Bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine Themed collection- Submission Deadline extended!

Analyst has launched a themed collection to highlight bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine

The emphasis of this themed issue is on bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine. The field of healthcare continues to move from the inefficient, one-size-fits-all-patients medicine of today, toward the data-driven and personalised medicine of tomorrow. According to the Precision Medicine Initiative led by the National Institutes of Health, precision medicine is “an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person”. In cancer, precision medicine uses specific information about the patient and their tumour to help diagnose, plan treatment, determine optimal drug levels, monitor response to therapy, and/or assess likely disease recurrence.

In this collection we aim to cover bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine, including imaging, spectroscopy, machine learning and miniaturised technologies on both solid tumours and liquid biopsy samples. The focus of this collection is not limited to cancer but is relevant to other diseases such as cystic fibrosis, diabetes and infectious diseases.

Guest Editors

This collection is co-guest edited by Analyst Advisory Board member Professor Steven Soper (The University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA) and Professor Andrew Godwin (Director, Molecular Oncology, The University of Kansas Medical Center, USA).

Professor Steven Soper

Professor Andrew Godwin

 

Submission deadline extended to 

30th June 2019 

Contribute to this collection

We welcome submissions of original research and review articles. Articles will be added to the collection as they are accepted and the resulting issue will benefit from extensive promotion.

About Analyst

Guided by Editor-in-Chief Duncan Graham and an international team of associate editors and editorial board membersAnalyst publishes analytical and bioanalytical research that reports premier fundamental discoveries and inventions, and the applications of those discoveries, unconfined by traditional discipline barriers.

Interested in contributing?

Email analyst-rsc@rsc.org 

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Analyst themed issue on Next wave advances in single cell analyses

We are delighted to draw your attention to the recent Analyst themed issue highlighting work on next wave advances in single cell analyses focusing on emerging analytical advances in metabolomic, lipidomic, proteomic, and glycomic approaches – as well as high-dimensional approaches that unify multiple aspects of single-cell biology and medicine.

This collection was put together by Guest Editors Takehiko Kitamori (University of Tokyo, Japan), Amy E. Herr (University of California, Berkeley, USA), Ulf Landegren (Uppsala University, Sweden) and Masood Kamali-Moghaddam (Uppsala University, Sweden), who worked hard to create this issue and ensure that its content was of the highest quality. An Editorial by the Guest Editors prefaces the collection.

Read the full collection now: http://rsc.li/advances-in-single-cell-analyses

All papers in the collection are free to access until the end of May 2019 with an RSC Publishing Account.

We hope you enjoy reading the full collection. Take a look at a small selection of excellent articles featured in the collection below:

Critical Review
High throughput screening of complex biological samples with mass spectrometry – from bulk measurements to single cell analysis

Emily E. Kempa, Katherine A. Hollywood, Clive A. Smith and Perdita E. Barran

Minireview
Recent advances in single cell manipulation and biochemical analysis on microfluidics

Dan Gao, Feng Jin, Min Zhou and Yuyang Jiang

Minireview
Advances in mass spectrometry based single-cell metabolomics

Kyle D. Duncan, Jonas Fyrestam and Ingela Lanekoff

Paper
Gel-based cell manipulation method for isolation and genotyping of single-adherent cells

Ryo Negishi, Reito Iwata, Tsuyoshi Tanaka, David Kisailus, Yoshiaki Maeda, Tadashi Matsunaga and Tomoko Yoshino

Paper
Dual cationic–anionic profiling of metabolites in a single identified cell in a live Xenopus laevis embryo by microprobe CE-ESI-MS

Erika P. Portero and Peter Nemes

 

Keep up to date with Analyst throughout the year by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

 

Versatile electrochemistry approaches themed collection – Submit now

Bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine themed collection – Submit now

SPEC2018: International Society of Clinical Spectroscopy themed issue – Read now

Analyst Emerging Investigator SeriesApply now

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Top 10 Most Accessed Analyst Articles – Q1 2019

This month sees the following articles in Analyst from the last 12 months that are in the top ten most read from January – March 2019.

All articles have been made free to access until the end of May 2019. So, why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Reviews

High throughput screening of complex biological samples with mass spectrometry – from bulk measurements to single cell analysis
Emily E. Kempa, Katherine A. Hollywood, Clive A. Smith and Perdita E. Barran
Analyst, 2019,144, 872-891
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01448E

A review of sorting, separation and isolation of cells and microbeads for biomedical applications: microfluidic approaches
Arash Dalili, Ehsan Samiei and Mina Hoorfar
Analyst, 2019,144, 87-113
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01061G

Microfluidic bioanalytical flow cells for biofilm studies: a review
Mohammad Pousti, Mir Pouyan Zarabadi, Mehran Abbaszadeh Amirdehi, François Paquet-Mercier and Jesse Greener
Analyst, 2019,144, 68-86
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01526K

Review: a comprehensive summary of a decade development of the recombinase polymerase amplification
Jia Li, Joanne Macdonald and Felix von Stetten
Analyst, 2019,144, 31-67
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01621F

Recent advances in single cell manipulation and biochemical analysis on microfluidics
Dan Gao, Feng Jin, Min Zhou and Yuyang Jiang
Analyst, 2019,144, 766-781
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01186A

Advances in mass spectrometry based single-cell metabolomics
Kyle D. Duncan, Jonas Fyrestam and Ingela Lanekoff
Analyst, 2019,144, 782-793
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01581C

Editorial

Next wave advances in single-cell analyses
Amy E. Herr, Takehiko Kitamori, Ulf Landegren and Masood Kamali-Moghaddam
Analyst, 2019,144, 735-737
DOI: 10.1039/C9AN90011J

Papers

Merging metabolomics and lipidomics into one analytical run
Michaela Schwaiger, Harald Schoeny, Yasin El Abiead, Gerrit Hermann, Evelyn Rampler and Gunda Koellensperger
Analyst, 2019,144, 220-229
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01219A

Reporter bacteriophage T7NLC utilizes a novel NanoLuc::CBM fusion for the ultrasensitive detection of Escherichia coli in water
T. C. Hinkley, S. Garing, S. Singh, A-L. M. Le Ny, K. P. Nichols, J. E. Peters,J. N. Talbert and S. R. Nugen
Analyst, 2018,143, 4074-4082
DOI: 10.1039/C8AN00781K

Simultaneous non-polar and polar lipid analysis by on-line combination of HILIC, RP and high resolution MS
Evelyn Rampler, Harald Schoeny, Bernd M. Mitic, Yasin El Abiead, Michaela Schwaiger and Gunda Koellensperger
Analyst, 2018,143, 1250-1258
DOI: 10.1039/C7AN01984J

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Outstanding Reviewers for Analyst in 2018

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Analyst in 2018, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Hugh Byrne, Focas Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology ORCiD: 0000-0002-1735-8610

Professor Lingxin Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research ORCiD: 0000-0002-3764-3515

Professor Jeremy Driskell, Illinois State University ORCiD: 0000-0001-5082-898X

Professor Ning Gan, Ningbo University ORCiD: 0000-0001-9772-2437

Professor Hideaki Hisamoto, Osaka Prefecture University ORCiD: 0000-0003-1067-4116

Professor Young-Pil Kim, Hanyang University ORCiD: 0000-0001-7234-1320

Professor Feng Li, Qingdao Agricultural University ORCiD: 0000-0002-3894-6139

Professor Yi-Tao Long, East China University of Science and Technology ORCiD: 0000-0003-2571-7457

Professor Zachary Schultz, The Ohio State University ORCiD: 0000-0003-1741-8801

Dr Bhavya Sharma, University of Tennessee ORCiD: 0000-0003-4388-5702

Dr Muhammad Shiddiky, Griffith University ORCiD: 0000-0003-4526-4109

Dr James Wade, Dow Chemical ORCiD: 0000-0002-9740-1905

We would also like to thank the Analyst board and the analytical chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

 

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Versatile electrochemical approaches – Themed collection in Progress!

 

Analyst has launched a themed collection focusing on versatile electrochemical approaches for sensing, biology, and energy.

Solving pressing challenges in these fields requires the development of enabling tools and strategies that converge in fundamental concepts of analysis to address materials properties and charge transfer. In this collection, we aim to cover the broad range of cutting-edge electrochemical approaches being explored for the detection of analytes and the understanding of processes relevant to energy and biological systems. These approaches encompass nanoscale electrochemistry, rational electrode design, biomolecular analysis, and interface-sensitive methods. Accordingly, this collection will feature new electroanalytical strategies in characterising energy storage and energy harvesting systems, in biomedical diagnostics, and in measurement and imaging sciences.

 

 

Joaquin Rodriguez Lopez

Damien Arrigan

 

Guest Editors

This collection is co-guest edited by Analyst Associate Editor Professor Damien Arrigan  (Curtin University, Australia) and Associate Professor Joaquín Rodríguez López (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA).

 

 

 

 

 

Submission deadline: 30th September 2019 

 

 

Contribute to this collection

We welcome submissions of original research and review articles. Articles will be added to the collection as they are accepted and the resulting issue will benefit from extensive promotion.

About Analyst

Guided by Editor-in-Chief Duncan Graham and an international team of Associate Editors and Editorial Board membersAnalyst publishes analytical and bioanalytical research that reports premier fundamental discoveries and inventions, and the applications of those discoveries, unconfined by traditional discipline barriers.

Interested in contributing?

Email analyst-rsc@rsc.org

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21st Australia and New Zealand Electrochemistry Symposium

Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

The organising committee is especially interested in featuring the work from PhD research students and other early-career researchers. A confirmed keynote speaker is Prof. Andrea Russell from the University of Southampton, UK and Prof. Huijun Zhao from Griffith University, Australia.

Organising Committee

  • Prof. Anthony O’Mullane (QUT)
  • Dr. Muhammad Shiddiky (Griffith)
  • Dr. Yang Liu (JCU)
  • Dr. Ruth Knibbe (UQ)
  • Dr. Debbie Silvester-Dean (Curtin)
  • Prof. Damien Arrigan (Curtin)
  • Prof. Chuan Zhao (UNSW)
  • Ummul Sultana (QUT)

Important dates:

  • 8 February 2019: Deadline for abstract submission
  • 15 April 2019: early-bird registration deadline
  • 29 April 2019: Symposium

 

When: 29 -30 April 2019

Where: QUT, Gardens Point, OJW Room

Contact:

Anthony O’Mullane

Registration Fees

Early-bird** Normal
Members* $300 $350
Non-members $350 $400
Student members* $150 $200
Student non-members $200 $250
*RACI or ISE Members
**Early-bird rates: Before 15 April 2019

Please Click Here to Register

Please Click Here for the Flyer

Please Click Here for the Abstract Template

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1st European Top-Down Proteomics Symposium

The 1st European Top-Down Proteomics Symposium is taking place from 12th – 14th Febraury, 2019, in Paris, France.

The symposium will focus on top-down proteomics, the analysis of intact proteins and protein complexes using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

In this symposium, world-leading experts in top-down proteomics will present the most advanced technologies and approaches. A wide range of topics will be covered including the latest developments in instrumentation, sample preparation both in denaturing and native conditions, intact protein fractionation/separation, data analysis as well as applications in life sciences and human health.

Additionally, attendees will be encourage to take part in discussions on the future directions, challenges, and opportunities for top-down proteomics. In addition to notable scientists, the meeting will also attract younger researchers who are building their careers and are looking to interact with leaders in the field.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS

Dr Rodolphe Antoine, University of Lyon, France
Dr Alain Beck, Laboratoires Pierre Fabre, France
Pr Isabelle Fournier, University of Lille, France
Pr Albert Heck, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Pr Amy Herr, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Pr Ole Jensen, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
Pr Neil Kelleher, Northwestern University, USA
Pr Alexander Makarov, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Germany
Pr Dame Carol Robinson, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Pr Michal Sharon, Weizmann Institute, Israel
Dr Yuri Van der Burgt, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands
Pr Vicki Wysocki, Ohio State University, USA

ROUNDTABLES AND MODERATORS (CTDP)

Sample preparation, intact protein separation,instrumentation, data analysis
Dr Ljiljana Pasa-Tolic, Pacific Northwest, National Laboratory, USA
Dr Ying Ge, University of Wisconsin, USA
Industrial and regulatory applications (i.e. antibody and biologics analysis)
Dr Yury Tsybin, Spectroswiss, Switzerland
Dr Jeffrey Agar, Northeastern University, USA
Future directions of top-down proteomics
Pr Neil Kelleher, Northwestern University, USA
Pr Joseph Loo, University of California Los Angeles, USA
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Emerging Investigator Series – Ashley Ross

We are delighted to introduce our latest Analyst Emerging Investigator, Ashley Ross!

Ashley Ross is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University of Cincinnati (UC) and a member of the Neuroscience Department and Center for Pediatric Neuroscience. She received her BS in Chemistry in 2009 at Christopher Newport University and was an undergraduate intern at NASA Langley Research Center for 3 years working with Drs. Margaret Pippin and Gao Chen. She received a PhD in Chemistry in Dr. Jill Venton’s lab at the University of Virginia in 2014. In 2014, she became a post-doc in Dr. Rebecca Pompano’s lab at the University of Virginia and was an American Association of Immunologists (AAI) Careers in Immunology Fellow. Since 2017, she has been at UC working on developing electrochemical and microfluidic tools to investigate neurochemical regulated immunity.

Read Ashley’s Emerging Investigator Series paper “Subsecond detection of guanosine using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry” and find out more about her in the interview below:

 

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on subsecond detection of guanosine using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?
Over the last 10 years, I have focused on developing bioanalytical tools to study complex chemical signaling. My early work in graduate school focused on developing electrochemical tools to study the other important purine, adenosine. Specifically, I developed a new electrode modification procedure which combined carbon nanotubes and Nafion to enhance adenosine detection and I developed a new waveform for fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. My research soon evolved from developing novel tools to studying the release and function of rapid adenosine signaling in the brain. I switched gears quite a bit during my post-doc, where I focused on developing microfluidic tools to locally stimulate live lymph node slices to study the importance of the spatial complexity of the immune system and to quantitate cytokine diffusion within live tissue. My current research interests are focused on developing tools to study communication between the brain and the immune system. This particular paper went back to my roots a bit. We are really interested in guanosine signaling because of its rich involvement in neuroinflammatory processes; however, detecting millisecond changes in guanosine signaling in real-time is not possible with current technology. With FSCV, we are able to explore that rapid mode of signaling.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
I am very excited about the possibility of using FSCV to study brain-immune communication. How the brain and not only its immune system but the peripheral immune system communicates is not well understood, in part due to current technology. We are excited about all the new tools we are developing in the lab to help solve this technological barrier.

In your opinion, what is the biggest advantage of the fast-scan cyclic voltammetry method for guanosine detection?
Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry has excellent temporal and spatial resolution. With this technique, we can make measurements every 100 ms within discrete regions of the brain! Because we get a cyclic voltammogram, we are able to help distinguish what we are measuring. In the case of guanosine, a rapid extracellular signaling profile exists but the current techniques in the field to study guanosine signaling do not have the temporal resolution to capture it. With FSCV, we are hoping we can learn some interesting things about guanosine signaling in the brain!

What do you find most challenging about your research?
The biology! The brain and immune system are so complex! You can develop a technique on the bench but it can fail as soon as it is put into a complex matrix like tissue. Also, it is really difficult to predict what to expect when studying complex biological systems. We make hypotheses but I tell my students to not fall in love with those ideas! Everything can change when you start making actual measurements!

How do you spend your spare time?
I am a mother of two beautiful children, 6 year old Haylee and 3 year old Elijah. My husband Ronnie and I definitely spend most of our spare time with them. My daughter is in ballet, so chauffeuring her around to ballet practice and rehearsals is fun! I also enjoy singing in my spare time. I have been singing and performing since high school so it is definitely a nice “outlet” from work!

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?
I have always loved to perform whether it be in singing groups or in musicals, so probably a performer! But more realistically, maybe a paediatrician!

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?
I was given this advice and I think it is so valuable: In the early years, be in the lab with your students! When you are starting out, you are the expert and can help not only set the example in the lab but it helps foster a productive environment early on.

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SciX 2018, Atlanta, USA

SciX 2018, a conference featuring cutting edge developments in analytical sciences, instrumentation and unique applications, was held in Altanta, GA from October 21-26, 2018.

 

Award-Winning Scientists

The Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2018 recognizes an early career analytical scientist to raise the profile of the analytical sciences to the wider scientific community and general public. This year’s winner was Dr Wei Min, Columbia University, USA. His current research interests focus on developing novel optical spectroscopy and microscopy technology to address biomedical problems. In particular, his group has made important contributions to the development of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy and its broad application in biomedical imaging including bioorthogonal chemical imaging of small molecules and super-multiplex vibrational imaging.

Wei Min presents his Analyst Emerging Investigator Lecture

 

Analyst Chair Duncan Graham presents Wei Min with the Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship in Atlanta, USA

 

Wei gave a fascinating presentation during the Monday morning session, which was followed by a highly attended symposium of personally hand-picked speakers.

Symposium speakers: Juergen Popp, Duncan Graham, Richard Zare, Wei Min, Lingyan Shi, Katsumasa Fujita.

 

Congratulations Wei!

 

It also gives us great pleasure to announce that Analytical Methods Associate Editor Michael Roper and former Analytical Methods Editor-in-Chief Sue Lunte both received awards at SciX 2018.

Michael Roper was the recipient of the AES Mid-Career Award. After being presented with his award, Michael delivered a plenary lecture titled  “Electrophoretic Methods for Investigating Dynamic Behaviour of Pancreatic Cells”.

Analytical Methods Associate Editor Michael Roper (L) receives the AES Mid-Career Award.

 

The ANACHEM Award was awarded to Sue Lunte, who delivered her plenary lecture “Adventures in Electrically Driven Miniaturized Separations Systems for Bioanalysis” on Thursday 25th October.

Analytical Methods former Editor-in-Chief Sue Lunte (R) is presented with the ANACHEM Award by Professor Dana Spence.

 

We are extremely proud of Michael and Sue. Congratulations on well-deserved awards.

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Heinrich Emanuel Merck Award for Analytical Science 2019

In memory of the company’s founder Heinrich Emanuel Merck, the Merck Award has celebrated excellence in analytical chemistry for over two decades. It is open to researchers up to the age of 45 years who are developing solutions to analytical problems in the life, material and environmental sciences. This award honors scientists who are developing innovative analytical methods in chemistry with new applications that aim to improve human life.

The prize will be awarded for the 17th time at a special award ceremony at the EuroAnalysis2019 in Istanbul, Turkey from 1st – 5th September, 2019.

The judging panel will be chaired by Professor Renato Zenobi (ETH Zürich) and supported by 5 intentionally renowned analytical scientists.

Applications and nominations should be submitted before the deadline on 31st December 2018 to the following address:

Professor Renato Zenobi
ETH Zürich
Laboratory of Organic Chemistry
HCI E 329
CH-8093 Zürich, Switzerland
Email: zenobi@org.chem.ethz.ch

Further details 

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