RSC awards at SciX 2019

SciX 2019, a conference featuring cutting edge developments in analytical sciences, instrumentation and unique applications, was held in Palm Springs, California, USA from October 13-18, 2019.

Royal Society of Chemistry Award-Winning Scientists

The RSC Theophilus Redwood award is given for interdisciplinary work at the interface of analytical, biological, and materials chemistry and skills for passionately and effectively communicating science to broad audiences. The 2018 award winner was Christy Haynes, University of Minnesota, USA.

Christy Haynes is the Elmore H. Northey Professor of Chemistry at the University of Minnesota where she leads the Haynes Research Group, a lab dedicated to applying analytical and nanomaterials chemistry in the context of biomedicine, ecology, and toxicology.

Christy was given her award by Professor Duncan Graham, President of the RSC Analytical Division and Analyst Editor-in-Chief and she gave a stimulating lecture on Polymer-enabled plasmonic sensing. Her lecture was followed by an award symposium with a lineup of speakers selected by Christy.

Congratulations Christy!

Christy Haynes presents her RSC Theophilus Redwood 2018 Award Lecture
Christy Haynes presents her RSC Theophilus Redwood 2018 Award Lecture
Photo credits: Glen P. Jackson, WVU, USA
The RSC Analytical Division President and Analyst Editor-in-Chief Duncan Graham presents Christy Haynes with the Theophilus Redwood 2018 award at SciX 2019
The RSC Analytical Division President and Analyst Editor-in-Chief Duncan Graham presents Christy Haynes with the Theophilus Redwood 2018 award at SciX 2019

Photo credits: Glen P. Jackson, WVU, USA

Christy Haynes and Symposium speakers (left to right): Melissa Maurer-Jones, Autumn (Tian) Qiu, Vivian Ferry, Christy Haynes, Julie Biteen and Korin Wheeler

Christy Haynes and Symposium speakers (left to right): Melissa Maurer-Jones, Autumn (Tian) Qiu, Vivian Ferry, Christy Haynes, Julie Biteen and Korin Wheeler

Photo: Maria Southall, RSC

It also gives us great pleasure to announce that Analyst Advisory Board member Karen Faulds and Analytical Methods Associate Editor Chris Easley both received awards at SciX 2019.

Professor Karen Faulds was the recipient of the Charles Mann Award for Raman Spectroscopy. After receiving her award, Karen gave a plenary lecture on “Development of SERS and SESORRS for Multiplexed Bioanalysis”.

Analyst Advisory Board member Karen Faulds (L) is presented with the Charles Mann award.

Photo credits: Glen P. Jackson, WV, USA

Professor Chris Easley was the recipient of the AES Mid-Career Award. After being presented with his award, Chris delivered a plenary lecture titled “Digitizing Endocrine Tissue Secretions into Nanoliter Droplets for Analysis of Hormones and Metabolites at High Temporal Resolution”.

Analytical Methods Associate Editor Chris Easley (L) receives the AES Mid-Career Award from AES President Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte.

Photo credits: Glen P. Jackson, WV, USA

We are extremely proud of Karen and Chris. Congratulations on well-deserved awards!

A dinner to celebrate the awardees and the RSC symposium speakers was hosted by the Analyst and Analytical Methods Deputy Editor Maria Southall and RSC Analytical Division President and Analyst Editor-in-Chief Duncan Graham, an opportunity to interact with the Analyst and Analytical Methods Board members attending the conference.

 

Award winners, symposium speakers and Analyst and Analytical Methods Board members.

Award winners (L to R): Chris Easley, Christy Haynes and Karen Faulds. 

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Congratulations to Analyst Associate Editor, Jaebum Choo!

Analyst would like to offer congratulations to our Associate Editor, Jaebum Choo (Chung-Ang University), for his achievement winning the Taikyue Ree Academic Award, presented by the Korean Chemical Society.

Jaebum Choo is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Chung-Ang University. He obtained a PhD in Molecular Spectroscopy at Texas A&M University in 1994. From 1995-2019, he was a faculty member of Hanyang University. He was a Director of the “Center for Integrated Human Sensing System” (ERC, 2009-2013) and a BK21+ Director of Bionano Fusion Technology Program (2013-2019) supported by National Research Foundation of Korea. Professor Choo became a Baik Nam Distinguished Professor in 2015 due to his excellent academic achievements. His main research areas are SERS, biosensors, micro-devices and molecular spectroscopy. His current research programs are centered on the development of highly sensitive optical nano-sensor systems for rapid and sensitive in vitro diagnostics.Jaebum Choo

Please join us in offering our sincere congratulations to Jaebum!

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New themed collection on Optical Biosensor devices – open for submissions

We are very pleased to announce a new Analyst themed collection focusing on optical biosensor devices, guest edited by Associate Editor’s Ryan Bailey, Jaebum Choo, Laura Lechuga, Baohong Liu and Advisory Board member Chaoyong James Yang.

Optical biosensors have positioned themselves as one of the most successful branches of biosensor devices. The rapidly expanding of the field of optical biosensors has been possible thanks to the continuous progress is nanomaterials and nanostructures, new types of physical supports together with advanced biofunctionalization techniques, new receptors and demonstration of their applications for analyzing minimum-treated real samples, making them one of the most advanced and competitive sensing tool. The application scope of optical biosensors are wide-ranging and very diverse, including environmental, clinical, agriculture, veterinarian and security and rapidly expanding to diagnostics in resource-limited settings and personalised medicine.

The aim of this themed collection issue is to cover recent development of sensor devices combining with diverse optical detection methods. The issue will bring together the last developments in: innovative optical technologies at the transducer scheme, new nanomaterials and nanostructures, hybrid devices, improvement of sensitivity, miniaturization and multiplexing capabilities, microarray formats, sensors based on optofluidics, lab-on-chip and point-of-care platforms, new routes of biofunctionalization, single-molecule detection, covering the full spectrum of possible applications for optical biosensors.

We invite submissions of articles or reviews on topics across this theme.

Accepted articles will be collated into an online collection as soon as they are accepted and in the themed collection as a whole and will be promoted as a complete collection in Autumn/Winter 2020.

The submission deadline for this collection is 30th April 2020.

If you’re interested in submitting to the collection, please contact the Editorial Office.

We have compiled a collection of recent papers and reviews published in Analyst on this topic. Below is a selection of these articles. The rest can be read here and are available free to access* until 15th November.

A tri-site fluorescent probe for simultaneous sensing of hydrogen sulfide and glutathione and its bioimaging applications

Fengzao Chen, Deman Han*, Heng Liu, Shengfu Wang, Kai-Bin Li, Siqi Zhang and Wei Shia

 

Functionalized gold nanoparticle-enhanced competitive assay for sensitive small-molecule metabolite detection using surface plasmon resonance

Yong Cao, Bethany Griffith, Prasanna Bhomkar, David S. Wishart and Mark T. McDermott*

 

Recent advances in boronic acid-based optical chemosensors

Xin Wu, Xuan-Xuan Chen and Yun-Bao Jiang*

 

*Access is free through an RSC account (free to register)

 

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SCIX 2019

 

Are you going to be at SciX 2019? 

 

 

Analyst and the Royal Society of Chemistry are proud to announce that Professor Christy L. Haynes, (University of Minnesota, USA) is the winner of the RSC Theophilus Redwood Award. Professor Haynes will be giving an award plenary on the topic of Polymer-enabled Plasmonic Sensing at 08:00 am, Monday 14 October

Professor Christy Haynes

The Royal Society of Chemistry is also sponsoring a symposium in honour of Professor Christy Haynes (19AWD01) at 10:50 am, Monday 14 October. The symposium speakers are:

  • Julie Biteen, University of Michigan, USA
  • Vivian Ferry, University of Minnesota, USA
  • Tian (Autumn) Qiu, NIH, USA
  • Melissa Maurer-Jones, University of Minnesota Duluth, USA
  • Korin Wheeler, Santa Clara University, USA

Karen Faulds of the Analyst Advisory Board and Christopher J. Easley, Associate Editor of our sister journal Analytical Methods will be receiving prestigious awards at SciX 2019 and if you will be around, I encourage you to please attend their plenary lectures and award sessions.

  • Karen Faulds, will be receiving the Charles Mann Award for Raman Spectroscopy and will be giving a plenary lecture on Development of SERS and SESORRS for Multiplexed Bioanalysis at 8:00am on Tuesday 15 October, followed by a symposium in her honour at 9:15am (19AWD03).  

 

  • Chris Easley will be receiving the AES Electrophoresis Mid-Career Award and will be giving a plenary lecture on Digitizing Endocrine Tissue Secretions into Nanoliter Droplets for Analysis of Hormones and Metabolites at High Temporal Resolution at 8:30am on Wednesday 16 October, followed by a symposium in his honour at 9:15am (19AWD07).

Look out for our Royal Society of Chemistry booth, number 525, during the conference. Maria Southall, Deputy Editor, will be attending the conference and looks forward to meeting you at SciX 2019.


Read a recent paper by Christy L. Haynes and colleagues in our sister journal Environmental Science: Nano on Using an environmentally-relevant panel of Gram-negative bacteria to assess the toxicity of polyallylamine hydrochloride-wrapped gold nanoparticles

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Themed collection on Analytical Nanoscience – open for submissions

We are very pleased to announce a new Analyst themed collection focusing on analytical nanoscience, guest edited by Analyst Associate Editor Professor Jun-Jie Zhu (Nanjing University), Tim Albrecht (University of Birmingham), Karen Faulds (University of Strathclyde) and Russ Algar (University of British Columbia).

The theme includes, but is not necessarily limited to, the application of nanomaterials and nanotechnology to enable chemical and biological analysis, sensors, and imaging; methods for the fundamental characterization of nanomaterial structure and properties; bionanotechnology; detection or characterization of nanomaterials in the environment or biological matrices; and spectroscopies and imaging methods with nanoscale resolution.

Pictures of the collection Guest Editors, Jun-Jie Zhu, Tim Albrecht, Russ Algar, Karen Faulds

From left to right: Jun-Jie Zhu, Tim Albrecht, Russ Algar, Karen Faulds

We invite submissions of articles or reviews on topics across this broad theme.

Accepted articles will be collated in an online collection as soon as they are accepted and in the themed collection as a whole and will be promoted as a complete collection in Summer/Autumn 2020.

The submission deadline for this collection is 31st March 2020.

If you’re interested in submitting to the collection, please contact the Editorial Office.

We have compiled a collection of recent papers and reviews published in Analyst on this topic. Below is a selection of these articles – the rest can be read here and are available free to access* until 31st October 2019.

Fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) as convenient probes for metal ion detection in aqueous medium

Mukhtiar Ahmed,

 

Paper-based SERS analysis with smartphones as Raman spectral analyzers

Fanyu Zeng,  

 

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of microorganisms: limitations and applicability on the single-cell level

Ruben Weiss, 

 

Ligand density quantification on colloidal inorganic nanoparticles

Ashley M. Smith, 

 

Carbon dots as analytical tools for sensing of thioredoxin reductase and screening of cancer cells

Jagpreet Singh Sidhu, 

 

*Access is free through an RSC account (free to register)

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Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2020

Analyst is delighted to announce the third Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship is open for nominations.

The Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship is a platform for an early career analytical scientist to raise the profile of the analytical sciences to the wider scientific community and general public.

 

 

 

Lectureship details

  • The recipient will receive up to £2000 contribution towards travel and accommodation costs to attend and present a lecture based on their research at a leading international meeting.
  • Recipients will be invited to contribute a review to Analyst in the following year.

 

 

How to nominate

Self-nomination is not permitted.

Nominators must send the following to the editorial team (at analyst-rsc@rsc.org) by 29th February 2020:

  • A recommendation letter, including the name, contact details and website URL of the nominee.
  • A one-page CV for the nominee, including their date of birth, summary of education and career, a list of up to five of their top independent publications, total numbers of publications.
  • A one-page statement of achievement with a lay summary, written by the nominee describing their best accomplishments.
  • A supporting letter of recommendation from an independent referee. Ideally this should not be someone from the same institution or the nominee’s post doc or PhD supervisor.

The nominator and independent referee should comment on the candidate’s presenting skills.

Incomplete nominations or those not adhering to the above requirements will not be considered.

Particulars and selection criteria

  • To be eligible for the Lectureship, nominees typically will be within 10 years of completing their PhD, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path.
  • The editorial team will screen each nomination for eligibility and draw up a shortlist of candidates based on the nomination documents provided.
  • The recipient of the Lectureship will then be selected by the Analyst Editorial Board.

For any queries, please contact the editorial team at analyst-rsc@rsc.org.

Previous winners

2018 – Wei Min

2016 – Patrick L. Hayes

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Top 10 Most Accessed Analyst Articles – April – June 2019

The following Analyst articles from the last 12 months were the top 10 most read from April – June 2019.

All the articles have been made free to access for the next month. Take a look and let us know what you think, either here or on twitter @analystrsc.

 

Reviews

Review: a comprehensive summary of a decade development of the recombinase polymerase amplification

Jia Li, Joanne Macdonald and Felix von Stetten

Analyst, 2019,144, 31-67

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01621F

 

Advances in mass spectrometry based single-cell metabolomics

Kyle D. Duncan, Jonas Fyrestam and Ingela Lanekoff

Analyst, 2019,144, 782-793

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01581C

 

A review of sorting, separation and isolation of cells and microbeads for biomedical applications: microfluidic approaches

Arash Dalili, Ehsan Samiei and Mina Hoorfar

Analyst, 2019,144, 87-113

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01061G

 

Advances in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates for lipid and protein characterization: sensing and beyond

Ian Bruzas, William Lum, Zohre Gorunmez and Laura Sagle

Analyst, 2018,143, 3990-4008

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN00606G

 

Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) for classification of high-dimensional (HD) data: a review of contemporary practice strategies and knowledge gaps

Loong Chuen Lee, Choong-Yuen Liong and Abdul Aziz Jemain

Analyst, 2018,143, 3526-3539

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN00599K

 

Advancing single-cell proteomics and metabolomics with microfluidic technologies

Yifan Liu, Xuyue Chen, Yiqiu Zhang and Jian Liu

Analyst, 2019,144, 846-858

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01503A

 

Papers

Merging metabolomics and lipidomics into one analytical run

Michaela Schwaiger, Harald Schoeny, Yasin El Abiead, Gerrit Hermann, Evelyn Rampler, and Gunda Koellensperger

Analyst, 2019,144, 220-229

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01219A

 

Near-infrared fluorescent aza-BODIPY dyes for sensing and imaging of pH from the neutral to highly alkaline range

Christoph Staudinger, Johanna Breininger, Ingo Klimant and Sergey M. Borisov

Analyst, 2019,144, 2393-2402

DOI: 10.1039/C9AN00118B

 

A near-infrared fluorescent probe for evaluating endogenous hydrogen peroxide during ischemia/reperfusion injury

Runfeng Xu, Yue Wang, Huiyan You, Liangwei Zhang, Yunqing Wang and Lingxin Chen

Analyst, 2019,144, 2556-2564

DOI: 10.1039/C9AN00243J

 

Qualitative analysis of antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs): an experimental comparison of analytical techniques of cysteine-linked ADCs

Malin Källsten, Rafael Hartmann, Konstantin Artemenko, Sara Bergstrӧm Lind, Fredrik Lehmann and Jonas Bergquist

Analyst, 2018,143, 5487-5496

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01178H

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Professor Susan Lunte: New Analyst Editorial Board Member

We are very pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Susan Lunte to the Analyst Editorial Board!


Susan Lunte is the Ralph N. Adams Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Director of the Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry and Director of the NIH COBRE Centre for Molecular Analysis of Disease Pathways at the University of Kansas. Professor Lunte’s research interests lie in the development of new methodologies for separation and detection of peptides, amino acids, neurotransmitters and pharmaceuticals in biological fluids. This includes separation-based sensors for the continuous monitoring of drugs and neurotransmitters in freely roaming animals and new methodologies for the determination of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in cells. Of Analyst, Sue says “Analyst has been publishing papers on analytical chemistry and new technologies for over 140 years. Every new paper published in the journal continues the legacy that started in 1876. I am excited to be part of this tradition as an Editorial Board member.”

 

 


We welcome Professor Susan Lunte and her expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board.


Sue has chosen to highlight some excellent articles recently published in Analyst, and included some of her thoughts on them. We hope you enjoy reading these articles – we’ve made them free to access for a limited time with an RSC publishing account.

 

Critical review

Microfluidic methods for aptamer selection and characterization

Sean K. Dembowski and Michael T. Bowser

“Detailed review of recent progress using microfluidics for aptamer selection”

 

Paper

Detection of sepsis in patient blood samples using CD64 expression in a microfluidic cell separation device

Ye Zhang, Dimitri Pappas, et al.

“Sepsis is an important medical problem with no good methods of early detection. The paper by Dimitri Pappas describes an interesting possible clinical assay using on chip capture of CD64+ cells that is evaluated using clinical samples.”

 

Paper

Trapping of Au nanoparticles in a microfluidic device using dielectrophoresis for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

Gabriela B. Almeida, Ronei J. Poppi and José A. Fracassi da Silva

“Elegant demonstration of using insulating dielectrophoresis for enhancing detection of analytes using SERS”


You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Professor Junjie Zhu and Professor Baohong Liu: New Analyst Associate Editors

We are delighted to welcome our new Associate Editors Professor Junjie Zhu and Professor Baohong Liu to the Analyst Editorial Board!



Professor Zhu is a professor at School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Nanjing University. He is looking forward to receiving your submissions on electroanalytical chemistry, in vivo analysis, analytical nanoscience and bioanalytical sensors.

Professor Liu is a professor at the Department of Chemistry and Institute of Biomedical Sciences at Fudan University. She is looking forward to receiving your submissions on analytical nanoscience, bioanalytical sensors, electroanalytical chemistry, microfluidics and miniaturized devices, mass spectrometry and surface chemistry.

Both are very happy to join the editorial team of Analyst, they are looking forward to read your excellent work in the journal.”


Please join us in welcoming Professor Zhu and Professor Liu and do submit your best work to their editorial office.

Submit your article today!


Professor Liu and Professor Zhu have highlighted these exceptional articles recently published in Analyst. We hope you enjoy reading all these articles listed here!

Minireviews
Single plasmonic nanoparticles as ultrasensitive sensors
Tao Xie, Chao Jing and Yi-Tao Long

Gas-generating reactions for point-of-care testing
Liu Yang, Chaoyong Yang et al.

Critical Reviews
Recent advances in microRNA detection
Yongqiang Cheng, Zhengping Li et al.

DNA tetrahedron nanostructures for biological applications: biosensors and drug delivery
Jin Huang, Kemin Wang et al.

Graphene-based aptasensors: from molecule-interface interactions to sensor design and biomedical diagnostics
Li Wang, Aiguo Wu and Gang Wei

Paper
A two-photon fluorescent probe for nitroreductase imaging in living  cells, tissues and zebrafish under hypoxia conditions
Baoping Zhai, Zhihong Liu et al.


You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Professor Nicole Pamme: New Analyst Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Nicole Pamme as Associate Editor to the Analyst Editorial Board.


Nicole Pamme is a Professor in Analytical Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Hull. Her research activities focus on lab-on-a-chip devices for pharmaceutical, clinical and environmental analysis, biomedical research with tissue-on-a-chip devices as well as process integration and material synthesis in collaboration with Chemistry, Engineering and Biomedical Sciences. She has authored >100 peer reviewed publications, patents and book chapters in this area. Nicole studied Chemisty at University of Marburg (Germany), graduating with the title of Diplom-Chemiker, with a thesis on analytical chemistry for explosives residues in water and soil. For her PhD studies, she moved to Imperial College London (UK) where she worked under the supervision of Prof. Andreas Manz in ‘Single Particle Analysis in Microfluidic Chips’. This was followed by a 2 year stay as Independent Research Fellow in the International Centre of Young Scientists (ICYS) at the National Institute for Materials (NIMS) Sciences in Tsukuba (Japan). In December 2005, she was appointed as Lecturer in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Hull in the UK and has been promoted to Senior Lecturer (2011) and Reader (2013) and finally full professor in 2014. Nicole chaired the microTAS 2016 conference in Dublin (Ireland) and serves on the Board of Directors of the Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society (CBMS), currently as Vice President. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC) and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA).

 


We welcome Professor Nicole Pamme and her expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board as an Associate Editor.

Submit your article to Professor Nicole Pamme today!


Nicole has highlighted these exceptional articles recently published in Analyst, including her thoughts on the impact they are having on the community. We hope you enjoy reading all these articles listed here! 

Ambient-air ozonolysis of triglycerides in aged fingerprint residues
Stephanie Pleik, Dieter Kirsch et al.

Dual purpose fibre – SERS pH sensing and bacterial analysis: Paper microfluidics for in vivo analysis and sample taking – a research team from Edinburgh used wax patterning of filter paper to control nanoparticle deposition required for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The small filter patches are attached to an optical fibre, that is ‘bronchoscope-deployable’, and can carry out not only in vivo sensing, but also capture a sample at a desire location for downstream bacterial analysis.”

Electrochemical Hg2+ detection at tannic acid-gold nanoparticle modified electrodes by square wave voltammetry
Alex L. Suherman, Richard G. Compton et al.

“Environmental analysis of heavy metal pollution at fM levels – The Compton Group in Oxford have developed an electrochemical method that allows sensitive and specific analysis of mercury pollution in drinking water, at levels well below the WHO limits.” 

SABRE hyperpolarization enables high-sensitivity 1H and 13C benchtop NMR spectroscopy
Peter M. Richardson, Simon B. Duckett, Meghan E. Halse et al.

“Benchtop NMR with high sensitivity – A team from the Universities of York and Strathclyde demonstrated how para-hydrogen (p-H2) based signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) can be used to enhance the sensitivity of benchtop NMR measurements by factors of tens of thousands, enabling 2D NMR measurements.”

Tandem fluorescence and Raman (fluoRaman) characterisation of a novel photosensitiser in colorectal cancer cell line SW480
Julia Gala de Pablo, Andrew Whiting, Stephen D. Evans et al.

“Cell imaging with multi-purpose markers – A team from the University of Leeds has synthesised a photosensitizer that is fluorescent and exhibits a strong Raman signal. This allows for imaging of cancer cells with two spectroscopic techniques and may also enable external stimulation via light to alter cell activity.”


You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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