Emerging Investigator Series – Rebecca Whelan

Analyst is delighted to introduce our latest Emerging Investigator, Rebecca Whelan! You can read Dr Whelan’s paper, Affinity-free enrichment and mass spectrometry analysis of the ovarian cancer biomarker CA125 (MUC16) from patient-derived ascites, and find out more about her in the interview below!


Rebecca Whelan was born and raised in various small Wisconsin towns. She earned her B.A. with a double major in Chemistry and English from Lawrence University in Appleton, WI. She then moved west, joining Dick Zare’s lab at Stanford University for graduate work. Her focus there was the development of biosensor detectors for capillary electrophoresis (CE) separations. CE separations and affinity recognition remained core themes during her postdoc with Bob Kennedy at the University of Michigan and the start of her independent career at Oberlin College. Rebecca established a vigorous bioanalytical chemistry research program centered on undergraduate scholars at Oberlin and remained there for 14 years. She was excited to have the chance to relocate to the University of Notre Dame in August 2018. The Whelan lab at Notre Dame works in bioanalytical chemistry, using molecular recognition, small-scale separations, and mass spectrometry to characterize and detect ovarian cancer biomarkers.


  1. Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on analysis of an ovarian cancer biomarker, using mass spectrometry. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

Our first article on using mass spectrometry to analyse ovarian cancer biomarker CA125 (MUC16) was a method development paper, in which we showed the compatibility of suspension trapping with this large mucin protein (Anal Bioanal Chem, 2020, 412, 6361-6370). That study used two commercially available sources of CA125, one being a truncated variant expressed in CHO cells, and the other being full-length protein isolated from pooled human biofluids. The innovation in this most recent paper is analysing the CA125 isolated from the biofluids of individual ovarian cancer patients.

 

  1. What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

We are excited—and humbled—by the opportunity to continue working with samples from individuals with ovarian cancer. As we apply our bottom-up proteomics analysis strategy to samples derived from a larger number of individuals, we will look both for what is shared among samples and what is unique to individuals. The possibility of breaking through the current paradigm of how CA125 is detected to find a personalized CA125 signature that is detectable by mass spectrometry is very exciting to us. Such an innovation would generate new opportunities in personalized care for this serious disease. At the same time, we will continue to push the analytical performance of our method, lowering the limit of detection and improving quantitation through targeted analysis.

 

  1. In your opinion, what is the biggest advantage to using a mass spectrometry based assay, over other possible methods of analysis?

CA125 is currently detected through an immunoassay that has remain largely unchanged for decades. As with any immunoassay, what the assay really detects is an epitope, which in this case is mostly likely a discontinuous peptide sequence. Amazingly, the epitopes of CA125 have not been definitively identified (although we, and others, are actively working on that!) We wondered: what if some CA125 proteoforms in a patient’s blood happen to contain fewer epitopes, or happen to present epitopes in configurations that are not detectable by the immunoassay? Such samples would be incorrectly assessed as containing less CA125 than they actually do, which could have significant clinical implications. Mass spectrometry side-steps this dependence on epitope recognition completely.

 

  1. What do you find most challenging about your research?

CA125 (MUC16) is a challenging analyte. It’s the second-largest protein in the human body, with a variable molecular weight of 3 to 5 MDa, depending on its glycosylation. Like many other mucin proteins, it’s sticky: after all, one of its biological functions is to make mucus! In practical terms, this large size and stickiness means that if you aren’t careful, the protein will adsorb irreversibly to tips and tubes while also sticking to itself. In previous work, my group used this stickiness to advantage, performing aptamer selection inside tubes to which CA125 had adsorbed (J. Nucleic Acids, 2017, Article ID 9879135, 9 pages). For quantitation, however, the stickiness poses an obstacle that must be overcome. In addition to the analyte’s innate challenge, we work with a challenging sample matrix: crude human biofluid is our starting material. Any analyst who has tried to transition an assay from well-controlled conditions (commercially available analyte dissolved in buffer) to real-life samples knows that complexity and challenge abound in the real world. We firmly believe, however, that analytical researchers must strive to work within this complexity, because that it how real benefit to human health can be achieved.

 

  1. At which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

Naviya Schuster-Little—the graduate student who is first author on this paper—will be presenting at Pittcon 2021 in a virtual session (Tuesday, March 9, 8:30 am – 8:50 am) and would love to hear your feedback and answer your questions! I am a devoted attendee of the Midwestern Universities Analytical Chemistry Conference (MUACC) and the Gordon Research Conference on Bioanalytical Sensors, as well as Pittcon.

 

  1. How do you spend your spare time?

Music is a big part of my life. I’ve had several stints as a DJ on college radio stations in cities where I’ve lived, including Appleton, Wisconsin (WLFM) and Oberlin, Ohio (WOBC). I also love to cook (vegetarian, mostly) and go on rambles in places both familiar and unfamiliar.

 

  1. Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

I’m from a family of educators and can’t imagine a life that does not involve teaching in some capacity. As an undergraduate, I completed an English major as well as a Chemistry major and edited my college’s literary magazine. After college, I seriously considered earning a PhD in 17th century English literature (I love John Donne!) or an MFA in poetry. So maybe I would be a teacher of writing or literature.


If you are interested in reading other articles from the Emerging Investigator Series, you can find them here.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Emerging Investigator Series: Jean-Nicolas Dumez

Introducing one of our recent Emerging Investigator Series authors, Dr Jean-Nicolas Dumez! Read Dr Dumez’s recent paper ‘online reaction monitoring by single-scan 2D NMR under flow conditions,’ and find out more about him in the interview below!


Jean-Nicolas Dumez is a CNRS associate scientist at the University of Nantes, working on the developments of NMR methods for the analysis of solution mixture. He did a Ph.D. in solid-state NMR at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon in France, followed by two post-doctoral stays, working in magnetic resonance imaging, at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, then in hyperpolarisation, at the University of Southampton in the UK. He joined the CNRS and moved to solution-state NMR in 2014, first in Paris-Saclay, then in Nantes. He works on the development of NMR methods, and currently focuses on the analysis of solution mixtures.


Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on 2D NMR for online reaction monitoring. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

I have worked in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) since my master’s research project, but I have moved from solids to imaging to liquids. My main interest is in the development and use of spin-dynamics tools and concepts to look at molecules. I have enjoyed moving between topics, and this paper includes ingredients collected along the way in these different areas.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

We are working on fast methods related to the ones described in the Analyst paper, which use diffusion information to separate the spectra of molecules in a mixture. This involves concepts that we borrow from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and a nice mix of theory, experiments and simulation. We are also working towards reaction monitoring with these methods.

In your opinion, what is the biggest advantage to using single-scan ultrafast 2D NMR compared to other NMR methods?

The obvious advantage is speed. For out-of-equilibrium systems (chemical reactions, hyperpolarised substrates) that evolves on a minute timescale or less, there is often no other way to collect a full 2D NMR spectrum.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

When developing NMR methods, sometimes finding the right concept is the most challenging aspect and then everything runs smoothly. Sometimes turning this concept into something that works for more than special cases is the real challenge. Both can be interesting, and I find it hard to predict in advance.   

At which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I usually participate to magnetic resonance conferences such as EUROMAR and ENC. Hopefully the NMR community will be able meet in Asilomar next year!

How do you spend your spare time?

Most of my time outside the lab is happily spent with my family, and I occasionally still get a chance to read a few pages from a novel or listen to a recent record.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

I have never contemplated a profession that was not science related, be it teaching, fundamental research, R & D…


 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

New Associate Editor: Karen Faulds

Analyst welcomes Professor Karen Faulds (University of Strathclyde, UK) as our newest Associate Editor.


Karen Faulds is a Professor in the Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry at the University of Strathclyde and an expert in the development of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and Raman techniques for novel analytical detection strategies and in particular multiplexed bioanalytical applications. She has published over 140 peer reviewed publications and has filed 5 patents. She has been awarded over £20M in funding as principal and co-investigator from EPSRC, BBSRC, charities, industry and governmental bodies. Her Groups research has been recognised through multiple awards including the Nexxus Young Life Scientist of the Year Award (2009), Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) Joseph Black Award (2013), Craver Award (2016) and Charles Mann Award (2019). She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (2012), the Society for Applied Spectroscopy (2017) and the Royal Society of Edinburgh (2018). She has been named as one of the Top 50 Women in Analytical Science (2016), Top 10 Spectroscopist (2017) and Top 100 Influential Analytical Scientists (2019) by The Analytical Scientist. She has given over 90 invited talks at national and international conferences.

She was elected as the first female and youngest Chair of the Infrared and Raman Discussion Group (IRDG) in 2014 which is the oldest spectroscopic discussion society in the UK. She is an appointed member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) Chemical Biology Interface Division Council and a member of the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACSS) Governing Board and a member of the International Steering Committee of the International Conference on Raman Spectroscopy (ICORS). She is the Strathclyde Director of the EPSRC and MRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Optical Medical Imaging joint between the Universities of Edinburgh and Strathclyde, serves on the editorial board of RSC Advances and the editorial advisory board for Analyst, Chemical Society Reviews and Analytical Chemistry.


Read some of Karen’s recent Analyst papers here:

DNA detection by SERS: Hybridisation parameters and the potential for asymmetric PCR

DOI: 10.1039/c9an01732a

 

Detection of cardiovascular disease associated miR-29a using paper-based microfluidics and surface enhanced Raman scattering

DOI: 10.1039/c9an01748h

 

Surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) for probing through plastic and tissue barriers using a handheld spectrometer

DOI: 10.1039/c8an01249k

 

Development of a label-free Raman imaging technique for differentiation of malaria parasite infected from non-infected tissue

DOI: 10.1039/c7an01760j


Karen also served as a Guest Editor for Analyst‘s recent Analytical Nanoscience themed collection. You can read the collection here.


Submit your best work to Karen now!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

New Editor-in-Chief of Analyst – Norm Dovichi

Analyst is delighted to welcome a new Editor-in-Chief, Norm Dovichi. 

Norman Dovichi is an emeritus professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame. He received his BSc with a dual major in Chemistry and Mathematics from Northern Illinois University and his PhD in Physical Analytical Chemistry from the University of Utah, where he was Joel Harris’s first PhD student. He spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with Dick Keller. Since then he has held faculty positions at the Universities of Wyoming, Alberta, and Washington before moving to Notre Dame. Dovichi has graduated 69 PhD students, has published over 300 papers, holds seven US patents, and has given over 350 invited talks. He has served on the editorial advisory boards of 16 journals and served as Associate Editor for Analytical Chemistry for 17 years. He also has been named as an honorary professor at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

His group played a pioneering role in a range of research topics in analytical chemistry. In the 1980s, he introduced the concept of single molecule detection to the chemical literature; in recognition for this work, he was invited as a plenary lecturer at the Nobel Conference on Single Molecule Spectroscopy held in 1999. In the 1990s, his group developed capillary array electrophoresis instruments for high-throughput DNA sequencing. He was recognized for this work by the journal Science as an “Unsung Hero of the Human Genome Project” and he was a plenary lecturer at the symposium on the Evolution of DNA Sequencing Technology, held at Cold Springs Harbor in 2015. Over the last decade, his group has focused its attention on coupling capillary electrophoresis with tandem mass spectrometry as a tool for high throughput and high sensitivity proteomic analysis. This instrumentation has been patented and is now marked by CMP Scientific and Agilent. Finally, his group has recently coupled capillary electrophoresis with next-generation DNA sequencing for the comprehensive metagenomic analysis of complex environmental microbiomes.


Analyst would also like to take this opportunity to thank our previous Editor-in-Chief, Professor Duncan Graham, for his service to the journal.


Submit your best work to Norm and our team of Associate Editors now! 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2020 Winner

Analyst is delighted to announce the winner of our 2020 Emerging Investigator Lectureship, Yi-Lun Ying. This Lectureship was launched to be a platform for an early career analytical scientist to raise the profile of the analytical sciences to the wider scientific community and general public.

Yilun Ying

Dr. Yi-Lun Ying received her B.Sc in Fine Chemistry (2009), and Ph.D in Analytical Chemistry (2014) from East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST). After a doctoral exchange study in the University of Birmingham (2014), Dr. Ying carried out her postdoctoral research on nanopore single-molecule analysis and nanoscaled biosensors at ECUST. Since 2016, she started her independent work on the nanopore electrochemistry at ECUST. In 2019, she was promoted to professor at State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science in Nanjing University and also acted as a co-PI at the Chemistry and Biomedicine Innovation Center.

Dr. Ying currently focuses on developing electro-optical nanopore sensing modules for addressing peptide/protein sequencing and revealing the heterogeneous structure-activity relationship of the single biomolecules. To push the detection limit of the electrochemical measurement, her team is currently exploring the advanced artificial intelligence for nanopore arrays and innovating new sensing mechanisms to reserve the richest single molecule dynamics.

Dr. Ying’s work has been recognized by several awards and honors, including the L’Oreal-UNESCO International Rising Talents (2016), Excellent Young Scholars of National Natural Science Foundation of China (2019), National Ten Thousand Talent Program for Young Top-Notch Talent (2019). She has also served as an Editor for Results in Chemistry from its inception.

Once again, we offer our warmest congratulations to Yi-Lun on her acheivement!


Read some of Dr Ying’s most recent Analyst papers here*:

A thumb-size electrochemical system for portable sensors
Analyst, 2018, 143, 2760-2764
The analysis of single cysteine molecules with an aerolysin nanopore
Analyst, 2020,145, 1179-1183
Analyst, 2020,145, 2510-2514
*Free to read until July 15th with an RSC publishing account
Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Outstanding Reviewers for Analyst in 2019

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Analyst in 2019, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Hugh Byrne, Dublin Institute of Technology, ORCID: 0000-0002-1735-8610

Professor Lingxin Cen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, ORCID: 0000-0002-3764-3515

Dr Yu-Chung Chang, Washington State University, ORCID: 0000-0002-2764-7010

Professor Jeremy Driskell, Illinois State University, ORCID: 0000-0001-5082-898X

Professor Ning Gan, Ningbo University, ORCID: 0000-0001-9772-2437

Professor Hideaki Hisamoto, Osaka Prefecture University, ORCID: 0000-0003-1067-4116

Dr Juewen Liu, University of Waterloo, ORCID: 0000-0001-5918-9336

Professor Francis Martin, University of Central Lancashire, ORCID: 0000-0001-8562-4944

Dr Muhammad Shiddiky, Griffith University, ORCID: 0000-0003-4526-4109

Dr Chun-yang Zhang, Shandong Normal University, ORCID: 0000-0002-8010-1981

We would also like to thank the Analyst board and the analytical chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with an application form and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Biomedical Raman Imaging themed collection

Analyst is very pleased to announce the launch of our latest themed collection, focused on the topic of Biomedical Raman Imaging, guest edited by Paola Borri (Cardiff University, UK), Katsumata Fujita (Osaka University, Japan) and Analyst Advisory Board Member Wei Min (Columbia University, USA).

Paola BorriKatsumata FujitaWei Min

Raman spectroscopy has offered the potential as an optical biomedical imaging technique for many years due to the high molecular specificity, but has suffered from lack of sensitivity and the time taken for the measurements. Recent advances in instrumentation and variants on the technique such as SRS and CARS have addressed some of the limitations of the technique for biomedical imaging. This collection highlights advances in Raman spectroscopy aimed at improving the biomedical imaging capabilities and utility.

We invite submissions of articles or reviews on topics across this theme.

Accepted articles will be collated into an online collection as soon as they are accepted and the themed collection as a whole will be promoted as a complete collection in early 2021.

The submission deadline for this collection is September 30th 2020. 

If you’re interested in submitting to the collection, please contact the Editorial Office.

 

Images L to R: Paola, Katsumata and Wei.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Emerging Investigator Series – James Blakemore

We’re very pleased to introduce our latest Emerging Investigator, James Blakemore!

Picture of James Blakemore

James Blakemore is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Kansas. James was raised in Kansas, studied chemistry with Francis D’Souza at Wichita State University, and then moved to Yale University, completing his Ph.D. in Chemistry in 2012 as a student of Gary Brudvig and Robert Crabtree. Upon completing his Ph.D., James was a postdoctoral scholar at Caltech with Harry Gray. At KU since 2016, James’s research focuses on use of inorganic and organometallic chemistry with the d- and f-elements to gain new insights into clean energy sources.

Read James’ paper “Electrodeposition behavior of homoleptic transition metal acetonitrile complexes interrogated with piezoelectric gravimetry,” and find out more about him in the interview below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on the electrodeposition behaviour of homoleptic transition metal acetonitrile complexes. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?
Our work started by examining a nominally molecular catalyst system that seemed, under some conditions, to form electrodeposited heterogeneous material. This complicates catalyst design, and so we pursued this phenomenon, with the finding that a key homoleptic acetonitrile complex was an intermediate on the path to formation of heterogeneous material. We imagined that such acetonitrile complexes might be a more general class of electrodeposition precursors, and this idea brought us to the work laid out in our new paper.
What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
I am excited about the prospect of applying the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance to more exotic problems in inorganic chemistry. For example, electrochemical work aimed at new processing or purification routes for lanthanide and actinide elements (those from the f-block at the bottom of the periodic table) could be quite useful. The work in our new article shows how such work might be done.

In your opinion, what are the most promising applications of piezoelectric gravimetry?
It is remarkably useful for understanding complex electrochemical systems. In molecular electrochemistry, it is often straightforward to measure currents but understanding the species present in the system giving rise to those currents can be challenging to work out. Piezoelectric gravimetry allows you to study heterogeneous species that might form and/or be present initially, or rule them out. In complex situations like those often required for studies of catalysis, this is crucial information that can totally change your view of the chemistry happening in the system.

What do you find most challenging about your research?
Research in synthetic chemistry, that is, working with compounds that we prepare ourselves rather than those found naturally, is daunting. Sometimes, even if you can design a route to make a new compound, it just won’t work. As my Ph.D. co-supervisor Bob Crabtree used to say, “Sometimes Nature is against us.” Working with a good team, however, makes these setbacks less bitter!

How do you spend your spare time?
I enjoy running, and Kansas is a great place for it; we have many beautiful hills that are gentle on your knees! I have also recently started a new dance class, which is stimulating creativity in all aspects of my life.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?
When I was an undergraduate, I wanted to become a linguist. I suppose chemistry is a sort of language, so this might not be a surprise!

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?
One of the great pleasures for me during my time as an early-career scientist has been networking and meeting scientists from many different communities. As a postdoctoral scholar or graduate student, you may work in a narrower area, but as a faculty member, I have had the opportunity to meet a wide range of individuals with many different perspectives. I would advise early career scientists to embrace these opportunities, and the diversity of viewpoints that there are in the world. There are so many kind and supportive people to meet!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

RSC awards at SciX 2019

SciX 2019, a conference featuring cutting edge developments in analytical sciences, instrumentation and unique applications, was held in Palm Springs, California, USA from October 13-18, 2019.

Royal Society of Chemistry Award-Winning Scientists

The RSC Theophilus Redwood award is given for interdisciplinary work at the interface of analytical, biological, and materials chemistry and skills for passionately and effectively communicating science to broad audiences. The 2018 award winner was Christy Haynes, University of Minnesota, USA.

Christy Haynes is the Elmore H. Northey Professor of Chemistry at the University of Minnesota where she leads the Haynes Research Group, a lab dedicated to applying analytical and nanomaterials chemistry in the context of biomedicine, ecology, and toxicology.

Christy was given her award by Professor Duncan Graham, President of the RSC Analytical Division and Analyst Editor-in-Chief and she gave a stimulating lecture on Polymer-enabled plasmonic sensing. Her lecture was followed by an award symposium with a lineup of speakers selected by Christy.

Congratulations Christy!

Christy Haynes presents her RSC Theophilus Redwood 2018 Award Lecture
Christy Haynes presents her RSC Theophilus Redwood 2018 Award Lecture
Photo credits: Glen P. Jackson, WVU, USA
The RSC Analytical Division President and Analyst Editor-in-Chief Duncan Graham presents Christy Haynes with the Theophilus Redwood 2018 award at SciX 2019
The RSC Analytical Division President and Analyst Editor-in-Chief Duncan Graham presents Christy Haynes with the Theophilus Redwood 2018 award at SciX 2019

Photo credits: Glen P. Jackson, WVU, USA

Christy Haynes and Symposium speakers (left to right): Melissa Maurer-Jones, Autumn (Tian) Qiu, Vivian Ferry, Christy Haynes, Julie Biteen and Korin Wheeler

Christy Haynes and Symposium speakers (left to right): Melissa Maurer-Jones, Autumn (Tian) Qiu, Vivian Ferry, Christy Haynes, Julie Biteen and Korin Wheeler

Photo: Maria Southall, RSC

It also gives us great pleasure to announce that Analyst Advisory Board member Karen Faulds and Analytical Methods Associate Editor Chris Easley both received awards at SciX 2019.

Professor Karen Faulds was the recipient of the Charles Mann Award for Raman Spectroscopy. After receiving her award, Karen gave a plenary lecture on “Development of SERS and SESORRS for Multiplexed Bioanalysis”.

Analyst Advisory Board member Karen Faulds (L) is presented with the Charles Mann award.

Photo credits: Glen P. Jackson, WV, USA

Professor Chris Easley was the recipient of the AES Mid-Career Award. After being presented with his award, Chris delivered a plenary lecture titled “Digitizing Endocrine Tissue Secretions into Nanoliter Droplets for Analysis of Hormones and Metabolites at High Temporal Resolution”.

Analytical Methods Associate Editor Chris Easley (L) receives the AES Mid-Career Award from AES President Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte.

Photo credits: Glen P. Jackson, WV, USA

We are extremely proud of Karen and Chris. Congratulations on well-deserved awards!

A dinner to celebrate the awardees and the RSC symposium speakers was hosted by the Analyst and Analytical Methods Deputy Editor Maria Southall and RSC Analytical Division President and Analyst Editor-in-Chief Duncan Graham, an opportunity to interact with the Analyst and Analytical Methods Board members attending the conference.

 

Award winners, symposium speakers and Analyst and Analytical Methods Board members.

Award winners (L to R): Chris Easley, Christy Haynes and Karen Faulds. 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Congratulations to Analyst Associate Editor, Jaebum Choo!

Analyst would like to offer congratulations to our Associate Editor, Jaebum Choo (Chung-Ang University), for his achievement winning the Taikyue Ree Academic Award, presented by the Korean Chemical Society.

Jaebum Choo is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Chung-Ang University. He obtained a PhD in Molecular Spectroscopy at Texas A&M University in 1994. From 1995-2019, he was a faculty member of Hanyang University. He was a Director of the “Center for Integrated Human Sensing System” (ERC, 2009-2013) and a BK21+ Director of Bionano Fusion Technology Program (2013-2019) supported by National Research Foundation of Korea. Professor Choo became a Baik Nam Distinguished Professor in 2015 due to his excellent academic achievements. His main research areas are SERS, biosensors, micro-devices and molecular spectroscopy. His current research programs are centered on the development of highly sensitive optical nano-sensor systems for rapid and sensitive in vitro diagnostics.Jaebum Choo

Please join us in offering our sincere congratulations to Jaebum!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)