Archive for the ‘Hot Articles’ Category

Hot Perspective: Treating Wilsons Disease

Wilson’s disease is a rare genetic condition caused by inheriting an abnormal copy of the Wilson disease protein (ATP7B) gene. The disease affects approximately 1-4 people per 100,000 and prevents sufferers from regulating the concentration of copper within their body, inducing a copper overload.

The redox properties of copper make it a very important metal biologically and it is involved in a wide range of enzymatic processes. The anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase for example is expressed in all cells and is part of our anti-oxidant defence, while the more specialised dopamine β-hydroxylase is only expressed in the brain and is involved in dopamine conversion. Balancing the amount of copper we have in our bodies is crucial for good health, having a copper deficit would hinder vital functions, but having an excess can cause oxidative stress by promoting the formation of hydroxyl radicals.

Designing new drugs to treat Wilson’s disease which can be targeted to the liver, where excess copper is found

Treating Wilson’s disease involves life-long chelation therapy, this is the application of compounds designed to bind to the excess copper ions and allow them to be safely excreted. This Hot Perspective by Pascale Delangle and Elisabeth Mintz reviews the drugs currently in use and gives insight in to the development of more advanced treatments, highlighting the design of bio-inspired chelating agents and drug targeting.

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To find out more you can download this article now, which is free to access for 4 weeks!
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Chelation therapy in Wilson’s disease: from D-penicillamine to the design of selective bioinspired intracellular Cu(I) chelators
Pascale Delangle and Elisabeth Mintz
Dalton Trans., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12188C

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HOT Article: Anti-microbials that target destabilised DNA

Dinuclear ruthenium complex ΔΔ-Rubb7 selectively binds a destabilised segment of DNA

Richard Keene and colleagues report an inert dinuclear polypyridylruthenium(II) groove binding metal complex that exhibits slow exchange DNA binding in this HOT article.  Such compounds have potential as anti-microbial agents as they can block the interaction of important proteins with DNA.

For more details, download the article which is free to access for 4 weeks.

An approach to therapeutic agents through selective targeting of destabilised nucleic acid duplex sequences

Fangfei Li,  Daniel K. Weber,  Joy L. Morgan,  J. Grant Collins and F. Richard Keene
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12146H

This paper is part of forthcoming themed issue on Application of Inorganic Chemistry for non-Cancer Therapeutics. Here are some other articles due to be published in this issue….

Interference of a new cyclometallated Pt compound with Cu binding to amyloid-ß peptide
Isabelle Sasaki ,  Christian Bijani ,  Sonia Ladeira ,  Valérie Bourdon ,  Peter Faller and Christelle Hureau
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12177H

In vitro inhibitory properties of ferrocene-substituted chalcones and aurones on bacterial and human cell cultures
Keshri Nath Tiwari,  Jean-Philippe Monserrat,  Arnaud Hequet,  Carine Ganem-Elbaz,  Thierry Cresteil,  Gérard Jaouen,  Anne Vessières,  Elizabeth A. Hillard and Claude Jolivalt
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12180H

Polyanionic N-donor ligands as chelating agents in transition metal complexes: synthesis, structural characterization and antiviral properties against HIV
Sandra García-Gallego,  Javier Sánchez Rodríguez,  José Luis Jiménez,  Michela Cangiotti,  Maria Francesca Ottaviani,  M. Ángeles Muñoz-Fernández,  Rafael Gómez and F. Javier de la Mata
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT11793B

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HOT Article: Trifluoroacetate decomposition with coinage metals

The presence of C–F bonds in organic compounds has a dramatic influence on their physical, chemical and biological properties.  Metal mediated reactions that result in C–F bond formation or C–F bond activation have attracted considerable attention as the demand for organofluorine compounds has increased. Metal-catalysed decarboxylative cross-coupling reactions using trifluoracetate as a cheap source of  introducing “CF3” represents an attractive approach.  Until now, little has been known about the fragmentation mechanisms of metal trifluoracetates.   In this Dalton Transactions HOT article,  Rijs and O’Hair use a combination of gas-phase 3D quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to examine the mechanism of thermal decomposition of fluorinated coinage metal carboxylates.  Synthetic chemists should be able to use these results to design new ways of incorporating CF3 and F fragments using trifluoroacetate.

Read more for FREE until the 13th March 2012 at:

Forming trifluoromethylmetallates: competition between decarboxylation and C–F bond activation of group 11 trifluoroacetate complexes, [CF3CO2ML]
Nicole J. Rijs and Richard A. J. O’Hair
Dalton Trans., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12117D

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How big is a Cp?

Ferrocene is a sandwich complex of two cyclopentadienyl (Cp) units bound to an Fe centre and is probably the most famous organometallic compound containing a Cp ligand. There are a huge variety of organometallic complexes with a range of metal centres and ligands and there is a great deal of interest in their structural, chemical and physical properties.

This Hot Article details the preparation of a series of [(η7-C7H7)Zr(η5-L)] (L = Cp and Ind) complexes and their structural characterisation. The authors use this information to develop a system to measure the steric bulk of Cp ligands………..so how big is a Cp?

To find out, you can download this article now, which is free to access for 4 weeks

How big is a Cp? Cycloheptatrienyl zirconium complexes with bulky cyclopentadienyl and indenyl ligands
Andreas Glöckner, Heiko Bauer, Miyuki Maekawa, Thomas Bannenberg, Constantin G. Daniliuc, Peter G. Jones, Yu Sun, Helmut Sitzmann, Matthias Tamm and Marc D. Walter
Dalton Trans., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12132H

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Porphyrinic MOFs

If you’re interested in finding out more about MOFs, and in particular those based on metalloporphyrins, then look no further… Chao Zou and Chuan-De Wu’s recent Perspective article provides an interesting overview of these functional materials. The researchers from Zhejiang University, China, discuss synthetic strategies and applications ranging from hydrogen storage to photocatalysis. Although the application of porphyrinic MOFs is considerably underdeveloped compared to other porphyrinic materials, say Zou and Wu, this article demonstrates that metalloporphyrins are an ideal choice for designing crystalline solid frameworks.

To read more, download the article now – it’s free to access.
Functional porphyrinic metal–organic frameworks: crystal engineering and applications

This Perspective article is part of the upcoming themed issue on Coordination Chemistry in the Solid State, guest edited by Dalton Transactions Associate Editor, Russell Morris. Keep your eyes peeled for many of our other coordination chemistry articles which have already been published, including Burnett and Choe’s Perspective article on “Sequential self-assembly in metal–organic frameworks”.

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Hot Frontier: Pharmaceutical potential of selenium and tellurium compounds

Edward Tiekink is based at the University of Malaya

Edward Tiekink gives us a concise overview of drug developments involving selenium and tellurium compounds in this Dalton Transactions Frontier.

Download it today, whilst it is still free….

Therapeutic potential of selenium and tellurium compounds: Opportunities yet unrealised
Edward R. T. Tiekink
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12225A

Why not take a look at some of Edward Tiekink’s other recent articles:

The metal–carbonyl···π(aryl) interaction as a supramolecular synthon for the stabilisation of transition metal carbonyl crystal structures
Julio Zukerman-Schpector, Ionel Haiduc and Edward R.T. Tiekink
Chem. Commun., 2011, 47, 12682-12684
DOI: 10.1039/C1CC15579B, Communication

Interwoven coordination polymers sustained by tautomeric forms of the bridging ligand
Pavel Poplaukhin and Edward R. T. Tiekink
CrystEngComm, 2010, 12, 1302-1306
DOI: 10.1039/B916585A, Paper

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HOT Article: Catalyst with magnetic recovery

Jie-Sheng Chen and colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University report the synthesis of a Pd/Fe3O4 nanocomposite that can be used as a heterogeneous catalyst for the hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol.  Convenient recycling of the catalyst using a magnet is possible – find out more by downloading the article whilst it’s free to access:

Controlled synthesis of magnetic Pd/Fe3O4 spheres via an ethylenediamine-assisted route
Hai-Qun Wang, Xiao Wei, Kai-Xue Wang and Jie-Sheng Chen
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12278B

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Hot Article: Le Bail fitting used to extract single-crystal diffraction data

A team of researchers have determined the structure of metastable compound Bi2MnxAl7−xO14, an intermediate phase in the decomposition of mullite-Bi2MnxAl4-xO9+δ, using a strategy  that included the use of a charge-flipping algorithm and Monte-Carlo based simulations.  The strategy may be particularly useful in situations where it is difficult to get high quality crystals.

The article is currently free so download it today.

Mullite-derivative Bi2MnxAl7−xO14 (x ~ 1): structure determination by powder X-ray diffraction from a multi-phase sample
Tao Yang,  Vaclav Petricek,  Wei Wan,  Zidong Wei and Junliang Sun
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT11855F

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HOT Article: Facile Photoluminescent Phosphines

This Hot Article from the University of Western Ontario by Laura C. Pavelka and Kim M. Baines details some interesting cycloaddition reactions of phosphaalkenes with alkynes.

Reactions of this type have not been well studied and typically require electron rich alkynes and quite specialised phosphoalkenes for the reaction to proceed. Here the authors have developed a much simpler approach to the syntheses using readily available reagents and a more direct route, allowing them to produce a variety of 1,2-dihydrophosphinines in good yields.

To find out how, you can download their article which is free to access for the next 4 weeks

Facile synthesis of luminescent benzo-1,2-dihydrophosphinines from a phosphaalkene
Laura C. Pavelka and Kim M. Baines
Dalton Trans., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT11690A

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Spin transition polymorphs

A team of researchers have synthesised an iron(II) bispyrazolylpyridine complex in order to elucidate the interplay between spin transition and polymorphism.

Complexes demonstrating high spin–low spin crossover could prove to be very useful materials in technologies which rely on switching mechanisms, however, to use them to their full potential, any properties affecting their performance need to be understood – crystal symmetry being one of them. Mario Ruben and co-workers discovered that crystallisation of the iron(II) bispyrazolylpyridine complex produced two polymorphs which upon heating, yields a third polymorphic form. Interestingly, the different polymorphs each demonstrate different magnetic behaviour.

Whilst one polymorph, exhibits an abrupt, hysteretic high/low spin transition, the other remains low spin. The team have attributed this to varying levels of inter-molecular cooperativity within the crystal structures.

To read more, download the Dalton Transactions article now…

The interplay of iron(II) spin transition and polymorphism
Ivan Šalitroš, Olaf Fuhr, Andreas Eichhöfer, Robert Kruk, Ján Pavlik, Lubor Dlháň, Roman Boča and Mario Ruben

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