International Mass Spectrometry Conference 2014

International Mass Spectrometry Conference 2014The 20th International Mass Spectrometry Conference (IMSC) 2014 is fast approaching and this year will be held in Geneva, Switzerland, Aug 24-29, 2014.

Run jointly by the Swiss Group for Mass Spectrometry (SGMS), the French Mass Spectrometry Society (SFSM), the Division of Mass Spectrometry of the Italian Chemical Society (DSM), and under the auspices of the International Mass Spectrometry Foundation (IMSF), the meeting returns to Europe in 2014, after Kyoto (2012) and before it goes overseas again, to Toronto (2016).

Travel grant deadline is soon!  30 July 2014 – so get your applications in

For more information see the website: http://www.imsc2014.ch/

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Chemistry and Art

Will there be blood? - by Caroline Grainger

2014 is the Royal Society of Chemistry year of Chemistry and Art! There have been a number of initiatives around this, and we are pleased to promote some recent work the Analyst and Analytical Methods has been involved in.

50 Shades of Green - by Paul Jackson

Founded by Yalda Javadi, Ionic Magazine aims to bridge the gap between science and art and is published as an online magazine four times a year. Javadi says ‘The two subject matters are often considered to be poles apart and from two very different worlds. Science is about truth, about following rules and laws that help answer fundamental rational questions, whereas art invokes emotional connections through expression, impressions, concepts and creations. Yet both create a sense of mystery, both are matched when it comes to skill, creativity, imagination and impact.’

She created Ionic Magazine as a way to visually express modern day scientific breakthroughs. The ultimate goal: a stunning and stimulating collaboration of two traditionally contrasting worlds.

Fishing for isinglass - by Angie Brown

In collaboration with the Royal Society of Chemistry, Issue 6 of Ionic Magazine has a selection of papers from the Molecular Analysis for Art, Archaeometry and Conservation themed collection. This collection of papers across Analyst and Analytical Methods highlighted cutting edge analytical research from academia, national laboratories and museums showing the most recent analytical breakthroughs in the field of cultural heritage. The articles described those techniques recently employed to study art and cultural objects at the molecular level, characterising their structure, properties and chemistry.

Why not take a look at the beautifual and fascinating collection of artwork inspired by this selection of research papers?

As Javadi asks -Right side or left side brain, which way do you swing?

A selection of these papers will be free to read until Aug 3rd.

You may also be interested to read the lates issue of Chemistry World, a special issue of Chemistry and Art.

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HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our recent HOT Analyst articles, these are now free to access for the next few weeks!

Designing and fabricating double resonance substrate with metallic nanoparticles–metallic grating coupling system for highly intensified surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopyDesigning and fabricating double resonance substrate with metallic nanoparticles–metallic grating coupling system for highly intensified surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy
Ying Zhou, Xuanhua Li, Xingang Ren, Liangbao Yang and Jinhuai Liu  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00540F

Bimetallic Pd–Pt supported graphene promoted enzymatic redox cycling for ultrasensitive electrochemical quantification of microRNA from cell lysates
Fang-Fang Cheng, Jing-Jing Zhang, Ting-Ting He, Jian-Jun Shi, E. S. Abdel-Halim and Jun-Jie Zhu
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00777H

Recent developments in proteomic methods and disease biomarkers
Nina Bergman and Jonas Bergquist  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00627E

An Ru(II)–Fe(III) bimetallic complex as a multifunctional device for detecting, signal amplifying, and degrading oxalate
Cheuk-Fai Chow, Pui-Yu Ho and Cheng-Bin Gong  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00350K

High specific detection of osteopontin using a three-dimensional copolymer layer support based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
Hongxia Chen, Qiaohan Mei, Shengsong Jia, Kwangnak Koh, Keming Wang and Xinjian Liu
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00576G

Fluorometric/colorimetric logic gates based on BODIPY-functionalized mesoporous silica
Heekyoung Choi, Ji Ha Lee and Jong Hwa Jung  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00251B

Monitoring UVR induced damage in single cells and isolated nuclei using SR-FTIR microspectroscopy and 3D confocal Raman imaging
Ewelina Lipiec, Keith R. Bambery, Philip Heraud, Wojciech M. Kwiatek, Don McNaughton, Mark J. Tobin, Christian Vogel and Bayden R. Wood  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00838C

Up-regulating pyocyanin production by amino acid addition for early electrochemical identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Hunter J. Sismaet, Thaddaeus A. Webster and Edgar D. Goluch  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00756E

Analysis of ethyl and methyl centralite vibrational spectra for mapping organic gunshot residues
Jianbo Zeng, Ji Qi, Fuquan Bai, Jorn Chi Chung Yu and Wei-Chuan Shih  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00657G

Separation and sensitive determination of sphingolipids at low femtomole level by using HPLC-PIESI-MS/MS
Chengdong Xu, Eduardo Costa Pinto and Daniel W. Armstrong
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00775A

Affinity-based precipitation via a bivalent peptidic hapten for the purification of monoclonal antibodiesParameters affecting ion intensities in transmission-mode direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry
Michael W. Handlogten, Jared F. Stefanick, Peter E. Deak and Basar Bilgicer  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00780H

Parameters affecting ion intensities in transmission-mode direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry
Lindsay P. Harding, Gareth M. B. Parkes and James D. Townend  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00859F

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175 Faces of Chemistry – Martha Whiteley

Martha Whiteley

Martha Whiteley

“There is a long-established and inveterate prejudice… that girls are less capable of mental cultivation, and less in need of it, than boys” reported the 1868 Schools Inquiry Commission.

Analyst, and the historic J. Chem. Soc., Trans. contributor Martha Whiteley did much to reverse this prejudice, for which she has been nominated as an “175 Face of Chemistry”.

This Friday, why not take some time out to explore our journal archives, discover her research, and read about her campaigning for women fellows’ admission to the Royal Society – and the problems along the way (why should men be preferred simply because ‘they wear a distinctive dress and are privileged to grow a moustache?’ – Nature editor, 1909).

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Identifying DNA stucture using SERS

Detecting G-quadruplexes using SERS of silver nanoparticles

Differentiating quadruplexes from duplexes using silver nanoparticles and SERS

A promising drug target and ligand-binding site, G-quadruplexes form via Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding in guanine bases. These quartets are rich in guanine and are stabilized through π-π stacking interactions and a cation such as potassium or sodium. As researchers explore new compounds to target this region to treat diseases such as cancer, the structure of these quadruplexes and their response to ligands compared to standard DNA remains understudied. 

Researchers at the University of Strathclyde have used the sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect the formation of G-quadruplexes in the presence of stabilizing ligands and silver nanoparticles. They successfully differentiated the quadruplex DNA structure from the duplex based on the SERS signal, and demonstrated the capability of SERS in identifying higher order DNA structures. To read more about the qualitative detection of these structures, click the link below. It will be free to read until June 30. 

Qualitative SERS analysis of G-quadruplex DNAs using selective stabilizing ligands
K. Gracie, V. Dhamodharan, P. I. Pradeepkumar, K. Faulds and   D. Graham
Analyst
, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00551A
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Graphene Hybrids Join the Hunt for Mercury

Graphene-polyfuran hybrids for Hg sensing

Graphene-polyfuran hybrids for Hg sensing

Commonly associated with dental fillings, mercury has a wide range of industrial and domestic applications. However, it can be toxic to humans and the environment even in small concentrations, and has been linked to a number of fatal diseases including pulmonary edema and cyanosis.

Previously developed methods of mercury detection include photochemical, colorimetric and oligonucleotide-based approaches. However, these methods can be slow, expensive and associated with low sensitivity and selectivity for the analyte. Graphene composite materials, with their unusual and enhanced conductivity properties, are an attractive prospect for metal ion analysis.

Researchers led by Professor Jyongsik Jang at the Seoul National University, Korea, have developed a new class of graphene oxide-polyfuran nanotube hybrids. In this “HOT” Analyst paper, the authors test the potential of their graphene-based materials as high performance sensors for mercury ion detection. This method has proved to be highly selective for Hg2+ over other metal ions and has excellent sensitivity even at low mercury concentrations.

This article will be free to read until 30th June.

High-performance Hg2+ FET-type sensors based on reduced graphene oxide–polyfuran nanohybrids
Jin Wook Park, Seon Joo Park, Oh Seok Kwon, Choonghyen Lee and Jyongsik Jang
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00403E

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Gordon F. Kirkbright Bursary Award, 2015, OPEN!

Gordon F. Kirkbright Bursary Award, 2015, now open for nominations

The Gordon F. Kirkbright bursary award is a prestigious annual award that enables a promising student/non-tenured young scientist of any nation to attend a recognised scientific meeting or visit a place of learning.

The fund for this bursary was established in 1985 as a memorial to Professor Gordon Kirkbright in recognition of his contributions to analytical spectroscopy and to science in general. Although the fund is administered by the Association of British Spectroscopists (ABS) Trust, the award is not restricted to spectroscopists.

Applications are invited for the 2015 Gordon Kirkbright Bursary.

For further information contact John Chalmers at, email: vibspecconsult@aol.com

The closing date for entries is 31 December 2014.

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HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our new HOT articles just published in Analyst and free for you for the next couple of weeks:

Two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheets as a capillary GC stationary phase for highly effective molecular screening
Jia Jia, Fujian Xu, Shanling Wang, Xue Jiang, Zhou Long and Xiandeng Hou 
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00332B, Communication

On the optimization of operating conditions for Taylor dispersion analysis of mixtures
Hervé Cottet, Jean-Philippe Biron and Michel Martin  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00192C, PaperHot articles in Analyst

Capillary electrophoresis based on the nucleic acid detection in the application of cancer diagnosis and therapy
Dong-Sheng Lian and Shu-Jin Zhao  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00400K, Minireview

Micropatterning neuronal networks
Heike Hardelauf, Sarah Waide, Julia Sisnaiske, Peter Jacob, Vanessa Hausherr, Nicole Schöbel, Dirk Janasek, Christoph van Thriel and Jonathan West  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00608A, Paper

BRET-linked ATP assay with luciferase
Golnaz Borghei and Elizabeth A. H. Hall  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00436A, Paper

An ultra-high-throughput spiral microfluidic biochip for the enrichment of circulating tumor cells
Majid Ebrahimi Warkiani, Bee Luan Khoo, Daniel Shao-Weng Tan, Ali Asgar S. Bhagat, Wan-Teck Lim, Yoon Sim Yap, Soo Chin Lee, Ross A. Soo, Jongyoon Han and Chwee Teck Lim  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00355A, Paper

A purge and trap integrated microGC platform for chemical identification in aqueous samples
Muhammad Akbar, Shree Narayanan, Michael Restaino and Masoud Agah  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00254G, PaperHot articles in Analyst

Hybridization chain reaction-based fluorescence immunoassay using DNA intercalating dye for signal readout
Yan Deng, Ji Nie, Xiao-hui Zhang, Ming-Zhe Zhao, Ying-Lin Zhou and Xin-Xiang Zhang  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00190G, Paper

Evaluating the sensitivity of hybridization-based epigenotyping using a methyl binding domain protein
Brandon W. Heimer, Tatyana A. Shatova, Jungkyu K. Lee, Kaja Kaastrup and Hadley D. Sikes  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00667D, Communication

Qualitative SERS analysis of G-quadruplex DNAs using selective stabilising ligands
K. Gracie, V. Dhamodharan, P. I. Pradeepkumar, K. Faulds and D. Graham 
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00551A, Paper

A water-soluble sulfonate-BODIPY based fluorescent probe for selective detection of HOCl/OCl in aqueous media
Jiyoung Kim and Youngmi Kim 
Analyst, 2014,139, 2986-2989
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00466C, Communication

A coumarin-based fluorescent probe for differential identification of sulfide and sulfite in CTAB micelle solution
Haiyu Tian, Junhong Qian, Qian Sun, Chenjia Jiang, Runsheng Zhang and Weibing Zhang 
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00478G, Paper

Upconversion nanoparticles for ratiometric fluorescence detection of nitrite
Junfen Han, Cheng Zhang, Fei Liu, Bianhua Liu, Mingyong Han, Wensheng Zou, Liang Yang and Zhongping Zhang 
Analyst, 2014,139, 3032-3038
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00402G, Paper

Split aptazyme-based catalytic molecular beacons for amplified detection of adenosine
Jin Huang, Yong He, Xiaohai Yang, Kemin Wang, Ke Quan and Xiaoping Lin 
Analyst, 2014,139, 2994-2997
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00454J, CommunicationHot articles in Analyst

High-performance Hg2+ FET-type sensors based on reduced graphene oxide–polyfuran nanohybrids
Jin Wook Park, Seon Joo Park, Oh Seok Kwon, Choonghyen Lee and Jyongsik Jang 
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00403E, Communication

One-step prepared fluorescent copper nanoclusters for reversible pH-sensing
Wei Wang, Fei Leng, Lei Zhan, Yong Chang, Xiao Xi Yang, Jing Lan and Cheng Zhi Huang  
Analyst, 2014,139, 2990-2993
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00113C, Communication

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Developing a Professional Society and Vitamin G

Matthew J. Baker is a web-writer for Analyst. He is currently Senior Lecturer in Toxicology and Analytical Chemistry at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan), UK and Co-I and Younger Members Lead for the CLIRSPEC Network

Starting with a dark morning (due to being up at 4:00 am) I got to Manchester airport to meet up with my colleagues Dr Alex Henderson and Profs Roy Goodacre and Peter Gardner. A very quick and easy flight over to Dublin and we were at the mercy of our excellent host Prof. Hugh Byrne at the FOCAS Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology. The reason we were all here was the 2nd quarterly meeting of the Clinical Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy Network (www.clirspec.org) funded by an EPSRC Network Grant.

We had a lot to get through including feedback on the progress of the working parties, which will do the main work of the network, but also to report on the progress we have made so far. In a short amount of time we have been able to communicate our developments through our members at Pittcon2014, secure a session at SciX2014 and at Pittcon 2015, advertise ourselves through a Special Issue of the Journal of Biophotonics on “Photonic Biofluid Diagnostics” and importantly (very hot of the press) had a RSC Faraday Discussion accepted for 2016 on “Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy for Biomedical Diagnostics”.

Through this meeting we have managed to establish a Summer School that will take place in 2015 on the shores of Lake Windermere and our first conference that will be held at the University of Exeter hosted by Prof. Nick Stone and Dr Julian Moger in April 2015.  Stay tuned for more information soon.

A running theme of the meeting was the fact that we wanted to engage with the industrial and clinical communities to a greater extent and as such we are glad to be able to sponsor the invited talk of Prof. Hugh Barr at SPEC 2014, Krakow, Poland. The long first day came to close and Prof. Byrne was kind enough to take us for a drink (or two) of Vitamin G.

The next day of the meeting was solely set aside to discuss the development of an international professional society in clinical spectroscopy: the main thrust of our exit strategy. What we didn’t realise when the agenda was set was the potential minefield of logistical problems that we were getting into. However, after many hours discussion, we have a good plan and hope to be able to provide more information soon on how the dynamic world wide community of clinicians, industrialist and academics in our exciting field can get together in order to make a difference to the delivery of healthcare for the benefit of patients

Until the next time…

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What Affects the Coffee Ring of Biofluids?

Matthew J. Baker is a web-writer for Analyst. He is currently Senior Lecturer in Toxicology and Analytical Chemistry at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan), UK

When a drop is applied to a surface and dries, a number of factors control the formation of the dried drop. Essentially as the fluid or solvent evaporates, capillary flow transports molecules to the contact line of the drop with the surface and the drop dries as a ring with components coarsely separated, like a coffee ring.

Images of sessile drop formation

Drop deposition of biofluids is being investigated worldwide as a possible diagnostic tool. However, the parameters that affect the formation of the biofluids coffee ring are not fully understood and this is a barrier that needs to be overcome in order to realise the clinical potential of drop deposited biofluids. Drop deposition is particularly well suited for examining low abundance biofluids such as tears and synovial fluids but is also widely investigated for blood plasma and serum.

A team of US researchers, based at the University of Michigan, have recently published a HOT article characterising biofluids prepared by drop deposition. The researchers studied two model biofluids, blood plasma and synovial fluid, when deposited onto slightly hydrophilic substrates with a contact angle of 50 – 90 degrees. The researchers showed that under most circumstances the model biofluids followed the piling model, as suggested by Deegan et al. and that an increased understanding of the time-dependent rheology and intermolecular forces that occur during evaporation would provide a better approximation. Importantly, from molecular analysis of the drop via Raman spectroscopy, that whilst the morphology of the dried drop changed the chemical composition and molecular structure of the dried proteins within the outer ring were unaffected.

Karen Esmonde-White, one of the authors, comments “The formation of a ring-like structure and compatibility of the drop deposition technique with multiple analytical technologies are well-known features of drop deposition. In this study, we aimed to formalize what is mostly observational data regarding the underlying fluid dynamics of ring formation in drying biofluids. We hope that this work will improve our understanding of the underlying fluid dynamics and their effect on the dried deposit shape and chemical composition. These fundamental studies allow us to define sources of experimental variability in the drop deposition technique and improve its reproducibility. The eventual aim of these studies is clinical translation for examining rheological and chemical changes in synovial fluid associated with joint diseases”.

Characterization of biofluids prepared by sessile drop formation
Karen A. Esmonde-White, Francis W. L. Esmonde-White, Michael D. Morris and Blake J. Roessler
Analyst, 2014,139, 2734-2741
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02175K
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