Catching up with legal highs

Written by Rebecca Brodie for Chemistry World

Graphical AbstractA team of British and Australian scientists has combined two spectroscopy techniques to rapidly identify new psychoactive substances from police drug seizures.

Designers of new psychoactive drugs, or ‘legal highs’, constantly tweak their chemical structure to avoid drug laws. And a lack of certified reference standards alongside the sample preparation required for established methods such as GC–MS and HPLC–MS has hindered high-throughput screening. So how do you test for drugs when you don’t know what you’re looking for? This is a problem currently facing forensic scientists.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Infrared and Raman screening of seized novel psychoactive substances: a large scale study of >200 samples
L. E. Jones, A. Stewart, K. L. Peters, M. McNaul, S. J. Speers, N. C. Fletcher and S. E. J. Bell
Analyst, 2016, 141, 902-909
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02326B, Paper

Do you fancy submitting an article to Analyst? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

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SPEC 2016 – Abstract deadline soon

Graphical Abstract

SPEC 2016 is due to take place at Palais des congrés de Montréal in Canada between 26th – 30th June 2016

‘This international conference series brings together clinicians and scientists who are developing and improving innovative pre-clinical and clinical applications of vibrational spectroscopy that can lead to health care delivery improvements.’

Abstract deadline soon: 15th February 2016
10th April 2016: Early bird and presenting author registration deadline

Click here to submit your abstract

To find out more about the conference and to register your interest, please visit their website

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Editor’s Choice: Takehiko Kitamori selects his top Analyst papers by Japanese authors

Analyst Associate Editor, Professor Takehiko Kitamori (University of Tokyo, Japan) has selected his Top 5 articles published by Japanese authors recently published in Analyst.

Professor Kitamori is former Vice President of the University of Tokyo and is also a Professor in the Department of Applied Chemistry. His areas of research are micro/extended-nano fluidics, integration of chemical systems on microchips, applied laser spectroscopy for ultrasensitive detection, analytical chemistry, and extended-nano space chemistry.

Below, see what Takehiko says about each of the articles he has selected- all of which are free to access for the next 4 weeks!


Temperature-responsive molecular recognition chromatography using phenylalanine and tryptophan derived polymer modified silica beads

Yuki Hiruta et al., Analyst, 2016, 141, 910-917, DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01996F

Molecular recognition characteristics were realized in temperature-responsive chromatography using a temperature-controllable stationary phase and water as the sole mobile phase, which has been continuously developed by the authors. Functionalizing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-modified stationary phase by aromatic amino acids dramatically increases the retention times of aromatic steroids and aromatic amino acids in the separation. The method has potential in the separation of complex and delicate peptides, proteins and antibodies, which is important in biomedical and biochemical analysis.

Nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization using sinapic acid-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for mass spectrometry analysis

Hanaka Komori et al., Analyst, 2015, 140, 8134-8137, DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02081F

Very useful iron oxide nanoparticles for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry was reported, which greatly suppresses the background noise by self-ionization of ionization-assisting material. While conventional ionization methods and instruments have limitations by the molecular weight of the analyte, their new method allowed analysis of various molecules at wide-range molecular weights (102-104) such as pesticides, plant hormones, peptides and proteins.

DNA sensor’s selectivity enhancement and protection from contaminating nucleases due to a hydrated ionic liquid

Hisae Tateishi-Karimata et al., Analyst, 2015, 140, 4393-4398, DOI: 10.1039/C5AN00545K

The authors discovered that using the hydrated ionic liquid can enhance the selectivity of DNA sequence sensing by 10,000 times, due to stabilization of the triplex structure of DNA and inhibition of DNA degradation by contaminating nuclease. The DNA sensor using the hydrated ionic liquid greatly contributes to detection of disease-related genes in genetic diagnosis.

Affinity imaging mass spectrometry (AIMS): high-throughput screening for specific small molecule interactions with frozen tissue sections

T. Yoshimi et al., Analyst, 2015, 140, 7202-7208, DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01381J

A new imaging mass spectrometry system coupled with affinity-based imaging was applied to screening of chemical compounds with high affinity for Alzheimer’s disease brain. The method is very selective and applicable widely for organs and tissues, which will be important in medical diagnosis and cell biology.

Micro-thermography in millimeter-scale animals by using orally-dosed fluorescent nanoparticle thermosensors

Satoshi Arai et al., Analyst, 2015, 140, 7534-7539, DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01287B

The authors developed polymer nano-particles including temperature sensitive and less temperature sensitive dye, which allowed temperature sensing in millimeter tissue with self-calibration. Ratio-metric temperature mapping of fruit fly larva was successfully demonstrated with good temperature resolution (< 1 degree).

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Analytical Science Twitter Poster Conference 2016

We are delighted to announce the Analytical Science Twitter Poster Conference (#RSCAnalyticalPoster) will be happening March 17th to March 18th!

The Royal Society of Chemistry Analytical Science Twitter Poster Conference is an online event being held entirely over Twitter to bring members of the scientific research community together to share their research, network and engage in scientific debate.

© iStock

How do I take part?

During the event simply tweet an image (e.g. JPEG) which will be a digital poster summarising your research along with #RSCAnalyticalPoster and the title of your work. Throughout the day you can then answer any questions posed to you by other people on Twitter and ask questions about other posters. Make sure you follow #RSCAnalyticalPoster throughout the day as the conference progresses.

When is it?

Posters tweeted with #RSCAnalyticalPoster between 9am GMT March 17th and 9am GMT March 18th will be eligible to win prizes. Make sure you ask and answer lots of questions to ensure your work is well understood!

Is my research area suitable?

The conference is open to anyone working in any area of science whose research topic is in the scope of Analyst, Analytical Methods or JAAS. If you’re unsure if your poster is suitable for the conference, just get in touch and we can advise.

What can I win?

The main aim of the event is to meet new scientists, share ideas and learn about the latest developments in different areas of analytical science. The scientific committee will also select posters which stimulate wide interest and feature innovative, high quality, exciting analytical research. Posters prizes will be awarded for content & accessibility, design and researcher interaction with the conference. There will also be an audience award for the most tweeted poster.

Who is organising the event and how do I find them?

At different points throughout the day members of the scientific committee will be logging in to Twitter and searching for #RSCAnalyticalPoster to ask questions about some of the posters. Make sure you check back in at different times to see if you have any new questions and also make sure you ask questions about other posters. Members of the scientific committee and their Twitter names are listed below and make sure you follow us @analystrsc @MethodsRSC and @JAASNews for the latest updates.

Chair and Organisers

Matt Baker, University of Strathclyde, UK @ChemistryBaker

Craig Banks, Manchester Metropolitan University @Act_mmu

Sam Illingworth, Manchester Metropolitan University @samillingworth

Ed Randviir, Manchester Metropolitan University, @RandviirScience

Royal Society of Chemistry- Analyst @analystrsc, Analytical Methods @MethodsRSC and JAAS @JAASNews

Scientific Committee

© iStock

Damien Arrigan, Curtin University @arri_aus

Perdita Barran, The Universityof Manchester @PerditaB

Raychelle Burks, Doane College @DrRubidium

Richard Dluhy, UAB College of Arts and Sciences @radluhy

Carsten Engelhard, Universität Siegen @EngelhrC

Karen Faulds, University of Strathclyde @FauldsKaren

Roy Goodacre, The University of Manchester @RoyGoodacre

Renee JiJi, University of Missouri @ReneeJiJi

Simon Lewis, Curtin University @SimonWLewis

Jean-Francois Masson, University of Montreal @Masson_chem

Martin Resano, University of Zaragoza @MartinResano

Nick Stone, University of Exeter @profnickstone

Renee Webster, Monash University @reneewebs

How do I register?

Pre-registration is not necessary; however we will need to verify who you are and where you do your research to be eligible for the prizes. We strongly recommend you do this before the event by emailing us at and letting us know:

•  Your name, address and contact details

•  The title or topic of your poster

•  Your twitter ID

Register for #RSCAnalyticalPoster

We look forward to meeting you in March!

© Shutterstock

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need to check the copyright and permissions needed for figures or any other parts of my poster which have already been published?

Yes. Copyright owners have the exclusive right to copy their work and to issue copies of their work to the public, and it is an infringement for anyone else to do so without the copyright owner’s permission. If you are reproducing material contained in a Royal Society of Chemistry publication (journal articles, book or book chapters) you may do so providing that you fully acknowledge the original Royal Society of Chemistry publication and include a link back to it. If you wish to include material that has been published by another publisher, you will need to check how the publisher/copyright owner of the third party material wishes to receive permission requests. Information on this can be found on our Permission Requests page under “Use of third party material in our publications”.

If I include unpublished work in my poster, will I still be able to publish this in a peer-reviewed journal afterwards?

Subject to the usual conditions outlined in the Licence to Publish, being a part of the Twitter conference will not prevent you using some of the information included in your poster as part of an article in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal. Please note this policy varies by publisher and if you intend to submit your research for publication elsewhere after the event, you should check the individual policy for that journal and publisher.

What size should my poster be?

You can choose any dimensions for your poster, the important thing is that the text and figures are clear for people to read and understand. Using Microsoft PowerPoint, we found a text size of between 12-16 were clear to read when saving an A4 slide as a JPEG and uploading to Twitter. Using an A0 template, the text needed to be between 50 and 60 to be legible. You can use any software you like to create your poster, as long as the image you upload is clear for others to read. We recommend testing your poster on Twitter before the conference to make sure you are happy with your image.

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How to tell your left from your right amino acids

Written by Sarah Rogers for Chemistry World

Graphical Abstract

Most amino acids exist in two forms that are chemically identical but are mirror images of each other, like left and right hands. Left-handed amino acids play a key role in biological processes and are vital to life. It therefore makes sense to want to differentiate between left and right-handed versions.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


A universal strategy for visual chiral recognition of α-amino acids with L-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probes
Guoxin Song, Fulin Zhou, Chunli Xu and Baoxin Li
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02434J

Do you fancy submitting an article to Analyst? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

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SPEC 2016

Graphical Abstract

SPEC 2016 is due to take place at Palais des congrés de Montréal in Canada between 26th – 30th June 2016

‘This international conference series brings together clinicians and scientists who are developing and improving innovative pre-clinical and clinical applications of vibrational spectroscopy that can lead to health care delivery improvements.’

Dates for your diary:

15th February 2016: Abstract submission deadline
10th April 2016: Early bird and presenting author registration deadline

Click here to submit your abstract

To find out more about the conference and to register your interest, please visit their website

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Themed Issue on Innovative Tools for Cancer Screening, Detection and Diagnostics now published

The new themed issue for Analyst on innovative tools for cancer screening, detection and diagnostics is now published.

Guest Edited by Professor Steve Soper, University of North Carolina, USA and Dr Avraham Rasooly, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, USA, this collection is devoted to new technologies focused on the management of cancer-related diseases and covers a broad spectrum of new innovations including optical sensors (SERS, fluorescence, plasmon resonance, etc.), drug delivery vehicles, affinity agents, imaging contrast agents, microfluidics/nanofluidics and cell-based assays to name a few.

Cancer remains a devastating disease with 580,350 deaths and 1.66 million new cases reported in the US alone in 2013.  With 7.5 million deaths worldwide, cancer is the number 1 killer globally. Although 5-year survival rates have risen from 50% in 1975-77 to 68% in 2003-2008, major challenges remain toward further improving survival rates. The keys to realizing increased 5-year survival rates depend on significant improvements in early detection strategies as well as personalized treatment selection and effectively monitoring for disease recurrence. All of these focus areas can be enhanced through the development of new technological tools. Thus, this themed issue serves as a timely dissemination of new technologies that hold promise for the management of a variety of cancer-related diseases.

Enjoy!

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Deadline extended for themed issue on carbon and graphene in analytical science

We are extending the submission deadline for the upcoming Analyst themed issue showcasing the latest discoveries and developments in carbon and graphene in analytical science to January 31st, 2016. So keep sending in your high quality research to be included in this exciting issue.

Guest Edited by Professor Martin Pumera, Nanyang Technological University, this upcoming themed issue will showcase the latest technology, method and application-based science among the top researchers working in both academia and industry.

Unconfined by traditional discipline boundaries the issue will include carbon quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, and (nano)diamonds in the fields of electroanalysis, spectroscopy, and separation sciences. Recently there has been significant development in this area of research and now is an ideal time to have a special issue dedicated to recent advances.

Communications, full papers and review articles are welcomed, if you are interested in submitting a paper for this themed issue please contact us to let us know.

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EUROPT[R]ODE XIII Conference Registration Now Open

Registration is now open for the EUROPT[R]ODE XIII Conference taking place the University of Graz, Austria on the 20th – 23rd March, 2016.

Sponsored by Analyst, the biannual EUROPT[R]ODE conference is one of the major conference series on optical sensors. Since 1992, the EUROPT[R]ODE conference has been a forum for scientists and engineers from academia, research institutes and industry from all over the world.

We hope to see you there!

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Uncoiling collagen using advanced computers

Written by Fiona Gillespie for Chemistry World

Graphical Abstract
British and French researchers have used modern computing power to enhance mass spectrometry and analyse an extremely complex collagen molecule in a short time scale.

Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (2D FT-ICR MS), developed in the 1980s, links the mass-to-charge ratios of precursors and fragments in complex samples. Compared to tandem mass spectrometry, 2D FT-ICR MS does not require isolated precursors and shows better resolution. Its applications have been limited, however, due to a lack of sophisticated computers.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


H. J. Simon, M. A. van Agthoven, P. Y. Lam, F. Floris, L. Chiron, M.-A. Delsuc, C. Rolando, M. P. Barrow and P. B. O’Connor
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01757B, Paper

Do you fancy submitting an article to Analyst? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

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