HOT articles in Analyst!

Take a look at our recent HOT Analyst articles, these are now free to access for the next few weeks!

A label-free activatable aptamer probe for colorimetric detection of cancer cells based on binding-triggered in situ catalysis of split DNAzyme
Hui Shi, Duo Li, Fengzhou Xu, Xiaoxiao He, Kemin Wang, Xiaosheng Ye, Jinlu Tang and Chunmei He  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4181-4184
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00561A, Communication

A three-dimensional interpenetrating electrode of reduced graphene oxide for selective detection of dopamine
Xiaowen Yu, Kaixuan Sheng and Gaoquan Shi  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4525-4531
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00604F, Paper

Fine structural features of nanoscale zero-valent iron characterized by spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM)
Airong Liu and Wei-xian Zhang  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4512-4518
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00679H, Paper

On-chip monitoring of skeletal myoblast transplantation for the treatment of hypoxia-induced myocardial injury
Juan He, Chao Ma, Wenming Liu and Jinyi Wang  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4482-4490
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00697F, Paper

Global in vivo terminal amino acid labeling for exploring differential expressed proteins induced by dialyzed serum cultivation
Li-Qi Xie, Ai-Ying Nie, Shu-Jun Yang, Chao Zhao, Lei Zhang, Peng-Yuan Yang and Hao-Jie Lu  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4497-4504
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00728J, Paper

A novel variable selection approach that iteratively optimizes variable space using weighted binary matrix sampling
Bai-chuan Deng, Yong-huan Yun, Yi-zeng Liang and Lun-zhao Yi  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00730A, Paper

Using electron paramagnetic resonance to map N@C60 during high throughput processing
Simon R. Plant and Kyriakos Porfyrakis  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4519-4524
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00734D, Paper

Affinity-based precipitation via a bivalent peptidic hapten for the purification of monoclonal antibodies
Michael W. Handlogten, Jared F. Stefanick, Peter E. Deak and Basar Bilgicer  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4247-4255
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00780H, Paper

Real-time detection of metal ions using conjugated polymer composite papers
Ji Eun Lee, Hyeon Woo Shim, Oh Seok Kwon, Yang-Il Huh and Hyeonseok Yoon  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4466-4475
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00804A, Paper

Identification and discrimination of binding sites of an organoruthenium anticancer complex to single-stranded oligonucleotides by mass spectrometry
Suyan Liu, Kui Wu, Wei Zheng, Yao Zhao, Qun Luo, Shaoxiang Xiong and Fuyi Wang  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4491-4496
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00807C, Paper

Simultaneous analysis of nanoparticles and small molecules by high-performance liquid chromatography using a silica monolithic column
Naoki Itoh, Akira Sano, Tomofumi Santa and Masaru Kato  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4453-4457
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00819G, Communication

Parameters affecting ion intensities in transmission-mode direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry
Lindsay P. Harding, Gareth M. B. Parkes and James D. Townend  
Analyst, 2014,139, 4176-4180
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00859F, Communication

Simultaneous multiplexed quantification of nicotine and its metabolites using surface enhanced Raman scattering
Omar Alharbi, Yun Xu and Royston Goodacre  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00879K, Paper

A graphene oxide-based enzyme-free signal amplification platform for homogeneous DNA detection
Zhen Zhang, Yufei Liu, Xinghu Ji, Xia Xiang and Zhike He  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00933A, Paper

A spatiotemporally defined in vitro microenvironment for controllable signal delivery and drug screening
Ching-Te Kuo, Hao-Kai Liu, Guan-Syuan Huang, Chi-Hao Chang, Chen-Lin Chen, Ken-Chao Chen, Ruby Yun-Ju Huang, Ching-Hung Lin, Hsinyu Lee, Chiun-Sheng Huang and Andrew M. Wo  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00936C, Paper

Detection of strep throat causing bacterium directly from medical swabs by touch spray-mass spectrometry
Alan K. Jarmusch, Valentina Pirro, Kevin S. Kerian and R. Graham Cooks  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00959B, Communication

A rapid method to estimate the concentration of citrate capped silver nanoparticles from UV-visible light spectra
D. Paramelle, A. Sadovoy, S. Gorelik, P. Free, J. Hobley and D. G. Fernig  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00978A, Paper

Diagnosing malaria infected cells at the single cell level using focal plane array Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy
Bayden R. Wood, Keith. R. Bambery, Matthew W. A. Dixon, Leann Tilley, Michael J. Nasse, Eric Mattson and Carol J. Hirschmugl  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00989D, Communication

A napthelene–pyrazol conjugate: Al(III) ion-selective blue shifting chemosensor applicable as biomarker in aqueous solution
Manjira Mukherjee, Siddhartha Pal, Somenath Lohar, Buddhadeb Sen, Supriti Sen, Samya Banerjee, Snehasis Banerjee and Pabitra Chattopadhyay  
 Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01039F, Paper

Microfluidic device with tunable post arrays and integrated electrodes for studying cellular release
Asmira Selimovic, Jayda L. Erkal, Dana M. Spence and R. Scott Martin  
 Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01062K, Paper

High efficiency tandem mass spectrometry analysis using dual linear ion traps
Linfan Li, Xiaoyu Zhou, James W. Hager and Zheng Ouyang  
 Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01070A, Communication

Detection of counterfeit electronic components through ambient mass spectrometry and chemometrics
Kevin P. Pfeuffer, Jack Caldwell, Jake T. Shelley, Steven J. Ray and Gary M. Hieftje  
 Analyst, 2014,139, 4505-4511
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01071J, Paper

Hydroxylated near-infrared BODIPY fluorophores as intracellular pH sensors
Mohamed M. Salim, Eric A. Owens, Tielong Gao, Jeong Heon Lee, Hoon Hyun, Hak Soo Choi and Maged Henary  
 Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01104J, Paper

An inkjet-printed bioactive paper sensor that reports ATP through odour generation
Zhuyuan Zhang, Jingyun Wang, Robin Ng, Yingfu Li, Zaisheng Wu, Vincent Leung, Spencer Imbrogno, Robert Pelton, John D. Brennan and Carlos D. M. Filipe  
 Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01113A, Communication

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Call for papers: themed issue dedicated to sensing using biological and synthetic nanopores and nanopipettes.

biological and synthetic nanopores and nanopipettes

You are invited to contribute to the upcoming Analyst themed issue showcasing fundamental discoveries, progress and developments in sensing using biological and synthetic nanopores and nanopipettes.

For your article to be considered for the themed issue we must receive your manuscript by December 1st 2014.

Guest Edited by Dr Joshua Edel and Professor Sang-Hyun Oh, this upcoming themed issue will highlight the significant progress in developments related to single molecule biosensing using nanopores and nanopipettes. The issue will feature review articles, original research papers and communications across the breadth of the subject area.

If you would like to contribute a review article or original research paper to the biological and synthetic nanopores and nanopipettes themed issue, please contact us.

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Understanding the “How” of Disease Biomarker Discovery

An Overview of Biomarker Discovery

An Overview of Biomarker Discovery

A disease biomarker is a key indicator that when detected from the body can help determine whether an individual is at risk to develop a certain disease. Thus, the discovery of suitable biomarkers is very important to enable earlier diagnosis of disease, better treatment options, and lower overall healthcare costs. Over the years, substantial progress has been made in the field of proteomics to study proteins as disease biomarkers. However, while most effort has been made towards identifying new biomarkers, less focus has been made towards understanding and optimizing the methodologies, which is required in order to find effective biomarkers.

Nina Bergman and Jonas Bergquist from Uppsala University in Sweden have written a review article to outline the proteomic methods that are currently used for biomarker identification and analysis, assess some of the advantages and disadvantages of each method and provide insight into what the future may hold for biomarker discovery. Click on the link below to learn more (free access until September 6th):

Recent developments in proteomic methods and disease biomarkers
Nina Bergman and Jonas Bergquist
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00627E

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Strep throat spotted in seconds

Written by Megan Tyler for Chemistry World

Scientists have developed a non-invasive mass spectrometry-based diagnostic technique that can diagnose strep throat in less than 10 seconds.

Almost all of us will experience a sore throat at some point in our lives, and a number of these sore throats (~30%) will be caused by infections with Streptococci bacteria. Streptococcal pharyngitis, which is usually caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, is commonly known as ‘strep throat’ and can be treated with antibiotics if successfully diagnosed. Although the vast majority of strep throat cases resolve themselves within a few days, Streptococcal infections can lead to serious complications, such an inflammatory disease called rheumatic fever that can result in heart failure and even death. Children and the elderly are particularly susceptible to complications, so for these individuals, the rapid diagnosis and treatment of strep throat can be life-saving.

Touch spray-mass spectrometry can detect strep throat causing bacterium directly from medical swabs


Read the full article in Chemistry World»

Read the original journal article in Analyst – it’s free to access until 12th September:
Detection of strep throat causing bacterium directly from medical swabs by touch spray – mass spectrometry
Alan K Jarmusch, Valentina Pirro, Kevin S Kerian and R. Graham Cooks
Analyst, 2014, Accepted Manuscript, DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00959B

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Analyst Impact Factor announced: 3.906!

Analyst, 2014, Issue 1We are delighted to announce that our latest Impact Factor* is 3.906!

Analyst remains the home of premier fundamental discoveries, inventions and applications in the analytical and bioanalytical sciences. It publishes leading edge interdisciplinary research that presents a significant advance in fundamental theory or practice of the chemical, physical and biological sciences from an analytical perspective and remains in the top 3 general analytical journals publishing primary research.

The Editorial office thanks all of our Board members, authors, readers and reviewers for their continued support.

We invite you to submit your latest piece of high impact work with us here.

Click through to see how the other Royal Society of Chemistry journals did.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2013 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2014).

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Analytical Sciences in Brazil – web themed issue

Analyst and Analytical Methods recently joined forces to produce a web themed issue on Analytical Sciences in Brazil, highlighting the growth of the field of analytical science in Brazil with the aim to provide a showcase for some of the best researchers in this area.

As an extra special feature of this issue, please read below the introductory Editorial from Guest Editors, Professor Ivo M. Raimundo Jr and Professor Boris Mizaikoff, translated into Portuguese.

Analytical Sciences in Brazil – Editorial

 The use of EEM fluorescence data and OPLS/UPLS-DA algorithm to discriminate between normal and cancer cell lines: a feasibility studyÉ uma honra apresentar este número temático virtual dos periódicos Analyst e Analytical Methods dedicado à Ciências Analíticas no Brasil. Esta iniciativa oportuna da Royal Society of Chemistry acontece em um período particularmente especial e importante para os pesquisadores brasileiros, visto que recentemente as agências de financiamento nacionais e estaduais têm feito esforços excepcionais objetivando uma melhora consistente na qualidade das pesquisas, desenvolvimentos e inovações desenvolvidas no Brasil, que são expressos de forma significativa nos programas “Institutos Nacionais de Ciência e Tecnologia” e “Ciência sem Fronteiras”. O programa “Institutos Nacionais de Ciência e Tecnologia” tem a finalidade de agregar grupos de pesquisa de todo o Brasil em Centros Virtuais para realizar pesquisas colaborativas nas fronteiras da ciência em áreas estratégicas nacionais, para dar suporte ao desenvolvimento sustentável do país e estimular a inovação em ciência. “Ciência sem Fronteiras” é um programa de mobilidade e intercâmbio internacional com o objetivo de expandir e consolidar ainda mais a ciência, tecnologia e inovação, encorajando e apoiando os processos de internacionalização das universidades e centros de pesquisa. Além disso, são criadas oportunidades para a implementação de projetos de colaboração de longa duração entre pesquisadores brasileiros e pesquisadores internacionais com elevada experiência, promovendo também o intercâmbio de estudantes de graduação e pós-graduação, além de pós-doutorandos, com instituições internacionais de alto nível. Enquanto estes programas certamente melhorarão a competitividade da pesquisa brasileira, é a ciência conduzida pelos pesquisadores envolvidos que darão vida a estes programas.
Trace analysis of pesticides and an assessment of their occurrence in surface and drinking waters from the State of São Paulo (Brazil)

O tópico deste número temático é extremamente significativo, uma vez que enfatiza a importância da química analítica em um cenário científico global. Por um bom período, a química analítica foi considerada uma área periférica da química e os químicos analíticos eram vistos apenas como provedores de dispositivos e métodos para análises qualitativas e quantitativas demandadas, por exemplo, pelas indústrias (controle de qualidade e de processos), laboratórios clínicos e monitoramento ambiental. Entretanto, durante as últimas décadas a “química analítica convencional” sofreu uma notável evolução, transformando-se em “ciências analíticas modernas”, que pode ser, não totalmente, mas em parte certamente atribuída aos avanços da microeletrônica, microfabricação, nanomateriais/nanotecnologia e quimiometria. Atualmente, as ciências analíticas modernas amadureceram, tornando-se uma disciplina de pesquisa altamente interdisciplinar, ágil e transformadora, abordando, por exemplo, de tecnologia analítica de processos à análise de uma única célula, de monitoramento ambiental à química verde, de diagnósticos clínicos/médicos ao sensoriamento (bio)químico e de análise de composição de materiais à quantificação de contaminantes em alimentos. Adicionalmente, além de determinar “o que” e “quanto” existe de um constituinte-alvo, a química analítica contemporânea adicionou os domínios espaciais, temporais e de especiação à estes parâmetros, isto é, “onde”, “quando” e “como” um analito está presente dentro de uma determinada matriz. Em outras palavras, a Química Analítica evoluiu para uma disciplina chave da química moderna, movendo-se de sua periferia para o seu núcleo central.

Qual a situação das Ciências Analíticas no Brasil? Esta foi a questão que fizemos quando foi lançada a ideia de um número especial neste tema. O Brasil está ainda focando em “química analítica” ou está contribuindo ativamente com desenvolvimentos inovadores em “ciências analíticas”? Enquanto esta questão pode ser certamente respondida sob diferentes aspectos e considerações, a resposta da comunidade de química analítica brasileira fala por si mesma: dois meses após a data limite para submissão de artigos para este número especial, 38 manuscritos haviam sido aceitos para publicação, os quais documentam de forma notável a relevância, a vitalidade e a inovação das ciências analíticas no Brasil. Mais importante e para particular satisfação dos Editores, em vez de regiões específicas – e provavelmente favorecidas financeiramente – dentro do Brasil, as contribuições têm sido submetidas de norte a sul e de leste a oeste do país. Por exemplo, enquanto as regiões ao norte e à oeste eram certamente consideradas “distantes” dos epicentros da ciência, isto mudou dramaticamente durante os últimos trinta anos, assim como a química analítica. De uns poucos Programas de Pós-Graduação em universidades no sul e sudeste, o cenário científico expandiu-se para proporcionar uma ampla multiplicidade, espalhada por todo o país. Este imenso esforço de pesquisadores de diferentes estados, que foram as sementes destes novos programas, hoje reflete na diversidade e força do ensino de química por todo o Brasil. Portanto, a resposta é claramente “sim”. O Brasil dedica-se e contribui para as ciências analíticas modernas, acima e além das contribuições publicadas neste número especial!
A novel architecture based upon multi-walled carbon nanotubes and ionic liquid to improve the electroanalytical detection of ciprofibrate

Finalmente, os Editores deste número temático – Prof. Ivo M. Raimundo Jr. (Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brasil) e Prof. Boris Mizaikoff (Universidade de Ulm, Alemanha) – gostariam de agradecer profundamente May Copsey (Editora) e Rebecca Brodie (vice-editora) por tratar de todos os detalhes referentes à esta edição, a qual não seria possível sem suas generosas assistências. Além disso, gostariam também de agradecer o Instituto Nacional de Ciências e Tecnologias Analíticas Avançadas, que forneceu as bases para esta iniciativa. Por fim, mas não menos importante, gostariam de agradecer todos os pesquisadores brasileiros que contribuíram para este número, possibilitando que o Analyst e o Analytical Methods proporcionem aos seus leitores um sabor especial das Ciências Analíticas atualmente produzidas no Brasil!

To read some of the exciting research being performed in Brazil, please click through and check out the web themed issue.

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International Mass Spectrometry Conference 2014

International Mass Spectrometry Conference 2014The 20th International Mass Spectrometry Conference (IMSC) 2014 is fast approaching and this year will be held in Geneva, Switzerland, Aug 24-29, 2014.

Run jointly by the Swiss Group for Mass Spectrometry (SGMS), the French Mass Spectrometry Society (SFSM), the Division of Mass Spectrometry of the Italian Chemical Society (DSM), and under the auspices of the International Mass Spectrometry Foundation (IMSF), the meeting returns to Europe in 2014, after Kyoto (2012) and before it goes overseas again, to Toronto (2016).

Travel grant deadline is soon!  30 July 2014 – so get your applications in

For more information see the website: http://www.imsc2014.ch/

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Chemistry and Art

Will there be blood? - by Caroline Grainger

2014 is the Royal Society of Chemistry year of Chemistry and Art! There have been a number of initiatives around this, and we are pleased to promote some recent work the Analyst and Analytical Methods has been involved in.

50 Shades of Green - by Paul Jackson

Founded by Yalda Javadi, Ionic Magazine aims to bridge the gap between science and art and is published as an online magazine four times a year. Javadi says ‘The two subject matters are often considered to be poles apart and from two very different worlds. Science is about truth, about following rules and laws that help answer fundamental rational questions, whereas art invokes emotional connections through expression, impressions, concepts and creations. Yet both create a sense of mystery, both are matched when it comes to skill, creativity, imagination and impact.’

She created Ionic Magazine as a way to visually express modern day scientific breakthroughs. The ultimate goal: a stunning and stimulating collaboration of two traditionally contrasting worlds.

Fishing for isinglass - by Angie Brown

In collaboration with the Royal Society of Chemistry, Issue 6 of Ionic Magazine has a selection of papers from the Molecular Analysis for Art, Archaeometry and Conservation themed collection. This collection of papers across Analyst and Analytical Methods highlighted cutting edge analytical research from academia, national laboratories and museums showing the most recent analytical breakthroughs in the field of cultural heritage. The articles described those techniques recently employed to study art and cultural objects at the molecular level, characterising their structure, properties and chemistry.

Why not take a look at the beautifual and fascinating collection of artwork inspired by this selection of research papers?

As Javadi asks -Right side or left side brain, which way do you swing?

A selection of these papers will be free to read until Aug 3rd.

You may also be interested to read the lates issue of Chemistry World, a special issue of Chemistry and Art.

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HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our recent HOT Analyst articles, these are now free to access for the next few weeks!

Designing and fabricating double resonance substrate with metallic nanoparticles–metallic grating coupling system for highly intensified surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopyDesigning and fabricating double resonance substrate with metallic nanoparticles–metallic grating coupling system for highly intensified surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy
Ying Zhou, Xuanhua Li, Xingang Ren, Liangbao Yang and Jinhuai Liu  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00540F

Bimetallic Pd–Pt supported graphene promoted enzymatic redox cycling for ultrasensitive electrochemical quantification of microRNA from cell lysates
Fang-Fang Cheng, Jing-Jing Zhang, Ting-Ting He, Jian-Jun Shi, E. S. Abdel-Halim and Jun-Jie Zhu
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00777H

Recent developments in proteomic methods and disease biomarkers
Nina Bergman and Jonas Bergquist  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00627E

An Ru(II)–Fe(III) bimetallic complex as a multifunctional device for detecting, signal amplifying, and degrading oxalate
Cheuk-Fai Chow, Pui-Yu Ho and Cheng-Bin Gong  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00350K

High specific detection of osteopontin using a three-dimensional copolymer layer support based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
Hongxia Chen, Qiaohan Mei, Shengsong Jia, Kwangnak Koh, Keming Wang and Xinjian Liu
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00576G

Fluorometric/colorimetric logic gates based on BODIPY-functionalized mesoporous silica
Heekyoung Choi, Ji Ha Lee and Jong Hwa Jung  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00251B

Monitoring UVR induced damage in single cells and isolated nuclei using SR-FTIR microspectroscopy and 3D confocal Raman imaging
Ewelina Lipiec, Keith R. Bambery, Philip Heraud, Wojciech M. Kwiatek, Don McNaughton, Mark J. Tobin, Christian Vogel and Bayden R. Wood  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00838C

Up-regulating pyocyanin production by amino acid addition for early electrochemical identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Hunter J. Sismaet, Thaddaeus A. Webster and Edgar D. Goluch  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00756E

Analysis of ethyl and methyl centralite vibrational spectra for mapping organic gunshot residues
Jianbo Zeng, Ji Qi, Fuquan Bai, Jorn Chi Chung Yu and Wei-Chuan Shih  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00657G

Separation and sensitive determination of sphingolipids at low femtomole level by using HPLC-PIESI-MS/MS
Chengdong Xu, Eduardo Costa Pinto and Daniel W. Armstrong
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00775A

Affinity-based precipitation via a bivalent peptidic hapten for the purification of monoclonal antibodiesParameters affecting ion intensities in transmission-mode direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry
Michael W. Handlogten, Jared F. Stefanick, Peter E. Deak and Basar Bilgicer  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00780H

Parameters affecting ion intensities in transmission-mode direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry
Lindsay P. Harding, Gareth M. B. Parkes and James D. Townend  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00859F

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175 Faces of Chemistry – Martha Whiteley

Martha Whiteley

Martha Whiteley

“There is a long-established and inveterate prejudice… that girls are less capable of mental cultivation, and less in need of it, than boys” reported the 1868 Schools Inquiry Commission.

Analyst, and the historic J. Chem. Soc., Trans. contributor Martha Whiteley did much to reverse this prejudice, for which she has been nominated as an “175 Face of Chemistry”.

This Friday, why not take some time out to explore our journal archives, discover her research, and read about her campaigning for women fellows’ admission to the Royal Society – and the problems along the way (why should men be preferred simply because ‘they wear a distinctive dress and are privileged to grow a moustache?’ – Nature editor, 1909).

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