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Outstanding Paper Award 2021

We’re celebrating the exceptional work published in Nanoscale Horizons

Our annual Outstanding Paper Award recognises some of the exceptional work published in Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons, and the authors behind those articles. The winners are chosen by the Editorial and Advisory Boards based on the science presented and the work’s potential future impact.

Discover our 2021 winners here

Please join us in congratulating the winners of the 2021 Outstanding Paper Award! We hope that you enjoy reading their outstanding articles as much as we did!

 

With best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery
Managing Editor, Nanoscale Horizons

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Efficient Photogeneration: A Means of Synthesising Highly Reactive Molecules

Efficient Photogeneration: A Means of Synthesising Highly Reactive Molecules

An infographic highlighting the photogeneration of nonacene on nanostructured graphene

We would like to share an infographic highlighting the excellent work by Fernando Martín, Amadeo L. Vázquez de Parga et al. on the synthesis of highly reactive large organic molecules by photogeneration on graphene! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Nanoscale Horizons article.

Efficient photogeneration of nonacene on nanostructured graphene
Cosme G. Ayani, Michele Pisarra, José I. Urgel, Juan Jesús Navarro, Cristina Díaz, Hironobu Hayashi, Hiroko Yamada, Fabian Calleja, Rodolfo Miranda, Roman Fasel, Fernando Martín and Amadeo L. Vázquez de Parga
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NH00184A

An infographic summarising the content of the article "Efficient photogeneration of nonacene on nanostructured graphene"

Meet the authors

Professor Amadeo L. Vázquez de Parga

Amadeo L. Vázquez de Parga

Amadeo L. Vázquez de Parga obtained his doctorate in June 1992 in the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid. The topic of the thesis was the design and construction of an ultra-high vacuum tunneling (STM) microscope capable of routinely obtaining atomic resolution. It was the first of these instruments that worked in Spain. After obtaining the doctor’s degree, he completed a postdoctoral stay at the IBM laboratories in Rüschlikon, Zürich (Switzerland), investigating the excited luminescence in the tunnel process. It should be noted that STM was invented in this laboratory and two of its researchers were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1987 for this discovery. Since 2019 I hold a post of full professor in the department of Physics of the Condensed Matter in the UAM and since 2008 I am also Associate Senior Researcher in IMDEA-Nanoscience. The years 2002 and 2003 was a visiting researcher at the Radboud University, in Nijmegen (Holland) where I was performing microscopy experiments with a spin polarized tunnel effect. From January until December 2018 I have been invited researcher at the ARC Centre of Excellence FLEET in the group of Prof. M. Fuhrer at Monash University, Melbourne (Australia). I have been working on growth and characterization of TMDS. I have conducted short research stays at various centers, including the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, California (1990), the Max Planck Institute in Halle (Germany) (2000), Gakushuin University, Tokyo (Japan) (2004) and University of Chiba in Chiba, Japan (2014).

 

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Most Popular 2021 Nanoscale Horizons Articles

Most popular articles in 2021

 

We wanted to share with you some of the most popular articles published in Nanoscale Horizons last year, determined by their citations and page views.

Read the most popular Nanoscale Horizons articles here

All of the articles in the collection are free to access until the end of March 2022. Read some of the featured articles below.

Nanoarchitectonics: what’s coming next after nanotechnology?
Katsuhiko Ariga
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NH00680G

Radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale: experimental trends and challenges
Christophe Lucchesi, Rodolphe Vaillon and Pierre-Olivier Chapuis
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NH00609B

Engineering a photosensitizer nanoplatform for amplified photodynamic immunotherapy via tumor microenvironment modulation
Yaxin Zhou, Xiaomeng Ren, Zhaosheng Hou, Ningning Wang, Yue Jiang and Yuxia Luan
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NH00480D

Synthesis of monodisperse high entropy alloy nanocatalysts from core@shell nanoparticles
Yifan Chen, Xun Zhan, Sandra L. A. Bueno, Ibrahim H. Shafei, Hannah M. Ashberry, Kaustav Chatterjee, Lin Xu, Yawen Tang and Sara E. Skrabalak
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NH00656D

A plasmon-based nanoruler to probe the mechanical properties of synthetic and biogenic nanosized lipid vesicles
Lucrezia Caselli, Andrea Ridolfi, Jacopo Cardellini, Lewis Sharpnack, Lucia Paolini, Marco Brucale, Francesco Valle, Costanza Montis, Paolo Bergese and Debora Berti
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NH00012H

 

We hope you enjoy reading these popular articles.

With best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery
Managing Editor, Nanoscale Horizons

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Towards Efficient Fuel Production by Photocatalysis with Cu2S Monolayers

Towards Efficient Fuel Production by Photocatalysis with Cu2S Monolayers

An infographic highlighting Cu2S as a promising photocatalyst for CO2 reduction

We would like to share an infographic highlighting the excellent work by Jinlan Wang et al. on Cu2S monolayers which have a low limiting potential, high product selectivity, strong visible light absorbance and satisfactory band edge positions for CO2 reduction! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Nanoscale Horizons article.

Selective visible-light driven highly efficient photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to C2H5OH by two-dimensional Cu2S monolayers
Shiyan Wang, Xiaowan Bai, Qiang Li, Yixin Ouyang, Li Shi and Jinlan Wang
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NH00196E

An infographic summarising the content of the article "Selective visible-light driven highly efficient photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to C2H5OH by two-dimensional Cu2S monolayers"

Meet the authors

Shiyan Wang

Shiyan Wang

Shiyan Wang received his BS and ME degrees in College of Physics and Materials Science at the Henan Normal University in 2015 and 2018, respectively. At present, he is working on his PhD under the supervision of Prof. Jinlan Wang at the School of Physics at Southeast University. His current research focuses on theoretical simulation and design for the catalytic reaction of two-dimensional materials.

Professor Jinlan Wang Jinlan Wang

Jinlan Wang is currently a distinguished professor in School of Physics at Southeast University. She got her Ph. D from Department of Physics, Nanjing University in 2002. Then, she had three-year Postdoctoral experiences at Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory. Since 2006, she joined in Southeast University as a faculty and developed a computational physics and chemistry group. Her current research interest mainly focuses on computational studies and design of two-dimensional materials and clean energy materials. The techniques involves from machine learning to classical molecular dynamics to different level first-principles methods. She is Associated Editor of Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances and Scientific Editor of Nanoscale Horizons and she is an RSC Fellow.

 

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Taper-Free Faceting in GaAs Nanowires for Improved Optoelectronic Properties

Taper-Free Faceting in GaAs Nanowires for Improved Optoelectronic Properties

An infographic highlighting taper-free faceting as a method to gain ultralow-surface recombination velocity in nanowires

We would like to share an infographic highlighting the excellent work by Zahra Azimi, Jennifer Wong-Leung et al. on taper-free faceting in GaAs nanowires which gives the lowest surface recombination velocity reported for GaAs nanowires, despite the presence of twin defects! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Nanoscale Horizons article.

Understanding the role of facets and twin defects in the optical performance of GaAs nanowires for laser applications
Zahra Azimi, Nikita Gagrani, Jiangtao Qu, Olivier L. C. Lem, Sudha Mokkapati, Julie M. Cairney, Rongkun Zheng, Hark Hoe Tan, Chennupati Jagadish and Jennifer Wong-Leung
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NH00079A

An infographic summarising the content of the article "Understanding the role of facets and twin defects in the optical performance of GaAs nanowires for laser applications"

Meet the authors

Zahra Azimi

Zahra Azimi

Zahra Azimi is currently a PhD candidate in the Research School of Physics at the Australian National University. She received her BSc and MSc in Materials at Sharif University of Technology. Prior to starting her PhD, she worked as an R&D in a nanotechnology company with focus of self-cleaning and multi-functional coatings. Her research interests are epitaxial growth of III-V materials and characterisation and analysis of semiconductor nanostructures. Her PhD research focuses on the growth of InGaAs nanowires by selective area metal organic vapour phase epitaxy for optoelectronic applications

Professor Jennifer Wong-Leung Jennifer Wong-Leung

Jennifer Wong-Leung is currently an honorary associate professor in the department of Electronic Materials Engineering at the Australian National University. She has a B.Sc. Hons. in Physics (University of Bristol, UK) and a Ph.D. (ANU, Australia). She was awarded an ARC postdoctoral fellowship (1998–2001) and an ARC QEII fellowship (2002–2007). She has over 20 years post-Ph.D. experience and has collaborated extensively with research groups in the US, Sweden, Norway and the UK as well in Australia. Her research interests and expertise are in the electron microscopy of semiconductors, processing, III–V nanowires, organic-inorganic halide perovskites, semiconductor heterostructures and nanostructures as well as electrical characterization techniques.

 

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Improving Biodistribution and Targeted Tissue Accumulation of Nanoparticles

Improving Biodistribution and Targeted Tissue Accumulation of Nanoparticles

An infographic highlighting macropinocytosis inhibitory nanoparticles to improve delivery of nanotherapeutics

We would like to share an infographic highlighting the excellent work by Evan Scott et al. on macropinocytosis inhibitory nanoparticles that reduce the non-specific uptake of an “effector” nanoparticle by cells, allowing for greater accumulation and uptake of targeted nanoparticles in tissues of interest! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Nanoscale Horizons article.

Enhancing subcutaneous injection and target tissue accumulation of nanoparticles via co-administration with macropinocytosis inhibitory nanoparticles (MiNP)
Trevor Stack, Yugang Liu, Molly Frey, Sharan Bobbala, Michael Vincent and Evan Scott
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NH00679C

An infographic summarising the content of the article “Enhancing subcutaneous injection and target tissue accumulation of nanoparticles via co-administration with macropinocytosis inhibitory nanoparticles (MiNP)"

Meet the authors

Trevor Stack

Trevor Stack, Ph.D. Is currently a Scientist at Takeda Pharmaceuticals in Cambridge, MA. working on novel oncology drug development. He graduated with a B.A. in biomedical engineering from Tufts University in 2012 and a Ph.D in biomedical engineering from Northwestern University in 2021. His graduate work focused on nanoparticle platform design and ways to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles in tissues of interest, including solid tumors. Prior to his graduate work, Trevor worked on product and process development of cell based immunotherapy platforms at various biotech companies in the Boston area.

Professor Evan Scott Evan Scott

Evan Scott, Ph.D. is the Kay Davis Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering & Microbiology-Immunology within the Northwestern University’s McCormick School of Engineering and Feinberg School of Medicine. He respectively received a B.S. and Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Brown University in 2002 and Washington University in St. Louis in 2009. As a Whitaker International Scholar, he completed his postdoctoral training in Switzerland at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL). Dr. Scott is a recipient of the 2015 NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, the 2015 National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the 2014 American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant. He was selected as a 2017 BMES Young Innovator of Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering, 2018 Nano Research Young Innovator in Nanobiotechnology, 2018 American Society for Engineering Education PRISM 20 under 40, National Academy of Engineering Frontiers of Engineering 2018 speaker, 2019 Biomaterials Science Emerging Investigator, and 2019 Halo 40 under 40 Chicago Scientist.

 

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Determining the Rigidity of Lipid Nanovesicles with a Plasmonic Nanoruler

Determining the Rigidity of Lipid Nanovesicles with a Plasmonic Nanoruler

An infographic highlighting a new method to measure the stiffness of extracellular vesicles

We would like to share an infographic highlighting the excellent work by Costanza Montis, Debora Berti et al. on using plasmonic gold nanoparticles to measure the mechanical properties of vesicles! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Nanoscale Horizons article.

A plasmon-based nanoruler to probe the mechanical properties of synthetic and biogenic nanosized lipid vesicles
Lucrezia Caselli, Andrea Ridolfi, Jacopo Cardellini, Lewis Sharpnack, Lucia Paolini, Marco Brucale, Francesco Valle, Costanza Montis, Paolo Bergese and Debora Berti
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NH00012H

An infographic summarising the content of the article “A plasmon-based nanoruler to probe the mechanical properties of synthetic and biogenic nanosized lipid vesicles"

Meet the authors

Professor Costanza Montis

Costanza Montis,

Costanza Montis is Assistant Professor of Physical Chemistry at the Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, and member of the Italian Consortium for Colloid and Surface Science (CSGI). She received her PhD in Chemical Sciences from the University of Florence in 2013. Her main research activity focuses on the understanding of complex phenomena occurring at interfaces, from a physicochemical perspective. Her scientific interests are in Physical Chemistry of Soft Matter and include the biophysical understanding of nano-bio interfaces; the design of lipid-nanoparticles hybrid materials for biomedical applications; the engineering/characterisation of biogenic extracellular vesicles; the study of nanostructured materials for applications in restoration of works of art.

Professor Debora Berti Debora Berti

Debora is Full Professor of Physical Chemistry at the Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff”, University of Florence, where she leads the BioSoftMatter group. Debora’s work focuses on Soft Matter systems, from design to applications in several areas, mainly in biologically relevant fields. Throughout her career, Debora has pioneered the application of radiation scattering methods, such as small angle scattering and reflectivity, to characterize the structural details of self-assemblies with biological relevance. Her research topics include hybrid nano and micro particle/lipid assemblies for responsive drug delivery, interaction of nanostructured assemblies with model membranes, mechanistic understanding of the nanobiointerface. Currently, she is Vice President of the University of Florence.

 

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New Durable 5-Metal High-Entropy Alloy for Catalysis

New Durable 5-Metal High-Entropy Alloy for Catalysis

An infographic highlighting the synthesis of monodisperse high entropy alloy nanocatalysts from core@shell nanoparticles

We would like to share an infographic highlighting the excellent work by Yawen Tang, Sara E. Skrabalak et al. on a novel synthesis method for the formation of monodisperse high-entropy alloy nanoparticles! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Nanoscale Horizons article.

Synthesis of monodisperse high entropy alloy nanocatalysts from core@shell nanoparticles
Yifan Chen, Xun Zhan, Sandra L. A. Bueno, Ibrahim H. Shafei, Hannah M. Ashberry, Kaustav Chatterjee, Lin Xu, Yawen Tang and Sara E. Skrabalak
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NH00656D

An infographic summarising the content of the article “Synthesis of monodisperse high entropy alloy nanocatalysts from core@shell nanoparticles"

Meet the authors

Dr Yifan Chen

Yifan Chen

Yifan is a postdoctoral researcher at the Electron Microscopy for Materials Science in Dr. Sara Bal’s group (University of Antwerp, Belgium). She received her PhD from the Nanjing Normal University in Dr. Yawen Tang’s group. During her PhD candidate period, she was a visiting student at Indiana University working in the group led by Dr. Sara Skrabalak. Yifan was a Research Fellow in the Centre for Bioimaging Sciences at the National University of Singapore, Dr. Utkur Mirsaidov. She joined the Electron Microscopy for Materials Science in 2021 and her research interests are centred on direct visualization of surface ligands by transmission electron microscopy.

Professor Sara Skrabalak Sara Skrabalak

Dr. Sara Skrabalak received her B.A. in chemistry from Washington University in St. Louis in 2002 where she conducted research with Professor William E. Buhro. She then moved to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she completed her Ph.D. in chemistry in fall of 2006 under the tutelage of Professor Kenneth S. Suslick. She then conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Washington – Seattle with Professors Younan Xia and Xingde Li. She is the James H. Rudy Professor of Chemistry at Indiana University – Bloomington and a recipient of both NSF CAREER and DOE Early Career Awards. She is a 2012 Research Corporation Cottrell Scholar, a 2013 Sloan Research Fellow, a 2014 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, and 2017 Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellows. In 2014, she received the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry. She is Editor-in-Chief for Chemistry of Materials and ACS Materials Letters. Her research group focuses on nanomaterial design and synthesis (https://skrabalak.lab.indiana.edu/).

 

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Nanoscale Horizons 2022 Lunar New Year Collection

Lunar New Year collection

A collection of our most popular articles from Asia

To celebrate the Lunar New Year, we are delighted to highlight some of the most popular articles, determined by their citations and page views, published in Nanoscale Horizons last year by corresponding authors based in Asia.

Read the collection

All of the articles in the collection are free to access until the end of March 2022. Read some of the featured articles below.

Nanoarchitectonics: what’s coming next after nanotechnology?
Katsuhiko Ariga
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NH00680G

Lanthanide upconversion and downshifting luminescence for biomolecules detection
Guotao Sun, Yao Xie, Lining Sun and Hongjie Zhang
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NH00299F

Engineering a photosensitizer nanoplatform for amplified photodynamic immunotherapy via tumor microenvironment modulation
Yaxin Zhou, Xiaomeng Ren, Zhaosheng Hou, Ningning Wang, Yue Jiang and Yuxia Luan
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NH00480D

Ferroelectric polymer-based artificial synapse for neuromorphic computing
Sungjun Kim, Keun Heo, Sunghun Lee, Seunghwan Seo, Hyeongjun Kim, Jeongick Cho, Hyunkyu Lee, Kyeong-Bae Lee and Jin-Hong Park
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NH00559B

Selective visible-light driven highly efficient photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to C2H5OH by two-dimensional Cu2S monolayers
Shiyan Wang, Xiaowan Bai, Qiang Li, Yixin Ouyang, Li Shi and Jinlan Wang
Nanoscale Horiz., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NH00196E

 

We hope you enjoy reading these popular articles and wish you a happy Lunar New Year!

With best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery

Managing Editor, Nanoscale Horizons

 

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Horizons Community Board collection: Optical and Photonic Materials

Optical and Photonic Materials

A new online article collection guest edited by members of the Horizons Community Boards

The Community Boards that support Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons provide a platform for early career researchers to share their experiences and ideas on scientific publishing. Working together and sharing their unique expertise, our Community Board members have recommended several key topics where significant, rapid progress has been made in the last two years. Today we are delighted to share their selected top articles published in the Horizons journals showcasing the most important advances in optical and photonic materials and devices.

This collection is guest edited by Xiaolu Zhuo (CIC biomaGUNE, Spain), Li Na Quan (Virginia Tech, USA), and Qingchen Dong (Shanghai University, China). To get to know our guest editors, check out their Editorial article introducing this collection.

 

Read the collection

Read the introductory editorial

 

We hope you enjoy reading this collection.

With best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery

Managing Editor, Nanoscale Horizons

Dr Michaela Muehlberg

Executive Editor, Materials Horizons

 

 

 

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