Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Latest HOT, Review and Open Access content from Environmental Science: Nano

We are delighted to share with you a hand-picked selection of papers recently published in Environmental Science: Nano.

HOT papers – as recommended by our Editors & Reviewers

Polystyrene nano- and microplastic accumulation at Arabidopsis and wheat root cap cells, but no evidence for uptake into roots
Stephen E. Taylor et al

Natural organic matter facilitates formation and microbial methylation of mercury selenide nanoparticles
Qing Chang et al

Carbon-based ionic liquid gels: alternative adsorbents for pharmaceutically active compounds in wastewater
Carla Rizzo et al

Read more HOT papers at rsc.li/esnano-hot

Reviews – timely overviews of key topics in environmental nanoscience

Metal nanoparticles in the air: state of the art and future perspectives
Anna Rabajczyk et al

Doing nano-enabled water treatment right: sustainability considerations from design and research through development and implementation
M. Falinski et al

Perspectives on palladium-based nanomaterials: green synthesis, ecotoxicity, and risk assessment
Songhao Luo et al

Read more Reviews at rsc.li/esnano-reviews

Open Access – read for free!

Environmental and health risks of nanorobots: an early review
Rickard Arvidsson and Steffen Foss Hansen

Fluorescent plastic nanoparticles to track their interaction and fate in physiological environments
Jessica Caldwell et al

Environmental context determines the impact of titanium oxide and silver nanoparticles on the functioning of intertidal microalgal biofilms
Claire Passarelli et al

Read more Open Access content at rsc.li/esnano-oa

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We hope you enjoy reading these papers, and we welcome your future submissions to the journal.

With best wishes,

Peter & Neil

Peter Vikesland Neil Scriven
Editor-in-Chief Executive Editor
Environmental Science: Nano Environmental Science: Nano
Virginia Tech, USA Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit to Environmental Science: Nano

About Environmental Science: Nano
Led by Editor-in-Chief Peter Vikesland (Virginia Tech), Environmental Science: Nano is the premier journal dedicated to nano aspects of environmental science and sustainability. The journal has an Impact Factor of 7.638* and is published on a not-for-profit basis by the Royal Society of Chemistry; as a learned society and professional body, the RSC is committed to supporting the global scientific community by re-investing all surplus into charitable activities such as education, outreach, and science policy. More details about the journal and our scope can be found on our website: rsc.li/esnano

Sign up for alerts     Latest Issue     Emerging Investigators      Themed Collections

 

 

 

 

Meet the team

 

* 2019 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2020)

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Find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal including our Open Access options

 Environmental Science: Nano is complemented by our sister journals, Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts and Environmental Science: Atmospheres; find out more about the these journals at rsc.li/envsci

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New Editorial Board Member: Leanne Gilbertson

We are delighted to announce that Dr Leanne Gilbertson (University of Pittsburgh, USA) has joined the Environmental Science: Nano team as an Editorial Board member.

Dr Leanne Gilbertson is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She joined the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the Fall of 2015 and holds a secondary appointment in the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. Before joining the faculty, Dr Gilbertson was a postdoctoral associate in the Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale University where her research established and validated structure-property-function and structure-property-hazard relationships for engineered nanomaterials. She received her MS and PhD degrees from Yale University in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, supported by the NSF Graduate Research and EPA STAR Fellowships. She received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry with a minor in education from Hamilton College, after which she spent several years as a secondary school teacher before returning to graduate school.

Dr Gilbertson’s research group is engaged in projects aimed at informing sustainable design of emerging materials and technologies proposed for use in areas at the nexus of the environment and public health. They work in the areas of sustainable agriculture, water treatment, and combatting antimicrobial resistance. Dr. Gilbertson uses material chemistry manipulations to elucidate guidelines for how to control nanomaterial design with the intent of simultaneously enhancing their functional performance while minimizing their adverse impacts. In this work, she focuses on carbon nanomaterials (CNTs, graphene, and carbon nitride) and metal nanoparticles (Ag and Cu). Dr. Gilbertson also has expertise in life cycle assessment (LCA), which she applies to evaluate tradeoffs of emerging nanotechnologies. The results of these analyses are used to inform sustainable development of promising technologies. Her research is supported by the National Science Foundation, 3M non-tenured faculty award, and the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award.

To find out more about her research group, please visit www.leannegilbertson.com and follow her on Twitter @lmgLab.

Leanne says: “My experiences with Environmental Science: Nano, as an author and reviewer, have always been incredibly positive. It is a great community of scholars striving to ensure that our field publishes high quality research. Environmental Science: Nano is my ‘go to’ source of reliable, cutting edge research in environmental nanotechnology. It is an honor to serve on the Editorial Board and I look forward to working with my distinguished colleagues at the journal.”

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Latest HOT, Review and Open Access content from Environmental Science: Nano

We are delighted to share with you a hand-picked selection of papers recently published in Environmental Science: Nano.

HOT papers – as recommended by our Editors & Reviewers

The fabrication of 3D hierarchical flower-like δ-MnO2@COF nanocomposites for the efficient and ultra-fast removal of UO22+ ions from aqueous solution
Xin Zhong et al

Nanoscale observations of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation
Odeta Qafoku et al

 Synergistic effects of lanthanide surface adhesion and photon-upconversion for enhanced near-infrared responsive photodegradation of organic contaminants in wastewater
Jiaying Wang et al

Prolonging the antibacterial activity of nanosilver-coated membranes through partial sulfidation
Ana C. Barrios et al

Read more HOT papers at rsc.li/esnano-hot

Reviews – timely overviews of key topics in environmental nanoscience

Probing the immune responses to nanoparticles across environmental species. A perspective of the EU Horizon 2020 project PANDORA
Annalisa Pinsino et al

Opportunities for nanotechnology to enhance electrochemical treatment of pollutants in potable water and industrial wastewater – a perspective
Sergi Gardia-Segura et al

Interplay between engineered nanomaterials and microbiota
Yirong Zhang et al

Read more Reviews at rsc.li/esnano-reviews

Open Access – read for free!

Mechanistic insights into toxicity pathways induced by nanomaterials in Daphnia magna from analysis of the composition of the acquired protein corona
Laura-Jayne A. Ellis and Iseult Lynch

Fragmentation of polymer nanocomposites: modulation by dry and wet weathering, fractionation, and nanomaterial filler
Richard Zepp et al

Organic matter influences transformation products of ferrihydrite exposed to sulfide
Laurel K. ThomasArrigo et al

Read more Open Access content at rsc.li/esnano-oa

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We hope you enjoy reading these papers, and we welcome your future submissions to the journal.

Submit to Environmental Science: Nano

Click here to return to the journal homepage

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Latest HOT, Review and Open Access content from Environmental Science: Nano

 

 

 

 

We are delighted to share with you a hand-picked selection of papers recently published in Environmental Science: Nano.

HOT papers – as recommended by our referees

Validation of a field deployable reactor for in situ formation of NOM-engineered nanoparticle corona
Allan Philippe et al

Role of nano-biochar in attenuating the allelopathic effect from Imperata cylindrica on rice seedlings
Xinhua Zhan, Baoshan Xing et al

Leveraging electrochemistry to uncover the role of nitrogen in the biological reactivity of nitrogen-doped graphene
Leanne M. Gilbertson et al

Read more HOT papers at rsc.li/esnano-hot

Reviews – timely overviews of key topics in environmental nanoscience

Strategies for robust and accurate experimental approaches to quantify nanomaterial bioaccumulation across a broad range of organisms
Elijah J. Petersen et al

In situ remediation of subsurface contamination: opportunities and challenges for nanotechnology and advanced materials
Gregory V. Lowry et al

Strategies for determining heteroaggregation attachment efficiencies of engineered nanoparticles in aquatic environments
Antonia Praetorius et al

Read more Reviews at rsc.li/esnano-reviews

Open Access – read for free!

Assessment of Cu and CuO nanoparticle ecological responses using laboratory small-scale microcosms
Stacey L. Harper et al

Plant species-dependent transformation and translocation of ceria nanoparticles
Peng Zhang, Zhiyong Zhang et al

Testing the bioaccumulation of manufactured nanomaterials in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea using a new test method
Sebastian Kuehr et al

Read more Open Access content at rsc.li/esnano-oa

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About Environmental Science: Nano
Led by Editor-in-Chief Peter Vikesland (Virginia Tech), Environmental Science: Nano is the premier journal dedicated to nano aspects of environmental science and sustainability. The journal has an Impact Factor of 7.683* and is published on a not-for-profit basis by the Royal Society of Chemistry; as a learned society and professional body, the RSC is committed to supporting the global scientific community by re-investing all surplus into charitable activities such as education, outreach, and science policy. More details about the journal and our scope can be found on our website: rsc.li/esnano

Meet the team

 

 

* 2019 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2020)

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The scope of Environmental Science: Nano has been updated!

 

As journals evolve and fields develop it is important to ensure that a journal’s scope reflects both the type of work that the journal wishes to publish, and also the research communities that it represents. With this in mind, the Editorial Board has recently re-assessed the journal scope, and we have refined our scope as outlined below.

 

More details about the journal and our scope can be found on our website.

Submit your best research at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/esn

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About Environmental Science: Nano
Led by Editor-in-Chief Peter Vikesland (Virginia Tech), Environmental Science: Nano is the premier journal dedicated to nano aspects of environmental science and sustainability. The journal has an Impact Factor of 7.704* and is published on a not-for-profit basis by the Royal Society of Chemistry; as a learned society and professional body, the RSC is committed to supporting the global scientific community by re-investing all surplus into charitable activities such as education, outreach, and science policy. More details about the journal and our scope can be found on our website: rsc.li/esnano

Meet the team

 

 

 

 

 

* 2018 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2019)

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Environmental Science journals offer double-blind peer review option

We are delighted to announce that Environmental Science: Nano, Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts and Environmental Science: Water Research &Technology will be offering authors a choice of single- or double-blind peer review for submitted manuscripts.

In traditional single-blind peer review the reviewers are anonymous, but author names and affiliations are known to reviewers.

In double-blind peer review the authors and reviewers’ identities are concealed from each other.

The option for double-blind peer review will be available to authors from 9th September for Environmental Science: Nano, and from 7th October for Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts and Environmental Science: Water Research &Technology.

The choice of which peer review model should be used for each manuscript will be completely up to the authors. However, as an author, if you opt for the double-blind process you will need to anonymise your manuscript before submission, avoiding mention of any information that might give your identity away. Authors who choose this option will be responsible for ensuring their submission is anonymised; we have prepared a checklist to help you.

As a reviewer for our Environmental Science journals, you may be invited to review a manuscript that has been anonymised. All communication with you regarding double-blind manuscripts will omit author and affiliation details.

Why double-blind?

To date, our Environmental Science journals have used the traditional, single-blind peer review model favoured by most scientific journals, and we continue to trust in the effectiveness of this system. However, we recognise that there has been growing interest in double-blind peer review from our community. Advocates of double-blind review suggest that it can reduce the impact of biases, both obvious and subtle, conscious or unconscious, on peer review. These biases could be based on gender, ethnicity, author affiliation, and so on.

 

 

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Major society chemistry publishers jointly commit to integration with ORCID

ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities, ensuring authors gain full credit for their work.

Today, we signed their open letter, along with ACS Publications, committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

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The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) today each became signatories to the ORCID Open Letter, reasserting the commitment of both organizations to enhancing the scholarly publishing experience for researchers worldwide who are involved in chemistry and allied fields.

The commitment by these two global chemistry publishers to undertake new workflow integration with technology infrastructure provided by ORCID, a not-for-profit organization that provides unique identifiers for researchers and scholars, will enable both societies to provide unambiguous designation of author names within chemistry and across the broader sciences. This partnership with ORCID will resolve ambiguity in researcher identification caused by name changes, cultural differences in name presentation, and the inconsistent use of name abbreviations that is too often a source of confusion for those who must rely on the published scientific record.

By becoming signatories to the ORCID Open Letter, these two major chemical societies are voicing their intent to collect ORCID iDs for all submitting authors through use of the ORCID API, and to display such identifiers in the articles published in their respective society journals. The integration of such activities within the publishers’ workflows means authors will benefit from automated linkages between their ORCID record and unique identifiers embedded within their published research articles, ensuring their contributions are appropriately recognized and credited.

During the publishing process, ACS and the Royal Society of Chemistry will automatically deposit publications to Crossref, which in turn will coordinate with ORCID to link and update the publishing activity populated to authors’ respective ORCID profiles, thus attributing each published work to the correct researcher. Existing holders of an ORCID iD will encounter a one-time prompt to grant permission for the linkage. If authors do not have an ORCID iD, they can easily enroll without navigating away from the publishers’ manuscript submission site. If users wish to revoke integrated ORCID profile access at any time, they can elect to do so through their ACS, Royal Society of Chemistry or ORCID accounts.

Both ACS Publications and the Royal Society of Chemistry understand the importance of attributing accurately the scholarly contributions of research scientists in the context of their other professional activities. “ACS has supported ORCID since the outset of the initiative,” says Sarah Tegen, Ph.D., Vice President of Global Editorial & Author Services at ACS Publications. “We are pleased now to align with the Royal Society of Chemistry in this endeavor, as both societies underscore our willingness not only to encourage and assist our respective authors in establishing their unique ORCID profiles, but also to help tackle the broader challenge of researcher name disambiguation in the scholarly literature. With the integration of author ORCID iDs in our publishing workflows, we will ensure that researchers receive proper credit for their accomplishments.”

Emma Wilson, Ph.D., Director of Publishing at the Royal Society of Chemistry adds, “We have been a supporter of ORCID since 2013, recognizing the benefits it brings to researchers; ORCID can and will make a huge difference to our authors’ ability to gain full credit for their work. ORCID will also help researchers meet the requirements of their research funders — for example, a number of funders have already announced that all grant applicants must now include a researcher’s ORCID iD. A unified system that integrates and links research-related information with accurate and timely linkage to the publishing output of authors has the potential to simplify and speed up their grant applications — something we know is important to researchers.”

“The ACS and the Royal Society of Chemistry have been long-standing supporters of ORCID,” says Laurel Haak, Ph.D., Executive Director, ORCID. “We are pleased to see ORCID integration into ACS and Royal Society of Chemistry Publications systems. This will be a substantial benefit to researchers in the chemistry community, both in improving search and discovery of research articles, and for attribution and recognition of researchers’ contributions to the discipline.”

About the American Chemical Society and ACS Publications

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

ACS Publications, a division of the American Chemical Society, is a nonprofit scholarly publisher of 50 peer-reviewed journals and a range of eBooks at the interface of chemistry and allied sciences, including physics and biology. ACS Publications journals are among the most-cited, most-trusted and most-read within the scientific literature. Respected for their editorial rigor, ACS journals offer high-quality service to authors and readers, including rapid time to publication, a range of channels for researchers to access ACS Publications’ award-winning web and mobile delivery platforms, and a comprehensive program of open access publishing options for authors and their funders. ACS Publications also publishes Chemical & Engineering News — the Society’s newsmagazine covering science and technology, business and industry, government and policy, education and employment aspects of the chemistry field.

About the Royal Society of Chemistry

The Royal Society of Chemistry is the world’s leading chemistry community, advancing excellence in the chemical sciences. With over 50,000 members and a knowledge business that spans the globe, we are the U.K.’s professional body for chemical scientists; a not-for-profit organisation with 175 years of history and an international vision for the future. We promote, support and celebrate chemistry. We work to shape the future of the chemical sciences — for the benefit of science and humanity.

About ORCID

ORCID’s vision is a world where all who participate in research, scholarship and innovation are uniquely identified and connected to their contributions across disciplines, borders and time. ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities. It provides open tools that enable transparent and trustworthy connections between researchers, their contributions and affiliations. The organization provides this service to help people find information and to simplify reporting and analysis. ORCID is a not-for-profit organization, sustained by fees from member organizations. Its work is open, transparent and non-proprietary. The organization strives to be a trusted component of research infrastructure with the goal of providing clarity in the breadth of research contributions and the people who make them.

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Introducing our new Associate Editor

We are delighted to introduce Wei-Guo as a new Associate Editor for Environmental Science: Nano.

Wei-Guo joins Greg Lowry, Iseult Lynch and Kristin Schirmer as Associate Editors handling submissions to the journal.

Dr. Wei-Guo Song is a Professor in the Institute of Chemistry at the Chinese Academy of Sciences (ICCAS). He is also a Professor at the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences. He obtained his BSc. from Peking University in 1992, and his PhD from University of Southern California in 2001. He joined ICCAS in 2005, and received National Distinguished Young Scholar award in 2007.

His research group focuses on the design of nano porous materials and their properties. More specifically, he is interested in using nano porous materials as adsorbents for inorganic pollutants, and as heterogeneous catalysts for catalytic degradation of organic pollutants. He is also interested in developing high performance catalysts including noble metal catalysts, solid acid/base catalysts, non-metal catalysts, etc. for fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries.

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Please join us in welcoming Wei-Guo to Environmental Science: Nano.

Interested in the latest news, research and events of the Environmental Science journals? Find us on Twitter: @EnvSciRSC

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Environmental Science: Nano winners at ICEENN

Nano 2015 logo

Many congratulations to Olga Zaytseva and Miguel Ángel Gómez González on their poster prize success at the 10th International Conference on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials, which took place from 6th-10th September 2015 at the University of Vienna, Austria.

As one of the globally leading conferences on environmental nanoscience and nanoecotoxicology, the 10th ICEENN brought together researchers, regulators and industry to discuss the recent advances in the investigations of risks of current and future applications in the key sector of nanotechnology, along with procedures of risk management to maintain the economic and social benefits of the sector. Sessions dealt with key research areas such as analysis of nanomaterials, toxicology and ecotoxicology, and innovation and applications of nanotechnology to environmental issues.

Olga Zaytseva of Hohenheim University, Stuttgart, produced a winning poster entitled ‘Phytotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in soybean (Glycine max.)‘, while Miguel Ángel Gómez González of the Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, won with his poster entitled ‘Arsenic speciation in contaminated soils by AF4/SP-ICPMS and XAS techniques: Role of colloids in the mobilization of arsenic‘.

The judges of the prizes thought the quality of the presentations and posters was really high and, from the Environmental Science: Nano team, we would like to thank all the students that attended or presented at the meeting.

For more details on ICEENN 2015 please visit the conference website.

Presentation for the prize winners of ICEENN 2015

Many congratulations on this achievement from the Environmental Science: Nano team

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2015 SNO Emerging Investigator

The SNO Emerging Investigator designation gives recognition to emerging scientists and engineers working in the area of sustainable nanotechnology.  In recognition of this designation, a certificate and a US$1500 prize will be presented at the 2015 SNO Conference.

Criteria and eligibility include:

  1. Investigators who are within the first 10 years post Ph.D.
  2. An impactful body of independent work and publications in the area of sustainable nanotechnology: environmental, societal, or economic.
  3. Attendance at the 2015 SNO Conference in Portland, Oregon November 8th – 10th 2015 and a high quality paper submission to Environmental Science: Nano within one year after receiving the award.

The nomination consists of a single (1-page max) nomination letter, a second (1-page max) support letter and a 2-page CV (self-nominations are not accepted). The nomination letter should describe how the nominee’s research impacts the field of sustainable nanotechnology.

The support letter should focus on the nominee’s teaching, service and leadership in the field of sustainable nanotechnology. Both the nomination and support letters can be made by SNO members and Environmental Science: Nano Editorial and Advisory  Board members.  Nominations are not restricted to the US or UK.

Letters and CVs are due to Environmental Science: Nano Editor-in-Chief Vicki H. Grassian (vicki-grassian@uiowa.edu) by September 15, 2015.

The selected Emerging Investigator will be honored at the SNO Awards dinner on Sunday November 8, 2015.

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