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Stopping endocrine disruptors in their tracks

The endocrine system

The endocrine system

US scientists have come up with a system to assess whether chemists’ latest synthetic product is an endocrine disruptor – a chemical that interferes with hormone regulation in animals and humans.

As industry seeks replacements for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as bisphenol A and some flame retardants, it often discovers that the replacements are no better, and sometimes worse, than what is being replaced. This is because the replacements have been designed using the same flawed tools as their parent chemicals and because of the lack of adequate EDC testing, say the scientists. Now, a team led by Pete Myers, chief executive and chief scientist at Environmental Health Sciences, Virginia, has come up with a way to address this using a system they call TiPED (tiered protocol for endocrine disruption).

Read the full article in Chemistry World!

Tweet: RT @ChemistryWorld Stopping endocrine disruptors in their tracks http://rsc.li/TUxb2q 

Link to journal article
Designing endocrine disruption out of the next generation of chemicals
T. T. Schug,  R. Abagyan, B. Blumberg, T. J. Collins, D. Crews, P. L. DeFur, S. M. Dickerson, T. M. Edwards, A. C. Gore, L. J. Guillette, T. Hayes, J. J. Heindel, A. Moores, H. B. Patisaul, T. L. Tal, K. A. Thayer, L. N. Vandenberg, J. C. Warner, C. S. Watson, F. S. vom Saal, R. T. Zoeller, K. P. O’Brien and J. P. Myers
Green Chem., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35055F

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Issue 12 of Green Chemistry now published online

The last issue of 2012 of Green Chemistry is now published online.

Green Chemistry issue 12, 2012, front coverThe front cover of this months’ issue features work by Amit Naskar and colleagues from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA, who report the development of lignin-based thermoplastics.  Lignin is one of the most abundant natural polymers, and represents an valuable renewable resource.  Previous work into applications of this material found that it could be combined with flexible polymers to produce a variety of co-polymer materials.  However, these materials tended to be thermoset plastics and brittle materials and therefore are barely recyclable.  Here the team managed to create lignin-based co-polymer thermoplastics, which would be recyclable and potentially biodegradable as well.

Turning renewable resources into value-added polymer: development of lignin-based thermoplastic, Tomonori Saito, Rebecca H. Brown, Marcus A. Hunt, Deanna L. Pickel, Joseph M. Pickel, Jamie M. Messman, Frederick S. Baker, Martin Keller and Amit K. Naskar, Green Chem., 2012, 14, 3295-3303

The inside front cover highlights work by Yu Fan, Xiaojun Bao and colleagues from the China University of Petroleum (China) and the University of British Columbia (Canada) who report the synthesis of zeolite Y from natural aluminosilicate minerals for application in fluid catalytic cracking.  Modern industrial synthesis of zeolite Y involves chemicals that are derived from natural bauxite, but this requires an huge amount of energy and generates a lot of waste.  Here, zeolite Y could be synthesised directly from natural aluminosilicate minerals, avoiding the need of additional inorganic chemicals and relying instead on natural raw materials.  The resulting zeolite exhibited outstanding catalytic cracking performance.

Synthesis of zeolite Y from natural aluminosilicate minerals for fluid catalytic cracking application, Tiesen Li, Haiyan Liu, Yu Fan, Pei Yuan, Gang Shi, Xiaotao T. Bi and Xiaojun Bao, Green Chem., 2012, 14, 3255-3259

Read these articles for free for 6 weeks!

Stay up-to-date with the latest news and content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Meet our Authors: François Jérôme

Picture of François JérômeFrançois Jérôme is a research director at the CNRS University of Poitiers, France.  His research is focused on the catalytic activation of biomass and the subsequent conversion of the products to value-added chemicals.  François took a few moments to chat to Green Chemistry to talk about the challenges facing this field of research…

Who or what initially inspired you to become a chemist?

When I was a kid, I was very curious and I always wanted to have a rational explanation on many natural phenomena such as volcanoes, earthquakes, storms, space, etc… Later, when I entered the University, I had the chance to attend the courses of Prof. Pierre Dixneuf. During three consecutive years, he taught me with enthusiasm and passion catalysis and organometallic chemistry. His courses really gave me the taste of chemistry.

What has been the motivation behind your recent research?

The depletion of fossil carbon reserves together with the continuous increase of the barrel price requires the society to imagine and design new and innovative strategies. In this context, fascinating works have recently been proposed that now open new fields to be explored in chemistry. In particular, the synthesis of fine chemicals and chemical platforms from non-edible resources has become a fascinating topic. Beside the green aspect of this approach, the biggest challenge faced by chemists consists in designing bio-based chemicals with superior performances than fossil-derived chemicals while respecting the essential requirements of economic competitiveness and social progress. The concept of green chemistry has dramatically changed the way we work and driven us to think about chemistry differently. In particular, the design of an atom economical or energy-saving process is not self-satisfied anymore and major other issues of green chemistry need to be addressed such as supply of renewable raw materials, structural variability of biomass, which plants for which markets, biodiversity, resource management (water, metal, carbon) and environmental impact of processes. All of these considerations are really motivating mainly because the successful design of a “green process” obviously requires close collaborations between researchers with different scientific horizons.

What do you see as the main challenges facing research in this area?

Click here to read the full interview

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Top ten most accessed articles in September

This month sees the following articles in Green Chemistry that are in the top ten most accessed:-

A simple and efficient approach for the palladium-catalyzed ligand-free Suzuki reaction in water 
Chun Liu, Yixia Zhang, Ning Liu and Jieshan Qiu  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2999-3003 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc36098e 

Multicomponent reactions in unconventional solvents: state of the art 
Yanlong Gu  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2091-2128 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc35635j 

Transition metal-free, NaOtBu-O2-mediated one-pot cascade oxidation of allylic alcohols to α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids 
Sun Min Kim, Young Sug Kim, Dong Wan Kim and Jung Woon Yang  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2996-2998 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc36203a 

Low melting mixtures in organic synthesis – an alternative to ionic liquids? 
Carolin Ruß and Burkhard König  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2969-2982 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc36005e 

A convenient guide to help select replacement solvents for dichloromethane in chromatography 
Joshua P. Taygerly,  Larry M. Miller,  Alicia Yee and Emily A. Peterson  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 3020-3025 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc36064k 

Gold nanoparticles stabilized on nanocrystalline magnesium oxide as an active catalyst for reduction of nitroarenes in aqueous medium at room temperature 
Keya Layek, M. Lakshmi Kantam,  Masayuki Shirai, Daisuke Nishio-Hamane, Takehiko Sasaki and H. Maheswaran  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 3164-3174 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc35917k 

Highly atom-economic, catalyst- and solvent-free oxidation of sulfides into sulfones using 30% aqueous H2O2 
Marjan Jereb  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 3047-3052 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc36073j 

A one-pot approach for conversion of fructose to 2,5-diformylfuran by combination of Fe3O4-SBA-SO3H and K-OMS-2 
Yao Fu  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2986-2989 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc35947b 

What’s new with CO2? Recent advances in its copolymerization with oxiranes 
Donald J. Darensbourg and Stephanie J. Wilson  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2665-2671 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc35928f 

Transfer hydrogenation of ketones by ceria-supported Ni catalysts 
Katsuya Shimura and Ken-ichi Shimizu  
Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2983-2985 
DOI: 10.1039/c2gc35836k 

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Green Chemistry? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us with your suggestions.

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Issue 11 of Green Chemistry now online

The latest issue of Green Chemistry is now available to read online!

Green Chemistry, issue 11, 2012, front coverThe front cover of issue 11 of Green Chemistry features work my Pedro Lozano and colleagues from the University of Murcia, Spain, who report a clean bio-catalytic route to flavour esters.  The team used switchable ionic liquid/solid phases as the reaction/separation media to achieve this, whereby a fully homogeneous liquid phase could be achieved at 50 °C and a solid-phase system could be created at room temperature.  This allows the enzyme to function in the ionic liquid at temperatures compatible for enzyme catalysis, in this case giving almost 100% yields of flavour esters at 50 °C.  By cooling and subsequent centrifugation, the liquid, almost pure, reaction product could be easily separated off leaving the biocatalyst/ionic liquid system in place which can then be reused for multiple cycles.

A clean enzymatic process for producing flavour esters by direct esterification in switchable ionic liquid/solid phases, Pedro Lozano,  Juana M. Bernal and Alicia Navarro, Green Chem., 2012, 14, 3026-3033

The inside front cover of the issue features work by Joshua Taygerly, Emily Peterson and colleagues from Amgen Inc. and Northeastern University, USA, who have developed a guide which aims to help synthetic chemists find suitable and more environmentally friendly alternatives to a DCM-solvent system for chromatographic purification of compounds.  The authors selected several ‘drug-like’ molecules which reflected the types of molecules regularly prepared and purified, tested several alternative solvent systems to DCM.  From the results, they assembled a figure which allows the scientist to find the potentially equivalent, alternative system(s).  The primary use of this guide is to provide chemists with a quickly identifiable starting point for selecting alternative solvent systems to DCM.

A convenient guide to help select replacement solvents for dichloromethane in chromatography, Joshua P. Taygerly, Larry M. Miller, Alicia Yee and Emily A. Peterson, Green Chem., 2012, 14, 3020-3025

These articles are free to access for 6 weeks!

You can also read Pedro Lozano’s recent interview with Green Chemistry here.

Stay up-to-date with the latest news and content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Professor Joan Brennecke elected to the National Academy of Engineering

Joan Brennecke receiving her certificate of membership to the National Acadamy of EngineeringGreen Chemistry Advisory Board member Joan Brennecke, the Keating-Crawford Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, USA, has been elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering.  This honour has been awarded “for innovation in the use of ionic liquids and supercritical fluids for environmentally benign chemical processing.” 

Election to the National Academy of Engineering is one of the highest professional distinctions that can be awarded to an engineer.  An Academy membership honours those who have made outstanding contributions to engineering research, practice or education.

Green Chemistry would like to extend our warmest congratulations to Professor Brennecke on this achievement.

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From Waste to Wealth Using Green Chemistry

On Thursday the 27th September, Professor James Clark from the University of York, UK, gave a public lecture at The Chemistry Centre in London on “From Waste to Wealth using Green Chemistry“.

The world today faces the fundamental issues of increasing waste but decreasing resources as it tries to cope with the ever increasing consumption of a growing population.  Many of the raw resources and elements needed for the manufacture of important products used everyday are now running out.  For example, in our search for ‘carbon-free’ products we have then created additional problems by significantly depleting the world’s resource of other elements, such as germanium.  James Clark answering questions after his talk at The Chemistry CentreWe generate so much waste, but what do we do with it?  How can we deal with our waste more efficiently?

The only way these problems can be met and dealt with is through a fundamentally different approach to the way we consume resources.  Professor Clark’s lecture shows how by considering our waste as an opportunity rather than a problem, we can fully move towards a truly sustainable resource consumption model and give our children some hope for the future.

The event, sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline, was strongly attended by an audience of 100 people from a broad range of different backgrounds.  The event generated lots of questions and some lively debates which continued long after the lecture had ended. 

Missed the lecture?  You can watch Professor Clark’s lecture in full on The Reaction website!

Professor Clark is the founding Editor of Green Chemistry and is also one of the Editors of the RSC Green Chemistry Book Series – find out more here.

You may also be interested in a few of Professor Clark’s recent Green Chemistry articles – free to access until the 9th November 2012:

Preparation and characterisation of bioplastics made from cottonseed protein, H.-B. Yue, Y.-D. Cui, P. S. Shuttleworth and James H. Clark, Green Chem., 2012, 14, 2009-2016

Thermosetting resin based on epoxidised linseed oil and bio-derived crosslinker, Nontipa Supanchaiyamat, Peter S. Shuttleworth, Andrew J. Hunt, James H. Clark and Avtar S. Matharu, Green Chem., 2012, 14, 1759-1765

A quantitative comparison between conventional and bio-derived solvents from citrus waste in esterification and amidation kinetic studies, James H. Clark, Duncan J. Macquarrie and James Sherwood, Green Chem., 2012, 14, 90-93

Switchable adhesives for carpet tiles: a major breakthrough in sustainable flooring, Peter S. Shuttleworth, James H. Clark, Robert Mantle and Nigel Stansfield, Green Chem., 2010, 12, 798-803

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Top ten most accessed articles in August

This month sees the following articles in Green Chemistry that are in the top ten most accessed:-

L-Proline-promoted three-component reaction of anilines, aldehydes and barbituric acids/malononitrile: regioselective synthesis of 5-arylpyrimido[4,5-b]quinoline-diones and 2-amino-4-arylquinoline-3-carbonitriles in water
Ali Khalafi-Nezhad, Samira Sarikhani, Elham Shaikhi Shahidzadeh and Farhad Panahi
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35765H, Paper

Multicomponent reactions in unconventional solvents: state of the art
Yanlong Gu
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35635J, Critical Review

KOH-mediated transition metal-free synthesis of imines from alcohols and amines
Jian Xu, Rongqiang Zhuang, Lingling Bao, Guo Tang and Yufen Zhao
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35714C, Communication

A Convenient Guide to Help Select Replacement Solvents for Dichloromethane in Chromatography
Joshua P. Taygerly, Larry M. Miller, Alicia Yee and Emily A. Peterson
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC36064K, Paper

One-step hydrogenolysis of glycerol to biopropanols over Pt-H4SiW12O40/ZrO2 catalysts
Shanhui Zhu, Yulei Zhu, Shunli Hao, Hongyan Zheng, Tao Mo and Yongwang Li
Green Chem., 2012,14, 2607-2616, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35564G, Paper

Experimental and theoretical studies on imidazolium ionic liquid-promoted conversion of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural
Yu-Nong Li, Jin-Quan Wang, Liang-Nian He, Zhen-Zhen Yang, An-Hua Liu, Bing Yu and Chao-Ran Luan
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35845J, Paper

Design and synthesis of benzylpyrazolyl coumarin derivatives via a four-component reaction in water: investigation of the weak interactions accumulating in the crystal structure of a signified compound
Partha Pratim Ghosh, Gargi Pal, Sanjay Paul and Asish R. Das
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC36021G, Communication

A new route of CO2 catalytic activation: syntheses of N-substituted carbamates from dialkyl carbonates and polyureas
Jianpeng Shang, Shimin Liu, Xiangyuan Ma, Liujin Lu and Youquan Deng
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC36043H, Paper

Pd-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica: an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for Hiyama and Sonogashira couplings, and cyanation reactions
Arindam Modak, John Mondal and Asim Bhaumik
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35820D, Paper

PEG-functionalized ionic liquids for cellulose dissolution and saccharification
Shaokun Tang, Gary A. Baker, Sudhir Ravula, John E. Jones and Hua Zhao
Green Chem., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35631G, Paper

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Green Chemistry? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us with your suggestions.

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Issue 10 of Green Chemistry now online!

The latest issue of Green Chemistry is now available to read online.

Front cover of Green Chemistry, issue 10, 2012The front cover of issue 10 highlights work by Ulrich Schwaneberg and colleagues from RWTH Aachen University, nova-Institut GmbH and the University of Hamburg, Germany.  The aim of this study was to generate re-engineered cellulases which can match application demands in biorefineries and avoid expensive downstream processing.  The team developed a fluorescence-based high throughput screening method for directed evolution of cellulases, in an effort to improve the activity and resistance of a cellulase in aqueous solutions of deep eutectic solvents and concentrated seawater.  This work opens up new opportunities for the development of cellulases as catalysts for the depolymerisation of cellulose under mild conditions.

Reengineering CelA2 cellulase for hydrolysis in aqueous solutions of deep eutectic solvents and concentrated seawater, Christian Lehmann, Fabrizio Sibilla, Zaira Maugeri, Wolfgang R. Streit, Pablo Domínguez de María, Ronny Martinez and Ulrich Schwaneberg, Green Chem., 2012, 3, 2719-2726

The inside front cover of this issue features work by Eugene Chen and co-workers from Colorado State University who present an efficient process for upgrading 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 5,5′-di(hydroxymethyl)furoin (DHMF), a promising intermediate for kerosene/jet fuel.  The reaction was performed in an ionic liquid [EMIM]OAc and catalysed by N-heterocyclic carbenes.  The process could be completed in 1 hour at an ambient atmosphere and 60-80°C, which are industrially favourable conditions.

Organocatalytic upgrading of the key biorefining building block by a catalytic ionic liquid and N-heterocyclic carbenes, Dajiang (D. J.) Liu, Yuetao Zhang and Eugene Y.-X. Chen, Green Chem., 2012, 3, 2738-2746

Stay up-to-date with the latest news and content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Solvent guide to replce DCM in chromatography

A quick bench-top solvent guide reference has been developed in order for alternative solvents to dichloromethane (DCM) to be selected for separation of a variety of organic molecules.

Chromatography is widely used by synthetic chemists for purification as it can be broadly applied to a vast range of compounds and is very adaptable.  However, the largest contributor of chlorinated solvent waste in the medicinal chemistry industry is chromatography – primarily DCM.  Given the significant human and environmental toxicities associated with DCM, reduction or ideally replacement of this solvent is important.

Guide to select alternative solvent systems to DCM for ellution of neutral compoundsHere, Joshua Taygerly, Emily Peterson and colleagues from Amgen Inc. and Northeastern University, USA have developed a guide which aims to help synthetic chemists find suitable and more environmentally friendly alternatives to a DCM-solvent system for chromatographic purification of compounds.  The authors selected several ‘drug-like’ molecules which reflected the types of molecules regularly prepared and purified, and separated these into three categories – acidic, basic and neutral (where ‘neutral’ refers to compounds without a carboxylic acid or amine functionality).  They tested several alternative solvent systems and assembled a figure which allows the scientist to find the DCM solvent system that would have been applied to a particular molecule and follow it up vertically to find potentially equivalent systems (see the guide for neutral compounds right).

The primary use of this guide is to provide chemists with a quickly identifiable starting point for selecting alternative solvent systems to DCM.

You can read this article for free until the 17th October 2012!

A convenient guide to help select replacement solvents for dichloromethane in chromatography, Joshua P. Taygerly, Larry M. Miller, Alicia Yee and Emily A. Peterson, Green Chem., 2012, DOI: 10.1039/C2GC36064K

You may also be interested in these articles relating to solvent selection – free to access for 2 weeks:

Searching for green solvents, Philip G. Jessop, Green Chem., 2011, 13, 1391-1398

Expanding GSK’s solvent selection guide – embedding sustainability into solvent selection starting at medicinal chemistry, Richard K. Henderson, Concepción Jiménez-González, David J. C. Constable, Sarah R. Alston, Graham G. A. Inglis, Gail Fisher, James Sherwood, Steve P. Binks and Alan D. Curzons, Green Chem., 2011, 13, 854-862

Green chemistry tools to influence a medicinal chemistry and research chemistry based organisation, Kim Alfonsi, Juan Colberg, Peter J. Dunn, Thomas Fevig, Sandra Jennings, Timothy A. Johnson, H. Peter Kleine, Craig Knight, Mark A. Nagy, David A. Perry and Mark Stefaniak, Green Chem., 2008, 10, 31-36

Stay up-to-date with the latest news and content in Green Chemistry by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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