Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Biomaterials Science Overview of 2022

Now that 2022 has come to a close, join us as we look back at some of our highlights from last year and as we look forward to some of our upcoming activities in 2023!

 

Biomaterials Science 10th Anniversary

October 2022 marked the 10th Anniversary of Biomaterials Science. Our Editor-in-Chief, Jianjun Cheng and Executive Editor, Maria Southall wrote an Editorial reflecting on the progress of the journal over the past 10 years and look towards the future of Biomaterials Science.

We celebrated the anniversary with a number of activities such as:

·        Biomaterials Science 10th Anniversary collection featuring high quality research and review articles from some of the top authors in biomaterials

·        Post-publication web collections from four of our key regions; Europe, China, North America and Asia-Pacific, featuring some of the most cited, most downloaded and most shared articles during the first 10 years of the journal

·        ‘Reviewer spotlight’ recognising some of our most loyal outstanding reviewers who have supported the journal in the past few years

Keep an eye on our Twitter for the latest celebratory activities and check out the latest research published in the ongoing anniversary collection.

 

Biomaterials Science Top Picks of 2022

We have selected some of the most cited, most downloaded and most shared articles published in Biomaterials Science from last year for our Most Popular 2022 collection

All articles in this collection are FREE to read until 28 February 2023.

Congratulations to all featured authors!

 

 

Editorial Board

We welcomed Prof. Nasim Annabi (University of California, Los Angeles) to the Editorial Board of Biomaterials Science as an Associate Editor in February 2022. Prof. Annabi was the recipient of the Biomaterials Science Lectureship 2021 in recognition of her contributions to the biomaterials field. Her research involves the design and engineering of advanced biomaterials for applications in regenerative medicine.

 

Biomaterials Science Lectureship

The Biomaterials Science Lectureship 2022 was awarded to Dr Yizhou Dong (Ohio State University). This annual award was established in 2009 to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the biomaterials science field. Dr. Dong’s research focuses on the design and development of biotechnology platforms for the treatment of genetic disorders, infectious diseases, and cancers. To learn more about Yizhou Dong and his research, read our Lectureship winner blog post. You can check out articles from Yizhou and from our previous winners in the Lectureship winners collection.

Profile picture of Yizhou Dong

The nominations for the 2023 Lectureship award are now closed. We have received a number of excellent nominations and we would like to thank everyone for their support. We look forward to announcing the winner later this year.

 

Biomaterials Science Emerging Investigators

Biomaterials Science is proud to spotlight our ongoing Emerging Investigators Series. Our Emerging Investigators are at the early stages of their independent careers and invited for this collection in recognition of their potential to influence future directions in the field. Congratulations to all the featured researchers on their important work so far!

Read the collection

Meet the Scientists

 

Themed collections

Read this ongoing themed collection in Biomaterials Science on ‘CRISPR biomaterials’, Guest Edited by Yuan Ping (Zheijiang University), Qiaobing Xu (Tufts University) and Ming Wang (Chinese Academy of Sciences).

 

Keep an eye out for the exciting work being added to the collection

Browse all past collections on our platform, and see our upcoming collections on our calls for submissions page. We will be announcing more collections during the year, so keep a look out!

 

Open calls

The deadline is soon approaching for this open call to submit your work to a themed collection on ‘Microneedles’ joint with our companion journal, Journal of Materials Chemistry B. Guest Edited by Ester Caffarel-Salvador (Scientific Consultant, USA), Ryan Donnelly (Queen’s University Belfast, UK), Harvinder Gill (Texas Tech University, USA) and Hyungil Jung (Yonsei University, Korea), this themed collection aims to bring together recent advancements in the field of microneedles, from materials design to application and all that is in between.

Read the collection so far

 

HOT articles

Remember to check out the Biomaterials Science HOT articles collection featuring hot articles highlighted by the Editors and referees. All articles in the collection are FREE to read until 28 February 2023.

 

Open Access

The Royal Society of Chemistry has announced that all 31 fully-owned hybrid journals, including Biomaterials Science, have been approved as “Transformative Journals” with cOAlition S, an international consortium of research funding and performing organisations. Find out more about our strive towards 100% Open Access here.

 

#RSCPoster: Save the date

#RSCPoster is a global Twitter Poster Conference, held entirely online over the course of 24 hours. The event brings together the global chemistry community to network with colleagues across the world and at every career stage, share their research and engage in scientific debate.

The 2023 #RSCPoster Twitter Conference will be held from 12:00 (UTC) 28 February 2023 to 12:00 (UTC) 1 March 2023.

How you can help…

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you in addition to our authors, reviewers and readers for their support throughout 2022. Here are some of the ways in which you can continue to make a positive contribution to Biomaterials Science:

  • Submit to one of our open themed collections and encourage your colleagues to submit.
  • If you are organising a conference or virtual event, please do let us know if you would like to arrange mutual promotion between the conference and Biomaterials Science. We can offer poster prizes, social media and blog promotion, and adverts in the journal and on the journal web page.
  • Read our recent articles and follow the latest news on the Biomaterials Science blog and on our Facebook and Twitter
  • Send your best research to Biomaterials Science.
  • Sign up to be a reviewer for Biomaterials Science.

 

Thank you for your continued interest in and support of Biomaterials Science. We look forward to seeing what 2023 brings!

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Biomaterials Science 10th Anniversary Reviewer Spotlight- Honggang Cui

Biomaterials Science is delighted to recognise our outstanding reviewers for their support and significant contributions to the journal. As part of the 10th Anniversary celebrations, we are highlighting some of our most loyal reviewers in a ‘Reviewer Spotlight’ series. We are grateful to all our reviewers and appreciate the dedication and support they give to the journal.

Honggang Cui is a Biomaterials Science reviewer and has received an outstanding reviewer award for his contributions to the journal in 2020. Find out more about Honggang below and read his interview with advice for reviewers for the journal.

 

Honggang Cui is an associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at The John Hopkins University with a joint appointment in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.  Dr. Cui works on the development of supramolecular biomaterials and drug-based assemblies, with the goal of improving the current treatment and prevention of some important human diseases.

 

1. What do you like most about being a reviewer for Biomaterials Science?

The opportunity to learn something exciting and new. I also enjoy having the opportunity to help the authors improve the quality of their manuscript.

 

2. What would you recommend to new reviewers to ensure their report is helpful?

A manuscript cannot solve all the problems in the field. So long as a manuscript can teach us something new and important, it is a good manuscript worthy of sharing with the community. Questions raised should be centered on the key points that the authors tried to convey in their manuscript. Even if you recommend rejection, please explain your rationale and provide constructive suggestions as to how the manuscript can be further improved.

 

You can find out more about Honggang and his research on his webpage

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Biomaterials Science 10th Anniversary Reviewer Spotlight- Yongzhuo Huang

Biomaterials Science is delighted to recognise our outstanding reviewers for their support and significant contributions to the journal. As part of the 10th Anniversary celebrations, we are highlighting some of our most loyal reviewers in a ‘Reviewer Spotlight’ series. We are grateful to all our reviewers and appreciate the dedication and support they give to the journal.

Yongzhuo Huang is a Biomaterials Science reviewer and has received an outstanding reviewer award for his contributions to the journal in 2019. Find out more about Yongzhuo below and read his interview about his experiences of being a reviewer.

 

Yongzhuo Huang is currently a Professor of Pharmaceutics at the Shanghai Institute for Materia Medica at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He received his Ph.D. from Zhejiang University and then conducted postdoctoral training at the University of Michigan College of Pharmacy. He focuses on application of drug delivery technology to explore the new therapeutic mechanisms and strategies in cancer and inflammation diseases. He is interested in targeted drug delivery, transdermal delivery, and protein delivery.

He has published over 150 articles, and supervised/co-supervised 50 graduates, 20 PhD students, and 8 postdoctoral researchers.

He is an editor of International Journal of Pharmaceutics, and serves in the advisory or editorial boards of Nano Letters, Journal Controlled Release, Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B, Cancer Biology & Medicine and Medicine in Drug Discovery. He has also served as a Guest Editor for various theme issues, including the issue of “Biomimetic Therapeutics” in Biomaterials Science (2019). He is an active reviewer for over 120 scientific journals.

 

1. What encouraged you to become a reviewer for Biomaterials Science?

Biomaterials Science is a well-respected journal covering multidisciplinary areas. I like to keep myself posted on the up-to-date cutting-edge research to be published in the journal. Moreover, I have authored a number of articles in BM, and thanks to the excellent reviewers, their valuable comments did help me a lot improve the quality of the articles. As a way to give back, I am more than happy to serve as a reviewer for BM. 

 

2. What would you recommend to new reviewers to ensure their report is helpful?

When I review a manuscript, I often ask myself what I will do if I am going to conduct a similar study. I will compare the plan conceived in my mind with the work in the manuscript and try to find out the pros and cons. Originality and solidness is two essential criteria to evaluate a manuscript. If a reviewer can provide a detailed analysis of originality of the work and solidness of the experiments will be helpful for the authors to improve their work and for the editors to make a decision. Please treat a manuscript in a way what you want yours to be treated.

 

3. Has being a reviewer affected how you approach the preparation of your recent manuscripts?

Yes. I do learn a lot from being a reviewer. When a manuscript leaves me a deep impression, I would try to find out which elements stick in my mind. From a critical reading of a manuscript, I can appreciate the well-organized structure, clear presentation, and the way to prepare the beautiful schemes and figures. Such experience will affect my manuscript-writing, in various aspects.

 

You can find out more about Yongzhuo and his research on his webpage.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Biomaterials Science 10th Anniversary Reviewer Spotlight- Jiao Jiao Li

Biomaterials Science is delighted to recognise our outstanding reviewers for their support and significant contributions to the journal. As part of the 10th Anniversary celebrations, we are highlighting some of our most loyal reviewers in a ‘Reviewer Spotlight’ series. We are grateful to all our reviewers and appreciate the dedication and support they give to the journal.

Jiao Jiao Li is a Biomaterials Science reviewer and has received outstanding reviewer awards for her contributions to the journal in 2019, 2020 and 2021. Find out more about Jiao Jiao below and read her interview for advice for reviewers and authors publishing in the journal.

Dr Jiao Jiao Li is a biomedical engineer and medical scientist. Her research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine aims to develop new therapies for chronic diseases, particularly for damaged bones and joints using a combination of approaches including stem cells, biomaterials, nanotechnology, and more. She is a Lecturer and Research Group Leader at University of Technology Sydney, a National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Fellow, and Co-Deputy Director on the Australian Research Council Training Centre for Innovative BioEngineering. She was selected by Science & Technology Australia as a 2021-22 Superstar of STEM – one of 60 Australian women to serve as national role models for the community. Jiao Jiao has been recognised for her contributions to research and social impact, including in 2022 the NSW Young Tall Poppy Scientist of the Year for her nationally significant contributions to research excellence and science communication, and being named as Australia’s Top 20 Under 40 Researchers. She was also the Australian winner of the international Falling Walls Lab competition in 2021. Jiao Jiao has a passion for disseminating science in the community, and for raising up the next generation of secondary and tertiary students for their future careers and leadership in STEM.

 

1. What do you like most about being a reviewer for Biomaterials Science?

Biomaterials Science gets a lot of high quality submissions from the field. As someone who was initially trained as a biomaterials scientist, I love seeing the latest cutting-edge work going on in the field. I myself have learnt a lot from the papers I reviewed, many of which were from groups conducting the most innovative work in my interest area of tissue engineering. I also really appreciate the efficient and transparent peer review process. By looking at my own comments compared to those of other reviewers and the editor’s decision on manuscripts, I have learnt a lot about the peer review process and how to optimise the quality of my own manuscripts. Also, I think I have been reviewing for the journal for a good many years and it has almost grown up together with my academic career. I am proud to say that I have helped contribute to the growth of Biomaterials Science over the years as now a major outlet for high quality papers in the biomaterials field.

 

2. Do you have any advice for first-time authors seeking publication in BM?

I find that the best (original research) manuscripts all share some common characteristics: 1) the work conducted was innovative or gave some new insights into what was previously not known in the field, 2) the characterisations were done to good breadth and depth appropriate to the subject matter, and results taken together convincingly prove the conclusions, and 3) the manuscript was written in a way that demonstrates knowledge of the latest advances relating to the specific subject matter and explains the significance of the work to a possibly generalist scientific audience. Also, I find that the editors of the journal are very good at finding reviewers who have specific expertise in the topic area of the manuscript, so the manuscript needs to make sure that it well explains the specific novelty/significance of the work compared to the latest advances (e.g., why is this particular combination of fabrication process/materials composition/analysis techniques new or different from what has already been done?).

 

3. What would you recommend to new reviewers to ensure their report is helpful?

I think as a responsible reviewer, we should make a firm judgement about where we want the manuscript to go after the review. The best manuscripts clearly worthy of publishing should be recommended as such, but most of them are more difficult to judge. If it looks like a study that holds value for publishing in the journal but has significant room for improvement, then the report should have constructive feedback to say specifically how you expect the manuscript to be improved. This could be from both a writing perspective and from an experimental/analysis perspective. Usually if a manuscript is missing appropriate controls or the analysis was not performed correctly but the data is still worth publishing, it is not realistic to ask for new experiments to be performed but rather it is better to ask the authors to explicitly discuss these limitations in the revision. For manuscripts that clearly do not match the quality of the journal, constructive feedback should still be given to point out (politely) the critical flaws in a way that might help the authors (e.g., insufficient analyses were performed, or the study did not provide new insights compared to what has already been reported many times in the literature). Also, I find it unnecessary to scrutinise sentences for language expression unless there is a technical mistake as it is not our role as reviewers to write the manuscript for the authors, but that’s just me.

 

4. What has been your biggest learning point from reviewing and has this affected how you approach the preparation of your recent manuscripts?

I find that the shared comments from other anonymous reviewers have really helped me a lot in benchmarking my own reviews and improving the preparation of my own manuscripts. Reviewing for Biomaterials Science has accompanied the growth of my academic career from a postdoctoral scientist to now a research team leader. Seeing the comments of other reviewers on the same manuscript, many of whom were clearly experts in the topic area gave me confidence that my feelings were correct about a particular piece of work in the field. There were some rare instances where my comments differed a lot from those of others, which I took as a valuable learning experience to see what I had missed and to benchmark my expectations. Building up my reviewing experience with Biomaterials Science over the years has definitely helped me in preparing more scientifically sound and better communicated manuscripts. It has also helped me gain realistic expectations of how my manuscripts are likely to land with expert reviewers and to better appreciate differing opinions.

 

You can find out more about Jiao Jiao and her research on her webpage and follow her on Twitter @JiaoJiaoLi_Syd.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Biomaterials Science 10th Anniversary Reviewer Spotlight- Nuria Oliva

Biomaterials Science is delighted to recognise our outstanding reviewers for their support and significant contributions to the journal. As part of the 10th Anniversary celebrations, we are highlighting some of our most loyal reviewers in a ‘Reviewer Spotlight’ series. We are grateful to all our reviewers and appreciate the dedication and support they give to the journal.

Nuria Oliva is a Biomaterials Science reviewer and received an outstanding reviewer award for her contributions to the journal in 2020. Find out more about Nuria below and read her interview for her tips and tricks for reviewers and authors publishing in the journal.

Dr. Nuria Oliva is an Assistant Professor and la Caixa Junior Leader Fellow at IQS Barcelona, and an Honorary Research Fellow at Imperial College London. Her group works at the intersection of biomaterials, biology and medicine to tackle complex human diseases like osteoarthritis, fibrosis or cancer. She graduated with a PhD in Medical Engineering and Medical Physics from the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, before becoming a postdoctoral fellow at Imperial College London. In 2020, Nuria started her independent group as an Imperial College Research Fellow.

 

1. What encouraged you to become a reviewer for Biomaterials Science?

I wanted to give back to the biomaterials community. I recognised that my previous work had been published thanks to the work of other experts in the field, and so I wanted to facilitate that for other scientists seeking to share their work.

2. Do you have any advice for first-time authors seeking publication in Biomaterials Science?

Less is more! Tell a compelling story that is backed up by your data, and only display the data that tells your story. All additional data can go to supplemental information. A compilation of massive amounts of data often distracts from getting the important, main message across.

3. What would you recommend to new reviewers to ensure their report is helpful?

Be objective, be fair and most importantly, provide details of any criticism. A vague review doesn’t help anyone involved in the process and generates more work for the editor, the authors, and yourself on the event of a second round of reviews.

4. Has being a reviewer affected how you approach the preparation of your recent manuscripts?

Absolutely. Having reviewed a fair amount of manuscripts by now, I understand better what works and what doesn’t work, and how to convey the message of the paper in a clearer way, both through the text and the figures.

 

You can find out more about Nuria and her research on her webpage and follow her on Twitter @noliva77

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Biomaterials Science Emerging Investigator- Amit Jaiswal

Amit Jaiswal is an Associate Professor in the School of Biosciences and Bioengineering at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Mandi, India. In 2008, he graduated with a B.Tech. in Biotechnology from Heritage Institute of Technology Kolkata, and in 2010, he earned an MTech. in Biotechnology from Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, India.  Thereafter, he received his PhD. degree in Nanotechnology from the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati in 2013. He completed his post-doctoral studies at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel and Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. In 2014, Dr. Jaiswal began his career at IIT Mandi as an Assistant Professor, and he is currently an Associate Professor there. His research interests are in the fields of materials chemistry, nanobiotechnology, and biomaterials. In recognition of his work, he was given the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) Young Scientist Research Award in 2017, and the Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) Young Scientist Award in 2018.  Additionally, in 2020, he was chosen to be an Associate of the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore. For his research accomplishments he was awarded with the Indian National Science Academy (INSA) 2021 medal for young scientists, and his research team also won the Gandhian Young Technological Innovation (GYTI) 2021 appreciation award. He has authored five book chapters and more than 40 peer-reviewed journal publications. He can be found on Twitter @AJnanobio.

Read Amit’s Emerging Investigators article, ‘Antimicrobial Mechanisms of Biomaterials: From Macro to Nano’ featured in the Biomaterials Science Emerging Investigators series 2022.

Visit the group webpage to find out more about Amit’s research:

www.theajlab.com

 

How do you feel about Biomaterials Science as a place to publish research on this topic?

I want to start by thanking the editorial team of the journal Biomaterials Science for considering our manuscript for publication in this journal.  Biomaterials Scienceis a fast-growing journal which has seen a steady growth over the past couple of years in terms of readership and quality of papers published. It is one of the Q1 journals in the field of biomedical engineering and biomaterials research and is a preferred journal for a lot of scientists worldwide working in this field. So, getting our paper accepted in Biomaterials Scienceis a great satisfaction for me and my team. Our manuscript, which provides a detailed discussion on the fundamentals of interaction of biomaterials (from macroscale to nanoscale) with pathogens like bacteria and viruses, is a topic which is very well suited and apt for the wide readership of this journal. Having this paper in Biomaterials Science will surely increase its visibility to the scientific community at large and I believe that the readers will greatly benefit from this paper.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Announcing a new Desktop Lectureship Seminar hosted by Biomaterials Science

The RSC Desktop Seminar Lectureship series provides an exciting opportunity for exceptional scientists to share their award-winning research virtually and for you to ask questions. Each session will either feature talks from a journal board member and a recent Lectureship winner, or by two recent Lectureship winners, spanning many topic areas and regions around the world. Further information about upcoming sessions is available here.

 

As part of the series, Biomaterials Science will host a session featuring talks from Associate Editor and 2021 Lectureship winner Dr Nasim Annabi and Associate Editor Prof. Shyni Varghese.

 

Biomaterials Science Lectureship

Wednesday 20 July 2022, 18:00 – 19:30 BST | 13:00 – 14:30 EST

 

 Register for free here

Please visit rsc.li/lectureship-series for the latest updates and registration links. If you think these events would interest someone you know, please do share this message. We hope you can join us at the Biomaterials Science Lectureship webinar or at another upcoming event. In the event that you are interested in any of the webinars but cannot make the date, register online before the scheduled event and you will be sent a link to the recording afterwards.

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Biomaterials Science Emerging Investigator- Anita Shukla

 

 

Anita Shukla is an Associate Professor of Engineering at Brown University. Professor Shukla’s research involves the development of nano- to macroscale biomaterials for the treatment of bacterial and fungal infections. Professor Shukla is the recipient of several national and University honors and awards for both her research and teaching, including a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award, an Office of Naval Research Director of Research Early Career Grant, and a Brown University Early Career Research Achievement Award and Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Prior to joining Brown in 2013, Professor Shukla was a National Institutes of Health Ruth Kirschstein postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Bioengineering at Rice University. She received her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2011 as an NSF Graduate Research Fellow. Professor Shukla also received an M.S. in Chemical Engineering Practice from MIT. She received a B.S. at Carnegie Mellon University in 2006 with majors in chemical engineering and biomedical engineering.

 

Read Anita’s Emerging Investigator article, ‘Bacteria-Responsive Biopolymer-Coated Nanoparticles for Biofilm Penetration and Eradication’ and check out the collection to read all of the 2022 Emerging Investigators articles.

 

1. How do you feel about Biomaterials Science as a place to publish research on this topic?

Biomaterials Science is a terrific journal covering the latest and greatest in biomaterials research. I feel that our research is reaching the right audiences that will both appreciate, critique, and learn from our work.

 

2. What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

Our lab is broadly focused on providing new drug delivery solutions to tackle the global antimicrobial resistance crisis. I am very excited that we are working on an extremely critical research area. The work that we have presented in this article tackles an important issue of treating biofilm infections. We show terrific efficacy of responsive nanoparticles against biofilm bacteria, and going forward as we uncover more about the mechanism of action, we can translate this technology to many other important species of pathogenic bacteria.

 

3. Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

You can’t win the game, if you don’t play it. So if you are excited about something, give it a shot!

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Paper of the month: Magnetic delivery of Fe3O4@polydopamine nanoparticle-loaded natural killer cells suggest a promising anticancer treatment

Natural killer (NK) cells have the intrinsic ability to recognise and eliminate cancer cells along with the potential to inhibit metastasis. NK cells utilize a variety of ways to kill tumor cells, such as stimulating cytokine release, direct cytotoxicity and activating targeted cells apoptosis. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has shown significant response to NK cell based immunotherapy in clinical settings. Recently, researchers have begun investigating ways to augment the recruitment and infiltration of NK cells into tumors for improved theranostics. Hence, it is vital to develop non-invasive methods for in vivo control and for the monitoring of the administered NK cells with tissue targeting ability. FDA approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have been proven biocompatible delivery vehicles and imaging probes for NK cells.

c8bm00588e

In the present work Jiang et al have synthesized nanoparticles (NPs) composed of a Fe3O4 core and polydopamine (PDA) shell, for tumor theranostics. The aim of this study was to develop magnetic NPs for an immune-cell delivery system to target NSCLC cells. The system stimulated the accumulation of NK cells at the tumor site via the placement of a tiny external magnetic device inside animals. The NK cells actively took up the Fe3O4@PDA NPs due to its physiological stability, while the biology of NK cells was not affected, owing to its biocompatible nature. In vivo studies demonstrated the reduced expression of Ki-67 and the elevated apoptosis of A549 cancer cells upon treatment with Fe3O4@PDA NP-labeled NK cells. Though there are some limitations associated with the invasive approach, the magnetic delivery of NP-NKs can be of promising value in clinical applications.

Tips/comments from the authors:

  • Coating of magnetic NPs with PDA played a vital role in its cellular uptake, as surface modification is an essential factor in the determination of the biocompatibility and the cellular absorption of magnetic NPs.
  • Due to the biocompatible nature of magnetic NPs, even high concentrations (100 μg/mL) did not induce apoptosis of NK cells.
  • With improved retention over time the delivery of Fe3O4@PDA NP-labeled NK cells can be expedited to the tumor via application of local magnetic field.
  • The position of the tumor and the implanted magnetic field should be close enough, while sufficient time should be given to the magnetic field for the achievement of potent therapeutic effect.
  • The non-invasive nature of three-dimensional (3-D) rotating magnetic fields or high gradient magnetic fields can enhance the magnetic strength in a central point for the effective accumulation of NPs.

 

Read the full article here: Magnetic delivery of Fe3O4@polydopamine nanoparticle-loaded natural killer cells suggest a promising anticancer treatment Biomater. Sci., 2018,6, 2714-2725

 

About the web writer

Muhammad OvaisMuhammad Ovais is a Web Writer for Biomaterials Science. Currently, he is a PhD candidate in Prof. Chunying Chen Lab at CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST), Beijing. His research interest lies in the development of novel nano-delivery systems for cancer immunotherapy. He has published a total of ~30 research/review articles. You can find or contact him on ResearchGate, LinkedIn and Chunying Chen’s lab

Contact Email: movais@bs.qau.edu.pk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/OVAISBiotec

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Focus on: Nanoparticle Delivery Systems

Developing nanoparticle formulations that can deliver drugs more effectively to the target sites with enhanced efficacy and reduced side effects has been an overarching goal in the field of nanobiotechnology. Dendrimers, micelles, and liposomes represent three major classes of nanoparticles that have shown promising results in drug delivery and bio-sensing.  Each type of nanoparticle has its own strengths and limitations in terms of the desirable payload, site of action, duration of action, release profile, and dosing frequency. Therefore, it is imperative to engineer these classical nanoparticle delivery systems for specific drug delivery application.

Nanoparticle delivery system

This month we focus on four articles published in Biomaterials Science reporting the recent advances in leveraging those different nanoparticle delivery systems for efficient, controlled, and targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

1. Nucleobase-modified polyamidoamine-mediated miR-23b delivery to inhibit the proliferation and migration of lung cancer
Haobo Han, Jiebing Yang, Yudi Wang, Wenqi Chen, Jiawen Chen, Yan Yang and Quanshun Li
Biomater. Sci., 2017, 5, 2268. DOI: 10.1039/c7bm00599g

In the current study, the authors aimed to further improve the transfection efficiency and biocompatibility of conventional polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers. To this end, the surface of PAMAM was chemically modified with 2-amino-6-chloropurine. This modification further enhanced the carrier/DNA interaction via the fine balance of hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction. Compared to the prototype PAMAM, the modified PAMAM demonstrated higher transfection efficiency. In an in vitro model, this gene carrier delivered miR-23b, a potent anti-proliferative and anti-invasive agent, more efficiently into A549 cancer cells, indicating the potential of this carrier in cancer nanotherapy.

2. Novel poly(vinyl alcohol)-based amphiphilic nanogels by non-covalent boric acid crosslinking of polymeric micelles
Hen Moshe, Yuval Davizon, Maya Menaker Raskin and Alejandro Sosnik
Biomater. Sci., 2017, 5, 2295. DOI: 10.1039/c7bm00675f

Poor physical stability often presents as a major drawback for polymeric micelles. The authors addressed this issue by non-covalent crosslinking of a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based polymeric micelles system with boric acid. Compared to the non-crosslinked control, this novel micelles demonstrated improved physical stability under harsh environment. More interestingly, these micelles could be spray-dried and efficiently consolidated into dry powders which were able to regenerate back into the original nanoparticles upon re-dispersion. This non-covalently crosslinked micelles also maintained good mucoadhesiveness and cytocompatibility.

3. Codelivery of sorafenib and GPC3 siRNA with PEI-modified liposomes for hepatoma therapy
Weitong Sun, Yong Wang, Mingyue Cai, Liteng Lin, Xiaoyan Chen, Zhong Cao, Kangshun Zhu and Xintao Shuai
Biomater. Sci., 2017, 5, 2468. DOI: 10.1039/c7bm00866j

Combination therapy using chemotherapeutic drugs and siRNA represents a promising strategy that can potentially induce and/or enhance the synergistic anticancer effects. To overcome the individual drawbacks of sorafenib and gene therapy, the authors developed a PEI based liposome system which allow the co-delivery of GPC3 siRNA and hydrophobic sorafenib molecule. The drug loaded liposomal delivery system displayed enhanced anticancer effects by suppressing the expression of the anti-apoptotic GPC3 gene and the proliferative cyclin D1 gene simultaneously in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells. Further, the improved therapeutic effects of this delivery system was demonstrated in an in vivo xenograft model.

4. Dimeric camptothecin-loaded RGD-modified targeted cationic polypeptide-based micelles with high drug loading capacity and redox-responsive drug release capability
Zhaopei Guo, Xingzhi Zhou, Mengze Xu, Huayu Tian, Xuesi Chen and Meiwan Chen
Biomater. Sci., 2017, 5, 2501. DOI: 10.1039/c7bm00791d

To tackle the low bioavailability problem of camptothecin, the authors devised a novel polymeric micelles system composed of cationic polypeptide poly-lysine-block-poly-leucine, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. The micelles system increased drug encapsulation efficiency, drug loading capacity, and physical stability of camptothecin. The RGD moiety further enhanced the intracellular uptake of micelles due to the cellular targeting capability of RGD sequence. Importantly, the drug loaded micelles effectively inhibited the proliferation of malignant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by inducing cellular apoptosis and decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential.

Read these articles for free until 10 January 2018

About the webwriterYingfei Xue

Yingfei Xue is a web writer for Biomaterials Science. Currently, he is a PhD candidate and graduate student researcher in Dr. Shilpa Sant lab at the University of Pittsburgh, USA.  His research focus on nano-/micro-technology in novel heart valve therapy. Find him on Twitter: @Phil_Xue or connect with him on ResearchGate

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)