Poster prize winners at ESOC

19th European Symposium of Organic Chemistry (ESOC2015)

Congratulations to the Poster Prize winners at ESOC 2015.

The winners are:

  • Michael E. Muratore (OBC Best Oral Comm Prize) – “The versatility of gold(I) catalysis applied to the total synthesis of (-)-nardoaristolone B and lundurine C”
  • Joanna Wencel-Delord (OBC Poster Prize) – “Asymmetric C-H activation and dynamic kinetic resolution: new tool for the synthesis of axially chiral biaryls”
  • Szilár Varga (ChemComm Poster Prize) – “Organocatalytic approach to indole terpenoids”
  • Ana M. Matos (MedChemComm Poster Prize) - “Genista tenera as a source of new innovative molecular leads against diabetes and related amyloid disorders: phytochemistry, synthesis and mechanism of action”

The European Symposium of Organic Chemistry is a biannual event which is held all over Europe.  The 19th European Symposium of Organic Chemistry was held from 12th – 16th of July in Lisbon, at the Universidade de Lisboa.   The conference is aimed at stimulating new emerging areas in Organic Chemistry.

Photos of the winners below (from left to right): Michael E. Muratore, Joanna Wencel-Delord, Ana M. Matos and Szilár Varga.

Michael E. Muratore (OBC Best Oral Comm Prize) Joanna Wencel-Delord (OBC Poster Prize)
Ana M. Matos (MedChemComm Poster Prize) Szilár Varga (ChemComm Poster Prize)
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Fast decisions and publication in Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry

At Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry we understand the importance of getting your work seen by your peers in the organic chemistry community as soon as possible.

This is why we get you a decision as fast as possible without compromising on the quality of the review process.

The average time for you to get the first decision on your Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry submission is just:

Communications: 12 days
Papers: 19 days

What is more, from submission to publication of the fully edited version of your manuscript (including time for author revisions) it takes on average:

Communications: 36 days
Papers: 49 days

This is based on based on all articles sent out to referees in the period January–June 2015. Articles that did not pass an initial assessment have not been included in this calculation.



Want to know more about OBC and the benefits of publishing your work with us?

Want to experience the same service as your colleagues that publish with us?

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Carbohydrate Active Enzymes in Medicine and Biotechnology Meeting

Carbohydrate Active Enzymes in Medicine and Biotechnology Meeting
19-21 August 2015, St Andrews, UK

Oral and poster abstract submission deadline is 26 June.

Register now to secure your place – members of the Royal Society of Chemistry are eligible for a reduced rate. The meeting will cover the following topics:

  • Insights into carbohydrate active enzymes in medicine
  • Use of carbohydrate active enzymes in biotechnology
  • Understanding mechanism and structure of carbohydrate active enzymes
  • Exploiting carbohydrate active enzymes in biosynthesis

The three day conference programme comprises of 15 plenary talks, including Prize and Award Lectures presented by Sabine Flitsch – Royal Society of Chemistry Interdisciplinary Prize 2014, Gideon Davies – Royal Society of Chemistry Khorana Prize 2014 and Glyn Hemsworth – Biochemical Society Early Career Research Award.

For more information and to book your place please visit our event page.

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Organic Chemistry Symposia finish in Kyoto


It’s the final day of our symposium series and it’s been another great one, in the historic city of Kyoto. Many thanks to our host Professor Keiji Maruoka.

Entrance to the Kyoto symposium

Professor Ken Itami

The speakers again presented some really exciting and innovative research. Alongside the international speakers Professor Naoto Chatani from Osaka University presented his work on Ni-catalysed functionalization of C-H bonds; OBC Editorial Board member Professor Kenichiro Itami (Nagoya University) talked about how C-H functionalization can be applied to biological and materials problems; and Professor Michinori Suginome presented on chirality-switchable helical macromolecules.

Speakers, host and RSC staff

Once again we saw some great work from some early career researchers: Professors Norie Momiyama (Institute of Molecular Research), Takuya Hashimoto (Kyoto University), Yusuke Kita and Koji Hirano (both from Osaka University).

It’s been a fantastic week of organic chemistry. Many thanks to all the hosts and speakers for making it a great set of symposia!

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Japan Organic Symposium travels to Tokyo

On to day two of the symposium series, this time at University of Tokyo’s fantastic new auditorium.

The international speakers were joined by a great line-up of researchers from the Tokyo area. First up was Professor Keisuke Suzuki from University of Tokyo, giving a great tour of his research on synthesis of hybrid natural products.

Professor Keisuke Suzuki gives his talk in the University's new auditorium

MedChemComm Advisory Board member Professor Mikiko Sodeoka from RIKEN presented some really nice work on trifluoromethylation of olefins and then the day was rounded off with a fantastic talk from Professor Hiroaki Suga (University of Tokyo) on his innovative peptide research.

Flash Presenter Assistant Professor Keiji Mori

As in Sendai we heard some really nice talks from a number of early career researchers: Professor Keiji Mori (Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology), Professor Yuichiro Hirayama (University of Shizuoka), Professor Shuhei Kusumoto and My Shunichiro Kato (both from University of Tokyo).

Participants in Tokyo

Many thanks to Professor Masayuki Inoue for hosting a great day!

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Organic chemistry Symposium – Tohoku University


We’ve just completed a great first day of the Japan Organic Chemistry Symposia.

Hosted by Professor Masahiro Terada at Tohoku University, the symposium featured speakers from the host university, Nihon University and Hokkaido University, along with international members of our journals’ Editorial Boards.

Tohoku University students outside the auditorium

First up was Professor Hidetoshi Tokuyama from Tohoku University, presenting on his syntheses of dihydrooxepine-containing epidithiodiketopiperazine natural products, then Erik Sorensen from Princeton University and the Editorial Board of Organic Chemistry Frontiers talked about some of his latest research in C-H functionalization.

Professor Tokuyama presenting

After lunch the packed audience saw talks from Professor Hiroyuki Isobe from Tohoku University on his latest research on cycloarylenes, and then Huw Davies from Emory University and the ChemSocRev Editorial Board talked about the NSF CCI Center for Selective C-H Functionalization, a really innovative collaboration between researchers in the US.

The packed audience in Sendai

Mid-afternoon saw some great Invited lectures by early career faculty: Professors Nozomi Saito and Shintaro Ishida from Tohoku University, Tsuyoshi Mita from Hokkaido University and Atsushi Kobayashi from Nihon University.

Hosts, speakers and the Royal Society of Chemistry team

The day was rounded off with plenary lectures from Professor Masaya Sawamura from Hokkaido University on hydrogen bonding with nonpolar sp3 C-H bonds in enantioselective cooperative metal catalysis, and Professor Margaret Brimble from University of Auckland and the Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry Editorial Board on some of her latest syntheses of benzannulated spiroketal natural products.

We’d like to thank Professor Terada and his colleagues for making it such a great symposium!

Speaker abstracts and biographies

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Japan Organic Chemistry Symposia – June 2015

This week the Royal Society of Chemistry is visiting three institutes in Japan for our 2015 Organic Chemistry Symposia. We’ll be at Tohoku University on Monday 1st June, University of Tokyo on Wednesday 3rd and Kyoto University on Friday 5th.

Each symposium will feature speakers from Japanese universities along with three international speakers who will travel to each institute.

The symposia are presented by our journals Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Frontiers, and supported by ChemComm, Chemical Society Reviews and Chemical Science. We’re very grateful to our hosts -Professor Masahiro Terada in Sendai, Professor Masayuki Inoue in Tokyo and Professor Keiji Maruoka in Kyoto – for their support for these events.

We hope to see you at one of the symposia!

More details about the symposia, including schedules and biographies:
Sendai
| Tokyo | Kyoto

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Meet the team at ESOC 2015

Next month I will be attending the 19th European Symposium on Organic Chemistry (ESOC 2015) held in Lisbon, Portugal, 12 – 16 July, and if you too are in attendance, I’d love to meet you there!

Dr Marie Cote, Oganic & Biomolecular Chemistry Deputy Editor

Please let us know if you will also be in attendance and would like to arrange a meeting – simply email us at the OBC editorial office.

OBC, ChemComm, Chemical Science and MedChemComm are delighted to be media partners of the conference, and there’s lots to look forward to again on this 19th edition of the symposium:

  • Prof. Peter Chen (ETH Zurich, Switzerland) will be presenting the Patai Rappoport Lecture 2015,
  • Prof. Christina Moberg (KTH School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Sweden) is the recipient of the 2014 EuCheMs Lecture Award, and
  • Prof. Nuno Maulide (University of Vienna, Austria) will present the Young Researcher Award Lecture

Plenary lectures at the symposium will be given by :

  • Prof. Carlos A. M. Afonso (University of Lisbon, Portugal)
  • Prof. Ernest Giralt (Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Spain)
  • Prof. Guy Lloyd-Jones (University of Edinburgh, UK)
  • Prof. Ilan Marek (Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Israel)
  • Prof. Peter H. Seeberger (Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Germany)
  • Prof. Timothy M. Swager (MIT, USA)
  • Prof. F. Dean Toste (UC Berkeley, USA)
  • Prof. Dirk Trauner (University of Munich, Germany)
  • Prof. Helma Wennemers (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)

Access the full scientific programme

    Will you be presenting a poster?

    ChemComm, OBC and MedChemComm will each be awarding a Poster Prize at ESOC 2015

    I look forward to meeting many of you in Lisbon!

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Introducing OBC Associate Editor Prof. Christian Hackenberger

Professor Christian Hackenberger has joined Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry as an Associate Editor. We are delighted to welcome him to the team and look forward to working with him over the coming years.

Christian completed his graduate studies with Prof. Sam Gellman (Univeristy Wisconsin-Madison) and his doctoral work with Prof. Carsten Bolm at the Rhine-Westphalia Institute of Technology Aachen. After his postdoctoral stay in the group of Prof. Barbara Imperiali at MIT he started his own lab at the Freie Universität Berlin as a FCI-Liebig-Scholar and Emmy Noether Fellow in 2005. In 2012, he accepted a position as the Leibniz–Humboldt Professor for Chemical Biology to the Leibniz Institut for Molecular Pharmacology and the Humboldt Universität zu Berlin.

Christian’s research interests focus around studying the biology, function and pharmacological potency of naturally and unnaturally modified peptides and proteins and include:

  • Development of ligation and modification strategies for the synthesis of functional proteins
  • Bioorthogonal Staudinger phosphite and phosphonite reactions
  • Labeling strategies for antibody ‐ and nanobody conjugates
  • Intracellular delivery and targeting
  • Protein and peptide PEGylation
  • Functional investigation of the Alzheimer‐relevant Tau protein
  • Engineering of protein‐based multivalent scaffolds
  • Metabolic oligosaccharide engineering

On starting his new role as Associate Editor for  Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry Christian said:

I am delighted to act as an associate editor to OBC. Without a question I am very happy about the nomination from the editorial board, especially because I published my very first independent paper back in 2006 in OBC. This new job is both a privilege and an honor to serve the community and work with the editorial team of the Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit a manuscript for Christian to handle
Visit Christian’s homepage

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Organic chemistry’s complexity conundrum

Organic synthesis is often heralded as more art than science. An organic chemist’s eye for complexity, breaking down structures into simpler forms, is honed and nurtured over decades. But, is it possible to take this seemingly intangible skill and quantify it, putting a simple number on how complex a chemical structure actually is?

Process chemists Martin Eastgate and Jun Li, at Bristol-Myers Squibb (B-MS) in the US have developed a tool to do just that, generating a unique index they have termed a molecule’s current complexity, which also accounts for changes over time due to the impact of new technologies.


Read the full Chemistry World story»

Read the original Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry article – it’s free to access until 2nd July:
Current complexity: a tool for assessing the complexity of organic molecules

Jun Lia and Martin D. Eastgate
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C5OB00709G

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