Cocaine users sweat over fingerprint analysis

Written by Simon Neil for Chemistry World

Graphical Abstract

Scientists in the UK and the Netherlands have revealed a rapid, single-fingerprint test for cocaine use. The procedure is less invasive, more hygienic and faster than established approaches, which typically test blood, urine or saliva. Portable versions could be available to law enforcement agencies within the next decade.

Have you recently taken an illicit drug? You have the right to remain silent, but if authorities really need an answer, there’s a global testing industry worth several billion dollars on hand to help, with an array of analytical techniques. Potentially adding to this arsenal, a team of scientists led by Melanie Bailey at the University of Surrey have now demonstrated a formidable test for cocaine – don’t sweat, it only needs one fingerprint.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>


Rapid detection of cocaine, benzoylecgonine and methylecgonine in fingerprints using surface mass spectrometry
Melanie J. Bailey, Robert Bradshaw, Simona Francese, Tara L. Salter, Catia Costa, Mahado Ismail, Roger P. Webb, Ingrid Bosman, Kim Wolff and Marcel de Puit
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN00112A

Do you fancy submitting an article to Analyst? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Submit your entry for the inaugural Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship

Send a copy of your CV, publication list and an original essay highlighting how analytical science underpins developments in the health sciences and you could be awarded up to £2000 and become the first Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship winner. Submissions must be made to the Editorial Office before 1 September 2015.

The Science
Analytical science is central to tackling the global challenges which face society and the Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship has been developed to showcase the essential contribution of the analytical sciences in overcoming these challenges. Developments in areas such as climate change, energy, food, water and health are crucial for societies around the world to thrive. The science underpinning these advances cannot be achieved without the pioneering research being carried out by analytical scientists worldwide.

An image of a lecture

© Shutterstock

The Lectureship
The Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship will be a platform for an early career analytical scientist to raise the profile of the analytical sciences to the wider scientific community and general public. The recipient will receive up to £2000 contribution towards travel and accommodation costs to attend and present a lecture based on their research at a leading international meeting to be decided by the Chair of the Analyst Editorial Board. The recipients essay will also be published as a Perspective article in the journal.

The Essay
To be considered for the Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship, candidates must submit an original essay of no more than 1000 words which calls attention to the significant and wide-reaching impact on scientific and societal issues related to this year’s theme in the analytical sciences.

The theme for the first lectureship is health. This broad topic will be open to all disciplines from across the analytical sciences and in line with the wider aims of the lectureship highlight how advances in analytical science underpin developments in issues of global concern. Essays must effectively and concisely convey the importance of analytical science in health related research, for example new innovations in optical sensors, imaging agents, microfluidic technologies, diagnostic tools, bioimaging techniques, affinity agents, body fluid, tissue and cell based assays and disease monitoring and management systems to name just a few. The emphasis of the essay will need to be on the importance of analytical science in relation to advances in any health related subject.

An image of DH5a

© Shutterstock

Particulars and selection criteria

•    To be eligible for the lectureship candidates must be at an early stage of their independent career. Typically this will be within 10 years of completing their PhD, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path.
•    The essay must be no more than 1000 words and succinctly express the importance of the fundamental developments in analytical science which relate to this year’s theme. The aim of the lectureship is to raise the profile and wider awareness of the analytical sciences, candidates should keep this in mind when writing their essay.
•    The essays will be judged by the Analyst Editorial Board and the recipient will be selected based on the originality and quality of their essay. The recipients essay will be published as a Perspective article in Analyst; as such the work should not look out of place in the journal. Please see the website for more details on the usual scope and standards of Analyst as well as further details of the Editorial Board who will be selecting the lectureship winner www.rsc.org/analyst.


How to submit your essay

To be considered for the lectureship candidates must send to the Editorial Office:

•    A copy of your CV
•    A list of published papers
•    An original essay of no more than 1000 words highlighting how advances in analytical science underpin developments in this year’s theme.

Submission Deadline: 1 September 2015

Submit your application for the Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our most recent HOT Analyst articles, these are now free to access for the next few weeks!

Graphical Abstract

Making Colourful Sense of Raman Images of Single Cells
Lorna Ashton, Katherine A. Hollywood and Royston Goodacre
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1852-1858
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02298J

Presence of Electrolyte Promotes Wetting and Hydrophobic Gating in Nanopores with Residual Surface Charges
Laura Innes, Diego Gutierrez, William Mann, Steven F. Buchsbaum and Zuzanna S. Siwy
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02244K

Metal-enhanced fluorescence and FRET on nanohole arrays excited at angled incidence
H.-P. Poirier-Richard, M. Couture, T. Brule and J.-F. Masson
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02257B

Sensing applications based on plasmonic nanopores: The hole story

Andreas B. Dahlin
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02258K

Colocalization of Fluorescence and Raman Microscopic Images for the Identification of Subcellular Compartments: A Validation Study

Sascha D. Krauß, Dennis Petersen, Daniel Niedieker, Inka Fricke, Erik Freier, Samir F. El-Mashtoly, Klaus Gerwert and Axel Mosig
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2360-2368
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02153C

Optical sensing and analyte manipulation in solid-state nanopores
Tal Gilboa and Amit Meller
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02388A

Coupling Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) Probe with Ambient MS for Rapid Enrichment and Detection of Phosphopeptides in Biological Samples
Yaoyao Zhao, Xiaoyun Gong, Xingyu Si, Zhenwei Wei, Chengdui Yang, Sichun Zhang and Xinrong Zhang
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2599-2602
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02156H

Comparison of transflection and transmission FTIR imaging measurements performed on differentially fixed tissue sections
David Perez-Guaita, Philip Heraud, Katarzyna M. Marzec, Miguel de la Guardia, Matti Kiupel and Bayden R. Wood
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2376-2382
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02034K

A metal (Co)-organic framework-based chemiluminescence system for selective detection of L-cysteine
Na Yang, Hongjie Song, Xiangyu Wan, Xiaoqing Fan, Yingying Su and Yi Lv
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2656-2663
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN00022J

Simultaneous intracellular redox potential and pH measurements in live cells using SERS nanosensors

L. E. Jamieson, A. Jaworska, J. Jiang, M. Baranska, D. J. Harrison and C. J. Campbell
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2330-2335
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02365J

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Photoacoustic nanoparticles highlight uranium in the body

Written By Cesar Palmero for Chemistry World

Graphical Abstract

Nanoparticles that can be detected with photoacoustic imaging when they complex with uranium ions could open the door to new plans of action after radiological incidents, like Chernobyl or Fukushima, US researchers claim.

Ultrasound imaging is a well-known technique – it’s used during pregnancy and to assess joint injuries, amongst other things. The basics are simple: sound comes in and sound comes out; the difference in backscattered sound is turned into an image. Analogously, in photoacoustic procedures a pulse of light goes in and some of its energy is absorbed. This energy heats the local area and produces a pressure wave as it expands, which is measured acoustically.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>


Parts per billion detection of uranium with a porphyrinoid-containing nanoparticle and in vivo photoacoustic imaging
I-Ting Ho, Jonathan L. Sessler, Sanjiv Sam Gambhir and Jesse V. Jokerst
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN00207A

Do you fancy submitting an article to Analyst? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Camera turned wine connoisseur

Written by Jennifer Newton for Chemistry World

Graphical Abstract

Seeing is smelling for a camera system developed by scientists in Japan that images ethanol vapour escaping from a wine glass. And, perhaps most importantly, no wine is wasted in the process.

Kohji Mitsubayashi, at the Tokyo Medical and Dental University, and colleagues impregnated a mesh with the enzyme alcohol oxidase, which converts low molecular weight alcohols and oxygen into aldehydes and hydrogen peroxide. Horseradish peroxide and luminol were also immobilised on the mesh and together initiate a colour change in response to hydrogen peroxide. When this mesh is placed on top of a wine glass, colour images from a camera watching over the mesh on top of a glass of wine can be interpreted  to map the concentration distribution of ethanol leaving the glass.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>


Correction: A sniffer-camera for imaging of ethanol vaporization from wine: the effect of wine glass shape
Takahiro Arakawa, Kenta Iitani, Xin Wang, Takumi Kajiro, Koji Toma, Kazuyoshi Yano and Kohji Mitsubayashi
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2887-2888
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN90029H

Do you fancy submitting an article to Analyst? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our most recent HOT Analyst articles, these are now free to access for the next few weeks!

Graphical Abstract

Label-free Raman imaging of the macrophage response to the malaria pigment hemozoin
Alison J. Hobro, Nicolas Pavillon, Katsumasa Fujita, Muge Ozkan, Cevayir Coban and Nicholas I. Smith
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2350-2359
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01850H

Calculation of Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Vibrational Analysis
Shaun T. Mutter, François Zielinski, Paul L. A. Popelier and Ewan W. Blanch
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02357A

Rapid identification of goblet cells in unstained colon thin sections by means of quantum cascade laser-based infrared microspectroscopy

N. Kröger-Lui, N. Gretz, K. Haase, B. Kränzlin, S. Neudecker, A. Pucci, A. Regenscheit, A. Schönhals and W. Petrich
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2086-2092
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02001D

Striatal dopamine release in a schizophrenia mouse model measured by electrochemical amperometry in vivo
Huadong Xu, Panli Zuo, Shirong Wang, Li Zhou, Xiaoxuan Sun, Meiqin Hu, Bin Liu, Qihui Wu, Haiqiang Dou, Bing Liu, Feipeng Zhu, Sasa Teng, Xiaoyu Zhang, Li Wang, Qing Li, Mu Jin, Xinjiang Kang, Wei Xiong, Changhe Wang and Zhuan Zhou
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02074J

Universal Enantioselective Discrimination by Raman Spectroscopy
Johannes Kiefer and Kristina Noack
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1787-1790
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02218A
Graphical Abstract
Sensitive Assay of Trypsin Using Poly(thymine)-Templated Copper Nanoparticles as Fluorescent Probes

Li-Juan Ou, Xiao-Yan Li, Li-Juan Li, Hong-Wei Liu, Ai-Ming Sun and Kai-Jian Liu
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1871-1875
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01994F

Testing and validating electroanalytical simulations
Enno Kätelhön and Richard G. Compton
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2592-2598
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02276A

Fast IR laser mapping ellipsometry for the study of functional organic thin films
Andreas Furchner, Guoguang Sun, Helge Ketelsen, Jörg Rappich and Karsten Hinrichs
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1791-1797
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01853B

A new method for wavelength interval selection that optimizes locations, widths and combinations of the intervals intelligently
Bai-Chuan Deng, Yong-Huan Yun, Pan Ma, Chen-Chen Lin, Da-Bing Ren and Yi-Zeng Liang
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1876-1885
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02123A

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our most recent HOT Analyst articles, these are now free to access for the next few weeks!

Graphical Abstract

Rapid biodiagnostic ex vivo imaging at 1 μm pixel resolution with thermal source FTIR FPA
C. R. Findlay, R. Wiens, M. Rak, J. Sedlmair, C. J. Hirschmugl, Jason Morrison, C. J. Mundy, M. Kansiz and K. M. Gough
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2493-2503
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01982B

Controlled growth of immunogold for amplified optical detection of aflatoxin B1
Xu Wang, Reinhard Niessner and Dietmar Knopp
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1453-1458
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02281E

A Comparative Study of Graphene-Hydrogel Hybrid Bionanocomposites for Biosensing

S. L. Burrs, D. C. Vanegas, M. Bhargava, N. Mechulan, P. Hendershot, H. Yamaguchi, C. Gomes and E. S. McLamore
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1466-1476
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01788A

Pre-Equlibration Kinetic Size-Exclusion Chromatography with Mass Spectrometry Detection (peKSEC-MS) for Label-Free Solution-Based
Jiayin Bao, Svetlana M. Krylova, Leonid T. Cherney, J. C. Yves Le Blanc, Patrick Pribil, Philip E. Johnson, Derek J. Wilson and Sergey N. Krylov
Analyst, 2015, 140, 990-994
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02232G

Forensic determination of blood sample age using a bioaffinity-based assay
Juliana Agudelo, Crystal Huynh and Jan Halámek
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1411-1415
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02269F
Graphical Abstract
Oxidative damage in DNA bases revealed by UV Resonant Raman spectroscopy

Francesco D’Amico, Francesca Cammisuli, Riccardo Addobbati, Clara Rizzardi, Alessandro Gessini, Claudio Masciovecchio, Barbara Rossi and Lorella Pascolo
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1477-1485
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02364A

The lipid-reactive oxygen species phenotype of breast cancer. Raman spectroscopy and mapping, PCA and PLSDA for invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma. Molecular tumorigenic mechanis
Jakub Surmacki, Beata Brozek-Pluska, Radzislaw Kordek and Halina Abramczyk
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2121-2133
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01876A

Self-cleaning properties in engineered sensors for dopamine electroanalytical detection

Guido Soliveri, Valentina Pifferi, Guido Panzarasa, Silvia Ardizzone, Giuseppe Cappelletti, Daniela Meroni, Katia Sparnacci and Luigi Falciola
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1486-1494
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02219J

Near-infrared excited ultraviolet emitting upconverting phosphors as an internal light source in dry chemistry test strips for glucose sensing
T. Valta, V. Kale, T. Soukka and C. Horn
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02028F

Micromotors to capture and destroy anthrax simulant spores
Jahir Orozco, Guoqing Pan, Sirilak Sattayasamitsathit, Michael Galarnyk and Joseph Wang
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1421-1427
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02169J

Compact 3D-Printed Interface for Coupling Open Digital Microchips with Venturi Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry
Jie-Bi Hu, Ting-Ru Chen, Chia-Hsien Chang, Ji-Yen Cheng, Yu-Chie Chen and Pawel L. Urban
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1495-1501
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02220C

Rapid Microstructure Characterization of Polymer Thin Films with 2D-Array Multifocus Raman Microspectroscopy
Ashok Zachariah Samuel, Sohshi Yabumoto, Kenichi Kawamura and Koichi Iwata
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1847-1851
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01983K
Graphical Abstract
Real-time detection of H5N1 influenza virus through hyperbranched rolling circle amplification

Seyed Vahid Hamidi, Hedayatollah Ghourchian and Gholamreza Tavoosidana
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1502-1509
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01954G

Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots from Plant Cytoplasm as Selective and Sensitive Fluorescent Probes for Detecting P-Nitroaniline in Both Aqueous and Soil Systems
Haoran Yuan, Denian Li, Yan Liu, Xizhe Xu and Chuanxi Xiong
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1428-1431
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01869A

Simultaneous strain and temperature sensing using slightly tapered optical fiber with inner air-cavity
H. F. Chen, D. N. Wang and Y. Wang
Analyst, 2015, 140, 1859-1862
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02230K

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Analytical Science Twitter Poster Conference Winners

The Scientific Committee and Chair selected the top four posters presented at #RSCAnalyticalPoster to be awarded poster prizes. Here the winners tell us a little bit more about their research…

Following last month’s Analytical Science Twitter Poster Conference we are delighted to introduce the poster prize winners in this blog post. The event was a great success, featuring work from across the analytical sciences, submitted from all over the world. Around 80 posters were presented during the conference, as well as a couple of videos. Around 380 people took part, asking questions and sharing ideas, with Tweets from Europe, USA, Canada, South America, Africa, Asia and Australia. The science was excellent, subjects presented included diagnosing diseases using nanotechnology, detecting 3rd hand smoke with HPLC, analysing latent fingerprints and microbial metabolomics among many others.

We’d like to say a huge thank you to everyone who took part in the event, in particular the Chair and Scientific Committee for dedicating their time and efforts and making the event such a success!

Chair and Organisers, Matt Baker, University of Strathclyde, UK @ChemistryBaker, Royal Society of Chemistry Analyst @analystrsc, Analytical Methods @MethodsRSC and JAAS @JAASNews. Scientific Committee, Carsten Engelhard, Universität Siegen @EngelhrC, Craig Banks, Manchester Metropolitan University @Act_mmu, Damien Arrigan, Curtin University @arri_aus, Jean-Francois Masson, University of Montreal @Masson_chem, Karen Faulds, University of Strathclyde @FauldsKaren, Martin Resano, University of Zaragoza @MartinResano, Nick Stone, University of Exeter @profnickstone, Perdita Barran, The University of Manchester @PerditaB, Raychelle Burks, Doane College @DrRubidium, Renee JiJi, University of Missouri @ReneeJiJi, Richard Dluhy, University of Georgia @radluhy, Roy Goodacre, The University of Manchester @RoyGoodacre

Many congratulations to the four prize winners of the Analytical Science Twitter Poster Conference!

WINNER

Sarah-Jane Richards

@RichardsSJ

Poster: Cholera and Sugars

My PhD research has focussed on the neutralisation and detection of bacteria and toxins. I am particularly interested in the development of rapid, label-free and inexpensive diagnostics, especially methods for low resource settings, such as in less-developed countries. We use carbohydrate functionalised gold nanoparticles as a colourimetric test for detecting bacteria and toxins and have optimised the particle design so that the method gives rapid readouts in biologically relevant (saline) conditions. We have also shown that this method is compatible with a simple mobile phone camera set up, removing the need for a spectrometer, making the system preferable for use in low resource and low expertise environments.

In the future, I aspire to develop these diagnostic methods into kit-type formats in order to facilitate their use by untrained operators. I am also interested in developing a paper based lateral flow assay for toxin detection, which will further improve the viability of the system in low resource environments by significantly reducing the cost. Having just finished by PhD studies, I am in the process of exploring my options for carrying out post-doctoral research, with a future view to starting my own research group.


RUNNER UP

Zoe Ayres

@ZJAyres

Poster: Heavy metal detection in aqueous environments using a novel diamond-based electrochemical sensor

I am really pleased to be selected as a runner up for the #rscanalyticalposter competition, which has been a great opportunity for me to get my research out to a wider audience. Work involves the development of novel diamond-based electrochemical sensors, capitalising on the material and electrochemical properties of freestanding boron doped diamond (BDD) films, including chemical and mechanical inertness, large solvent window, low background currents and the ability to be processed into any geometry electrode. Focus is currently on the development of Electrochemical-X-ray Fluorescence (EC-XRF), with an aim of ultimately detecting trace heavy metals in-situ, at a lake or riverside. Here the BDD functions as both an electrode, to preconcentrate metals from solution onto the electrode surface and X-ray window, to enable unambigious chemical identification of the metals on the surface and quantification by XRF. My research goals are to develop diamond-based sensors for use in real-world applications, whilst my career plans are to stay within analytical chemistry where I would love to be involved in the R&D of new analytical techniques.

I would like to take the opportunity to thank my supervisor Professor Julie Macpherson and Diamond colleagues in the Warwick Electrochemistry and Interfaces group, as well as Element Six for the growth of the BDD X-ray window electrodes used in this project. Thank also go to EPSRC and Element Six for funding my PhD project (EPSRC Case award EP/L505110/1).


RUNNER UP

James Hands

@MrJamesHands

Poster: Illuminating the Future of Cancer Diagnosis via Serum ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy

James is a Chemistry PhD candidate who is developing rapid spectroscopic methodologies for cancer diagnosis in collaboration with clinical partners at Royal Preston NHS Foundation Trust and The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust supported by Brain Tumour North West and the Sydney Driscoll Neuroscience Foundation. His research work has established a robust and highly reproducible diagnostic method for the diagnosis of brain cancer with high sensitivities and specificities using patient sera and ATR-FTIR. James recently developed a stratified diagnostic approach which allows for rapid diagnosis of cancer vs. non-cancer, metastatic cancer vs. organ confined, brain cancer severity and the organ of origin for metastatic disease. This work has resulted in 4 publications and 2 journal front covers. In addition to the 2014 Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies Student Award, he has also been awarded Best Clinical Poster at the British Neuro-oncology Society Annual Meeting 2013 and awarded 2 prizes at the National Health Service (NHS) Research & Innovation Showcase 2013/14 at Royal Preston Hospital, UK. James’ future goals include continuing research in the USA as a postdoctoral researcher in the field of biomedical spectroscopy.


RUNNER UP

Emily-Rose Billinge

@ERBillinge

Poster: Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing for Bioassays

During my undergraduate degree in neuroscience I was fascinated by the discovery and measurement of biomarkers, especially in relation to making peripheral measurements to analyse the nervous system as, at current, it is very difficult to diagnose disorders of the brain and invasive measurements carry high risk. This led me to take up a PhD researching the development of new technologies and methodologies to be used in bioassays. To do this I anchor a capture probe, termed “aptamers”, to micro and nanoscale beads. Aptamers are sequences of DNA which can bind specific targets in solution, by attaching these to the surface of beads it is possible to have each bead capture the target protein in solution. We then follow and measure this interaction using a nanopore technology allowing us to identify and quantify proteins in solution. The system we use is rapid and is highly portable so it is hoped that one day this could lead towards point-of-care testing in the field.

Following on from this I’d really like a career which involves both scientific measurements and interaction with the public. I also thoroughly enjoy writing and want to improve scientific representation so hopefully in the future I will be able to incorporate this into my future work. For now, however, I’m fairly happy to see where the world takes me with no fixed agenda and enjoy the journey.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Phone camera checks water for arsenic

Written by Anisha Ratan for Chemistry World

UK scientists have developed a mobile phone-based system to help people avoid drinking water contaminated with arsenic.1 The phone’s camera measures quantum dot fluorescence in response to arsenic, achieving a limit of detection as low as 5μM.

Approximately 57 million people worldwide encounter As(III) concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended maximum of 10μg/L on a regular basis. Chronic exposure to this well known carcinogen and poison, which binds to proteins and impairs cell function, is one of the largest environmental health disasters in the world. Finding a portable, easy-to-use method to measure levels of this most toxic form of arsenic in drinking water is therefore vital.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


A step towards Mobile Arsenic measurement for surface waters
Camille Ann De Villiers, Marta C Lapsley and Elizabeth A H Hall
Analyst, 2015, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02368D

Do you fancy submitting an article to Analyst? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Pittcon 2015 – Will you be there?

Pittcon 2015Will you be at the Pittcon conference on 8-12 March in New Orleans?

If so, we’d love to invite you to join us for coffee at RSC booth #4301 and help celebrate the 30th Anniversary of JAAS!

Browse our books and journals and find out why RSC Publishing is the best home for your research. And enjoy a 30% conference discount on all books on display (or 35% if you are an RSC member).

You could also win an iPad mini – simply sign up for one of our email alerts at booth #4301 to be in with a chance of winning.

The following Editorial staff will be attending Pittcon and would be pleased to meet you and answer your questions:

Rebecca Brodie Rebecca Brodie

Deputy Editor, Analyst, Analytical Methods, JAAS.

Janet Freshwater

Janet Freshwater

Senior Commissioning Editor, Books

We’re delighted to be presenting the Robert Boyle Prize for Analytical Science to Professor Eric Bakker at Pittcon. Join us for his award symposium on Tuesday, March 10, 2015, 1:30 PM, Room 244.

Please feel free to get in touch with us before the conference to arrange a meeting.

We look forward to meeting you in New Orleans!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)