Register now for the Dalton New Talent: Americas Desktop Seminar

We are delighted to announce our next Desktop Seminar in our New Talent series! Dalton Transactions is providing an opportunity for emerging investigators to present, discuss and showcase their inorganic chemistry research based on our popular New Talent series of themed issues.

The next desktop seminar is based on our 2020 themed issue, New Talent: Americas – attendance is free and registration is now open.

The seminar will be held on December 2, 2021 and will be chaired by Dalton Transactions Associate Editor, Professor Christine Thomas. The talks will cover a wide spectrum of topics within inorganic chemistry, including organometallic chemistry, main group chemistry and inorganic materials.

 

Speakers: 

 

Professor Cynthia L M Pereira

Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil

Talk Title: Mononuclear lanthanide(III) complexes containing oxamate ligands: synthesis, photophysical and magnetic properties

To find out more about Professor Pereira’s work, check out her article in the New Talent: Americas themed issue on Mononuclear lanthanide(III)-oxamate complexes as new photoluminescent field-induced single-molecule magnets: solid-state photophysical and magnetic properties

 

Graphical abstract: Mononuclear lanthanide(iii)-oxamate complexes as new photoluminescent field-induced single-molecule magnets: solid-state photophysical and magnetic properties
 
Professor David Herbert

University of Manitoba, Canada

Talk Title: Exploiting Ligand C=N Units in Molecular Materials Chemistry

To find out more about Professor Herbert’s work, check out his article in the New Talent: Americas themed issue on Zn-Templated synthesis of substituted (2,6-diimine)pyridine proligands and evaluation of their iron complexes as anolytes for flow battery applications

 

Graphical abstract: Zn-Templated synthesis of substituted (2,6-diimine)pyridine proligands and evaluation of their iron complexes as anolytes for flow battery applications
 
Professor Rebekka Klausen

Johns Hopkins University, USA

Talk Title: Fragments of crystalline silicon via target-oriented synthesis

To find out more about Professor Klausen’s work, check out her article in the New Talent: Americas themed issue on: Reductive halocyclosilazane polymerization  

 

Register now to attend these exciting talks!

 

Future desktop seminars will include more speakers from our 2020 themed issue, New Talent: Americas, as well as our other recent New Talent issues so watch this space for more details or sign up to our newsletter!  

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Celebrating our top 50 articles over the last 50 years

We are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions this year!

As part of our 50th anniversary celebrations, we want to highlight 50 of our most highly cited articles published over the last 50 years. These highly cited articles represent research that has been well-received by the community over the years, including seminal work in the field of inorganic chemistry and some notable review articles in key fields that have emerged over the last half-century.

Our top 50 list reflects the full scope of Dalton Transactions, with many articles containing useful pieces of information used for reference by inorganic chemists. One example includes our most cited article of all time by Addison and co-workers (with over 8000 citations*), which defines the structural parameter τ5 for the first time as an ‘index of trigonality’ for five-coordinate metal complexes. Another example includes one of our oldest articles from 1973, describing the preparation of [RuCl2(DMSO)4] as a useful ruthenium(II) precursor.

Our top 50 list includes articles from as early as 1973 to as recent as 2019, and our most cited articles are typically from the 1980s and the 2000s. The 50 articles in our list have garnered a total of over 43,000 citations.

You can browse the selection of our top 50 most highly cited articles categorised by subject area below, or see the full list on our collection webpage.

 


Figure 1: Cover art for Issue 35, Vol 39 (2010)

 

Bioinorganic Chemistry Year Citations*
The status of platinum anticancer drugs in the clinic and in clinical trials (On the cover, Figure 1) 2010 1141
Spectroscopic and redox studies of some copper(II) complexes with biomimetic donor atoms: Implications for protein copper centres 1979 552
Cationic, linear Au(I) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: Synthesis, structure and anti-mitochondrial activity 2006 200
Redox behavior of tumor-inhibiting ruthenium(III) complexes and effects of physiological reductants on their binding to GMP 2006 178

 

Coordination Chemistry Year Citations*
Synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic properties of copper(II) compounds containing nitrogen-sulphur donor ligands; the crystal and molecular structure of aqua[1,7-bis(N-methylbenzimidazol-2′-yl)-2,6-dithiaheptane]copper(II) perchlorate 1984 8277
A critical account on π-π stacking in metal complexes with aromatic nitrogen-containing ligands 2000 4046
Covalent radii revisited 2008 2255
Supplement. Tables of bond lengths determined by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Part 2. Organometallic compounds and co-ordination complexes of the d- and f-block metals 1989 1866
Structural variation in copper(I) complexes with pyridylmethylamide ligands: Structural analysis with a new four-coordinate geometry index, τ4 2007 1658
The bite angle makes the difference: A practical ligand parameter for diphosphine ligands 1999 428

 

Figure 2: Cover art for Issue 28, Vol 36 (2007)

Catalysis Year Citations*
Utilisation of CO2 as a chemical feedstock: Opportunities and challenges (On the cover, Figure 2) 2007 972
Cationic Group 4 metallocene complexes and their role in polymerisation catalysis: The chemistry of well defined Ziegler catalysts 1996 928
Alkane C-H activation and functionalization with homogeneous transition metal catalysts: A century of progress – A new millennium in prospect 2001 608
Electrocatalysis of hydrogen production by active site analogues of the iron hydrogenase enzyme: Structure/function relationships 2003 279
Carboxylato-triphenylphosphine complexes of ruthenium, cationic triphenylphosphine complexes derived from them, and their behaviour as homogeneous hydrogenation catalysts for alkenes 1973 260
Magnesium and zinc complexes of a potentially tridentate β-diketiminate ligand 2004 166

 

Coordination Networks & Supramolecular Chemistry Year Citations*
Engineering coordination polymers towards applications 2003 2971
Solvent extraction of strontium nitrate by a crown ether using room-temperature ionic liquids 1999 748
The rational design of high symmetry coordination clusters 1999 472
Hydrothermal synthesis and crystal structures of three-dimensional co-ordination frameworks constructed with mixed terephthalate (tp) and 4,4′-bipyridine (4,4′-bipy) ligands: [M(tp)(4,4′-bipy)] (M = CoII, CdII or ZnII) 2000 357
Aqueous room temperature synthesis of cobalt and zinc sodalite zeolitic imidizolate frameworks 2012 320
A flexible Eu(III)-based metal-organic framework: Turn-off luminescent sensor for the detection of Fe(III) and picric acid 2013 283

 

Inorganic materials & nanomaterials Year Citations*
Adsorption of divalent metal ions from aqueous solutions using graphene oxide 2013 560
Large scale electrochemical synthesis of high quality carbon nanodots and their photocatalytic property 2012 549
Study on composition, structure and formation process of nanotube Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 2003 436
Large-scale delamination of multi-layers transition metal carbides and carbonitrides “mXenes” 2015 297
The P2-Na2/3Co2/3Mn1/3O2 phase: Structure, physical properties and electrochemical behavior as positive electrode in sodium battery 2011 186
Sandwich-like NiCo layered double hydroxide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite cathodes for high energy density asymmetric supercapacitors 2019 183

 

Magnetism & Optical Properties/Photochemistry Year Citations*
Satellite structure in the X-ray photoelectron spectra of some binary and mixed oxides of lanthanum and cerium 1976 847
Organic-inorganic composite photocatalyst of g-C3N4 and TaON with improved visible light photocatalytic activities 2010 484
Low co-ordination numbers in lanthanide and actinide compounds. Part I. The preparation and characterization of tris{bis(trimethylsilyl)-amido}lanthanides 1973 465
Synthesis and study of a mixed-ligand ruthenium(II) complex in its ground and excited states: bis(2,2′-bipyridine)(dipyrido[3,2-a : 2′,3′-c]phenazine-N4N5)ruthenium(II) 1990 414
Relaxation dynamics of dysprosium(III) single molecule magnets 2011 407
New photocatalyst BiOCl/BiOI composites with highly enhanced visible light photocatalytic performances 2011 344
Exchange interaction in tetrameric oxygen-bridged copper(II) clusters of the cubane type 1980 309

 

Figure 3: Cover art for Issue 17, Vol 38, 2009

Organometallic & Main Group Chemistry Year Citations*
The phase behaviour of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborates; ionic liquids and ionic liquid crystals 1999 1284
Arene ruthenium(II) complexes formed by dehydrogenation of cyclohexadienes with ruthenium(III) trichloride 1974 1183
Dichlorotetrakis(dimethyl sulphoxide)ruthenium(II) and its use as a source material for some new ruthenium(II) complexes 1973 799
Ammonia-borane: The hydrogen source par excellence? 2007 668
Transition metal-carbon bonds. Part XLII. Complexes of nickel, palladium, platinum, rhodium and iridium with the tridentate ligand 2,6-bis[(di-t-butylphosphino)methyl]phenyl 1976 663
Subvalent Group 4B metal alkyls and amides. Part I. The synthesis and physical properties of kinetically stable bis[bis(trimethysilyl)methyl]-germanium(II), -tin(II), and -lead(II) 1976 492
Frustrated Lewis pairs: A new strategy to small molecule activation and hydrogenation catalysis (On the cover, Figure 3) 2009 403
Alkyl, alkynyl, and olefin complexes of bis(π-cyclopentadienyl)-molybdenum or -tungsten: A reversible metal-to-ring transfer of an ethyl group 1974 180

 

Mechanistic studies & Theoretical Chemistry Year Citations*
SUPERQUAD: An improved general program for computation of formation constants from potentiometric data 1985 1565
The accuracy of DFT-optimized geometries of functional transition metal compounds: A validation study of catalysts for olefin metathesis and other reactions in the homogeneous phase 2012 308
The Mayer bond order as a tool in inorganic chemistry 2001 303
The mechanism of the modified Ullmann reaction 2010 281
Kinetics and mechanism of ortho-palladation of ring-substituted NN-dimethylbenzylamines 1985 213
Mechanism of reductive elimination of ethane from some halogenotrimethylbis(tertiary phosphine)platinum(IV) complexes 1974 175
Synthesis and properties of the divalent 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe) complexes MCl2(dmpe)2 and MMe2(dmpe)2 (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, or Fe). X-Ray crystal structures of MCl2(dmpe)2 (M = Ti, V, or Cr), MnBr2(dmpe)2, TiMe1.3Cl0.7(dmpe)2, and CrMe2(dmpe)2 1985 169

 

*citation data according to Scopus, accessed on 24 September 2021

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HOT Articles – Online now and free to access

Dalton Transactions, Royal Society of Chemistry

We have updated our reviewer recommended ‘HOT articles’ for 2021.

We update our HOT articles collection quarterly and make the selected articles free to access until 19 November 2021! This collection represents the top 10% of research published in Dalton Transactions between July – September 2021.

Make the most of the free to access period by browsing the collection today!

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Gill Reid

Prof. Gill Reid and Dalton Transactions

This year we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week, we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Gillian Reid, as our final Golden Author in our series.

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Gill Reid is based at the University of Southampton in the UK. Her research focuses on main group and transition metal coordination chemistry, including macrocyclic chemistry, precursor synthesis for CVD and electrodeposition of semiconductor thin films and nanostructures, as well as metal fluoride coordination chemistry. Dalton means to Gill: “I believe that Dalton Transactions provides a great platform for disseminating research across the whole of inorganic chemistry and it is a great source of ideas and inspiration!”

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

In 2021, we published our most recent work describing a molecular organometallic complex, [nBu3Sn(TenBu)], that is a highly effective single source precursor for the growth of high quality, stoichiometric tin telluride (SnTe) thin films by chemical vapour deposition at relatively low temperatures.  The tin monochalcogenide semiconductors are interesting thermoelectric materials for the conversion of thermal energy into electrical potential, and therefore for energy harvesting. The article describes the temperature-dependent thermoelectric properties of the p-type SnTe films, which compare favourably with bulk SnTe. We were also able to demonstrate that this precursor allows area selective growth of SnTe onto lithographically patterned substrates.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

We are keen to expand our work in two ways: firstly, to exploit the area selective deposition to develop an efficient process for the fabrication of micro-thermoelectric generators for ‘internet of things’ applications and wireless sensing; and secondly, to optimise the volatility and broaden the precursor range to allow access to other key metal chalcogenide thermoelectric thin films.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

The key barriers in this area of research are to increase the thermoelectric efficiency of the materials and devices and to ensure the sustainability of the materials, such that they become viable for energy harvesting applications. By developing a compatible suite of molecular precursors we have the opportunity to optimise the thermoelectric properties of the films and to substitute scarce elements like tellurium for the more abundant lighter chalcogens (sulfur or selenium).

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions: which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

I will take the liberty of highlighting 2 articles addressing different topics that I personally think are very interesting and also remain very relevant to current research in my group. I think they provide two distinct illustrations of how inorganic chemistry allows the creation of new molecular complexes with tailored properties that can have important applications. The first article describes precursors for technologically important transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) thin films via chemical vapour deposition; see “Thio- and seleno-ether complexes with Group 4 tetrahalides and tin tetrachloride: preparation and use in CVD for metal chalcogenide films”.

The second article describes a new class of inorganic fluoride binders, in particular for incorporating radiofluorine (18F) under mild conditions in water based solvents- see Exploring transition metal fluoride chelates – synthesis, properties and prospects towards potential PET probes”. These have potential applications in medical imaging via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, and the subtle differences between the different metal ions in the periodic table offer really exciting prospects for the development of new and effective PET imaging agents.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

It’s really difficult to specify just one article as the chemistry in Dalton Transactions covers so many different topics and applications! However, the 2019 article from Gabbai and co-workers on Phosphonium–stibonium and bis-stibonium cations as pnictogen-bonding catalysts for the transfer hydrogenation of quinolines is significant as it illustrates some very nice new chemistry based on previously understudied organoantimony compounds, revealing the importance of the stibonium functions in catalysis.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

The area of inorganic chemistry is incredibly broad, and I think that is really exciting, offering great opportunities to develop new molecules, materials and processes that are relevant to many different fields of science and technology. I encourage young researchers to seek opportunities to use their specialist skills in inorganic chemistry and to collaborate with researchers in other fields to contribute to the next generation of scientific innovations.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

I consider Dalton Transactions to be one of the most important international journals for keeping track of new, high quality research in the broad field of inorganic chemistry. It is a great source of ideas and inspiration!

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

As our professional body for chemistry, as well as an internationally leading publisher and not-for-profit charitable organisation, I align very closely with the ambitions of the RSC to support chemists and advocate for the chemical sciences internationally. Therefore, publishing in RSC journals comes naturally!

I also believe that Dalton Transactions provides a great platform for disseminating research across the whole of inorganic chemistry as well as providing excellent author support.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

I have always found that the Editors and staff provide great support to authors and reviewers, aiming to ensure a fair peer-review process and speedy publication of articles.

 

You can check out Gill’s recent Dalton Transactions article on [nBu3Sn(TenBu)] as a precursor for the growth of tin telluride (SnTe) thin films below,


Low temperature CVD of thermoelectric SnTe thin films from the single source precursor, [nBu3Sn(TenBu)]

Fred Robinson, Daniel W. Newbrook, Peter Curran, C. H. (Kees) de Groot, Duncan Hardie, Andrew L. Hector, Ruomeng Huang and Gillian Reid*

Dalton Trans., 2021, 50, 998-1006

 


Check out the full collection of recent research published in Dalton Transactions by all of our featured Golden Authors in our Celebrating our Golden Authors collection.

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Guo-Xin Jin

Prof. Guo-Xin Jin and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Guo-Xin Jin.

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Dr. Guo-Xin Jin is based in the Department of Chemistry at Fudan University, China. His research focuses on catalysts for olefin polymerisation and organometallic complexes. Guo-Xin was previously an Associate Editor for Dalton Transactions, and Dalton means to him: “Dalton is a powerful tool for me to explore the frontiers of my field and to read cutting-edge research.”

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

The article describes the selective B(3)-H bond activation of o-carborane by using methyldithiocarboxyl as a directing group and a half-sandwich organoiridium metal corner. The substitution chemistry of the B(3)-H activated complex had been extended, while several substitution complexes including an iridated-o-carborane-[B10H10]2– complex were synthesized and characterized.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

Up until now, our group has achieved a series of research results based on the half-sandwich Ir/Rh(III) organometallic fragments, concluding the novel strategy for the constructing metallacycles or metallacages and the deeper exploration of the mentioned compounds for specific recognition, selective separation, stimuli-responsive topological transformation and so on. In the future, we expect to explore supramolecular compounds with more intricate topologies, and also to explore more deeply the application of the aforementioned compounds in more fields, such as the use of complex topologies to stabilize active intermediates or to regulate the size of gold nanoparticles by using finite cavities of cage-like compounds, etc.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

At present, the biggest challenge for us to expand into new areas may be that scientific exploration is largely limited by the current level of characterization means. For example, as the complexity of the topology increases, the corresponding characterization tests and analysis become more and more difficult, especially in the case of X-ray crystallographic analysis.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions- which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

The content of the articles published by our group mainly covers half-sandwich organometallic-based olefin catalysts, carborane chemistry and the exploration of organometallic supramolecular compounds on controlled synthesis with various kinds of applications. According to these aspects, these six representative papers are not only beneficial for beginners to understand the field, but also a great reference to inspire researchers to continue their own explorations in the field.

Half-sandwich Ir-based neutral organometallic macrocycles containing pyridine-4-thiolato ligands

Syntheses, reactions, and ethylenepolymerization of titanium complexes with [N,N,S] ligands

Design and self-assembly of variform organometallic macrocycle with terminal imidazole-based bridging ligands utilizing joints twist and rotation

Construction of iridium and rhodium cyclometalated macrocycles based on p-carborane and N,N′-donor bridging ligands

The synthesis and reactivity of 16-electron half-sandwich iridium complexes bearing a carboranylthioamide ligand

Host–guest capability of a three-dimensional heterometallic macrocycle

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

This review article with 3,434 citations reported by Prof. Christoph Janiak (Bioinorganic Chemistry and Catalysis at the University of Düsseldorf) that focuses on the definition of coordination polymers and the current state of research in a number of fields, such as catalysis, chirality, conductivity, luminescence, magnetism, spin-transition (spin-crossover), non-linear optics (NLO) and so on. This article is of great value in guiding and inspiring researchers to continue to explore the field of coordination polymers in depth, and therefore, I do suggest this article has made a significant contribution to the field of coordination polymers.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Perhaps not limited to newcomers of the field of organometallic chemistry, I believe that an outstanding researcher should have five qualifications, which I have summarized into four key words: Passion, Health, Direction and Modesty. Passion means that you have to be passionate about the field you are studying, because the process of scientific exploration is full of unknown results, success or failure, but you have to learn to enjoy the joy of what the process brings you, because only with enthusiasm can you enjoy exploring the truth. Health means that you have to be healthy enough to cope with the difficulties and stresses of scientific exploration, not only physically but also psychologically, so it is necessary to spend part of your focus on your health for scientific exploration. Direction means you should have a clear and appropriate goal: a clear direction can give yourself the direction to work hard, the right direction can give yourself the courage to keep moving forward. Modesty means that maintaining an attitude of modesty toward others, staying humble and learning to share will benefit you greatly.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

First of all, as a researcher, Dalton Transactions is a powerful tool for me to explore the frontiers of my field and to read it for cutting-edge research results. It is also an international platform for me to present the work of my group and share my research progress with researchers from all over the world. Secondly, during my tenure as Associate Editor of the journal, Dalton Transactions was a platform for me to enhance my capabilities by analysing various aspects of the submitted manuscripts to identify each quality paper for each reader.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

Dalton Transactions is an internationally recognized journal in the field of inorganic chemistry, covering almost all areas of research in the field. The fast publication schedule ensures that scientific results can be shared with active researchers in a timely manner, and the quality of submitted papers is enhanced through rigorous and fair review and professional editing.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

From the time I published my first research paper in Dalton Transactions in 2005 until now, I have been impressed by the admirable rigor of the editorial team in their work and their high level of professionalism, and the faster publication cycle has made me more willing to publish our group’s research work in the journal.

 

 

You can check out Guo-Xin’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on the selective B(3)-H bond activation of o-carboranes below.


Regioselective B(3)–H bond activation based on an o-carboranyl dithiocarboxylate ligand and its derivatives

Run-Ze Yuan, Peng-Fei Cui, Shu-Ting Guo and Guo-Xin Jin*

Dalton Trans., 2021, 50, 1060-1068

 

 


Check out the full collection of recent research published in Dalton Transactions by all of our featured Golden Authors in our Celebrating our Golden Authors collection.

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Pierre Braunstein

Prof. Pierre Braunstein and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week, we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Pierre Braunstein.

 

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Pierre Braunstein is based at the Institute of Chemistry at the University of Strasbourg. His research is focused on organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis. Pierre has previously served on both the Editorial and Advisory Boards for Dalton Transactions and has had an excellent experience publishing in Dalton ever since his first paper in 1973.

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

Including N-heterocyclic donors in the framework of pincer ligands is attracting considerable interest and those with a central NHC donor have been particularly successful. The diversity of side arms that can be installed at the N atom(s) of a NHC backbone includes not only the nature of the donor groups but also the length of the spacer connecting them to the heterocycle. These parameters critically influence the stereoelectronic properties of the pincer complexes and in our most recent Dalton article, we reported tritopic ligands of the type NimineCNHCNamine and the relevant copper, silver, nickel, chromium and iridium complexes.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

Our research interests have always been very diversified so that many areas would deserve further developments, including completing very promising but unfinished investigations.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

As an Emeritus professor, it is the lack of co-workers and funding that represents the biggest barriers. Fortunately, some active collaborations are in place and most rewarding.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

Don’t ask the father of many children to tell you his favourite kid!

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

They are too many to offer a fair selection.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Learn from the literature, work hard to create your own niche, follow your intuitions and, most importantly, enjoy what you are doing.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

An international, well-established and respected journal covering inorganic, bioinorganic, and organometallic chemistries with a broad readership.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

I’ve always enjoyed the professionalism of the editors and publisher, the speed of publication, and the most constructive, helpful, courteous and polite comments from the well-selected referees. I was impressed when I had the opportunity to follow this more closely as member of the Advisory Board (1994-1995) and Associate Editor (1996-2001) for Dalton and member of the Council of the Royal Society of Chemistry (2005-2009).

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

Excellent, and I have never been disappointed since my first paper in Dalton in 1973!

 

 

You can check out Pierre’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on the coordination chemistry of tritopic ligands incorporating NHCs below.


Cu(I), Ag(I), Ni(II), Cr(III) and Ir(I) complexes with tritopic NimineCNHCNamine pincer ligands and catalytic ethylene oligomerization

Xiaoyu Ren, Marcel Wesolek* and Pierre Braunstein*

Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 12895-12909

 

 


Check out the full collection of recent research published in Dalton Transactions by all of our featured Golden Authors in our Celebrating our Golden Authors collection.

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Vivian W. W. Yam

Prof. Vivian W. W. Yam and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Vivian W. W. Yam.

 

 

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Vivian Yam is based at the University of Hong Kong, and her research focuses on coordination and organometallic chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, materials chemistry and photochemistry. Vivian chooses to publish in Dalton Transactions because “it is an international reputable society journal dedicated to inorganic and coordination chemistry research.”

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

Our most recent research works published in Dalton Transactions involve the design and spectroscopic studies of functional metal complexes for luminescence, donor-acceptor charge transfer, supramolecular assembly and chemosensing.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

We would like to expand our studies through an understanding of weak intermolecular forces and the interplay of various factors that influence the controlled manipulation and assembly of molecular metal complexes and their excited states for functional materials research.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

The biggest barriers are to be able to control and manipulate the molecular configurations and supramolecular assemblies of our systems in order to perturb the electronic communication and coupling to control the excited states and their charge transfer behaviour. The understanding of how microscopic properties can influence the macroscopic properties is also crucial to the design of molecular materials with desired functional properties. The computational power and its ability to provide accurate theoretical description and insights into the electronic structures of large molecules, clusters and assemblies are also important.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

One important piece of work is the design and discovery of luminescent organogold(III) diimine complexes. Gold(III) complexes have long been known to be non-emissive. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of strong σ-donor ligands like alkyls and aryls in generating luminescent gold(III) complexes with room-temperature phosphorescence. This has laid the foundation for our subsequent works on luminescent gold(III) complexes for OLED applications. Another work involves the systematic study of luminescent trinuclear two- and three-coordinate gold(I) complexes with Au(I)Au(I) interactions. Other works on luminescent metal alkynyls, chalcogenides and chalcogenolates of gold, silver, copper, platinum and palladium and others are also key to the development of luminescent metal complexes and their excited states.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

There are so many seminal works in Dalton Transactions and many of them have made a significant impact to the field. It is difficult to select just one.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Chemistry is a central science. Transition metal chemistry is fascinating given the diverse array of metals and metal chemistry that one can explore. It is important to build a strong foundation not only in chemistry and its sub-disciplines, but also in other disciplines of science. Read widely to develop the common language to interact with scientists from other disciplines. Be creative, adventurous and forward-looking. There is so much to be learned and to be inspired by. It is a life-long self-learning process.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

Quality, rigour, professional, international and friendly.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

It is an international reputable society journal dedicated to inorganic and coordination chemistry research. The manuscripts receive prompt, fair and quality handling.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

I have good experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions. The editors and editorial team are professional, helpful and caring.

 

 

You can check out Vivian’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on functional metal complexes for luminescence below.


Synthesis and cation-binding studies of gold(I) complexes bearing oligoether isocyanide ligands with ester and amide as linkers

Franky Ka-Wah Hau and Vivian Wing-Wah Yam*

Dalton Trans., 2016, 45, 300-306

 

 


Check out the full collection of recent research published in Dalton Transactions by all of our featured Golden Authors in our Celebrating our Golden Authors collection.

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Christoph Janiak

Prof. Christoph Janiak and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Christoph Janiak.

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Christoph Janiak is based at the Institute for Inorganic and Structural Chemistry at Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf in Germany. His research is mainly focused on porous materials and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). For Christoph, Dalton is one of his first choices where he publishes his research and “Dalton is a very good journal for high level research where the work will be read.” Christoph also has many highly cited papers in Dalton Transactions, including two review articles that have each been cited over 3400 times.

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

My most recent publications in Dalton are about coordination networks and MOFs. In particular, I have published a practical guide to calculate the isosteric heat/enthalpy of adsorption via adsorption isotherms in MOFs as a Perspective, which I hope will be interesting for a broader audience.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

In the future, my research will also move to the field of electrocatalysis using MOFs and other porous materials, metal nanoparticles and ionic liquids.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

My lack of time in view of many other duties such as refereeing (journal manuscripts, grant proposals), administrative work and a comparatively high teaching load.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

My 2003 review, Engineering coordination polymers towards applications, focused on what are now called MOFs and their properties. It was not the structures but instead the properties which are still interesting today in this exploding field, which were summarized and critically assessed in this review, including sorption and catalytic behavior, magnetism, luminescence etc.

Also, the paper published in the year 2000: A critical account on π–π stacking in metal complexes with aromatic nitrogen-containing ligands. Its reception by the scientific community came as a surprise to me.

Both papers have been cited over 3400 and 4000 times respectively, and I feel extremely honoured and greatly thank all my colleagues who made use of these two Dalton articles over the years.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

The article which I like is the one on the “Addison tau parameter” where a geometric descriptor for the distortion of five-coordinate molecules was given (albeit not emphasized in the title): Synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic properties of copper(II) compounds containing nitrogen–sulphur donor ligands; the crystal and molecular structure of aqua[1,7-bis(N-methylbenzimidazol-2′-yl)-2,6-dithiaheptane]copper(II) perchlorate

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Read the literature, give due credit to previous publications, stay honest and self-critical with your own results and do not underestimate others who do not publish in (so-called) high-impact journals.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

I am extremely thankful to Dalton Transactions to have given me the opportunity to publish my work here over the years. I am always sure that the work which I publish in Dalton will be noticed by my peers.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

I am highly satisfied with their handling of the manuscripts, including quite fair referee reports.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

The citations which I have received to my 52 articles in Dalton (with 19 cited over 50 times and 11 cited over 100 times) prove to me that Dalton is a very good journal for high level research where the work will be read. For me, Dalton is one of my first choices where I publish my research.

 

You can check out Christoph’s recent Dalton Transactions Perspective on a practical guide to calculate the isosteric heat/enthalpy of adsorption via adsorption isotherms in MOFs below.


A practical guide to calculate the isosteric heat/enthalpy of adsorption via adsorption isotherms in metal–organic frameworks, MOFs

Alexander Nuhnen and Christoph Janiak*

Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 10295-10307

 

 


Check out the full collection of recent research published in Dalton Transactions by all of our featured Golden Authors in our Celebrating our Golden Authors collection.

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Alexandra Slawin

Prof. Alexandra Slawin and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Alexandra Slawin.

 

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Alex Slawin is a specialist crystallographer in the School of Chemistry at the University of St Andrews in Scotland. Her research in chemical crystallography focuses on structure determination by solving molecular puzzles. She chooses to publish in Dalton Transactions for its “broad readership and to support the RSC,” and Dalton reminds her of “how John Dalton strove hard to pursue his own ideals despite many detractors and delivered a useful tool for generations to come.”

 

As the specialist crystallographer on over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

I’m interested in crystallography of all types, so they were all significant and interesting to me.  I like Use of Se4N4 and Se(NSO)2 in the preparation of palladium adducts of diselenium dinitride, Se2N2; crystal structure of [PPh4]2[Pd2Br6(SeN2)], from the early years of my career, working with Paul Kelly who is an engaging collaborator. This was a challenging material to handle, and I had no access to low temperature – just a very neat final structure which has formed the basis of further work.

  

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

I have recently undergone a course in mediation so this may well expand the thrust of my research interests.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

Money

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

I like this one from Paul Pringle in Bristol (neat ligands and a good study): Ring size effects in cyclic fluorophosphites: ligands that span the bonding space between phosphites and PF3

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Broaden your interests from the start.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

It always reminds me how John Dalton strove hard to pursue his own ideals despite many detractors and delivered a useful tool for generations to come.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

For its broad readership and to support the RSC.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

I started publishing over 35 years ago and will carry on.

 

 

You can check out Alex’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on the structural variations of a new hybrid lead(II) pervoskite below.


Structural variations in (001)-oriented layered lead halide perovskites, templated by 1,2,4-triazolium

Yuan-Yuan Guo, Lin-Jie Yang, Jason A. McNulty, Alexandra M. Z. Slawin and Philip Lightfoot*

Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 17274­-17280

 

 


Check out the full collection of recent research published in Dalton Transactions by all of our featured Golden Authors in our Celebrating our Golden Authors collection.

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Shaikh M. Mobin

Prof. Shaikh M. Mobin and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Shaikh M. Mobin.

 


Our author at a glance:

Prof. Shaikh Mobin is based in the Department of Chemistry at the Indian Institute of Technology Indore (IIT Indore), India. His research is focused on the design and synthesis of novel MOFs and COFs, and their applications in sensing, drug delivery, energy storage and conversion, catalysis and more. He chooses to publish in Dalton Transactions because it has “the fairest review process and wide readership among traditional inorganic chemists” and is a ‘bible for fundamental inorganic chemistry articles’.

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

Our latest research was an invited review. This invitation came to us in a very crucial time in 2020 when we all were under lockdown and this review helped us a lot in keeping the group members’ momentum high and it prevented us in our worries of loss of time apart. In this review, we highlighted the recent and future prospects on mixed-metal MOFs as emerging supercapacitor candidates.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

From bench work to publications, research has been a very challenging task these days. Thus, to keep up with the pace and quality of research, we are planning to expand our research in various upcoming areas. In this regard, we have so far been able to keep a good amount of co-workers and we would like to continue to keep this trend going. We will also continue to have multi-disciplinary work within the group, and most important is to keep yourself updated with the track of ongoing research in your field.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

The biggest barriers which I can immediately think about are (i) Research funding and (ii) state of the art research facilities. Both are correlated and with the recent pandemic, this may put up a further barrier in basic research funding. We have ideas that comprise of both fundamental research and applied research, but getting it funded is still a major hurdle and also exploring for easy accessible facilities to complete such projects is challenging. Nevertheless, that also indicates that we must have the best project proposal to compete for available funding.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

Our work on solid-state structural transformations (see Retention of single crystals of two Co(II) complexes during chemical reactions and rearrangement and Single-crystal to single-crystal transformations in discrete hydrated dimeric copper complexes) is always very special for me. The other most interesting work is the design and synthesis of  A novel mesoionic carbene based highly fluorescent Pd(II) complex as an endoplasmic reticulum tracker in live cells, which also appeared as cover art for Dalton.

Another area of research which I find more interesting is electrochemical sensing by employing: (i) Small biomolecule sensors based on an innovative MoS2–rGO heterostructure modified electrode and (ii) Non-enzymatic amperometric sensing of glucose by employing sucrose templated microspheres of copper oxide (CuO). All these areas of works have attracted good readership across the globe.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

Although it’s difficult to choose any one particular impactful article, if I had to suggest one article in the area of solid-state structural reactivity, I would choose the perspective by Vittal, J. J. et al on Photochemical reactions of metal complexes in the solid state, which has well written notes on this topic. Another perspective, which I personally feel has quite an impact to inorganic readership in the area of electronic structure, is Electronic structure alternatives in nitrosylruthenium complexes by Profs Kaim and Lahiri, which nicely covers the fundamental aspects of electronic structure. In optical sensing, I would suggest Triarylborane substituted naphthalimide as a fluoride and cyanide ion sensor by Misra et al., which is very interesting in this field.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

One must be aggressive in your research with checking the updated literature in your own field. As I said above, from bench work to publications, research is extremely challenging these days: for instance, you may discuss some work in your group meeting and by the time you have your next group meeting, you may see similar work has been published. Do your research planning very carefully and have a good team and give them liberty to work.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

I call it a “Bible for Fundamental Inorganic Chemistry articles”. It’s one of my all-time favourite journals.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

Dalton has the fairest review process and wide readership among traditional inorganic chemists.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

It has always been satisfying and excellent.

 

You can check out Shaikh’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on the prospects of mixed-metal MOFs as supercapacitors below.


Recent highlights and future prospects on mixed-metal MOFs as emerging supercapacitor candidates

Richa Rajak, Ravinder Kumar, Shagufi Naz Ansari, Mohit Saraf and Shaikh M. Mobin*

Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 11792-11818

 

 


Check out the full collection of recent research published in Dalton Transactions by all of our featured Golden Authors in our Celebrating our Golden Authors collection.

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