460 (DOI: 10.1039/d0nr03400b)

M R Tchalala et al, Tip-induced oxidation of silicene nano-ribbons, Nanoscale Adv., 2020, 2, 2309 (DOI: 10.1039/d0na00332h)

 

Room temperature superconductors

X Yang et al, Observation of short-range Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states with threefold symmetry in layered superconductor 2H-NbSe2, Nanoscale, 2020, 12, 8174 (DOI: 10.1039/d0nr01383h)

 

Quantum control

U Kumar et al, Single plasmon spatial and spectral sorting on a crystalline two-dimensional plasmonic platform, Nanoscale, 2020, 12, 13414 (DOI: 10.1039/d0nr02066d)

 

Artificial enzymes: catalysis by design

F Wang et al, A mesoporous encapsulated nanozyme for decontaminating two kinds of wastewater and avoiding secondary pollution, Nanoscale, 2020, 12, 14465 (DOI: 10.1039/d0nr03217d)

 

Congratulations to the authors of the papers highlighted in the series.

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Themed collection: Spectroscopy and scattering for chemistry

Spectroscopy and scattering for chemistry

New possibilities and challenges with large scale facilities

 

Guest edited by Kirsten M. Ø. Jensen, Serena DeBeer and Dorota Koziej

We are delighted to introduce a new themed online collection featuring new studies taking advantage of in situ synchrotron and neutron techniques. The wide variety of methods and approaches to data analysis applied illustrates the many options synchrotron and neutron methods now provide to chemists.

 

 

Read the collection here.

 

 

Here are a selection of articles from this collection. All articles are free to access until the end of November 2020.*

 

Applications of pair distribution function analyses to the emerging field of non-ideal metal–organic framework materials

Celia Castillo-Blas, José María Moreno, Ignacio Romero-Muñiz and Ana E. Platero-Prats

Nanoscale, 2020, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR01673J

 

Selective magnetometry of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in liquids

Juliusz Kuciakowski, Angelika Kmita, Dorota Lachowicz, Magdalena Wytrwal-Sarna, Krzysztof Pitala, Sara Lafuerza, Dorota Koziej, Amélie Juhin and Marcin Sikora

Nanoscale, 2020, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR02866E

 

Surface softening in palladium nanoparticles: effects of a capping agent on vibrational properties

Luca Rebuffi, Binayak Mukherjee, Stefano Siboni, Allison P. Young, Benjamin P. Williams, Chia-Kuang Tsung and Paolo Scardi

Nanoscale, 2020, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR00182A

 

We hope you enjoy reading this collection.

 

 

* Free access to articles via your free Royal Society of Chemistry publishing personal account

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Professor Manzhou Zhu joins the Associate Editor team

Professor Manzhou Zhu joins the Associate Editor team

Welcome to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

 

We are delighted to welcome Professor Manzhou Zhu, Anhui University, China, as a new Associate Editor working across Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances.

 

 

 

 

 

What attracted you to pursue a career in nanoscience and how did you get to where you are now?

I had been engaged in natural product chemistry and organic chemistry before I conducted postdoctoral research in Prof. Rongchao Jin’s group at Carnegie Mellon University. Since then, my research has been focused on metal nanoclusters, and I am always deeply attracted by the intriguing findings and unexplored areas in the nanocluster science. I am fascinated by how materials can behave so differently at the nanoscale.  Such an interest motivates me to fill myself with nanoscience arts, and I really enjoy it.

 

Why did you choose to specialize in your specific research field?

My research focusses on metal nanoclusters. Metal nanoclusters occupy the gap between discrete atoms and plasmonic nanomaterials, and are an emerging class of atomically precise nanomaterials. And the precise nature of nanocluster structures enables the elucidation of their structure-property relationships, which is essential if cluster-based nanomaterials with enhanced performances are to be rationally designed. I’m extremely interested in the precise nature of nanoclusters that we can see and control at the atomic level.

 

What do you see as the biggest challenges facing researchers who work in your field?

For the nanocluster science, in my opinion, we have gradually known about nanoclusters at the atomic level and controlled them in dictated structures and properties in the past few decades Therefore, the biggest challenges ahead of researchers are the applications of nanoclusters or nanocluster-based nanomaterials.

 

What is your biggest passion outside of science?

My biggest passion outside of science is cooking. Cooking gives me a chance to be creative outside of lab. I love to create my own recipes. It is interesting to try out different combinations of ingredients. I also feel fulfilled when I make something delicious that my family love to eat.

 

What career would you have chosen if you had not taken this career path?

Maybe I would choose to be a builder if I had not taken my current career. I grew up in the countryside and many people there went to the city to seek for jobs. The most common job for people like us from the countryside is to be a builder. If I had not gone to college, I would become a builder like my peers. Now, instead of building houses out of bricks I am building new materials out of atoms and molecules. So I always regard myself as a nano-builder by considering that there are many parallels between the building construction and the nanocluster construction.

 

What do you see as the most important scientific achievement of the last decade?

The last decade has witnessed lots of exciting scientific breakthroughs, such as gene editing, cell reprogramming, metamaterial development, nano-technology development, and so on. To me, the significantly developed nano-technologies that help us to directly “see” the nanoscience are the most exciting, such as cryo-electron microscopy (the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry) and lattice light-sheet microscope (seeing the cells at high spatiotemporal resolution; e.g., Science, 2014, 1257998).

 

Why should young people study chemistry?

Everything that happens around us is associated with chemistry. Chemistry is one of the most important science and is closely associated with our life. Studying chemistry means learning how to find, understand, and solve problems in our life. Chemistry also teaches us to discover the essence of materials, and thus comprehend their existence and further control them. By studying chemistry, young people can better understand the world, and have the chance to unravel these mysteries and make a difference to the world.

 

Please join us in welcoming Professor Zhu to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

Best wishes,

Dr Charlotte Marshall                          Dr Ania Rulka

Managing Editor, Nanoscale                  Executive Editor, Nanoscale Advances

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Introducing new members of the Advisory Board

Introducing the new members of the Advisory Board

Welcome to the team!

We are delighted to welcome the following new members to the joint Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances Advisory Board! The board consists of 44 expert scientists working across the breadth of nanoscience & nanotechnology.


Professor Stephanie Brock, Wayne State, USA. The Brock group’s research is centered on the synthesis and characterization of novel inorganic/solid state materials with unique and tunable properties, particularly nanomaterials.
Professor Raffaella Buonsanti, EPFL, Switzerland. Through the core expertise in colloidal synthesis, her team develops novel approaches to complex materials to drive chemical transformations.
Professor Jingyi Chen, University of Arkansas, USA. The Chen group focuses on rational design and synthesis of functional materials towards optimal properties and performance for energy conversion, tribology, and human-health applications.
Professor Kristen Fichthorn, Pennsylvania State University, USA. Professor Fichthorn’s research is primarily in atomic-scale simulation of fluid-solid interfaces, with applications in thin-film and crystal growth, colloidal assembly and stability, catalysis at surfaces, wetting and spreading, lubrication, and separations.
Professor Christy Haynes, University of Minnesota, USA. The Haynes group focuses on applications of analytical chemistry in the fields of immunology and toxicology, with much expertise in the area of single cell analysis.
Professor Jesse Jokerst, UCSD, USA. The Jokerst group works to improve the contrast of ultrasound images via nanoscale contrast agents, which can often double as drug delivery vehicles.
Professor Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh, University of New South Wales, Australia. The Kalantar-Zadeh group works on sensors, nanotechnology, liquid metals, materials science, electronics, gastroenterology, and medical devices.
Professor Pooi See Lee, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. The Lee group develop high energy capacitors, energy saving electrochromic coatings, novel transparent conductors, flexible and stretchable devices.
Professor Laura Na Liu, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Germany. The Liu group focuses on developing sophisticated and smart nanomaterials to answer structural biology questions and to answer catalytic chemistry questions in local environments
Professor Kostya (Ken) Ostrikov, Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Prof Ostrikov is widely recognized as a pioneer and leading authority in low temperature plasma applications in nanoscale materials processing and discovery of fundamental mechanisms of nanoscale matter structuring and activation using plasmas and related processes.
Professor Dong Qin, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA. The Qin group researches bimetallic nanocrystals, understanding heterogeneous nucleation in nanocrystal growth with molecular probes, and colloidal silver nanocrystals.
Professor Ventsislav K. Valev, University of Bath, UK. The Valev group focuses on the interaction between powerful laser light and nanostructured materials.
Professor Miriam Vitiello, CNR-Nano, Italy. The Vitiello group researches THz Quantum cascade lasers, THz nanodetectors, graphene and 2D materials for nanophotonics and nanoelectronics, THz near-field optics, THz metrology, and high resolutions spectroscopy and imaging.
Professor Xiaojun Wu, University of Science and Technology of China, China. The research interests of the Wu group include materials design methods, the design and computational simulation of spintronics materials, (photo)catalytic materials for energy, and other low-dimensional functional materials.
Professor Yujie Xiong, University of Science and Technology of China, China. The Xiong group research centers on solar-driven artificial carbon cycle through the combination of four routes: photocatalysis, electrocatalysis, photoelectrochemical system and plasmonic catalysis, based on the rationally designed inorganic materials and devices.
Professor Lin Xu, Nanjing Normal University, China. The Xu group is interested in functional nanomaterials, nanocatalysts for fuel cells, electrocatalysis and electrode materials for batteries.
Professor Ya Yang, Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. The Ya group focus on the development of micro-nano energy and sensing research, building high-performance composite nano-generators and high-precision self-driving sensor arrays through research in material design and controllable preparation.
Professor Gang Zhang, Institute of High Performance Computing, ASTAR, Singapore. The Zhang group focuses on using quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics to simulate electronic, thermal, and optical properties of novel materials and structures in important engineering problems.

 

Please join us in welcoming these new Advisory Board members to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

Best wishes,

Dr Charlotte Marshall                          Dr Ania Rulka

Managing Editor, Nanoscale                  Executive Editor, Nanoscale Advances

 

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