Most read articles in July – September 2016

The articles below are 10 of the most read Review articles and 10 of the most read Papers & Communications from Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry in July, August and September 2016.

Review Articles

Transition-metal catalyzed valorization of lignin: the key to a sustainable carbon-neutral future
Markus D. Kärkäs, Bryan S. Matsuura, Timothy M. Monos, Gabriel Magallanes and Corey R. J. Stephenson
DOI: 10.1039/C5OB02212F, Review Article

Selective chemical labeling of proteins
Xi Chen and Yao-Wen Wu
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB00126B, Review Article

Synthesis of substituted pyrenes by indirect methods
Juan M. Casas-Solvas, Joshua D. Howgego and Anthony P. Davis
DOI: 10.1039/C3OB41993B, Review Article

Modern advances in heterocyclic chemistry in drug discovery
Alexandria P. Taylor, Ralph P. Robinson, Yvette M. Fobian, David C. Blakemore, Lyn H. Jones and Olugbeminiyi Fadeyi
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB00936K, Review Article

Recent applications in natural product synthesis of dihydrofuran and -pyran formation by ring-closing alkene metathesis
Reece Jacques, Ritashree Pal, Nicholas A. Parker, Claire E. Sear, Peter W. Smith, Aubert Ribaucourt and David M. Hodgson
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB00593D, Review Article

Organic synthetic transformations using organic dyes as photoredox catalysts
Shunichi Fukuzumi and Kei Ohkubo
DOI: 10.1039/C4OB00843J, Review Article

Palladium catalysed meta-C–H functionalization reactions
Aniruddha Dey, Soumitra Agasti and Debabrata Maiti
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB00395H, Review Article

Design and synthesis of analogues of natural products
Martin E. Maier
DOI: 10.1039/C5OB00169B, Review Article

Biomineralization-inspired synthesis of functional organic/inorganic hybrid materials: organic molecular control of self-organization of hybrids
Atsushi Arakaki, Katsuhiko Shimizu, Mayumi Oda, Takeshi Sakamoto, Tatsuya Nishimura and Takashi Kato
DOI: 10.1039/C4OB01796J , Review Article

Synthesis of highly functionalized C60 fullerene derivatives and their applications in material and life sciences
Weibo Yan, Stefan M. Seifermann, Philippe Pierrat and Stefan Bräse
DOI: 10.1039/C4OB01663G, Review Article


Papers & Communications

A protocol for amide bond formation with electron deficient amines and sterically hindered substrates
Maria E. Due-Hansen, Sunil K. Pandey, Elisabeth Christiansen, Rikke Andersen, Steffen V. F. Hansen and Trond Ulven
DOI: 10.1039/C5OB02129D, Communication

5-Position-selective C–H trifluoromethylation of 8-aminoquinoline derivatives
Ben S. Pilgrim, Alice E. Gatland, Carlos H. A. Esteves, Charlie T. McTernan, Geraint R. Jones, Matthew R. Tatton, Panayiotis A. Procopiou and Timothy J. Donohoe
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB01325B, Paper

Enantioselective synthesis of 2,3-disubstituted trans-2,3-dihydrobenzofurans using a Brønsted base/thiourea bifunctional catalyst
Pan Gao, Li Liu, Zhuangzhi Shi and Yu Yuan
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB01326K, Paper

Iridium(III)-catalyzed regioselective direct arylation of sp2 C–H bonds with diaryliodonium salts
Estela Haldón, M. Carmen Nicasio and Pedro J. Pérez
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB01145D, Paper

Palladium-catalyzed enolate arylation as a key C–C bond-forming reaction for the synthesis of isoquinolines
Ben S. Pilgrim, Alice E. Gatland, Carlos H. A. Esteves, Charlie T. McTernan, Geraint R. Jones, Matthew R. Tatton, Panayiotis A. Procopiou and Timothy J. Donohoe
DOI: 10.1039/C5OB02320C, Paper

Facile one-pot synthesis of unsymmetrical ureas, carbamates, and thiocarbamates from Cbz-protected amines
Hee-Kwon Kim and Anna Lee
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB01290F, Paper

Insights into the catalytic mechanism of N-acetylglucosaminidase glycoside hydrolase from Bacillus subtilis: a QM/MM study
Hao Su, Xiang Sheng and Yongjun Liu
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB00320F, Paper

Scalable anti-Markovnikov hydrobromination of aliphatic and aromatic olefins
Marzia Galli, Catherine J. Fletcher, Marc del Pozo and Stephen M. Goldup
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB00692B, Communication

A rapid and efficient one-pot method for the reduction of N-protected α-amino acids to chiral α-amino aldehydes using CDI/DIBAL-H
Jakov Ivkovic, Christian Lembacher-Fadum and Rolf Breinbauer
DOI: 10.1039/C5OB01838B, Communication

Pd-catalyzed cascade allylic alkylation and dearomatization reactions of indoles with vinyloxirane
Run-Duo Gao, Qing-Long Xu, Li-Xin Dai and Shu-Li You
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB01523A, Communication

Keep up-to-date with the latest issues of Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry with our E-alerts

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Editor’s Choice – Meet our Associate Editors

Meet our Associate Editors and read some of their favourite recent OBC articles for free*

Professor Jin-Quan Yu’s (Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California, USA) research centres around the discovery of novel reactions based on C-H activation.

Jin’s recommended articles:

C–H activation enables a rapid structure–activity relationship study of arylcyclopropyl amines for potent and selective LSD1 inhibitors
Shin Miyamura, Misaho Araki, Yosuke Ota, Yukihiro Itoh, Shusuke Yasuda, Mitsuharu Masuda, Tomoyuki Taniguchi, Yoshihiro Sowa, Toshiyuki Sakai, Takayoshi Suzuki, Kenichiro Itami, Junichiro Yamaguchi

Asymmetric synthesis of (−)-renieramycin T
Junhao Jia, Ruijiao Chen, Hao Liu, Xiong Li, Yuanliang Jia, Xiaochuan Chen


Professor Margaret Brimble (University of Auckland, New Zealand) is the Director of Medicinal Chemistry and a distinguished Professor at the University of Auckland. Her research program focuses on the synthesis of bioactive natural products, antimicrobial peptides and peptidomimetics.

Margaret’s recommended articles:

Concise diastereoselective synthesis of calcaripeptide C via asymmetric transfer hydrogenation/Pd-induced chiral allenylzinc as a key reaction
Gullapalli Kumaraswamy, Vykunthapu Narayanarao, Ragam Raju

Concise synthesis of calystegines B and B< intramolecular Nozaki–Hiyama–Kishi reaction
Hong-Yao Wang, Atsushi Kato, Kyoko Kinami, Yi-Xian Li, George W. J. Fleet, Chu-Yi Yu


Professor Christian Hackenberger’s (Leibniz-Institut für Molekulare Pharmakologie and Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany) research focuses on the development of new bioorthogonal reactions to study protein function and in particular posttranslational modifications, addressing issues such as the study of the Alzheimer-relevant tau protein, antibody-drug conjugates and new methods for the delivery of functional proteins into cells.

Christian’s recommended articles:

Site-selective incorporation and ligation of protein aldehydes
Richard J. Spears, Martin A. Fascione

Protein ubiquitination via dehydroalanine: development and insights into the diastereoselective 1,4-addition step
Roman Meledin, Sachitanand M. Mali, Sumeet K. Singh, Ashraf Brik


Professor Lei Liu’s (Tsinghua University, China) research group is interested in all aspects of chemical protein synthesis.

Lei’s recommended articles:

Hybrid phase ligation for efficient synthesis of histone proteins
Ruixuan R. Yu, Santosh K. Mahto, Kurt Justus, Mallory M. Alexander, Cecil J. Howard, Jennifer J. Ottesen

Enediyne-based protein capture agents: demonstration of an enediyne moiety acting as a photoaffinity label
Joyee Das, Sayantani Roy, Swapnil Halnor, Amit Kumar Das and Amit Basak


We invite you to submit your urgent research to their editorial offices. With a reputation for quality and fast times to publication, OBC is the home of highly significant original research and reviews in all areas of organic chemistry, including organic synthesis, physical organic chemistry, supramolecular chemistry and bioorganic chemistry.

————————————–

*Access is free until 31/12/2016 through a registered RSC account.

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OBC Call for Papers – Peptide Materials

Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry is delighted to announce a call for papers for its latest themed issue on:

Peptide Materials

Guest Editors: John D. Tovar (Johns Hopkins University, USA), Dave Adams (University of Glasgow, UK) and Honggang Cui (Johns Hopkins University, USA)

Deadline for Submission: 15 April 2017

OBC offers fast decisions and publication (average time from receipt to first decision for peer reviewed articles is 12 days for communications and 19 days for papers). Colour publication is free and all articles are indexed in MEDLINE. You can choose for your article to be handled by the Cambridge office or one of our Associate Editors: Christian Hackenberger, Lei Liu, Margaret Brimble or Jin-Quan Yu.

Scope

Proteins are privileged macromolecules that play critical roles in catalysis, extracellular matrix structure, cargo transport, and cell signalling. Over the past two decades, the role of peptides as functional components of materials systems has been elucidated. These systems have found use in a variety of emerging technologies spanning optoelectronics, energy conversion, regenerative medicine and drug delivery.

In this special issue, we will focus on peptides and peptide mimics not as isolated molecules of therapeutic value but as components of larger collective systems. Among these collections will be examples of polymers with a variety of natural and unnatural amino acid monomer feed compositions, smaller oligopeptides designed to self-associate into complex hierarchical structures, and complex macromolecules with unusual properties. We will showcase examples whereby specific functions are built into molecular units that can be augmented or even amplified within higher-order structures.



















Research in OBC is published as communications (for urgent work – up to 5 pages in length) or full papers. There is also the opportunity to write a Perspective or Review article for the issue, and if you would be interested in this please let us know beforehand. All submissions will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of OBC. Guidelines are available at rsc.li/1K0EgYx and rsc.li/1OoQWQh.

If you are interested in taking part in this issue, please email OBC: obc-rsc@rsc.org

Manuscripts can be submitted using the Royal Society of Chemistry’s online article submission service. Please clearly state that the manuscript is submitted for the themed issue on Peptide Materials.

To view recent articles or find out more about OBC, please visit the journal’s homepage:

Organic & Biomolecular ChemistryRapid publication of high quality organic chemistry research



Please note that articles will be published online as soon as ready to ensure no delay in dissemination of your work. Articles for the web theme will be published in regular issues of the journal. The themed issue will then be published online once all articles have been published. Click here for an example of a previous web theme issue in OBC.

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Improving liposomal boron carriers for effective boron neutron capture therapy

For years, radiotherapy has been an essential mode of noninvasive cancer therapy and advancements have led to life saving treatments for patients. In contrast to other conventional radiotherapies, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is unique in its selective destruction of cancerous cells. BNCT is based on nuclear capture and fission reactions when nonradioactive 10B is irradiated with neutrons to yield excited 11B* which decays into high energy alpha particles and 7Li nuclei. Boron is preferentially accumulated into tumour cells though non-toxic carriers and the short length of the generated neutron beams (5-9 µm) destroys nearby cells leaving the surrounding healthy tissue intact.

The development of carrier systems that deliver sufficient amounts of boron to carry out effective destruction of all vicinal tumour cells has been a significant area of BNCT research for many years. A recent breakthrough made by Professors Atsushi Ikeda of Hiroshima University, Takeshi Nagasaki of Osaka City University and Kazuya Koumoto of Konan University has led to the development of a novel method for incorporating boron-containing moieties within hydrophobic lipid membranes.

Liposomes have been studied extensively as boron carriers and are promising candidates for BNCT as lipids display low toxicity. In the past, boron-containing liposomes have been prepared by dissolution of boron compounds in an internal water phase (Figure, A) or by using amphiphilic boron compounds embedded in the liposomal bilayer such that boron coats the outer surface of the lipid membrane (Figure, B). Unfortunately, even when these two methods are used in conjunction, the concentration of boron within the liposome is insufficient for effective BNCT and increasing liposomal dosing is problematic as high concentrations of lipids interfere with uptake mechanisms in the liver.

A novel method for boron transport is therefore of high value and in their recent OBC publication, the first example of boron incoporation into liposomal lipid membranes was successfully demonstrated. Key was the preparation of aryl pinacolato boronate esters bearing methyl groups at both ortho positions (Figure, R1 positions) of the phenyl rings which helped in stabilizing the boronate esters against hydrolysis.

While the concentration of boron within the lipid membrane was not particularly high, this study has unlocked yet another avenue through which non-toxic liposomal boron carrier concentrations can be improved and when used with previous boron loading methods, produces liposomes with sufficient boron concentrations to carry out BCNT. This result will no doubt enhance BNCT and lead to critical, life saving therapies for cancer patients.

To find out more see:

Lipid-membrane-incorporated arylboronate esters as agents for boron neutron capture therapy
Masafumi Ueda, Kengo Ashizawa, Kouta Sugikawa, Kazuya Koumoto, Takeshi Nagasaki and Atsushi Ikeda
DOI:10.1039/C6OB02142E


Victoria Corless is currently completing her Ph.D. in organic chemistry with Prof. Andrei Yudin at The University of Toronto. Her research is centred on the synthesis of kinetically amphoteric molecules, which offer a versatile platform for the development of chemoselective transformations with particular emphasis on creating novel biologically active molecules.

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OrgSyn 50 Conference 27th – 28th February 2017

OrgSyn 50 – Developments in Organic Chemistry

Fluorochem invite you to join them from 27-28 February 2017 in Manchester, UK to celebrate their 50-year milestone in helping support research and supplying intermediates for R&D worldwide.

During the two days there will be 13 outstanding lectures covering a broad range of subjects. Fluorochem are delighted to have attracted a high calibre of speakers to this event and want to ensure people don’t miss out on a unique opportunity to appreciate the remarkable standard of current research being undertaken in the UK. Join them for tales of the unexpected; from fluorination to feedstock, cascades to catalysis and nanoscale to nature. Learn about the latest in cancer research and engage in topics such as rotaxanes, urea function and digitising chemistry.

Introducing an outstanding line up of speakers which includes:

For more information and to register please visit the website.

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Poster prize winners at the 10th Symposium on Biorelevant Chemistry

Congratulations to the two poster prize winners at the 10th Symposium on Biorelevant Chemistry!

We were pleased to present prizes to these winners:

Yuuma Shisaka (Nagoya University) – Molecular BioSystems Poster Prize
Title: ‘Interaction Analysis of Hemoprotein HasA with Captured Synthetic Metal Complexes and Its Specific Receptor HasR from Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

Yuki Imakura (University of Tokyo) – Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry Poster Prize
Title: ‘Design of long-lived hyperpolarized probes based on T1 relaxation mechanism’

Organized by the Chemical Society of Japan, the Biorelevant Chemistry Symposium took place from 7-9 September 2016 in Kanazawa, Japan and was attended by a total of 430 delegates.

From left to right: Professor Hisakazu Mihara (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Chair of the Division of Biofunctional Chemistry, Chemical Society of Japan), Professor Nobutaka Fujieda (Osaka University, Poster award committee co-chair), Mr Yuuma Shisaka (Nagoya Univerisity, Molecular BioSystems award winner), Mr Yuki Imakura (Nagoya Univerisity, OBC award winner), Professor Kenji Yokoyama (Tokyo University of Technology, Chair of the Division of Biotechnology, Chemical Society of Japan), Professor Asanuma Hiroyuki (Nagoya University, Poster award committee chair), Professor Masato Saito (Osaka University, Poster award committee co-chair).

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An efficient second-generation total synthesis of Aplyronine A

The importance of natural products in health and medicine is enormous owing to their diverse biological activities and their role as a basis for drug development. Endeavours in total synthesis have attracted some of the most talented organic chemists–providing intellectual and creative outlets–and have been central to the evolution and technical development of organic synthesis.

In the early 1990’s, Professor Hideo Kigoshi of the University of Tsukuba reported the first total synthesis of the marine macrolide Aplyronine A which is still a highly desirable synthetic target due to its potent and unique biological properties.

In collaboration with Professor Ichiro Hayakawa of Okayama University, the group has recently published a highly efficient second-generation total synthesis of Aplyronine A which requires fewer synthetic steps and boasts an improved overall yield. Issues with poor stereoselectivity, regioselectivity and isomerization were overcome through the optimization of a Ni/Cr-mediated coupling.

As shown in the retrosynthetic pathway below, Aplyronine A was obtained from 10, the same intermediate used in the first generation synthesis however, instead of the Julia coupling between ketone and sulfone-containing fragments, the macrolactone 11 was cyclized via an intramolecular Ni/Cr-mediated coupling. This modification drastically reduced the number of unwanted byproducts obtained from the Julia coupling and eliminated the need to employ a modified Yamaguchi lactonization which had resulted in the formation of an undesired 26-membered lactone that required an additional isomerization to yield the desired product. Precursor 11 was constructed through an intermolecular esterification between carboxylic acid 12 and alcohol 13 which were each prepared through asymmetric Ni/Cr-mediated couplings. In the case of the carboxylic acid, route efficiency was further enhanced as this strategy resulted in the simultaneous formation of the C14–C15 (E)-trisubstituted double bond and the C13 stereogenic center through the use of a chiral ligand.

In addition to establishing an efficient synthetic pathway to Aplyronine A, the Ni/Cr-mediated coupling has significant potential in the preparation of structurally diverse derivatives which may result in enhanced biological activity and the discovery of a novel lead.

The popularity of natural products as synthetic targets will continue as they provide unparalleled inspiration for drug leads and the synthesis of non-natural compounds. Strategies to develop concise and efficient synthetic routes are significantly important not only in terms of their utility in medicine but in the downstream application of novel synthetic methodologies developed during the process of their total synthesis.

To find out more see:

Second generation total synthesis of aplyronine A featuring Ni/Cr-mediated coupling reactions
Ichiro Hayakawa, Keita Saito, Sachiko Matsumoto, Shinichi Kobayashi, Ayaka Taniguchi, Kenichi Kobayashi, Yusuke Fujii, Takahiro Kanekob and Hideo Kigoshi
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB02241C


Victoria Corless is currently completing her Ph.D. in organic chemistry with Prof. Andrei Yudin at The University of Toronto. Her research is centred on the synthesis of kinetically amphoteric molecules, which offer a versatile platform for the development of chemoselective transformations with particular emphasis on creating novel biologically active molecules.

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Halogen bonding in anion recognition and sensing

As part of an ongoing research programme in host-guest supramolecular chemistry, Professor Paul Beer of Oxford University has been developing methods for the synthesis of interlocking molecular architectures based on halogen bond donor motifs.

Halogen bonding interactions—the noncovalent, attractive interaction between an electron deficient halogen (X) and a Lewis base (B)—are slowly becoming more prevalent as a complimentary alternative to more commonly used binding interactions. Since its discovery in the late 1960’s, anion recognition chemistry has developed from an interesting area of academic research to a pillar of supramolecular chemistry. In recent years, there has been dramatic advancements within the field that have resulted in a number of practical applications such as organocatalysis involving ion complexation, ion extraction from mixtures and the development of sensory devices and molecular switches.

Anions play fundamental roles in a large number of biological, chemical, medicinal and environmental processes and nature’s binders typically complex anions through intricate networks of electrostatic interactions. The ability to mimic the selectivity of biological systems in artificial settings has been a longstanding challenge in this field.

In a recent OBC publication, the Beer group successfully synthesized two mono-cationic and two dicationic halogen and hydrogen bonding rotaxane anion recognition systems (see figure) and successfully demonstrated the enhanced binding affinity and selectivity of the dicationic halogen bonding analogue relative to its hydrogen bond-containing counterpart. In addition, the dicationic halogen bonding system displayed an enhanced preference for binding to bromine anions over other halides, nitrate and dihydrogen phosphate oxoanions. NMR binding studies reveal that the enhanced strength and selectivity of halide recognition is the result of chelated charge assisted halogen bonding interactions in the dicationic system. This study elegantly demonstrates efforts in exploiting the XB chelate effect to improve anion binding affinity and selectivity. Halogen bonding is still an emerging area of research however, examples such as this highlight its utility as a complementary mode of binding when compared to other more established interactions and will no doubt lead to an evolution in anion receptor design.


To find out more see:

Chelated charge assisted halogen bonding enhanced halide recognition by a pyridinium-iodotriazolium axle containing [2]rotaxane
Alexander E. Hess and Paul D. Beer
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB01851C


Victoria Corless is currently completing her Ph.D. in organic chemistry with Prof. Andrei Yudin at The University of Toronto. Her research is centred on the synthesis of kinetically amphoteric molecules, which offer a versatile platform for the development of chemoselective transformations with particular emphasis on creating novel biologically active molecules.

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Congratulations to Ben Feringa

Inaugural OBC Chair wins 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

The prestigious Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016 was awarded jointly to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa for their outstanding contributions to the design and synthesis of molecular machines. Many congratulations to all of them!


Ben Feringa has not only significantly influenced our journal as the  inaugural Chair of Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry from 2003 to 2007, but he has also so far published an impressive 40 manuscripts in OBC since it’s launch. We would like to mark this special occasion by highlighting only a few of them here:


Bacterial patterning controlled by light exposure
Willem A. Velema, Jan Pieter van der Berg, Wiktor Szymanski, Arnold J. M. Driessen and Ben L. Feringa

Mild Ti-mediated transformation of t-butyl thio-ethers into thio-acetates
Thomas C. Pijper, Jort Robertus, Wesley R. Browne and Ben L. Feringa

Silanization of quartz, silicon and mica surfaces with light-driven molecular motors: construction of surface-bound photo-active nanolayers
Gábor London, Gregory T. Carroll and Ben L. Feringa

Chiral separation by enantioselective liquid-liquid extraction
Boelo Schuur, Bastiaan J. V. Verkuijl, Adriaan J. Minnaard, Johannes G. de Vries, Hero J. Heeres and Ben L. Feringa

Catalytic asymmetric conjugate addition of dialkylzinc reagents to α,β-unsaturated sulfones
Pieter H. Bos, Beatriz Maciá, M. Ángeles Fernández-Ibáñez, Adriaan J. Minnaard and Ben L. Feringa

Copper-free ‘click’: 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and arynes
Lachlan Campbell-Verduyn, Philip H. Elsinga, Leila Mirfeizi, Rudi A. Dierckx and Ben L. Feringa

A redesign of light-driven rotary molecular motors
Michael M. Pollard, Auke Meetsma and Ben L. Feringa

Photoresponsive dithienylethene-urea-based organogels with “reversed” behavior
Masako Akazawa, Kingo Uchida, Jaap J. D. de Jong, Jetsuda Areephong, Marc Stuart, Giuseppe Caroli, Wesley R. Browne and Ben L. Feringa

Rhodium/phosphoramidite-catalyzed asymmetric arylation of aldehydes with arylboronic acids
Richard B. C. Jagt, Patrick Y. Toullec, Johannes G. de Vries, Ben L. Feringa and Adriaan J. Minnaard

Enantioselective synthesis of β2-amino acids using rhodium-catalyzed hydrogenation
Rob Hoen, Theodora Tiemersma-Wegman, Barbara Procuranti, Laurent Lefort, Johannes G. de Vries, Adriaan J. Minnaard and Ben L. Feringa


If you are interested please find a full list of his OBC articles here.

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International Chemical Biology Society (ICBS) – 5th Annual Conference

Meet our Deputy Editor James Anson

Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry (OBC) is pleased to support the 2016 annual meeting of the International Chemical Biology Society.  The conference aims to provide a forum for chemical biologists to speak of their work and discuss important scientific problems and to promote exchange between emerging and established scientists.

This international conference has a balanced program of speakers from all disciplines in chemical biology ranging from infectious diseases to natural products to epigenetics and many more.  This year the speakers include:

  • Laura Kiessling (University of Wisconsin-Madison) – Us Versus Them: Microbial Glycans as Cellular ID Cards
  • Kai Johnsson (École PolytechniqueFédérale de Lausanne) – Expanding Protein Function Through Synthetic Chemistry
  • Junying Yuan (Harvard Medical School) – Regulation of Inflammation and Cell Death by RIPK1
  • Ulrike Eggert (Molecular BioSystems Editorial Board, King’s College London) – A Chemical Approach to Understanding Cell Division
  • Tapas Kundu (Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore) – Small Molecule Modulators of Histone Acetyltransferases: Implications in Disease Biology
  • Emily Balskus (Harvard University) – Chemical Discovery in the Human Microbiota

… and many more. For more information and to register please visit the website.


Meet the team:

James Anson (Deputy Editor of OBC, Natural Product Reports, MedChemComm and Molecular BioSystems) will be attending the event. He would love to hear about your research and meet with our readers, authors and referees. Please do get in touch with James if you would like to arrange a meeting in advance.

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