Archive for the ‘Dalton 50th Anniversary’ Category

Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Gill Reid

Prof. Gill Reid and Dalton Transactions

This year we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week, we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Gillian Reid, as our final Golden Author in our series.

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Gill Reid is based at the University of Southampton in the UK. Her research focuses on main group and transition metal coordination chemistry, including macrocyclic chemistry, precursor synthesis for CVD and electrodeposition of semiconductor thin films and nanostructures, as well as metal fluoride coordination chemistry. Dalton means to Gill: “I believe that Dalton Transactions provides a great platform for disseminating research across the whole of inorganic chemistry and it is a great source of ideas and inspiration!”

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

In 2021, we published our most recent work describing a molecular organometallic complex, [nBu3Sn(TenBu)], that is a highly effective single source precursor for the growth of high quality, stoichiometric tin telluride (SnTe) thin films by chemical vapour deposition at relatively low temperatures.  The tin monochalcogenide semiconductors are interesting thermoelectric materials for the conversion of thermal energy into electrical potential, and therefore for energy harvesting. The article describes the temperature-dependent thermoelectric properties of the p-type SnTe films, which compare favourably with bulk SnTe. We were also able to demonstrate that this precursor allows area selective growth of SnTe onto lithographically patterned substrates.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

We are keen to expand our work in two ways: firstly, to exploit the area selective deposition to develop an efficient process for the fabrication of micro-thermoelectric generators for ‘internet of things’ applications and wireless sensing; and secondly, to optimise the volatility and broaden the precursor range to allow access to other key metal chalcogenide thermoelectric thin films.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

The key barriers in this area of research are to increase the thermoelectric efficiency of the materials and devices and to ensure the sustainability of the materials, such that they become viable for energy harvesting applications. By developing a compatible suite of molecular precursors we have the opportunity to optimise the thermoelectric properties of the films and to substitute scarce elements like tellurium for the more abundant lighter chalcogens (sulfur or selenium).

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions: which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

I will take the liberty of highlighting 2 articles addressing different topics that I personally think are very interesting and also remain very relevant to current research in my group. I think they provide two distinct illustrations of how inorganic chemistry allows the creation of new molecular complexes with tailored properties that can have important applications. The first article describes precursors for technologically important transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) thin films via chemical vapour deposition; see “Thio- and seleno-ether complexes with Group 4 tetrahalides and tin tetrachloride: preparation and use in CVD for metal chalcogenide films”.

The second article describes a new class of inorganic fluoride binders, in particular for incorporating radiofluorine (18F) under mild conditions in water based solvents- see Exploring transition metal fluoride chelates – synthesis, properties and prospects towards potential PET probes”. These have potential applications in medical imaging via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, and the subtle differences between the different metal ions in the periodic table offer really exciting prospects for the development of new and effective PET imaging agents.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

It’s really difficult to specify just one article as the chemistry in Dalton Transactions covers so many different topics and applications! However, the 2019 article from Gabbai and co-workers on Phosphonium–stibonium and bis-stibonium cations as pnictogen-bonding catalysts for the transfer hydrogenation of quinolines is significant as it illustrates some very nice new chemistry based on previously understudied organoantimony compounds, revealing the importance of the stibonium functions in catalysis.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

The area of inorganic chemistry is incredibly broad, and I think that is really exciting, offering great opportunities to develop new molecules, materials and processes that are relevant to many different fields of science and technology. I encourage young researchers to seek opportunities to use their specialist skills in inorganic chemistry and to collaborate with researchers in other fields to contribute to the next generation of scientific innovations.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

I consider Dalton Transactions to be one of the most important international journals for keeping track of new, high quality research in the broad field of inorganic chemistry. It is a great source of ideas and inspiration!

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

As our professional body for chemistry, as well as an internationally leading publisher and not-for-profit charitable organisation, I align very closely with the ambitions of the RSC to support chemists and advocate for the chemical sciences internationally. Therefore, publishing in RSC journals comes naturally!

I also believe that Dalton Transactions provides a great platform for disseminating research across the whole of inorganic chemistry as well as providing excellent author support.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

I have always found that the Editors and staff provide great support to authors and reviewers, aiming to ensure a fair peer-review process and speedy publication of articles.

 

You can check out Gill’s recent Dalton Transactions article on [nBu3Sn(TenBu)] as a precursor for the growth of tin telluride (SnTe) thin films below.


Low temperature CVD of thermoelectric SnTe thin films from the single source precursor, [nBu3Sn(TenBu)]

Fred Robinson, Daniel W. Newbrook, Peter Curran, C. H. (Kees) de Groot, Duncan Hardie, Andrew L. Hector, Ruomeng Huang and Gillian Reid*

Dalton Trans., 2021, 50, 998-1006

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Guo-Xin Jin

Prof. Guo-Xin Jin and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Guo-Xin Jin.

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Dr. Guo-Xin Jin is based in the Department of Chemistry at Fudan University, China. His research focuses on catalysts for olefin polymerisation and organometallic complexes. Guo-Xin was previously an Associate Editor for Dalton Transactions, and Dalton means to him: “Dalton is a powerful tool for me to explore the frontiers of my field and to read cutting-edge research.”

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

The article describes the selective B(3)-H bond activation of o-carborane by using methyldithiocarboxyl as a directing group and a half-sandwich organoiridium metal corner. The substitution chemistry of the B(3)-H activated complex had been extended, while several substitution complexes including an iridated-o-carborane-[B10H10]2– complex were synthesized and characterized.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

Up until now, our group has achieved a series of research results based on the half-sandwich Ir/Rh(III) organometallic fragments, concluding the novel strategy for the constructing metallacycles or metallacages and the deeper exploration of the mentioned compounds for specific recognition, selective separation, stimuli-responsive topological transformation and so on. In the future, we expect to explore supramolecular compounds with more intricate topologies, and also to explore more deeply the application of the aforementioned compounds in more fields, such as the use of complex topologies to stabilize active intermediates or to regulate the size of gold nanoparticles by using finite cavities of cage-like compounds, etc.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

At present, the biggest challenge for us to expand into new areas may be that scientific exploration is largely limited by the current level of characterization means. For example, as the complexity of the topology increases, the corresponding characterization tests and analysis become more and more difficult, especially in the case of X-ray crystallographic analysis.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions- which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

The content of the articles published by our group mainly covers half-sandwich organometallic-based olefin catalysts, carborane chemistry and the exploration of organometallic supramolecular compounds on controlled synthesis with various kinds of applications. According to these aspects, these six representative papers are not only beneficial for beginners to understand the field, but also a great reference to inspire researchers to continue their own explorations in the field.

Half-sandwich Ir-based neutral organometallic macrocycles containing pyridine-4-thiolato ligands

Syntheses, reactions, and ethylenepolymerization of titanium complexes with [N,N,S] ligands

Design and self-assembly of variform organometallic macrocycle with terminal imidazole-based bridging ligands utilizing joints twist and rotation

Construction of iridium and rhodium cyclometalated macrocycles based on p-carborane and N,N′-donor bridging ligands

The synthesis and reactivity of 16-electron half-sandwich iridium complexes bearing a carboranylthioamide ligand

Host–guest capability of a three-dimensional heterometallic macrocycle

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

This review article with 3,434 citations reported by Prof. Christoph Janiak (Bioinorganic Chemistry and Catalysis at the University of Düsseldorf) that focuses on the definition of coordination polymers and the current state of research in a number of fields, such as catalysis, chirality, conductivity, luminescence, magnetism, spin-transition (spin-crossover), non-linear optics (NLO) and so on. This article is of great value in guiding and inspiring researchers to continue to explore the field of coordination polymers in depth, and therefore, I do suggest this article has made a significant contribution to the field of coordination polymers.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Perhaps not limited to newcomers of the field of organometallic chemistry, I believe that an outstanding researcher should have five qualifications, which I have summarized into four key words: Passion, Health, Direction and Modesty. Passion means that you have to be passionate about the field you are studying, because the process of scientific exploration is full of unknown results, success or failure, but you have to learn to enjoy the joy of what the process brings you, because only with enthusiasm can you enjoy exploring the truth. Health means that you have to be healthy enough to cope with the difficulties and stresses of scientific exploration, not only physically but also psychologically, so it is necessary to spend part of your focus on your health for scientific exploration. Direction means you should have a clear and appropriate goal: a clear direction can give yourself the direction to work hard, the right direction can give yourself the courage to keep moving forward. Modesty means that maintaining an attitude of modesty toward others, staying humble and learning to share will benefit you greatly.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

First of all, as a researcher, Dalton Transactions is a powerful tool for me to explore the frontiers of my field and to read it for cutting-edge research results. It is also an international platform for me to present the work of my group and share my research progress with researchers from all over the world. Secondly, during my tenure as Associate Editor of the journal, Dalton Transactions was a platform for me to enhance my capabilities by analysing various aspects of the submitted manuscripts to identify each quality paper for each reader.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

Dalton Transactions is an internationally recognized journal in the field of inorganic chemistry, covering almost all areas of research in the field. The fast publication schedule ensures that scientific results can be shared with active researchers in a timely manner, and the quality of submitted papers is enhanced through rigorous and fair review and professional editing.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

From the time I published my first research paper in Dalton Transactions in 2005 until now, I have been impressed by the admirable rigor of the editorial team in their work and their high level of professionalism, and the faster publication cycle has made me more willing to publish our group’s research work in the journal.

 

 

You can check out Guo-Xin’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on the selective B(3)-H bond activation of o-carboranes below.


Regioselective B(3)–H bond activation based on an o-carboranyl dithiocarboxylate ligand and its derivatives

Run-Ze Yuan, Peng-Fei Cui, Shu-Ting Guo and Guo-Xin Jin*

Dalton Trans., 2021, 50, 1060-1068

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Pierre Braunstein

Prof. Pierre Braunstein and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week, we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Pierre Braunstein.

 

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Pierre Braunstein is based at the Institute of Chemistry at the University of Strasbourg. His research is focused on organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis. Pierre has previously served on both the Editorial and Advisory Boards for Dalton Transactions and has had an excellent experience publishing in Dalton ever since his first paper in 1973.

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

Including N-heterocyclic donors in the framework of pincer ligands is attracting considerable interest and those with a central NHC donor have been particularly successful. The diversity of side arms that can be installed at the N atom(s) of a NHC backbone includes not only the nature of the donor groups but also the length of the spacer connecting them to the heterocycle. These parameters critically influence the stereoelectronic properties of the pincer complexes and in our most recent Dalton article, we reported tritopic ligands of the type NimineCNHCNamine and the relevant copper, silver, nickel, chromium and iridium complexes.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

Our research interests have always been very diversified so that many areas would deserve further developments, including completing very promising but unfinished investigations.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

As an Emeritus professor, it is the lack of co-workers and funding that represents the biggest barriers. Fortunately, some active collaborations are in place and most rewarding.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

Don’t ask the father of many children to tell you his favourite kid!

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

They are too many to offer a fair selection.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Learn from the literature, work hard to create your own niche, follow your intuitions and, most importantly, enjoy what you are doing.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

An international, well-established and respected journal covering inorganic, bioinorganic, and organometallic chemistries with a broad readership.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

I’ve always enjoyed the professionalism of the editors and publisher, the speed of publication, and the most constructive, helpful, courteous and polite comments from the well-selected referees. I was impressed when I had the opportunity to follow this more closely as member of the Advisory Board (1994-1995) and Associate Editor (1996-2001) for Dalton and member of the Council of the Royal Society of Chemistry (2005-2009).

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

Excellent, and I have never been disappointed since my first paper in Dalton in 1973!

 

 

You can check out Pierre’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on the coordination chemistry of tritopic ligands incorporating NHCs below.


Cu(I), Ag(I), Ni(II), Cr(III) and Ir(I) complexes with tritopic NimineCNHCNamine pincer ligands and catalytic ethylene oligomerization

Xiaoyu Ren, Marcel Wesolek* and Pierre Braunstein*

Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 12895-12909

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Vivian W. W. Yam

Prof. Vivian W. W. Yam and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Vivian W. W. Yam.

 

 

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Vivian Yam is based at the University of Hong Kong, and her research focuses on coordination and organometallic chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, materials chemistry and photochemistry. Vivian chooses to publish in Dalton Transactions because “it is an international reputable society journal dedicated to inorganic and coordination chemistry research.”

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

Our most recent research works published in Dalton Transactions involve the design and spectroscopic studies of functional metal complexes for luminescence, donor-acceptor charge transfer, supramolecular assembly and chemosensing.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

We would like to expand our studies through an understanding of weak intermolecular forces and the interplay of various factors that influence the controlled manipulation and assembly of molecular metal complexes and their excited states for functional materials research.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

The biggest barriers are to be able to control and manipulate the molecular configurations and supramolecular assemblies of our systems in order to perturb the electronic communication and coupling to control the excited states and their charge transfer behaviour. The understanding of how microscopic properties can influence the macroscopic properties is also crucial to the design of molecular materials with desired functional properties. The computational power and its ability to provide accurate theoretical description and insights into the electronic structures of large molecules, clusters and assemblies are also important.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

One important piece of work is the design and discovery of luminescent organogold(III) diimine complexes. Gold(III) complexes have long been known to be non-emissive. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of strong σ-donor ligands like alkyls and aryls in generating luminescent gold(III) complexes with room-temperature phosphorescence. This has laid the foundation for our subsequent works on luminescent gold(III) complexes for OLED applications. Another work involves the systematic study of luminescent trinuclear two- and three-coordinate gold(I) complexes with Au(I)Au(I) interactions. Other works on luminescent metal alkynyls, chalcogenides and chalcogenolates of gold, silver, copper, platinum and palladium and others are also key to the development of luminescent metal complexes and their excited states.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

There are so many seminal works in Dalton Transactions and many of them have made a significant impact to the field. It is difficult to select just one.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Chemistry is a central science. Transition metal chemistry is fascinating given the diverse array of metals and metal chemistry that one can explore. It is important to build a strong foundation not only in chemistry and its sub-disciplines, but also in other disciplines of science. Read widely to develop the common language to interact with scientists from other disciplines. Be creative, adventurous and forward-looking. There is so much to be learned and to be inspired by. It is a life-long self-learning process.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

Quality, rigour, professional, international and friendly.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

It is an international reputable society journal dedicated to inorganic and coordination chemistry research. The manuscripts receive prompt, fair and quality handling.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

I have good experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions. The editors and editorial team are professional, helpful and caring.

 

 

You can check out Vivian’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on functional metal complexes for luminescence below.


Synthesis and cation-binding studies of gold(I) complexes bearing oligoether isocyanide ligands with ester and amide as linkers

Franky Ka-Wah Hau and Vivian Wing-Wah Yam*

Dalton Trans., 2016, 45, 300-306

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Christoph Janiak

Prof. Christoph Janiak and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Christoph Janiak.

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Christoph Janiak is based at the Institute for Inorganic and Structural Chemistry at Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf in Germany. His research is mainly focused on porous materials and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). For Christoph, Dalton is one of his first choices where he publishes his research and “Dalton is a very good journal for high level research where the work will be read.” Christoph also has many highly cited papers in Dalton Transactions, including two review articles that have each been cited over 3400 times.

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

My most recent publications in Dalton are about coordination networks and MOFs. In particular, I have published a practical guide to calculate the isosteric heat/enthalpy of adsorption via adsorption isotherms in MOFs as a Perspective, which I hope will be interesting for a broader audience.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

In the future, my research will also move to the field of electrocatalysis using MOFs and other porous materials, metal nanoparticles and ionic liquids.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

My lack of time in view of many other duties such as refereeing (journal manuscripts, grant proposals), administrative work and a comparatively high teaching load.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

My 2003 review, Engineering coordination polymers towards applications, focused on what are now called MOFs and their properties. It was not the structures but instead the properties which are still interesting today in this exploding field, which were summarized and critically assessed in this review, including sorption and catalytic behavior, magnetism, luminescence etc.

Also, the paper published in the year 2000: A critical account on π–π stacking in metal complexes with aromatic nitrogen-containing ligands. Its reception by the scientific community came as a surprise to me.

Both papers have been cited over 3400 and 4000 times respectively, and I feel extremely honoured and greatly thank all my colleagues who made use of these two Dalton articles over the years.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

The article which I like is the one on the “Addison tau parameter” where a geometric descriptor for the distortion of five-coordinate molecules was given (albeit not emphasized in the title): Synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic properties of copper(II) compounds containing nitrogen–sulphur donor ligands; the crystal and molecular structure of aqua[1,7-bis(N-methylbenzimidazol-2′-yl)-2,6-dithiaheptane]copper(II) perchlorate

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Read the literature, give due credit to previous publications, stay honest and self-critical with your own results and do not underestimate others who do not publish in (so-called) high-impact journals.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

I am extremely thankful to Dalton Transactions to have given me the opportunity to publish my work here over the years. I am always sure that the work which I publish in Dalton will be noticed by my peers.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

I am highly satisfied with their handling of the manuscripts, including quite fair referee reports.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

The citations which I have received to my 52 articles in Dalton (with 19 cited over 50 times and 11 cited over 100 times) prove to me that Dalton is a very good journal for high level research where the work will be read. For me, Dalton is one of my first choices where I publish my research.

 

You can check out Christoph’s recent Dalton Transactions Perspective on a practical guide to calculate the isosteric heat/enthalpy of adsorption via adsorption isotherms in MOFs below.


A practical guide to calculate the isosteric heat/enthalpy of adsorption via adsorption isotherms in metal–organic frameworks, MOFs

Alexander Nuhnen and Christoph Janiak*

Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 10295-10307

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Alexandra Slawin

Prof. Alexandra Slawin and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Alexandra Slawin.

 

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Alex Slawin is a specialist crystallographer in the School of Chemistry at the University of St Andrews in Scotland. Her research in chemical crystallography focuses on structure determination by solving molecular puzzles. She chooses to publish in Dalton Transactions for its “broad readership and to support the RSC,” and Dalton reminds her of “how John Dalton strove hard to pursue his own ideals despite many detractors and delivered a useful tool for generations to come.”

 

As the specialist crystallographer on over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

I’m interested in crystallography of all types, so they were all significant and interesting to me.  I like Use of Se4N4 and Se(NSO)2 in the preparation of palladium adducts of diselenium dinitride, Se2N2; crystal structure of [PPh4]2[Pd2Br6(SeN2)], from the early years of my career, working with Paul Kelly who is an engaging collaborator. This was a challenging material to handle, and I had no access to low temperature – just a very neat final structure which has formed the basis of further work.

  

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

I have recently undergone a course in mediation so this may well expand the thrust of my research interests.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

Money

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

I like this one from Paul Pringle in Bristol (neat ligands and a good study): Ring size effects in cyclic fluorophosphites: ligands that span the bonding space between phosphites and PF3

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Broaden your interests from the start.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

It always reminds me how John Dalton strove hard to pursue his own ideals despite many detractors and delivered a useful tool for generations to come.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

For its broad readership and to support the RSC.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

I started publishing over 35 years ago and will carry on.

 

 

You can check out Alex’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on the structural variations of a new hybrid lead(II) pervoskite below.


Structural variations in (001)-oriented layered lead halide perovskites, templated by 1,2,4-triazolium

Yuan-Yuan Guo, Lin-Jie Yang, Jason A. McNulty, Alexandra M. Z. Slawin and Philip Lightfoot*

Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 17274­-17280

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Shaikh M. Mobin

Prof. Shaikh M. Mobin and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Shaikh M. Mobin.

 


Our author at a glance:

Prof. Shaikh Mobin is based in the Department of Chemistry at the Indian Institute of Technology Indore (IIT Indore), India. His research is focused on the design and synthesis of novel MOFs and COFs, and their applications in sensing, drug delivery, energy storage and conversion, catalysis and more. He chooses to publish in Dalton Transactions because it has “the fairest review process and wide readership among traditional inorganic chemists” and is a ‘bible for fundamental inorganic chemistry articles’.

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

Our latest research was an invited review. This invitation came to us in a very crucial time in 2020 when we all were under lockdown and this review helped us a lot in keeping the group members’ momentum high and it prevented us in our worries of loss of time apart. In this review, we highlighted the recent and future prospects on mixed-metal MOFs as emerging supercapacitor candidates.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

From bench work to publications, research has been a very challenging task these days. Thus, to keep up with the pace and quality of research, we are planning to expand our research in various upcoming areas. In this regard, we have so far been able to keep a good amount of co-workers and we would like to continue to keep this trend going. We will also continue to have multi-disciplinary work within the group, and most important is to keep yourself updated with the track of ongoing research in your field.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

The biggest barriers which I can immediately think about are (i) Research funding and (ii) state of the art research facilities. Both are correlated and with the recent pandemic, this may put up a further barrier in basic research funding. We have ideas that comprise of both fundamental research and applied research, but getting it funded is still a major hurdle and also exploring for easy accessible facilities to complete such projects is challenging. Nevertheless, that also indicates that we must have the best project proposal to compete for available funding.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

Our work on solid-state structural transformations (see Retention of single crystals of two Co(II) complexes during chemical reactions and rearrangement and Single-crystal to single-crystal transformations in discrete hydrated dimeric copper complexes) is always very special for me. The other most interesting work is the design and synthesis of  A novel mesoionic carbene based highly fluorescent Pd(II) complex as an endoplasmic reticulum tracker in live cells, which also appeared as cover art for Dalton.

Another area of research which I find more interesting is electrochemical sensing by employing: (i) Small biomolecule sensors based on an innovative MoS2–rGO heterostructure modified electrode and (ii) Non-enzymatic amperometric sensing of glucose by employing sucrose templated microspheres of copper oxide (CuO). All these areas of works have attracted good readership across the globe.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

Although it’s difficult to choose any one particular impactful article, if I had to suggest one article in the area of solid-state structural reactivity, I would choose the perspective by Vittal, J. J. et al on Photochemical reactions of metal complexes in the solid state, which has well written notes on this topic. Another perspective, which I personally feel has quite an impact to inorganic readership in the area of electronic structure, is Electronic structure alternatives in nitrosylruthenium complexes by Profs Kaim and Lahiri, which nicely covers the fundamental aspects of electronic structure. In optical sensing, I would suggest Triarylborane substituted naphthalimide as a fluoride and cyanide ion sensor by Misra et al., which is very interesting in this field.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

One must be aggressive in your research with checking the updated literature in your own field. As I said above, from bench work to publications, research is extremely challenging these days: for instance, you may discuss some work in your group meeting and by the time you have your next group meeting, you may see similar work has been published. Do your research planning very carefully and have a good team and give them liberty to work.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

I call it a “Bible for Fundamental Inorganic Chemistry articles”. It’s one of my all-time favourite journals.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

Dalton has the fairest review process and wide readership among traditional inorganic chemists.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

It has always been satisfying and excellent.

 

You can check out Shaikh’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on the prospects of mixed-metal MOFs as supercapacitors below.


Recent highlights and future prospects on mixed-metal MOFs as emerging supercapacitor candidates

Richa Rajak, Ravinder Khttps://doi.org/10.1039/D0DT01676Dumar, Shagufi Naz Ansari, Mohit Saraf and Shaikh M. Mobin*

Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 11792-11818

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Evamarie Hey-Hawkins

Prof. Evamarie Hey-Hawkins and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Evamarie Hey-Hawkins.

 

Our author at a glance:

Prof. Dr. Evamarie Hey-Hawkins is based at the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry in the Faculty of Chemistry and Mineralogy at Leipzig University, Germany. Her research is focused on three main areas: homogeneous transition metal catalysis; inorganic compounds for medicinal and biological applications; and phosphorus-rich novel materials. She chooses to publish in Dalton Transactions because of its “excellent reputation and high-quality, original publications”, and has always felt that her research and contributions are highly appreciated.

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

In stimuli-responsive catalysis, redox-switchable catalysis is an important area. In our latest publication, we have shown that the aromatic core (s-triazine, benzene, or trifluorobenzene) in C3-symmetric tris(ferrocenyl)arene-based tris-phosphanes has a pronounced effect on their coordination behaviour towards gold(I), resulting in two different coordination modes for the 1:1 and 2:3 (L:M) complexes, respectively. The redox-responsive nature of the complexes was exploited in the catalytic ring-closing isomerisation of N-(2-propyn-1-yl)benzamide, in which the benzene-based 2:3 (L:M) complex comprising six ferrocenylene moieties was shown to display multiple activity states depending on the degree of (reversible) oxidation.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

As my scientific interests are manifold, expansion of my research in the future will be along our three main research areas. In switchable catalysis, we will focus on photo-switchable catalytic systems based on phosphines. In medicinal chemistry, we are now targeting anti-cancer drugs comprising more than one active component, to overcome resistance and reduce side effects. And last but not least, in materials science, we are now looking at the targeted synthesis of higher oligophosphines (≥ 9 phosphorus atoms), such as nona-, deca- or even higher oligophosphines, and their metal complexes as precursors for novel phosphorus-rich metal phosphides.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

Our research is highly interdisciplinary, and thus requires collaboration with experts worldwide. For example, in photo-switchable catalysis, we need to collaborate with experts in photochemistry and photophysics to understand the switching mechanisms and how to influence them. In medicinal chemistry, we are preparing the potential drugs, but we need experts to test their anti-tumour activity and to help us understand their mode of action. Luckily, we are extremely well connected, but the present pandemic has made personal interactions quite difficult for the time being.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions; which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

Our 2007 paper on Aminoalkylferrocenyldichlorophosphanes: facile synthesis of versatile chiral starting materials. As the title states, this ferrocenyl dichlorophosphine can be employed as an extremely versatile starting material for a large library of P-chiral, planar-chiral ferrocene derivatives.

Our joint paper on Novel chiral 1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands and their transition metal complexes with Andrey A. Karasik and his team from the Arbusov Institute in Kazan, Russia, in 2003, was the first of a series of papers on P,N heterocycles, macrocycles and cryptands. These ligands show a very rich coordination chemistry, and the resulting complexes are not only interesting for catalytic applications, but also as luminescent materials.

Our 2004 publication on The reactivity of cyclo-(P5tBu4) towards group 13, 14 and 15 metal chlorides: complexation and formation of cyclooligophosphanes, {cyclo-(P5tBu4)}2 and {cyclo-(P4tBu3)PtBu}2, by reductive elimination opened the door for the targeted formation of phosphorus-rich oligophosphines.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

It would be rather difficult to name just one article. However, I think that the Themed Collections, especially the annual “Frontier and Perspective articles” are an excellent collection of the most significant contributions in their respective fields.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

Be enthusiastic about your research. Believe in your ideas, have courage, determination, and perseverance in following your scientific goals. Collaboration can make your scientific life much richer but select your collaborators carefully. Be committed to very good science and of course, good scientific practice. Think positive and enjoy life.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

I published my first paper in Dalton Transactions thirty years ago in 1991 on the use of zirconocene(IV) bis(phosphanido) complexes as PR2 transfer reagents, an interdisciplinary topic that I worked on during my habilitation and is still topical today. While it took another ten years before I submitted my second paper dealing with the syntheses and solid-state structures of primary alkali metal phosphanides (MPHR, with M = K and Rb) in 2001, many more publications followed. I have always felt that my research and my contributions were highly appreciated by the journal.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

Dalton Transactions has an excellent reputation and is known for high-quality, original publications. As the scope of Dalton Transactions is perfectly aligned with my various research interests in inorganic, organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry, including new inorganic materials and homogeneous catalysis, I can be sure to reach the readership that we want to target with our publications in various areas.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

The handling of my submitted manuscripts is always very professional, fast and highly competent. After acceptance, publication is also very fast.

 

You can check out Eva’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on how arene substitution affects the coordination and catalytic behaviour of tris(1-phosphanyl-1′-ferrocenylene)arene gold(I) complexes below.


The core of the matter – arene substitution determines the coordination and catalytic behaviour of tris(1-phosphanyl-1′-ferrocenylene)arene gold(I) complexes

Axel Straube, Peter Coburger, Marvin Michak, Mark R. Ringenberg and Evamarie Hey-Hawkins*

Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 16667-16682

 

As featured on the cover:

 

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof Zhong-Min Su

Prof. Zhong-Min Su and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week, we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Zhong-Min Su.

Our author at a glance:

Professor Zhong-Min Su is based in the Key Lab of Polyoxometalate Science of Ministry of Education, at the Northeast Normal University in China. His research interests include polyoxometalates, metal-organic frameworks and photoelectric materials, all underpinned by theoretical chemistry.  He views Dalton Transactions as the home of new and innovative inorganic chemistry research.

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

Our research combines theoretical calculations with the design and synthesis of new molecules and materials, predicting and realizing the functional properties of molecules and materials.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

We will use theoretical chemistry combined with experimental chemistry to design and predict the molecular structure and functional properties of materials.

 

What would you say are the biggest barriers which need to be overcome to expand your research?

The large molecular weight of polyoxometalates brings about difficulties in theoretical calculations and the realization of accurate prediction of the properties of polyoxometalates.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

Our research focusing on the use of theoretical chemistry alongside experimental chemistry to explain and predict the mechanisms of functional properties of materials.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

All novel, complete, and in-depth research is vital to the development of molecular design and materials science.

 

What does publishing in Dalton Transactions mean to you?

Dalton is a well established and trustworthy journal which promotes the development of inorganic chemistry. I choose to publish my innovative inorganic chemistry research in Dalton Transactions, where these new, innovative, systematic studies can be recognized and enjoyed by reviewers and readers.

 

You can check out Zhong-Min’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on syntheses of cucurbit[6]uril-based metal–organic rotaxane networks by the anion regulation strategy and their proton conduction properties below.


Syntheses of cucurbit[6]uril-based metal–organic rotaxane networks by the anion regulation strategy and their proton conduction properties

Xue-Song Wu, Dong-Ming Cheng,  Xin-Long Wang, Jing Sun, Hong-Ying Zang and  Zhong-Min Su,

Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 1747-1751

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Celebrating our Golden Authors: Prof. Keith Murray

 Prof. Keith Murray and Dalton Transactions

This year, we are celebrating the 50th volume of Dalton Transactions by taking a look at some of our authors who have published over 50 articles in the journal. This week we learn what Dalton Transactions means to Professor Keith Murray.

 

Our author at a glance:

Professor Keith Murray’s research at Monash University, Australia, is focused on molecular magnetism and spin crossover. He chooses to publish with Dalton Transactions as the journal is dedicated to publishing “the finest inorganic chemistry in the UK and worldwide” and describes his experience publishing in Dalton Transactions over the years as a “happy and satisfying one”.

 

Please can you summarise your most recent research published in Dalton Transactions?

Lanthanoid pyridyl-β-diketonate ‘triangles’. New examples of single molecule toroics.  This paper, with Dr Rebecca Fuller, describes a collaborative project dealing with new examples of triangular lanthanoid(III) complexes displaying single molecule toroidal behaviour. The syntheses and structures are by Rebecca and group, the magnetism by my group and the theory by Rajaraman and group.

 

How do you intend to expand upon your research in the future?

At this stage in my 55 year research career I will concentrate on collaborative projects dealing with molecular based magnetic materials, with emphasis on single molecule toroics, and with spin switching materials.

 

You’ve published over 50 articles in Dalton Transactions, which of these works do you find to be most interesting/significant for our broad inorganic audience?

Crown-linked dipyridylamino-triazine ligands and their spin-crossover iron(II) derivatives: magnetism, photomagnetism and cooperativity.

This paper is classified as “HOT” and contains a nice balance of compound design, synthesis, magnetism, photomagnetism, spin switching and theory.

 

Outside of your own research, please suggest a Dalton Transactions article which you think has made a significant contribution to its field?

It is hard to single out one of many Dalton Transactions articles. Going back to J. Chem. Soc. A days, Geoffrey Wilkinson always wrote ‘straight across’ papers that contained key findings in metal catalysis chemistry. He didn’t need to “dress up” his papers.

 

What advice do you have for young researchers new to your field?

In the molecular magnetism field; work hard, get research grants and instrument grants (e.g. Squid magnetometers); attend and present at conferences thus widening their international networks; most importantly – support the research students including helping them to get jobs/fellowships post-thesis.

 

What does Dalton Transactions mean to you?

It represents the finest inorganic chemistry in the UK and worldwide. My first papers in Dalton (J. Chem. Soc. A) were in 1967.

 

Why do you choose to publish in Dalton Transactions?

See above. Being aware of impact factors, I see Dalton Trans. in the same group as Inorg. Chem., Chem Eur J., Eur. J. Inorg. Chem., Chem. Mater. and J. Mater. Chem.

Incidentally, John Dalton was born near where I was brought up in Eaglesfield, Cumbria.

 

What is your experience of publishing with Dalton Transactions?

My experience has always been a happy and satisfying one.

 

You can check out Keith’s most recent Dalton Transactions article on lanthanoid pyridyl-β-diketonate ‘triangles’. New examples of single molecule toroics below.


Lanthanoid pyridyl-β-diketonate ‘triangles’. New examples of single molecule toroics

Chiara Caporale, Alexandre N. Sobolev, Wasinee Phonsri, Keith S. Murray, Abinash Swain, Gopalan Rajaraman, Mark I. Ogden, Massimiliano Massi and Rebecca O. Fuller*
Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 17421-17432

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