Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Passive Sampling Themed Issue

Philipp Mayer, Frank Wania and Charles S. Wong introduce an ESPI themed issue on passive sampling.

This themed collection showcases some of the latest developments in passive sampling research – which has now progressed well beyond measuring aqueous concentrations of legacy contaminants. The contributions in this collection contain a wide range of different passive sampling approaches which were applied to water, air, soil vapours, sediments and even fish tissue. Improved sampler designs and materials are being developed and tested, contributing to the increasing popularity of passive sampling. The apparent simplicity of passive sampling is at the core of its true potential and betrays a wealth of opportunity for future research and monitoring.

To celebrate this collection, the following articles are free* to access – for a limited time only!

Passive sampling systems for ambient air mercury measurements

A review of passive sampling systems for ambient air mercury measurements
Jiaoyan Huang, Seth N. Lyman, Jelena Stamenkovic Hartman and Mae Sexauer Gustin
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00501A

Application of passive sampling methods for measurement of Hg concentrations and deposition is useful for understanding source and trends.

Evaluation of DGTEvaluation of DGT as a long-term water quality monitoring tool in natural waters; uranium as a case study
Geraldine S. C. Turner, Graham A. Mills, Michael J. Bowes, Jonathan L. Burnett, Sean Amos and Gary R. Fones
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00574G

DGT can be used as a long-term water quality environmental monitoring tool.

Low density polyethylene passive samplers

Field calibration of low density polyethylene passive samplers for gaseous POPs
Mohammed A. Khairy and Rainer Lohmann
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00493G

A field calibration study of low density polyethylene for measuring atmospheric concentrations of persistent organic pollutants was performed in East Providence (RI) USA.

*Access is free until 13.06.14 through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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Fireworks and the spread of particulate matter

A detailed study on the spatiotemporal distribution of atmospheric pollutants arising from the wide scale use of fireworks has been carried out by scientists in China, with a view to highlighting related environmental and health concerns.

Fireworks and firecrackers are used extensively across the globe in all manner of celebrations, though few match the sheer scale of Chinese New Year. They generate a variety of contaminants, including gasses such as carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, in addition to aerosols of microparticles known as particulate matter.

Read the full article for free!

Study on spatial and temporal distributions of contaminants emitted by Chinese New Year’ Eve celebrations in Wuhan
Ge Han, Wei Gong, Jihong Quan, Jun Li and Miao Zhang  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00588G, Paper

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Seasons greetings from ESPI!

The holidays are nearly here!!

We know everyone’s been working hard to finish off semesters and write up those papers. Here in Cambridge we’ve been working hard too, planning for the New Year and wrapping up 2013.

To spread the holiday cheer, we’ve chosen three highly accessed papers and made them *FREE TO ACCESS* for the next four weeks. Enjoy!

Merry Christmas from the ESPI team!




Perspective: Human exposure to aluminium, by Christopher Exley, Keele University

Paper: Do natural rubber latex condoms pose a risk to aquatic systems? by Scott Lambert, Food and Environments Agency, UK

Paper: The impact of an anti-idling campaign on outdoor air quality at four urban schools, by Patrick H Ryan, Cincinnati




Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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HOT articles – free to access!

Take a look at our HOT articles recommended by our referees – these have been made free to access for 4 weeks*

Nanomaterial disposal by incineration
Amara L. Holder, Eric P. Vejerano, Xinzhe Zhou and Linsey C. Marr
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00224A

GA

Combining multivariate statistics and analysis of variance to redesign a water quality monitoring network
Nathalie Guigues, Michèle Desenfant and Emmanuel Hance  
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00168G

GA

The oxidative toxicity of Ag and ZnO nanoparticles towards the aquatic plant Spirodela punctuta and the role of testing media parameters
Melusi Thwala, Ndeke Musee, Lucky Sikhwivhilu and Victor Wepener
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00235G

GA

Lability, solubility and speciation of Cd, Pb and Zn in alluvial soils of the River Trent catchment UK
Maria Izquierdo, Andrew M. Tye and Simon R. Chenery
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00370A   

GA

Human exposure to aluminium
Christopher Exley
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00374D

GA

Human biomonitoring issues related to lead exposure
Evert Nieboer, Leonard J. S. Tsuji, Ian D. Martin and Eric N. Liberda
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00270E   

GA

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and more importantly – free – to register!

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Top ten most accessed ES:P&I articles in January 2013

This month sees the following articles in Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts that are in the top ten most accessed:-

Evaluation of a low-cost commercially available extraction device for assessing lead bioaccessibility in contaminated soils 
Clay M. Nelson, Thomas M. Gilmore, James M. Harrington, Kirk G. Scheckel, Bradley W. Miller and Karen D. Bradham  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 573-578 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30789H 

Size distribution effects of cadmium tellurium quantum dots (CdS/CdTe) immunotoxicity on aquatic organisms 
A. Bruneau, M. Fortier, F. Gagne, C. Gagnon, P. Turcotte, A. Tayabali, T. L. Davis, M. Auffret and M. Fournier 
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 596-607 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30896G  
 
Levels and distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soil, sediment and dust samples collected from various electronic waste recycling sites within Guiyu town, southern China 
Iryna Labunska, Stuart Harrad, David Santillo, Paul Johnston and Kevin Brigden  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 503-511 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30785E  
 
The impact of marine shallow-water hydrothermal venting on arsenic and mercury accumulation by seaweeds Sargassum sinicola in Concepcion Bay, Gulf of California 
María Luisa Leal-Acosta, Evgueni Shumilin, Nicolai Mirlean, Francisco Delgadillo-Hinojosa and Ignacio Sánchez-Rodríguez  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 470-477 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30866E  

Monitoring the Performance and Microbial Diversity Dynamics of a Full Scale Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Plant Treating Sugar Factory Wastewater 
N. Altınay Perendeci, F. Yeşim Ekinci and Jean Jaques Godon  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 494-502 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30597F 

Link fluorescence spectroscopy to diffuse soil source for dissolved humic substance in Daning River, China 
Hao Chen, Bing-hui Zheng and Lei Zhang  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 485-493 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30715D  
 
Resolving sources of water-soluble organic carbon in fine particulate matter measured at an urban site during winter 
Sung Yong Cho and Seung Shik Park 
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 524-534 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30730H 

A Portable Analyzer for the Measurement of Ammonium in Marine Waters 
Natchanon Amornthammarong, Jia-Zhong Zhang,  Peter B. Ortner, Jack Stamates, Michael Shoemaker and Michael W. Kindel  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 579-584 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30793F  

Uncertainty models and influence of the calibration span on ambient air measurements of NO2 by chemiluminescence 
Marta Doval Miñarro, Pascual Pérez Ballesta,  Jonathan Barberá Rico and Enrique González Ferradás  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 512-523 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30395G  
 
Impact of a snail pellet on the phytoavailability of different metals to cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L.) 
Sabine Freitag, Eva M. Krupp, Andrea Raab and Jörg Feldmann 
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013, 15, 463-469 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30806A  

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

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Webinar: The power of modern HPTLC

Join Chemistry World and Advion for a webcast on the latest developments in HPTLC technology.

WHAT: Professor Morlock from the University of Giessen, Germany, will give an overview of current HPTLC methodology, explore some examples of HPTLC-MS coupling and review other current hyphenations in HPTLC. By the end of this free webinar, you will be able to:
- Recognise the power of modern HPTLC
- Learn about current hyphenations in HPTLC
- Understand the principle of elution-based HPTLC-MS
- Recognise how HPTLC hyphenations efficiently support analyses

WHEN: Wednesday, 20 March 2013 – 15:00 GMT

HOW: Click here to register (free)

Register today, even if you can’t make it on 20th March, and we’ll send you a link to the recorded webinar.

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Top ten most accessed articles in August

The following articles were in the top ten most accessed for the Journal of Environmental Monitoring in August:

Quantitation of persistent organic pollutants adsorbed on plastic debris from the Northern Pacific Gyre’s “eastern garbage patch”
Lorena M. Rios, Patrick R. Jones, Charles Moore and Urja V. Narayan
J. Environ. Monit., 2010, 12, 2226-2236
DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00239A

Concentrations of organophosphate esters and brominated flame retardants in German indoor dust samples
Sandra Brommer, Stuart Harrad, Nele Van den Eede and Adrian Covaci
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 2482-2487
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30303E

Screening organic chemicals in commerce for emissions in the context of environmental and human exposure
Knut Breivik, Jon A. Arnot, Trevor N. Brown, Michael S. McLachlan and Frank Wania
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 2028-2037
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30259D

Traffic emission factors of ultrafine particles: effects from ambient air
Sara Janhäll, Peter Molnar and Mattias Hallquist
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 2488-2496
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30235G

Arsenic mobilization and attenuation by mineral–water interactions: implications for managed aquifer recharge
Chelsea W. Neil, Y. Jeffrey Yang and Young-Shin Jun
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 1772-1788
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30323J

Occurrence and risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil from the Tiefa coal mine district, Liaoning, China
Jingjing Liu, Guijian Liu, Jiamei Zhang, Hao Yin and Ruwei Wang
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 2634-2642
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30433C

Correlations in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in UK ambient air and implications for source apportionment
Andrew S. Brown and Richard J. C. Brown
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 2072-2082
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM10963H

Potential impacts of disinfection processes on elimination and deactivation of antibiotic resistance genes during water and wastewater treatment
Michael C. Dodd
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 1754-1771
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM00006G

Distribution of trace element contamination in sediments and riverine agricultural soils of the Zhongxin River, South China, and evaluation of local plants for biomonitoring
Jinfeng Chen, Jiangang Yuan, Shanshan Wu, Biyun Lin and Zhongyi Yang
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 2663-2672
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30241A

Utilizing pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR to characterize fungal populations among house dust samples
Matthew W. Nonnenmann, Gloria Coronado, Beti Thompson, William C. Griffith, John Delton Hanson, Stephen Vesper and Elaine M. Faustman
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 2038-2043
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30229B

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to JEM? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

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Submission portal changes from 1st October 2012

We would like to make our authors and referees aware that from Monday 1st October 2012 our online submission portal will be changed to reflect our new name, Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts.

Author and referee accounts will remain valid, and we would like to remind all our readers that the scope of the journal remains the same.

If you have any queries about the name change please do not hesitate to contact us, we will be very happy to help!

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Top ten most accessed articles in July 2012

This month sees the following articles in the Journal of Environmental Monitoring that are in the top ten most accessed:

Emerging investigators contributors 2012 
Thomas Borch, Richard Carbonaro, Juana Maria Delgado-Saborit, Michael Dodd, Michelle Hladik, Young-Shin Jun, Christopher Kim, Jung-Hwan Kwon, Yi-Pin Lin, Sara Mason, Jennifer Murphy, Jeff Nason, Hee-Deung Park, Zhimin Qiang, Christopher Szakal 
J. Environ. Monit., 2012,14, 1745-1753
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM90032G  

Potential impacts of disinfection processes on elimination and deactivation of antibiotic resistance genes during water and wastewater treatment  
Michael C. Dodd  
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 1754-1771
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM00006G  

The release of engineered nanomaterials to the environment 
Fadri Gottschalk and Bernd Nowack  
J. Environ. Monit., 2011, 13, 1145-1155
DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00547A

Arsenic mobilization and attenuation by mineral–water interactions: implications for managed aquifer recharge  
Chelsea W. Neil,  Y. Jeffrey Yang and Young-Shin Jun  
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 1772-1788
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30323J  

Aquatic environmental nanoparticles  
Nicholas S. Wigginton, Kelly L. Haus and Michael F. Hochella Jr  
J. Environ. Monit., 2007, 9, 1306-1316
DOI: 10.1039/B712709J  

Contamination of Canadian and European bottled waters with antimony from PET containers 
William Shotyk, Michael Krachler and Bin Chen  
J. Environ. Monit., 2006, 8, 288-292
DOI: 10.1039/B517844B  

Utilizing pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR to characterize fungal populations among house dust samples  
Matthew W. Nonnenmann, Gloria Coronado, Beti Thompson, William C. Griffith, John Delton Hanson, Stephen Vesper and Elaine M. Faustman  
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 2038-2043
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30229B  

Comparative DFT study of inner-sphere As(III) complexes on hydrated α-Fe2O3(0001) surface models 
Christoffer J. Goffinet and Sara E. Mason  
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 1860-1871
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30355H  

Persistent organic pollutants in sediment from the southern Baltic: risk assessment  
Joanna Szlinder-Richert, Zygmunt Usydus and Aleksander Drgas  
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 2100-2107
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30221G  

Fingerprinting of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and other biogenic organic compounds (BOC) in oil-contaminated and background soil samples  
Zhendi Wang, C. Yang, Z. Yang, B. Hollebone, C. E. Brown, M. Landriault, J. Sun, S. M. Mudge, F. Kelly-Hooper and D. G. Dixon  
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, 14, 2367-2381
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30339F 

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to JEM? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

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An environmental review of the pork PCB/dioxin contamination incident in Ireland

We’ve had a bit of a break in HOT articles for the summer holidays but now we’re back with a scorcher!

Irish pork 2008 PCB dioxinIn December 2008 the Irish Government recalled all Irish pork and bacon products from pigs slaughtered in Ireland since September 1 2008 as a result of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination identified during routine monitoring of Irish pork products.  This lead to the slaughter of thousands of of pigs and cattle, and the destruction of tens of thousands of tonnes of pork products.

In this Focus article Ian Marnane from the Irish Environmental Protection Agency looks at the source and multiple factors that contributed to the contamination – the use of contaminated fuel in the animal-feed drying facilities – and what lessons could be learnt from this extremely unfortunate event.

The article is free to access* for the next four weeks:

Comprehensive environmental review following the pork PCB/dioxin contamination incident in Ireland
Ian Marnane
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30374D

Looking for some more summer reading? Why not check our some of our other HOT articles..

*Free access is provided to subscribing institutions or through an RSC Publishing Personal Account. Registration is quick and easy at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/account/register.

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