Hot Articles on materials for a molecular switch, doping and ferroelectrics, and the visual detection of pathogens

Graphical abstract: Gold nanocluster-based light-controlled fluorescence molecular switchGold nanocluster-based light-controlled fluorescence molecular switch. A light-controlled fluorescence molecular switch has been created by a team of Chinese scientists. The molecular switch is made from Au nanoclusters and thiolated spiropyran dyes. The fluorescence can be reversibly modulated using UV/Visible light due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer from the Au nanoclusters to the open-ring state merocyanine of the spiropyran molecules. The team say the switch could potentially be used for biological imaging and labeling, as well as in other fields such as reversible data storage and erasing. J. Mater. Chem., 2011, DOI:10.1039/C0JM04146G (Advance Article)

Graphical abstract: Ferroelectric, electrical, and structural properties of Dy and Sc co-doped BaTiO3Ferroelectric, electrical, and structural properties of Dy and Sc co-doped BaTiO3. Ferroelectric barium titanate is a perovskite used in many electronic devices, including high permittivity multilayer ceramic capacitors. In an effort to improve the properties of this material, scientists at the University of Sheffield investigated the influence of Dy and Sc co-doping on the ferroelectric, electrical and structural properties of BaTiO3. The team prepared Ba1−xDyxTi1−xScxO3 ceramics with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.075 and investigated the effect on phase transitions and ferroelectric properties. J. Mater. Chem., 2011, DOI:10.1039/C0JM04429F (Advance Article)

Graphical abstract: Visual optical discrimination and detection of microbial pathogens based on diverse interactions of conjugated polyelectrolytes with cellsVisual optical discrimination and detection of microbial pathogens based on diverse interactions of conjugated polyelectrolytes with cells. A method to rapidly identify fungi and bacteria using a blend of two cationic conjugated polymers has been developed by Qiong Yang, Shu Wang and coworkers at the Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. The team say that their approach could eventually have applications in medical, forensic, and environmental sciences. J. Mater. Chem., 2011, Advance Article DOI:10.1039/C0JM04424E

News in Materials Chemistry from Journal of Materials Chemistry

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Leave a Reply