Archive for the ‘Hot Article’ Category

HOT Articles – Online and free to access now

NJC royal society of chemistry

We have updated our reviewer recommended ‘HOT articles’ for 2021.

We update our HOT articles collection quarterly and make the selected articles free to access for 6 weeks! This collection represents the top 10% of research published in NJC in 2020 and 2021. Please note that only the HOT articles from July – September 2021 have been made free to access, this will be updated quarterly to reflect our latest HOT articles.

Make the most of the free to access period by browsing the collection today!

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HOT Articles – Online and free to access now

NJC royal society of chemistry

We have updated our reviewer recommended ‘HOT articles’ for 2021.

We update our HOT articles collection quarterly and make the selected articles free to access for 6 weeks! This collection represents the top 10% of research published in NJC in 2020 and 2021. Please note that only the HOT articles from January – March 2021 have been made free to access, this will be updated quarterly to reflect our latest HOT articles.

Make the most of the free to access period by browsing the collection today!

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HOT Articles – Online and free to access now

NJC royal society of chemistry

We have updated our reviewer recommend ‘HOT articles’ for 2020.

We update our HOT articles collection quarterly and make the selected articles free to access for 6 weeks! This collection represents the top 10% of research published in NJC in 2020. Please note that only the HOT articles from October – December 2020 have been made free to access, this will be updated quarterly to reflect our latest HOT articles.

Make the most of the free to access period by browsing the collection today!

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HOT Articles – Online and free to access now

NJC royal society of chemistry

We have updated our reviewer recommend ‘HOT articles’ for 2020.

We update our HOT articles collection quarterly and make the selected articles free to access for 6 weeks! This collection represents the top 10% of research published in NJC in 2020. Please note that only the HOT articles from April – June 2020 have been made free to access, this will be updated quarterly to reflect our latest HOT articles.

Make the most of the free to access period by browsing the collection today!

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HOT Articles – Online and free to access now

New Journal of Chemistry, NJC, Royal Society of Chemistry

We have updated our reviewer recommend ‘HOT articles’ for 2020.

We update our HOT articles collection quarterly and make the selected articles free to access for 6 weeks! This collection represents the top 10% of research published in NJC in 2020. Please note that only the HOT articles from January – March 2020 have been made free to access, this will be updated quarterly to reflect our latest HOT articles.

Make the most of the free to access period by browsing the collection today!

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Reviewer Recommended and Focus & Perspective Collections: Online now!

New Journal of Chemistry, NJC, Royal Society of Chemistry

We have just updated our reviewer recommend ‘HOT articles’ & our cummulative 2019 Focus & Perspectives collections.

We update our HOT articles collection quarterly and make the selected articles free to access for 6 weeks! This collection represents the top 10% of research published in NJC in 2019. Please note that only the HOT articles from April – June 2019 have been made free to access, this will be updated quarterly to reflect our latest HOT articles.

Make the most of the free to access period by browsing the collection today!

Why not start here:

 

Multifunctional WS2&M-AgNPs superhydrophobic conductive sponges for application in various sensors
Xueshan Jing and Zhiguang Guo
New J. Chem., 2019, 43, 5287-5296
DOI: 10.1039/C9NJ00167K, Paper

Two alkali calcium borates exhibiting second harmonic generation and deep-UV cutoff edges
Peng Ren, Yun Yang, Hao Li, Zhihua Yang and Shilie Pan
New J. Chem., 2019, 43, 9354-9363
DOI: 10.1039/C9NJ01680E, Paper

 

Our 2019 Focus & Perspective collection pulls together all of the reviews published in NJC throughout the year. Remember to check back to read our latest articles!

These two articles are already getting plenty of citations:

 

Recent advances in iminyl radical-mediated catalytic cyclizations and ring-opening reactions
Wenqing Yin and Xuelian Wang
New J. Chem., 2019, 43, 3254-3264
DOI: 10.1039/C8NJ06165C, Perspective

Life sensors: current advances in oxygen sensing by lanthanide complexes
Khushboo Iman and M. Shahid
New J. Chem., 2019, 43, 1094-1116
DOI: 10.1039/C8NJ04993A, Perspective

 

Submit your work to NJC – Check our website for handy tips and guidelines or find out more about the benefits of publishing with the Royal Society of Chemistry.

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Protecting marble monuments

Chemistry World has highlighted, in a recent article, work published in NJC by Dr Massimiliano Arca (Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Italy) and his colleagues. The authors have made a new oxamate salt that could help protect monuments from weathering. In their study, they show that the introduction of structural modifications on the oxamate anion provides a promising tool for the development of protective agents for calcareous stones.

Restoration-of-marble_DSC_0082_630m

The treatment was tested on marble statues by Giuseppe Maria Sartorio in the Monumental Cemetery of Bonaria in Cagliari, Sardinia © Paola Meloni

You can access the original NJC article:
Oxamate salts as novel agents for the restoration of marble and limestone substrates: case study of ammonium N-phenyloxamate
Laura Maiore, M. Carla Aragoni, Gianfranco Carcangiu, Ombretta Cocco, Francesco Isaia, Vito Lippolis, Paola Meloni, Arianna Murru, Alexandra M. Z. Slawin, Enrica Tuveri, J. Derek Woollins and Massimiliano Arca.
New J. Chem., 2016, Advance Article. DOI: 10.1039/C5NJ02505B.

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Origin of Life article in NJC highlighted in Chemistry World

The Chemistry World article Study probes role of chemical corruption in origin of life written by Heather Powell covers a recently published NJC article by Prof. Lindsey. Find out why using pure compounds might not always be the best strategy.

PrebioticChemistry_shutterstock_120155071_630m

You can also access the original article by Prof. Jonathan Lindsey (North Carolina State University) and his colleagues:

Complexity in structure-directed prebiotic chemistry. Effect of a defective competing reactant in tetrapyrrole formation
Richard M. Deans, Vanampally Chandrashaker, Masahiko Taniguchi and Jonathan S. Lindsey.
New J. Chem., 2015, Advance Article. DOI: 10.1039/C5NJ01474C.

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Capture of carbon dioxide by conjugated microporous polymers

Towards the global efforts to reduce carbon emission, carbon dioxide capture is currently being investigated as a potential strategy towards this goal.

Conjugated microporous polymers (CMPs) as a sub-family of microporous organic polymers (MOPs) are good candidates for CO2 capture because of the wide-ranging flexibility in the choice and design of components and the available control of pore parameters.

Dr Renqiang Yang and his colleagues (researchers at Chinese Academy of Science, University of Chinese Academy of Science and Taiwan National Central University) designed and synthesized three phospine oxide-based microporous polymers TEPO 1-3 owning strong affinity for CO2. The effects of the rigid length and fuctionalization of the monomer skeleton on the performance of porous materials has been investigated. Although the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of the TEPOs are less than 600 m2 g-1, the three polymers exhibit relatively high sorption abilities for CO2 (8.40 wt%) and ultrahigh hydrogen uptake (1.02 wt% at 77K/1.0 bar) compared to materials with similar BET surface areas. Interestingly, the polymers obtained exhibit remarkable performance in separating CO2 over CH4 as the selectivity of CO2/CH4 is a high as 15.5 at 273K.

This work reveals clearly that the gas uptake capacity of materials is highly depending on the length of rigid skeleton and the modification of functional groups in the monomer structure.

To find out more, read the full paper, which is free to access for a period of 4 weeks:

Phosphine oxide-based conjugated microporous polymers with excellent CO2 capture properties:  Shanlin Qiao, Wei Huang, Zhengkun Du, Xianghui Chen, Fa-Kuen Shieh and   Renqiang Yang; New J. Chem., 2014; DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ01477D

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Hot Article: Dye Hard

covalent modification

Industrial printing and fabric-dying processes generate vast amounts of wastewater. The removal of these industrial dyes, many of which are harmful to both aquatic and human health, is mandatory.

In this NJC paper, Jianyong Zhang, Cheng-Yong Su and co-workers (Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China) report a method for generating robust and mechanically stable nanotubes by modification of a supramolecular gel via a covalent capture reaction.

The surface of the resulting structure is cationic, allowing for the effective and selective adsorption of anionic dyes over cationic or neutral species. The authors also report that the materials can be reused for dye capture without losses in their capture ability.

 To find out more, read the full article, which is free to access for of 4 weeks:

Surface modification of supramolecular nanotubes and selective guest capture
Minjuan Lin, Haoliang Liu, Philip W. Miller, Jianyong Zhang and Cheng-Yong Su
New J. Chem., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C4NJ00445K

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