Archive for the ‘Board News’ Category

Professor Susan Lunte: New Analyst Editorial Board Member

We are very pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Susan Lunte to the Analyst Editorial Board!


Susan Lunte is the Ralph N. Adams Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Director of the Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry and Director of the NIH COBRE Centre for Molecular Analysis of Disease Pathways at the University of Kansas. Professor Lunte’s research interests lie in the development of new methodologies for separation and detection of peptides, amino acids, neurotransmitters and pharmaceuticals in biological fluids. This includes separation-based sensors for the continuous monitoring of drugs and neurotransmitters in freely roaming animals and new methodologies for the determination of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in cells. Of Analyst, Sue says “Analyst has been publishing papers on analytical chemistry and new technologies for over 140 years. Every new paper published in the journal continues the legacy that started in 1876. I am excited to be part of this tradition as an Editorial Board member.”

 

 


We welcome Professor Susan Lunte and her expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board.


Sue has chosen to highlight some excellent articles recently published in Analyst, and included some of her thoughts on them. We hope you enjoy reading these articles – we’ve made them free to access for a limited time with an RSC publishing account.

 

Critical review

Microfluidic methods for aptamer selection and characterization

Sean K. Dembowski and Michael T. Bowser

“Detailed review of recent progress using microfluidics for aptamer selection”

 

Paper

Detection of sepsis in patient blood samples using CD64 expression in a microfluidic cell separation device

Ye Zhang, Dimitri Pappas, et al.

“Sepsis is an important medical problem with no good methods of early detection. The paper by Dimitri Pappas describes an interesting possible clinical assay using on chip capture of CD64+ cells that is evaluated using clinical samples.”

 

Paper

Trapping of Au nanoparticles in a microfluidic device using dielectrophoresis for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

Gabriela B. Almeida, Ronei J. Poppi and José A. Fracassi da Silva

“Elegant demonstration of using insulating dielectrophoresis for enhancing detection of analytes using SERS”


You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Professor Junjie Zhu and Professor Baohong Liu: New Analyst Associate Editors

We are delighted to welcome our new Associate Editors Professor Junjie Zhu and Professor Baohong Liu to the Analyst Editorial Board!



Professor Zhu is a professor at School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Nanjing University. He is looking forward to receiving your submissions on electroanalytical chemistry, in vivo analysis, analytical nanoscience and bioanalytical sensors.

Professor Liu is a professor at the Department of Chemistry and Institute of Biomedical Sciences at Fudan University. She is looking forward to receiving your submissions on analytical nanoscience, bioanalytical sensors, electroanalytical chemistry, microfluidics and miniaturized devices, mass spectrometry and surface chemistry.

Both are very happy to join the editorial team of Analyst, they are looking forward to read your excellent work in the journal.”


Please join us in welcoming Professor Zhu and Professor Liu and do submit your best work to their editorial office.

Submit your article today!


Professor Liu and Professor Zhu have highlighted these exceptional articles recently published in Analyst. We hope you enjoy reading all these articles listed here!

Minireviews
Single plasmonic nanoparticles as ultrasensitive sensors
Tao Xie, Chao Jing and Yi-Tao Long

Gas-generating reactions for point-of-care testing
Liu Yang, Chaoyong Yang et al.

Critical Reviews
Recent advances in microRNA detection
Yongqiang Cheng, Zhengping Li et al.

DNA tetrahedron nanostructures for biological applications: biosensors and drug delivery
Jin Huang, Kemin Wang et al.

Graphene-based aptasensors: from molecule-interface interactions to sensor design and biomedical diagnostics
Li Wang, Aiguo Wu and Gang Wei

Paper
A two-photon fluorescent probe for nitroreductase imaging in living  cells, tissues and zebrafish under hypoxia conditions
Baoping Zhai, Zhihong Liu et al.


You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Professor Nicole Pamme: New Analyst Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Nicole Pamme as Associate Editor to the Analyst Editorial Board.


Nicole Pamme is a Professor in Analytical Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Hull. Her research activities focus on lab-on-a-chip devices for pharmaceutical, clinical and environmental analysis, biomedical research with tissue-on-a-chip devices as well as process integration and material synthesis in collaboration with Chemistry, Engineering and Biomedical Sciences. She has authored >100 peer reviewed publications, patents and book chapters in this area. Nicole studied Chemisty at University of Marburg (Germany), graduating with the title of Diplom-Chemiker, with a thesis on analytical chemistry for explosives residues in water and soil. For her PhD studies, she moved to Imperial College London (UK) where she worked under the supervision of Prof. Andreas Manz in ‘Single Particle Analysis in Microfluidic Chips’. This was followed by a 2 year stay as Independent Research Fellow in the International Centre of Young Scientists (ICYS) at the National Institute for Materials (NIMS) Sciences in Tsukuba (Japan). In December 2005, she was appointed as Lecturer in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Hull in the UK and has been promoted to Senior Lecturer (2011) and Reader (2013) and finally full professor in 2014. Nicole chaired the microTAS 2016 conference in Dublin (Ireland) and serves on the Board of Directors of the Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society (CBMS), currently as Vice President. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC) and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA).

 


We welcome Professor Nicole Pamme and her expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board as an Associate Editor.

Submit your article to Professor Nicole Pamme today!


Nicole has highlighted these exceptional articles recently published in Analyst, including her thoughts on the impact they are having on the community. We hope you enjoy reading all these articles listed here! 

Ambient-air ozonolysis of triglycerides in aged fingerprint residues
Stephanie Pleik, Dieter Kirsch et al.

Dual purpose fibre – SERS pH sensing and bacterial analysis: Paper microfluidics for in vivo analysis and sample taking – a research team from Edinburgh used wax patterning of filter paper to control nanoparticle deposition required for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The small filter patches are attached to an optical fibre, that is ‘bronchoscope-deployable’, and can carry out not only in vivo sensing, but also capture a sample at a desire location for downstream bacterial analysis.”

Electrochemical Hg2+ detection at tannic acid-gold nanoparticle modified electrodes by square wave voltammetry
Alex L. Suherman, Richard G. Compton et al.

“Environmental analysis of heavy metal pollution at fM levels – The Compton Group in Oxford have developed an electrochemical method that allows sensitive and specific analysis of mercury pollution in drinking water, at levels well below the WHO limits.” 

SABRE hyperpolarization enables high-sensitivity 1H and 13C benchtop NMR spectroscopy
Peter M. Richardson, Simon B. Duckett, Meghan E. Halse et al.

“Benchtop NMR with high sensitivity – A team from the Universities of York and Strathclyde demonstrated how para-hydrogen (p-H2) based signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) can be used to enhance the sensitivity of benchtop NMR measurements by factors of tens of thousands, enabling 2D NMR measurements.”

Tandem fluorescence and Raman (fluoRaman) characterisation of a novel photosensitiser in colorectal cancer cell line SW480
Julia Gala de Pablo, Andrew Whiting, Stephen D. Evans et al.

“Cell imaging with multi-purpose markers – A team from the University of Leeds has synthesised a photosensitizer that is fluorescent and exhibits a strong Raman signal. This allows for imaging of cancer cells with two spectroscopic techniques and may also enable external stimulation via light to alter cell activity.”


You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Professor Laura Lechuga: New Analyst Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Laura Lechuga as Associate Editor to the Analyst Editorial Board. Laura will start as an Analyst Associate Editor on the 1st July 2018.

 


Laura Lechuga is the CSIC Research Professor at the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Spain. She is the leader of the ICN2 Nanobiosensors and Bioanalytical Applications Group, which focusses on the technological development of nanophotonic biosensors, their integration into portable lab-on-a-chip platforms and their application in clinical and environmental diagnostics.

Professor Lechuga gained her PhD in chemistry in 1992 from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Between 2012 and 2015 she was an adjunct professor at the University of Norway within their department of Physics and Technology at the Artic. She has also been a distinguished visiting professor at the School of Electrical and Computer Sciences of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil) since 2013.


We welcome Professor Lechuga and her expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board as an Associate Editor. Submit your articles to Professor Lechuga from the 1st of July 2018!


You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Professor Jaebum Choo: New Analyst Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Jaebum Choo as Associate Editor to the Analyst Editorial Board.


Jaebum Choo is a Professor in the Department of Bionano Technology at Hanyang University. He obtained his PhD in Molecular Spectroscopy at Texas A&M University in 1994 and then, in 1995,  joined as a faculty member of Hanyang University. Jaebum has been the Director of “Center for Integrated Human Sensing System” (ERC supported by National Research Foundation of Korea, 2009-2013)and a President of Korean Biochip Society in 2015.

He is currently a BK21+ Director of Bionano Fusion Technology Program supported by National Research Foundation of Korea. His main research areas are SERS, biosensors, micro-devices and molecular spectroscopy. His current research programs are centered on the development of highly sensitive optical nano-sensor systems for rapid and sensitive in vitro diagnostics. He has given more than 130 invited lectures in the USA, Europe and Asia, and has published over 240 research papers in peer-reviewed journals and 5 book chapters. Professor Choo was appointed as a Baik Nam Distinguished Professor in 2015 due to his excellent academic achievements.


We welcome Professor Jaebum Choo and his expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board as an Associate Editor. Submit your article to Professor Jaebum Choo today!


Read some of Professor Choo’s latest research published in Analyst:

Analysis of ribonuclease activity in sub-nanoliter droplets by label-free fluorescence measurements

Choi, J.-W., Vasamsetti, B.M.K., Kim, K.-W., Seo, S.H., Lee, D.-H., Chang, S.-I., Choo, J., Kim, H.Y.

Raman spectrum identification based on the correlation score using the weighted segmental hit quality index

Park, J.-K., Park, A., Yang, S.K., Baek, S.-J., Hwang, J., Choo, J.

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Professor Damien Arrigan: New Analyst Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Professor Damien Arrigan as Associate Editor to the Analyst Editorial Board.


Damien Arrigan is a Professor of Analytical Chemistry at Curtin University, Perth, Australia. He studied as an undergraduate at Dublin City University and, after a two-year career in industrial biotechnology, undertook his PhD (1992) at the National University of Ireland, Cork, on electroanalysis with chemically modified electrodes.

Following postdoctoral positions at the National Microelectronics Research Centre (Cork) and the University of Southampton, he was a lecturer in analytical chemistry at University of Salford. In 2001 he relocated to Tyndall National Institute, Cork, where he started to combine miniaturisation tools with electrochemistry for detection purposes and in 2009 he moved to Curtin University.

Damien’s research interests encompass analytical chemistry and its boundaries with electrochemistry, especially the development of new sensing and detection methods and devices. Recent emphasis has been on exploration of the analytical opportunities afforded by electrochemistry at liquid-liquid (oil-water) interfaces, especially by miniaturisation of these interfaces for chemical and biochemical sensing. Current interests include nanopores and nanoscale electrochemistry, behaviour and detection of biological macromolecules and disease biomarkers, and the development of sensors to enhance water re-use technologies. You can find out more about Damien’s research on his homepage.


We welcome Professor Damien Arrigan and his expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board as an Associate Editor. Submit your article to Professor Damien Arrigan today!


Read some of Professor Arrigan’s latest research published in Analyst:

Electrochemical behaviour at a liquid-organogel microinterface array of fucoidan extracted from algae

Felisilda, B.M.B, Alvarez De Eulate, E., Stringer, D.N., Fitton, J.H. and Arrigan, D.W.M.

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Nanopipette probes cells without killing them

A research team from Japan has developed a method for sampling tiny amounts of fluid from single cells without killing them. They hope their technique will allow scientists to better study cellular mechanisms from differentiation to cancer formation.

Advances in analytical detection methods enable processing and detection of analytes, even individual molecules, from single cell samples. But before chemical analysis can take place, a sample must be extracted from the cell – a procedure the cell usually doesn’t survive.

Takehiko Kitamori’s team from the University of Tokyo now managed to form a 100nm-wide hole in a human cell membrane and connect this hole to a tiny pipette to extract a sample – all while keeping the cell alive. Instead of piercing the cell by force, they coated their nanopipette with a lipid bilayer, the same material the cell membrane is made out of, which causes the two to fuse.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Micro/extended-nano sampling interface from a living single cell
L. Lin, K. Mawatari, K. Morikawa, Y. Pihosh, A. Yoshizaki and T. Kitamori
Analyst, 2017, 142, 1689-1696
DOI: 10.1039/C7AN00220C, Paper

This paper is free to access until 16th June

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Professor Ryan C. Bailey: New Analyst Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Professor Ryan C. Bailey as Associate Editor to the Analyst Editorial Board.


Ryan C. Bailey received his PhD from Northwestern University in 2004 and then was a joint Post-doctoral Fellow at Caltech and the Institute for Systems Biology. He joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2006, with affiliate appointments in the Department of Bioengineering, Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, and Institute for Genomic Biology.

In 2016, Professor Bailey was appointed as the Robert A. Gregg Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Michigan. Professor Bailey’s research generally focuses on the development of new microscale analytical methods for detecting biomarkers and characterizing (bio)molecular interactions with applications in personalized clinical diagnostics and fundamental biochemistry/biophysics. To this end, his group has developed chip-integrated optical detection methods and microfluidic approaches that are being applied to translational transcriptomic, proteomic, and epigenomic analyses.

Professor Bailey has received various awards, including the Pittcon Achievement Award (2015), Arthur F. Findeis Award for Achievements by a Young Analytical Scientist (2013), and a NIH Director’s New Innovator Award (2007), and was named to the TR35: 35 Top Innovators under 35 list by Technology Review in 2012.


We welcome Professor Ryan C. Bailey and his expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board as Associate Editor alongside Takehiko Kitamori, Lanqun Mao, Jean-Francois Masson, Boris Mizaikoff, Steven Soper and Evan Williams. Submit your article to Professor Ryan C. Bailey today!

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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What we do in the shadows…

What goes up, must come down...

We are all passionate scientists, but we all have a “dark” side. I know for example that Professor Pat Unwin at Warwick University is an accomplished musician, likewise, Professor Dermot Diamond at Dublin City University. And myself? I run. I run trail races. I run ultra trail races.

What’s the meaning of “ultra”? Well, anything beyond a marathon: 45k… 50k… 70k… 100k… 160k… and beyond! I just ran across the beautiful island of Corsica – 5 days, a whopping 185k, 12,000m of altitude up and all the way down again. Tough? Yes… but doable! Admittedly, you go through 10 “runners highs” and 25+ “runners lows”. But in the end – doable! And after that adventure, I asked myself, how different are profession and passion actually? Maybe we should explore this a little further…

Let’s consider an example – writing an EU proposal or an ERC grant? Tough? Yes… but doable! And honestly, there are at least 10 “proposal highs” and 25+ “proposal lows” you go through. So, how different are profession and passion? Let’s see by comparing writing a major proposal versus preparing for an ultra trail race!

1. It’s all about preparation A clear “yes” for both!

2. You need to focusTrue, relevant in both cases!

3. Preliminary results are important –  It’s all about knowing what you are up to… tick the box for both!

4. Step outside your comfort zone –  No new achievements without breaking new ground. Ticked!

5. Physical and mental fitness –  A prerequisite, right?

6. You never know whether you will be successful, unless you try –  Guess we agree! Ticked!

7. If you fail, try again, fail better –  Ticked for both!

8. Never give up –  Who would ever do that?

After all, not so different right? Seems there is a lot of analogy between preparing a proposal and preparing for an ultra trail race! Whether you are a musician, an ultra trail runner, a scientist or an interdisciplinary combination, if you do it with passion, it may be tough, but it is doable!


See you on the next (ultra) trail! And don’t forget 9. Any step is a step closer to the finish line 😉 Cheers, Boris



More stories on Europe’s toughest trek: Corsica GR20 can be found here


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New technology may spell the end of having to discard liquids from hand luggage before boarding a plane

An image of the Cobalt Light Systems team

The Cobalt Light Systems team, from left to right: Pavel Matousek, Chief Scientific Officer; Guy Maskall, Data Scientist; Stuart Bonthron, VP Product Development; Craig Tombling, Chief Operating Officer; Paul Loeffen, Chief Executive Officer.(Credit: Cobalt Light Systems)

Analyst Editorial Board Member Professor Pavel Matousek at the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) Central Laser Facility explains, “The technology works using the technique of Raman spectroscopy. When combined with advanced algorithms to distinguish between the container and its contents, the technology is able to identify the chemical composition in seconds, and with greater reliability than any other existing system.”

The equipment developed by the Cobalt Light Systems team characterises the contents inside non-metallic containers, protecting travellers by screening for liquid explosives and has been shortlisted to win the UK’s premier engineering prize, the MacRobert Award.

To read more about this story and the MacRobert Award 2014 head over to the Science & Technology Facilities Council website.

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