Emerging Investigator Series – Deanpen Japrung

We are delighted to introduce our latest Analyst Emerging Investigator, Deanpen Japrung!

Deanpen Japrung received a BSc in Medical Technology from Chulalongkorn University and a MSc in Biochemistry from Mahidol University, Thailand. In 2010, she received a DPhil in Chemical Biology from the University of Oxford under supervision of Prof. Hagan Bayley. A post-doc in Prof. Joshua Edel and Prof. Tim Albrecht’s lab at Imperial College London followed this. In 2012, she became a researcher in Nano-Molecular Target Discovery laboratory, National Nanotechnology center (NANOTEC) and she was promoted to be a team leader of this lab in 2016. Since February 2019, she has also become a research group director of the Responsive Material and Nanosensor Research group. Her research has won awards from the Department of Medical Sciences (DMsc award in 2017), National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT research award in 2018), activity awards from the Diabetes Association of Thailand (in 2017, 2018 and 2019) and a silver medal from the 47th International Exhibition of Inventions, Switzerland (2019).  So far, she has published 20 papers, more than 20 Thai Patents and 1 US patent (Granted). Her research group is focusing on synthesis and functionalization of responsive nanomaterial and development of nanosensors for disease diagnosis.

Read Deanpen’s Emerging Investigator Series paper “Ultrasensitive detection of lung cancer-associated miRNAs by multiple primer-mediated rolling circle amplification coupled with a graphene oxide fluorescence-based (MPRCA-GO) sensor” (free to access until the end of August 2019) and find out more about her in the interview below:

 

 

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on detection of lung cancer-associated MicroRNAs. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

Our research group is focusing on development of nanosensor platforms for analysis of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as diabetes, Alzheimer and some cancers. Therefore, our first paper (as an independent researcher) was about the development of an aptasensor platform for the detection of glycated albumin, which is an intermediate biomarker for diabetes mellitus diagnosis (Biosens Bioelectron. 2016 Aug 15;82:140-5). In this paper, we used reduced graphene oxide to quench the fluorescence signal of the fluorescence labelled aptamer, which bind specifically to the glycated albumin. We measured fluorescence intensity when the fluorescence labelled aptamer left the graphene oxide to bind to the glycated albumin (target molecule). We found that the fluorescence intensity was dependent on the concentration of target molecules in the sample. Therefore, we calculated the glycated albumin concentration based on the standard curve from this system. After that we used computer simulation to study the binding mechanism of the DNA aptamer and reduced the graphene oxide (Molecular Simulation, 45:10, 841-848).

After these two publications, we have known how to deal with the graphene oxide quencher system, therefore we have continued develop the nanosensor platform using the reduce graphene oxide system to quench the fluorescence signal tag before binding to the other target molecules, such as DNA, RNA and other proteins. In the recent paper published in Analyst, apart from designing of new multiple primers, templates and using new ligase enzyme, we also used reduced graphene oxide to be a fluorescence quencher for detection of isothermal amplification product of target miRNA (miR-16, 21 and 210), which are biomarkers for lung cancer screening.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

The strategy employed in our study offers a significant improvement in sensitivity (1,000 folds compared to conventional multiple primers-mediated RCA method), specificity and detection time. This could prove very useful when detecting low abundant miRNAs e.g. miRNAs in serum/plasma and body fluids.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for developing sensors for MicroRNA detection?

I think the key design considerations for miRNA analysis is how to improve sensitivity, specificity and quantitative ability of the detection platform. More than 1000 types of microRNA (miRNA) have been discovered in the human body, however just small amount (<1 ng/mL) of miRNA is expressed and released into the blood circulation.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

The biggest challenges when conducting any research are finding real life applications for the research and how to commercialize the findings. To do all this, a research group consisting of multidisciplinary expertise is essential. An effective action plan is also vital.

How do you spend your spare time?

I love to spend time reading, book writing, painting with water colours and trail running. My favorite book is “Good luck” by Alex Rovira and Fernando Trias de Bes.

I am also a founder of the “Japrung Foundation for Rural Education” (2015-present). Our aim is to help poor students from the rural areas of Thailand. We do this by motivating them to believe in their own ability. The Foundation also offers scholarships.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

If I were not a scientist, I would love to be a writer because I love writing. I have been invited to write science articles in Thai newspapers, such as the Thai Post.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

I have always followed four steps to make me a happy scientist. These steps are adapted and combined from my favorite book “Good luck” and the advice from a global career strategist, Laura Sheehan.

1) Be open and ready to change.

2) Gain more experience and adapt your skills.

3) Make meaningful connections.

4) Be a sharing person.

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Congratulations to poster prize winners at The 21st Australia and New Zealand Electrochemistry Symposium

The 21st Australia and New Zealand Electrochemistry Symposium was held on Tuesday 30th April at Queensland University of Technology, Australia.

The symposium was a huge success, with many fantastic posters being presented. The RSC sponsored five posters for the event, with Analyst Associate Editor Professor Damien Arrigan presenting each of the winners with their certificiates,

And the winners are…

Mostafa Kamul Masud

William Adamson

Sashini Hapuarachchi

Luke Gundry

Chen Jia

 

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Have you read these recent clinical spectroscopy papers in Analyst?

Vibrational spectroscopies, based on infrared absorption and/or Raman scattering provide a detailed fingerprint of a material, based on the chemical content. Diagnostic and prognostic tools based on these technologies have the potential to revolutionise our clinical systems leading to improved patient outcome, more efficient public services and significant economic savings. (Extract from critical review on “Clinical applications of infrared and Raman spectroscopy: state of play and future challenges” by Matthew Baker et al, Analyst, 10.1039/C7AN01871A).

We have gathered our most recent Analyst publications on both fundamental technological and analytical developments and exciting applications on this topic, and are delighted to share this collection with you.

Read the full collection now: https://rsc.li/clinical-spectroscopy

We hope you enjoy reading this collection, which we have made free to access until the 15th June 2019 with an RSC Publishing Account.

Take a look at a small selection of the excellent articles featured in the collection below:

Critical Review
Clinical applications of infrared and Raman spectroscopy: state of play and future challenges
M. J. Baker, H. J. Byrne, J. Chalmers, P. Gardner, R. Goodacre, A. Henderson, S. G. Kazarian, F. L. Martin, J. Moger, N. Stone and J. Sulé-Susoh

Critical Review
Raman spectroscopy for cancer detection and cancer surgery guidance: translation to the clinics
I.P. Gerwin J. Puppels, et al.

Paper
High definition infrared chemical imaging of colorectal tissue using a Spero QCL microscope
B. Bird and J. Rowlette

Paper
Near-field infrared nanospectroscopy and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy enable complementary nanoscale analyses of lymphocyte nuclei
G. C. Ajaezi, K. M. Gough et al.

Paper
Three-dimensional depth profiling of prostate tissue by micro ATR-FTIR spectroscopic imaging with variable angles of incidence
C. L.Song and S. G. Kazarian

About the journal

Led by our Editor-in-Chief, Duncan Graham (University of Strathclyde, UK), Analyst is an international journal for the publication of fundamental discoveries, inventions and applications in the analytical and bioanalytical sciences.

We hope you enjoy reading these exciting recent papers on clinical spectroscopy and we welcome future submissions in this field in Analyst.

We would love to keep sharing exciting Analyst content and news with you, so please do sign up for our free table of contents alerts and e-newsletters so we can keep in touch.

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Gordon F. Kirkbright and Edward Steers Bursary Awards, 2020

The Gordon F. Kirkbright bursary award is a prestigious annual award that assists a promising early career scientist of any nation to attend a recognised scientific meeting or visit a place of learning. The fund for this bursary was established in 1985 as a memorial to Professor Gordon Kirkbright in recognition of his contributions to analytical spectroscopy and to science in general.

Owing to the generosity of one of our former trustees, an eminent atomic spectroscopist, Professor Edward B.M. Steers, we are now, from 2020, in the position of being able to award an Edward Steers bursary, in addition to the long standing Gordon Kirkbright bursary, to similarly assist a promising early scientist engaged in or utilising analytical spectroscopic techniques.

The ABS Trust defines early career as being either a student, or an employee in a non-tenured academic post or in industry, within 7 years of award of PhD excluding career breaks. The same conditions apply to each bursary.

Applications are invited for both the 2020 Gordon Kirkbright Bursary and the 2020 Edward Steers Bursary.  Although both funds are administered by the ABS Trust, the Kirkbright award is not restricted to spectroscopists, but is open to all involved with or utilising analytical science-based techniques.

Application Forms can be downloaded from:

http://www.abstrust.org/kirkbright-bursary-award-application-form

and:

http://www.abstrust.org/steers-bursary-award-application-form

or for further information visit:

http://www.abstrust.org/, or contact abstrustuk@gmail.com

The closing date for entries is 30 November 2019.

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Analyst themed issue on Next wave advances in single cell analyses

We are delighted to draw your attention to the recent Analyst themed issue highlighting work on next wave advances in single cell analyses focusing on emerging analytical advances in metabolomic, lipidomic, proteomic, and glycomic approaches – as well as high-dimensional approaches that unify multiple aspects of single-cell biology and medicine.

This collection was put together by Guest Editors Takehiko Kitamori (University of Tokyo, Japan), Amy E. Herr (University of California, Berkeley, USA), Ulf Landegren (Uppsala University, Sweden) and Masood Kamali-Moghaddam (Uppsala University, Sweden), who worked hard to create this issue and ensure that its content was of the highest quality. An Editorial by the Guest Editors prefaces the collection.

Read the full collection now: http://rsc.li/advances-in-single-cell-analyses

All papers in the collection are free to access until the end of May 2019 with an RSC Publishing Account.

We hope you enjoy reading the full collection. Take a look at a small selection of excellent articles featured in the collection below:

Critical Review
High throughput screening of complex biological samples with mass spectrometry – from bulk measurements to single cell analysis

Emily E. Kempa, Katherine A. Hollywood, Clive A. Smith and Perdita E. Barran

Minireview
Recent advances in single cell manipulation and biochemical analysis on microfluidics

Dan Gao, Feng Jin, Min Zhou and Yuyang Jiang

Minireview
Advances in mass spectrometry based single-cell metabolomics

Kyle D. Duncan, Jonas Fyrestam and Ingela Lanekoff

Paper
Gel-based cell manipulation method for isolation and genotyping of single-adherent cells

Ryo Negishi, Reito Iwata, Tsuyoshi Tanaka, David Kisailus, Yoshiaki Maeda, Tadashi Matsunaga and Tomoko Yoshino

Paper
Dual cationic–anionic profiling of metabolites in a single identified cell in a live Xenopus laevis embryo by microprobe CE-ESI-MS

Erika P. Portero and Peter Nemes

 

Keep up to date with Analyst throughout the year by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

 

Versatile electrochemistry approaches themed collection – Submit now

Bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine themed collection – Submit now

SPEC2018: International Society of Clinical Spectroscopy themed issue – Read now

Analyst Emerging Investigator SeriesApply now

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Top 10 Most Accessed Analyst Articles – Q1 2019

This month sees the following articles in Analyst from the last 12 months that are in the top ten most read from January – March 2019.

All articles have been made free to access until the end of May 2019. So, why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Reviews

High throughput screening of complex biological samples with mass spectrometry – from bulk measurements to single cell analysis
Emily E. Kempa, Katherine A. Hollywood, Clive A. Smith and Perdita E. Barran
Analyst, 2019,144, 872-891
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01448E

A review of sorting, separation and isolation of cells and microbeads for biomedical applications: microfluidic approaches
Arash Dalili, Ehsan Samiei and Mina Hoorfar
Analyst, 2019,144, 87-113
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01061G

Microfluidic bioanalytical flow cells for biofilm studies: a review
Mohammad Pousti, Mir Pouyan Zarabadi, Mehran Abbaszadeh Amirdehi, François Paquet-Mercier and Jesse Greener
Analyst, 2019,144, 68-86
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01526K

Review: a comprehensive summary of a decade development of the recombinase polymerase amplification
Jia Li, Joanne Macdonald and Felix von Stetten
Analyst, 2019,144, 31-67
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01621F

Recent advances in single cell manipulation and biochemical analysis on microfluidics
Dan Gao, Feng Jin, Min Zhou and Yuyang Jiang
Analyst, 2019,144, 766-781
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01186A

Advances in mass spectrometry based single-cell metabolomics
Kyle D. Duncan, Jonas Fyrestam and Ingela Lanekoff
Analyst, 2019,144, 782-793
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01581C

Editorial

Next wave advances in single-cell analyses
Amy E. Herr, Takehiko Kitamori, Ulf Landegren and Masood Kamali-Moghaddam
Analyst, 2019,144, 735-737
DOI: 10.1039/C9AN90011J

Papers

Merging metabolomics and lipidomics into one analytical run
Michaela Schwaiger, Harald Schoeny, Yasin El Abiead, Gerrit Hermann, Evelyn Rampler and Gunda Koellensperger
Analyst, 2019,144, 220-229
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01219A

Reporter bacteriophage T7NLC utilizes a novel NanoLuc::CBM fusion for the ultrasensitive detection of Escherichia coli in water
T. C. Hinkley, S. Garing, S. Singh, A-L. M. Le Ny, K. P. Nichols, J. E. Peters,J. N. Talbert and S. R. Nugen
Analyst, 2018,143, 4074-4082
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN00781K

Simultaneous non-polar and polar lipid analysis by on-line combination of HILIC, RP and high resolution MS
Evelyn Rampler, Harald Schoeny, Bernd M. Mitic, Yasin El Abiead, Michaela Schwaiger and Gunda Koellensperger
Analyst, 2018,143, 1250-1258
DOI: 10.1039/C7AN01984J

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Outstanding Reviewers for Analyst in 2018

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Analyst in 2018, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Hugh Byrne, Focas Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology ORCiD: 0000-0002-1735-8610

Professor Lingxin Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research ORCiD: 0000-0002-3764-3515

Professor Jeremy Driskell, Illinois State University ORCiD: 0000-0001-5082-898X

Professor Ning Gan, Ningbo University ORCiD: 0000-0001-9772-2437

Professor Hideaki Hisamoto, Osaka Prefecture University ORCiD: 0000-0003-1067-4116

Professor Young-Pil Kim, Hanyang University ORCiD: 0000-0001-7234-1320

Professor Feng Li, Qingdao Agricultural University ORCiD: 0000-0002-3894-6139

Professor Yi-Tao Long, East China University of Science and Technology ORCiD: 0000-0003-2571-7457

Professor Zachary Schultz, The Ohio State University ORCiD: 0000-0003-1741-8801

Dr Bhavya Sharma, University of Tennessee ORCiD: 0000-0003-4388-5702

Dr Muhammad Shiddiky, Griffith University ORCiD: 0000-0003-4526-4109

Dr James Wade, Dow Chemical ORCiD: 0000-0002-9740-1905

We would also like to thank the Analyst board and the analytical chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

 

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Versatile electrochemical approaches – Themed collection in Progress!

 

Analyst has launched a themed collection focusing on versatile electrochemical approaches for sensing, biology, and energy.

Solving pressing challenges in these fields requires the development of enabling tools and strategies that converge in fundamental concepts of analysis to address materials properties and charge transfer. In this collection, we aim to cover the broad range of cutting-edge electrochemical approaches being explored for the detection of analytes and the understanding of processes relevant to energy and biological systems. These approaches encompass nanoscale electrochemistry, rational electrode design, biomolecular analysis, and interface-sensitive methods. Accordingly, this collection will feature new electroanalytical strategies in characterising energy storage and energy harvesting systems, in biomedical diagnostics, and in measurement and imaging sciences.

 

 

Joaquin Rodriguez Lopez

Damien Arrigan

 

Guest Editors

This collection is co-guest edited by Analyst Associate Editor Professor Damien Arrigan  (Curtin University, Australia) and Associate Professor Joaquín Rodríguez López (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA).

 

 

 

 

 

Submission deadline: 30th September 2019 

 

 

Contribute to this collection

We welcome submissions of original research and review articles. Articles will be added to the collection as they are accepted and the resulting issue will benefit from extensive promotion.

About Analyst

Guided by Editor-in-Chief Duncan Graham and an international team of Associate Editors and Editorial Board membersAnalyst publishes analytical and bioanalytical research that reports premier fundamental discoveries and inventions, and the applications of those discoveries, unconfined by traditional discipline barriers.

Interested in contributing?

Email analyst-rsc@rsc.org

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21st Australia and New Zealand Electrochemistry Symposium

Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

The organising committee is especially interested in featuring the work from PhD research students and other early-career researchers. A confirmed keynote speaker is Prof. Andrea Russell from the University of Southampton, UK and Prof. Huijun Zhao from Griffith University, Australia.

Organising Committee

  • Prof. Anthony O’Mullane (QUT)
  • Dr. Muhammad Shiddiky (Griffith)
  • Dr. Yang Liu (JCU)
  • Dr. Ruth Knibbe (UQ)
  • Dr. Debbie Silvester-Dean (Curtin)
  • Prof. Damien Arrigan (Curtin)
  • Prof. Chuan Zhao (UNSW)
  • Ummul Sultana (QUT)

Important dates:

  • 8 February 2019: Deadline for abstract submission
  • 15 April 2019: early-bird registration deadline
  • 29 April 2019: Symposium

 

When: 29 -30 April 2019

Where: QUT, Gardens Point, OJW Room

Contact:

Anthony O’Mullane

Registration Fees

Early-bird** Normal
Members* $300 $350
Non-members $350 $400
Student members* $150 $200
Student non-members $200 $250
*RACI or ISE Members
**Early-bird rates: Before 15 April 2019

Please Click Here to Register

Please Click Here for the Flyer

Please Click Here for the Abstract Template

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1st European Top-Down Proteomics Symposium

The 1st European Top-Down Proteomics Symposium is taking place from 12th – 14th Febraury, 2019, in Paris, France.

The symposium will focus on top-down proteomics, the analysis of intact proteins and protein complexes using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

In this symposium, world-leading experts in top-down proteomics will present the most advanced technologies and approaches. A wide range of topics will be covered including the latest developments in instrumentation, sample preparation both in denaturing and native conditions, intact protein fractionation/separation, data analysis as well as applications in life sciences and human health.

Additionally, attendees will be encourage to take part in discussions on the future directions, challenges, and opportunities for top-down proteomics. In addition to notable scientists, the meeting will also attract younger researchers who are building their careers and are looking to interact with leaders in the field.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS

Dr Rodolphe Antoine, University of Lyon, France
Dr Alain Beck, Laboratoires Pierre Fabre, France
Pr Isabelle Fournier, University of Lille, France
Pr Albert Heck, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Pr Amy Herr, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Pr Ole Jensen, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
Pr Neil Kelleher, Northwestern University, USA
Pr Alexander Makarov, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Germany
Pr Dame Carol Robinson, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Pr Michal Sharon, Weizmann Institute, Israel
Dr Yuri Van der Burgt, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands
Pr Vicki Wysocki, Ohio State University, USA

ROUNDTABLES AND MODERATORS (CTDP)

Sample preparation, intact protein separation,instrumentation, data analysis
Dr Ljiljana Pasa-Tolic, Pacific Northwest, National Laboratory, USA
Dr Ying Ge, University of Wisconsin, USA
Industrial and regulatory applications (i.e. antibody and biologics analysis)
Dr Yury Tsybin, Spectroswiss, Switzerland
Dr Jeffrey Agar, Northeastern University, USA
Future directions of top-down proteomics
Pr Neil Kelleher, Northwestern University, USA
Pr Joseph Loo, University of California Los Angeles, USA
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